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November, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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Button batteries can cause serious injury
upi.com - 11-30-11
More button batteries are in use as households increase the number of electronic products they acquire, leading to more injuries, U.S. researchers say.
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Why fish oil is good for your brain: Study finds it boosts memory by 15 per cent
dailymail.co.uk - 11-30-11
Eating oily fish such as salmon and trout can significantly improve your memory say scientists.
A new study found that a fatty acid found in fish and seafood can boost memory function by 15 per cent.
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Number of people with HIV in the UK poised to hit 100,000 as infections rise 6% in a year
dailymail.co.uk - 11-30-11
Nearly 100,000 people are living with HIV in the UK but a quarter of them are unaware that they have the disease, according to the Health Protection Agency.
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New England sees puzzling rise in Legionnaires' disease
msnbc.msn.com - 11-30-11
Legionnaires' disease, a strain of pneumonia, is on the rise in New England this year, and the reason for the flare-up remains unexplained, health officials said on Tuesday.
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New Way To Defeat Drug-Resistant Superbugs: Renew Their Susceptibility To Antibiotics
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-30-11
How do you defeat an opponent who has acquired an effective new defence mechanism? Either develop a more powerful weapon, or find a way to undermine his clever new defence device. In the war against superbugs, this is the equivalent of either developing new drugs, or make them susceptible again to existing drugs. Well, now scientists have discovered a way to do this for drug-resistant bacteria that have acquired an ingenious defence mechanism: efflux pumps. These pumps enable the bugs to expel antibiotic drugs from their bodies; that is until a team of chemists from Brown University comes along and blocks their pumps, making them vulnerable again to antibiotics.
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US Teens Not Eating Enough Fruit And Veg, CDC Report
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-30-11
US teens are eating less than the recommended amount of fruit and vegetables, according to the latest report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that was published on 25 November.
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Cancer drug 'scalpers' corner US market
uk.news.yahoo.com - 11-30-11
Pssst. Wanna buy some chemo drugs?
A new trend in pharmaceutical sales has raised concerns over ethics and patient safety, as companies buy up critical cancer drugs in short supply and attempt to resell them at huge markups.
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Is 'miracle' cure for diabetes simply healthy eating? Low-calorie diet reverses disorder in just four months, say scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 11-30-11
Type 2 diabetes could be reversed in just four months by simply following a low-calorie diet, a study has revealed.
According to the research, people who reduced their calorific intake in their daily diet experienced a far greater improvement in the condition - and their health in general - than any medication offered.
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Scan can spot 'curable cause of high blood pressure'
bbc.co.uk - 11-30-11
Doctors say they have found a medical test that can diagnose the most common curable cause of high blood pressure.
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Footballers: Too many headers 'can damage the brain'
bbc.co.uk - 11-30-11
Frequently heading a football can lead to brain injury, warn doctors who say they have found proof on brain scans.
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Gray Matter in Brain's Control Center Linked to Ability to Process Reward; Structure-Function Impairments Observed in People Addicted to Cocaine
sciencedaily.com - 11-30-11
The more gray matter you have in the decision-making, thought-processing part of your brain, the better your ability to evaluate rewards and consequences. That may seem like an obvious conclusion, but a new study conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is the first to show this link between structure and function in healthy people -- and the impairment of both structure and function in people addicted to cocaine.
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Coffee May Protect Against Endometrial Cancer, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 11-30-11
Long-term coffee consumption may be associated with a reduced risk for endometrial cancer, according to a recent study in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
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HIV not treated because it's not known
upi.com - 11-30-11 - 11-30-11
Almost 75 percent of Americans living with HIV do not have their infection under control, U.S. health officials said Tuesday.
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U.S. teens hardly eating any produce
upi.com - 11-30-11
U.S. teenage consumption of fruit and vegetables comes nowhere near the recommended four to five servings per day, health officials say.
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Men overconfident in their performance
upi.com - 11-30-11
Discrimination against women may not be the only reason women hit a glass ceiling in corporations; men's overconfidence is also a factor, U.S. researchers say.
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Debunked: Men thinking about sex all day
upi.com - 11-30-11
Men think about sex more often than women, but men also think about eating and sleeping more than women do, U.S. researchers said.
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Newt Gingrich: Medical Marijuana Is a Convenience That Must Be Stopped
deathandtaxesmag.com - 11-29-11
It’s rare to hear Republican politicians espouse medical marijuana. If they support it at all, they stick to the “states rights” rhetoric their voters know so well. See, for example, Ron Paul.
But Newt Gingrich thinks marijuana, medical or otherwise, is so dastardly that federalism should be tossed out the window and Mary Jane should be banished from coast to coast.
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Tinnitus Drives Sufferers to Distraction, Desperation
abcnews.go.com - 11-29-11
The unrelenting screeching sounds from tinnitus sometimes left actor William Shatner unsure "whether I would survive," while jazz guitarist Al Di Meola said tinnitus has meant living with "this screaming, and you can't shut it off." Little wonder the inability to silence the noise in their heads has led some sufferers to contemplate, and even commit suicide.
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How to repair your memory: From long-haul travel to not eating enough meat, forgetfulness has many causes, but there is a fix..
dailymail.co.uk - 11-29-11
You walk into the kitchen only to realise you haven’t a clue what you went there for. You can’t remember the name of the person you were introduced to a second ago.
Or you find yourself increasingly talking about thingamabobs and whatchamacallits.
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Wifi-enabled laptops may be nuking sperm
msnbc.msn.com - 11-29-11
The digital age has left men's nether parts in a squeeze, if you believe the latest science on semen, laptops and wireless connections.
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A second chance for faulty food? FDA calls it 'reconditioning'
msnbc.msn.com - 11-29-11
When a school lunch supplier repackaged moldy applesauce into canned goods and fruit cups, it drew a sharp warning from federal health regulators last month -- and general disgust from almost everyone else.
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Damage From Alzheimer's Disease Reversed With Deep Brain Stimulation
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-29-11
Applying electrical pulses directly into targeted areas of the brain appears to reverse some of the damage caused by Alzheimer's disease and may even improve cognitive function and memory, according to Dr Andres M. Lozano and his team at Toronto Western Hospital in Ontario, Canada, who carried out a small study into the effects of deep brain stimulation on patients with early signs of the disease.
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Well-Done Red Meat May Increase Risk For Aggressive Prostate Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-29-11
New research led by the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), offers further evidence of a link between aggressive prostate cancer and meat consumption, and suggests it is driven largely by consumption of grilled or barbecued red meat, especially when it is well-done. The researchers hope their findings will help determine which potential cancer-causing compounds should be the target of prostate cancer prevention strategies.
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New advice to prevent and correct flat head syndrome in babies
cnn.com - 11-29-11
Since 1992, when the American Academy of Pediatrics began recommending that babies sleep on their backs, the number of deaths due to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome or SIDS - the number one cause of death among infants younger than 1 year of age - has been cut in half, according to the CDC.
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Brain find sheds light on autism
bbc.co.uk - 11-29-11
Cells taken from people with a rare syndrome linked to autism could help explain the origins of the condition, scientists suggest.
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Cancer survivors run high 2nd cancer risk
upi.com - 11-29-11
Cancer survivors have more than double the risk of getting a second primary cancer of the same type than those who have not had cancer, Danish researchers say.
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Death risk not increased by fatty liver
upi.com - 11-29-11
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, common among the obese and those with heart disease, does not appear to affect survival, U.S. researchers say.
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Head Size Tied to Regressive Autism in Boys
healthday.com - 11-29-11
Boys with regressive autism have a larger head circumference and bigger brains than other children, a new study finds.
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Angioplasty Patients May Be at Risk for Rehospitalization
healthday.com - 11-29-11
About one in 10 people who have angioplasty to open blocked heart arteries will land back in the hospital within 30 days, a new study indicates.
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Drug May Slow Spread of Deadly Eye Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 11-29-11
A drug commonly used to treat seizures appears to make eye tumors less likely to grow if they spread to other parts of the body, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
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Half of all girls and a third of boys are obsessed with body image
dailymail.co.uk - 11-28-11
Half of girls and a third of boys are willing to take extreme measures to get a perfect body or reach an ideal weight, a study has found.
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Boost your baby's brain power: Scientists say wait two years before having your second child
dailymail.co.uk - 11-28-11
Forget expensive educational DVDs and private tutors, the secret to smart children could be as simple as giving birth to them two years apart.
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Healthier Food Choices Impacted By Low Motivation And Attention, Not The Labeling Itself
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-28-11
The final results from the Food Labeling to Advance Better Education for Life (FLABEL) project, which provides the latest research on consumer behavior and nutrition labels, demonstrate that even though the nutritional information on European food labels is well understood, consumers lacking motivation and attention nevertheless prevent the labels from making a positive impact on food choices.
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First Time Mothers' Home Births Have A Higher Risk Of Complications
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-28-11
Women who are pregnant for the first time and decide to have a home birth should be aware that there is a significantly higher risk of complications, compared to first time mothers who have the baby in an an obstetric or midwifery unit, researchers from Oxford University reported in the BMJ (British Medical Journal). However, for second and subsequent births, women with low risk pregnancies do not have a statistically significantly higher risk, the authors added.
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Neglecting HIV/AIDS in the Southeast
cnn.com - 11-28-11
Dr. Vincent Marconi travels to Durban, South Africa, every summer with his family to work with hundreds of HIV and AIDS patients. Despite global support for research and high-profile activists, AIDS continues to batter many developing countries. The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS estimates that there are 5.6 million people in South Africa alone living with the deadly disease.
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Most rate personal doctor as excellent
upi.com - 11-28-11
A high percentage of U.S. adults give their physicians high grades, an online survey indicates.
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Drug treats middle-of-the-night insomnia
upi.com - 11-28-11
Intermezzo, zolpidem tartrate tablets for under the tongue, has been approved by the U.S. government to treat middle-of-the-night insomnia, officials say.
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Surviving Holiday Parties When You Have Social Anxiety
healthday.com - 11-28-11
Socializing is a major part of the holiday season, but many people find it difficult.
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Britta Riley: A garden in my apartment - TED video (7:53)
ted.com - 11-28-11
Britta Riley wanted to grow her own food (in her tiny apartment). So she and her friends developed a system for growing plants in discarded plastic bottles -- researching, testing and tweaking the system using social media, trying many variations at once and quickly arriving at the optimal system. Call it distributed DIY. And the results? Delicious.
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Louie Schwartzberg: Nature. Beauty. Gratitude. - TED video (9:55)
ted.com - 11-27-11
Nature’s beauty can be easily missed -- but not through Louie Schwartzberg’s lens. His stunning time-lapse photography, accompanied by powerful words from Benedictine monk David Steindl-Rast, serves as a meditation on being grateful for every day.
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Drug may help prevent breast cancer
upi.com - 11-27-11
A drug used to treat type 2 diabetes is promising as a preventive drug for breast cancer or other cancers, U.S. and South Korean researchers say.
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Four common meds send thousands of seniors to hospital
yourlife.usatoday.com - 11-27-11
An estimated 100,000 older Americans are hospitalized for adverse drug reactions yearly, and most of those emergencies stem from four common medications, a new study finds.
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Senators think they have solved the Internet sales tax problem
upi.com - 11-27-11
British Internet entrepreneur Martha Lane Fox says elderly people would be less lonely if they were online more.
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The Thatcher gene: Scientists discover secret of internal alarm clock that allows some to get by on just four hours' sleep
dailymail.co.uk - 11-27-11
A gene that controls how long we sleep has been discovered by scientists explaining why some people have their own internal alarm clock.
Scientists identified a gene called ABCC9 that can reduce the length of time we sleep. The same gene has previously been linked to heart disease and diabetes.
The discovery could explain why light sleepers, such as Margaret Thatcher, are able to get by on just four hours shut-eye a night.
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Heart patients prefer longevity over quality of life
msnbc.msn.com - 11-27-11
When an elderly person's chronic disease is impossible to cure, many doctors might assume that patient would chose to improve the quality of his or her remaining life rather than to extend it as is. Those doctors would be mistaken most of the time, according to a new study.
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The Effects Of Beer And Wine On The Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-27-11
Research published in the European Journal of Epidemiology by Costanzo S, Di Castelnuovo de Gaetano G et al has sought to separate the effects of wine, beer or spirit drinking in relation to fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. The Italian authors carried out an updated meta-analysis on the relationship between wine, beer or spirit consumption and cardiovascular outcomes, using state-of-the-art statistical techniques.
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New Design For Mechanical Heart Valves
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-27-11
The heart's valves, which guarantee the unidirectional flow of blood from one chamber to another, are asymmetrical. For example, the two flaps of the heart's mitral valve - which regulates blood flow between the left atrium and the left ventricle - vary in size by up to 70 percent. This arrangement, says fluid mechanicist Marija Vukicevic from the University of Trieste (now a researcher at Clemson University), naturally drives blood flow along the lateral wall of the ventricle; from there, blood takes a smooth turn creating a large vortex that redirects the blood toward the aorta (the main blood vessel of the heart), through which it exits out into the body.
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Artificial pancreas could be 'holy grail' for Type 1 diabetics
cnn.com - 11-27-11
Kerry Morgan was just 3 years old when she participated in her first clinical trial for type 1 diabetes prevention. She didn't have the disease, but her 7-year old sister did and there was concern that she might develop it, too. During the trial she was given one shot of insulin a day in the hope that it would stave off the disease, but a year later, she was officially diagnosed.
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Study: Snow shoveling can kill middle-aged
upi.com - 11-27-11
There has been plenty of anecdotal evidence that snow shoveling is linked to heart attacks, but Canadian researchers confirm snow shoveling can kill.
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PTSD ease linked to dream sleep
upi.com - 11-27-11
U.S. researchers say they discovered a link between post-traumatic stress disorder and rapid eye movement sleep that may unlock new treatment methods.
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More exercise results in healthier eating
upi.com - 11-27-11
People who exercise also start to eat better and as a result their brain may change, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Dyslexics may have trouble blocking noise
upi.com - 11-27-11
Dyslexia symptoms, including trouble reading and spelling, may be at least partly due to difficulty blocking out background noise, U.S. researchers say.
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Vitamin D-fortified yogurt helps heart
upi.com - 11-27-11
Regular consumption of a vitamin D-fortified yogurt drink improves cholesterol levels and biomarkers of heart disease, in diabetics, researchers in Iran say.
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TV Takes a Close Look at a Marijuana Haven, Just Before the Law Does
nytimes.com - 11-26-11
The Discovery Channel will broadcast the first episode of “Weed Wars” on Thursday. The four-part series offers an inside look at the medical marijuana business at Harborside Health Center in Oakland, the largest dispensary on the West Coast. The show stars the colorful crew that runs the dispensary: Steve DeAngelo, the silver-pigtailed co-founder and executive director; Luigi Zamarra, the nervous accountant; and Dave Wedding Dress, the bearded, dress-wearing co-founder, among others.
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14-year-old gets two months in Bali prison for marijuana possession
nationalpost.com - 11-26-11
A Bali court sentenced a 14-year-old Australian boy to two months in jail on Friday for possessing a few grams of marijuana, a lighter sentence than sought by prosecutors after Canberra asked for leniency.
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Leftover Turkey to the Fridge, Stat
abcnews.go.com - 11-26-11
As we enjoy our most food-oriented holiday tomorrow, nutritionists and food safety experts recommend that particular care be taken to ensure that leftovers -- whether kept for later meals or dispatched home with guests -- don't become a catalyst for the pain, vomiting, and diarrhea that afflicts some 400,000 Americans annually on Thanksgiving.
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Too much acetaminophen over time may damage liver
usatoday.com - 11-26-11
Taking slightly too much of the pain reliever acetaminophen (best known by the brand name Tylenol) over time can lead to an overdose that can cause liver failure and death, according to a new study.
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We're not dumping the junk! Shoppers ignore health warnings on food and buy whatever they want, study finds
dailymail.co.uk - 11-26-11
Most shoppers ignore nutritional labels labels on food packets and simply buy what they like, a new study claims.
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Chinese medicine could double the chances of childless couples conceiving
dailymail.co.uk - 11-26-11
Couples with fertility problems are twice as likely to get pregnant using traditional Chinese medicine as western drugs, say researchers.
They found a two-fold improvement in pregnancy rates over just four months of treatment from practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine.
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7 easy ways to boost your immune system
msnbc.msn.com - 11-26-11
Your body’s immune system is more powerful than you probably imagine. How powerful, you ask? Scientists from the University of Pennsylvania recently took immune cells from three patients with leukemia, then genetically altered them into “serial killer” cells, designed to attack one tumor cell, then another and another. The study was small and the treatment experimental, but the results were groundbreaking—two patients went into complete remission, and the other had a dramatic antitumor response. The modified immune system cells multiplied at least 1,000 times in the body, wiped out cancer cells, and stimulated a population of “memory” cells that may protect against recurrences.
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Painful Migraines Linked To Higher Depression Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-26-11
Individuals who have migraines have a higher chance of experiencing major depressive episodes, researchers from the University of Calgary, Canada, reported in the journal Headache. The authors added that the higher risk is there the other way round - that those with major depressive episodes are also at a higher risk of having migraines.
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Another Genetic Clue To Autism: Opposite Malfunctions Have Same Result
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-26-11
In most cases, autism is caused by a combination of genetic factors, but some cases, such as Fragile X syndrome, a rare disorder with autism-like symptoms, can be traced to a variation in a single gene that causes overproduction of proteins in brain synapses, the connectors that allow brain cells or neurons to communicate with one another. Now a new study led by the same MIT neuroscientist who made that discovery, finds that tuberous sclerosis, another rare disease that leads to autism and intellectual disability, is caused by a malfunction at the opposite end of the spectrum: underproduction of the synaptic proteins.
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The 8 germiest places in the mall
cnn.com - 11-26-11
During the craziness of the holidays, the last thing you want is to get sidelined with a cold, flu, stomach bug -- or worse. But while you're checking items off your shopping list, you may be exposing yourself to germs -- like flu viruses, E. coli, and staph -- that can make you sick.
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Firefighters: Exercise riskier than job
upi.com - 11-26-11
U.S. firefighters' workplace injury and death rates are among the highest but firefighters are at even greater risk of injury during exercise, researchers say.
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Autoimmune Woes May Raise Risk for Lung Clots
healthday.com - 11-26-11
Patients hospitalized for autoimmune disorders, like rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease, may be at greater risk for a life-threatening pulmonary embolism, a clot in a main artery of the lung, a new study finds.
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More Aggressive Chemo May Help Younger Lymphoma Patients: Study
healthday.com - 11-26-11
Higher doses of chemotherapy with less time between treatments may benefit younger people suffering from aggressive lymphomas, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (one of the most common and aggressive forms of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma), according to new research.
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Yawning May Cool the Brain When Needed
healthday.com - 11-26-11
Yawning helps keep the brain cool, and the sinuses play a role in that process by acting as bellows, a new report suggests.
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ADHD drugs in short supply
upi.com - 11-26-11
People diagnosed with attention-deficit disorder are having trouble filling prescriptions for Adderall, Ritalin and other drugs, U.S. pharmacists say.
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Shoppers warned of mall germs
upi.com - 11-26-11
Researchers in New York and elsewhere are warning shoppers to beware of the most germ-infested parts of the mall, including restroom sinks.
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Sharing family stories benefits young, old
upi.com - 11-26-11
Holiday family gatherings are a perfect opportunity for sharing family stories to the benefit of younger and older generations, a U.S. counselor says.
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Sharing family stories benefits young, old
upi.com - 11-26-11
Holiday family gatherings are a perfect opportunity for sharing family stories to the benefit of younger and older generations, a U.S. counselor says.
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How to guard against hitchhiking bedbugs
upi.com - 11-26-11
Most U.S. adults say they dislike bedbugs because they fear being bitten, but many do not check for bedbugs while traveling, a survey indicates.
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Chicken and eggs can boost your memory: Scientists discover nutrient that may slow down ageing of the brain
dailymail.co.uk - 11-25-11
This may be the first time you've heard of it, but diets rich in choline may help protect your brain from the affects of ageing.
The nutrient from the B vitamin family is found in foods like chicken, eggs and saltwater fish as well as legumes such as kidney beans.
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Want to lose weight? Why you should kick-start a health plan with exercise BEFORE you change your diet
dailymail.co.uk - 11-25-11
Most weight-watchers know that the best way to shed pounds is to combine a healthy diet with exercise, rather than just rely on one or the other.
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Is this a symptom I see before me? Reading Shakespeare helps doctors understand patients' mental state
dailymail.co.uk - 11-25-11
Doctors should brush up on their Shakespeare to help improve their understanding of how the mind can affect the body, according to an unusual study.
Dr Kenneth Heaton said many doctors don't realise how many physical symptoms can be caused solely by psychological problems.
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Eczema Yeast Can Be Killed Off, Raising Hope Of New Treatments
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-25-11
Scientists in Sweden have discovered certain peptides kill off the yeast Malassezia sympodialis which can trigger skin disorders such as atopic eczema, seborrhoeic eczema, and dandruff, without harming healthy skin cells. While further work is needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms, they hope their discovery will lead to a new treatment for these debilitating skin conditions.
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Anxiety: Friend or Foe?
time.com - 11-25-11
Few among us haven't laid awake at night, staring at the ceiling as the worries start to crowd our minds — from unpaid bills to the unstable economy to a loved one's recent cancer diagnosis. We know how anxiety feels, and it doesn't feel good.
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Thanksgiving food from Mexico, S. America
upi.com - 11-25-11
Turkey, potatoes, squash and corn are synonymous with Thanksgiving, but all come from Latin America, while cranberries are native, a U.S. expert says.
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Could Slow Eating Be Key to Staying Slim?
healthday.com - 11-25-11
With Thanksgiving feasting here, new research suggests a simple way to avoid packing on holiday pounds: Eat more slowly.
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Black Friday Is About More Than Bargains, Expert Says
healthday.com - 11-25-11
Black Friday, the kickoff to the holiday shopping season, is as much about the quest as it is about getting good deals, according to a marketing expert.
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Happy, Feel-Good Holiday Seasons Start With Healthy Choices at Thanksgiving, Nutrition Experts Say
sciencedaily.com - 11-25-11
While most people only gain about a pound of weight during the holiday season, that pound may never come off, increasing the likelihood of becoming overweight or obese and the risk of related health problems, according to a National Institutes of Health study. University of Missouri dietitians recommend families maintain healthy diet and exercise habits during the holiday season beginning with Thanksgiving.
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Researchers Decode a Puzzling Movement Disorder
sciencedaily.com - 11-25-11
Neurodegenerative diseases represent one of the greatest challenges of our aging society. However, investigation into these diseases is made particularly difficult due to the limited availability of human brain tissue. Scientists from the Life & Brain Research Center and Neurology Clinic of Bonn University have now taken a roundabout path: They reprogrammed skin cells from patients with a hereditary movement disorder into so-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) and obtained functional nerve cells from them. They subsequently decoded how the disease arises.
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Medical Marijuana Industry Is Unnerved by U.S. Crackdown
nytimes.com - 11-25-11
An intensifying federal crackdown on growers and sellers of state-authorized medical marijuana has badly shaken the billion-dollar industry, which has sprung up in California since voters approved medical use of the drug in 1996, and has highlighted the stark contradiction between federal and state policies.
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What's killing America? U.S. ranks 28th in life expectancy (lower than Chile and Greece) while it pays the MOST for health care
dailymail.co.uk - 11-25-11
A new survey on health care is revealing that you may not be getting what you pay for if you check into a U.S. hospital.
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Coffee may reduce endometrial cancer risk
upi.com - 11-24-11
Women who are long-term coffee drinkers are associated with a reduced risk for endometrial cancer, U.S. researchers say.
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Poor pay linked to worker depression
upi.com - 11-24-11
Financial strain, a lack of food and symptoms of depression were common among an ethnically diverse sample of U.S. nursing homes employees, researchers say.
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Less people know, less they want to know
upi.com - 11-24-11
The less people know about complex issues such as the economy, energy and the environment, the less they want to know, Canadian researchers found.
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The Most Important Thanksgiving Conversation You Can Have
abcnews.go.com - 11-24-11
Once again, this Thanksgiving we are grateful to all the people who keep this mission alive day after day: to ensure that each and every one of us understands, communicates, and has honored their end-of-life wishes.
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Giving thanks helps your psychological outlook
usatoday.com - 11-24-11
While it seems pretty obvious that gratitude is a positive emotion, psychologists for decades rarely delved into the science of giving thanks. But in the last several years they have, learning in many experiments that it is one of humanity's most powerful emotions. It makes you happier and can change your attitude about life, like an emotional reset button.
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Ladies stake their claim by faking their moan
msnbc.msn.com - 11-24-11
Half of you ladies have faked an orgasm at least once, scientists claim. Maybe you knew the real thing just wasn’t gonna happen, so you wanted to wrap it up and go to sleep. Perhaps you didn’t want to bruise his ego.
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Tylenol Slight Overdosing Can Eventually Become Life Threatening
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-24-11
Acetaminophen (paracetamol, Tylenol) can become life-threatening if you repeatedly keep taking slightly more than you should, researchers from University of Edinburgh and the Scottish Liver Transplantation Unit reported in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. A patient with symptoms may come into hospital not knowing why, and will not immediately say they have been overdosing slightly.
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How Meditation Benefits The Brain
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-24-11
A new brain imaging study led by researchers at Yale University shows how people who regularly practise meditation are able to switch off areas of the brain linked to daydreaming, anxiety, schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. The brains of experienced meditators appear to show less activity in an area known as the "default mode network", which is linked to largely self-centred thinking. The researchers suggest through monitoring and suppressing or "tuning out" the "me" thoughts, meditators develop a new default mode, which is more present-centred.
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Teen volunteering cuts alcohol, drug use
upi.com - 11-24-11
Programs that foster positive social behaviors such as volunteering reduce the likelihood teens will use alcohol or drugs in adulthood, U.S. researchers say.
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Holiday gifts provide only transient joy
upi.com - 11-24-11
Many holiday gifts give only transient joy, but consider the gift of fellowship because the benefits of social contact are long lasting, a U.S. researcher says.
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Less wheezing linked to babies eating fish
upi.com - 11-24-11
Babies who eat fish before being 9 months are less likely to suffer pre-school wheeze, researchers in Sweden found.
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Could Slow Eating Be Key to Staying Slim?
healthday.com - 11-24-11
With Thanksgiving feasting here, new research suggests a simple way to avoid packing on holiday pounds: Eat more slowly.
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Four Common Meds Send Thousands of Seniors to Hospital: CDC
healthday.com - 11-24-11
An estimated 100,000 older Americans are hospitalized for adverse drug reactions yearly, and most of those emergencies stem from four common medications, a new study finds.
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Dreaming Takes the Sting out of Painful Memories
sciencedaily.com - 11-24-11
They say time heals all wounds, and new research from the University of California, Berkeley, indicates that time spent in dream sleep can help us overcome painful ordeals.
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Physical Activity Impacts Overall Quality of Sleep
sciencedaily.com - 11-24-11
People sleep significantly better and feel more alert during the day if they get at least 150 minutes of exercise a week, a new study concludes.
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Daily stress is leading to a rise in the potential nightmare of 'sleep texting', expert claims
dailymail.co.uk - 11-23-11
The stress of daily life has sparked a new phenomenon - sleep texting.
People with the rare condition send incoherent text messages while asleep to their friends and family - completely unaware that they are doing it.
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Low BMI Linked to Alzheimer's and Death After Surgery
abcnews.go.com - 11-23-11
Maintaining a low Body Mass Index, or BMI, has long been considered a healthy practice for the general population, but two new studies have suggested links between low BMI and serious health conditions.
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Cure for insomnia could be on the cards
telegraph.co.uk - 11-23-11
Researchers in the US have found the chemical trigger that surpresses sleep and wakes people up, which can also be blocked to produce restful sleep.
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BPA levels soar after lunching on canned soup
msnbc.msn.com - 11-23-11
Eating canned food every day may raise the levels of the compound bisphenol A (BPA) in a person's urine more than previously suspected, a new study suggests.
People who ate a serving of canned soup every day for five days had BPA levels of 20.8 micrograms per liter of urine, whereas people who instead ate fresh soup had levels of 1.1 micrograms per liter, according to the study. BPA is found in many canned foods — it is a byproduct of the chemicals used to prevent corrosion.
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Southerners may eat more on Thanksgiving
upi.com - 11-23-11
Most Thanksgiving meals are high in calories, but the Web site WeightTraining.com suggests U.S. southerners consume more Thanksgiving calories than northerners.
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Form and Function: New MRI Technique to Diagnose or Rule out Alzheimer's Disease
sciencedaily.com - 11-23-11
On the quest for safe, reliable and accessible tools to accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found a new way of diagnosing and tracking Alzheimer's disease, using an innovative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique called arterial spin labeling (ASL) to measure changes in brain function. The team determined that the ASL-MRI test is a promising alternative to the current standard, a specific PET scan that requires exposure to small amounts of a radioactive glucose analog and costs approximately four-times more than an ASL-MRI.
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Over-regulation of drugs is 'costing lives'
telegraph.co.uk - 11-23-11
It costs around $1 billion and takes around ten years for a new drug to come onto the market and in the meantime millions of people worldwide, who could have benefited, will have died, Professor Sir Peter Lachmann, founding president of the Academy of Medical Sciences, said.
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DHS issues Turkey fryer warning
washingtonexaminer.com - 11-23-11
The Department of Homeland Security is taking any threat seriously during the Thanksgiving holiday, including the ominous threat to our national security posed by turkey fryers.
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Survey: Many less thankful, but doing OK
upi.com - 11-23-11
One-third of U.S. adults say they will have more to be thankful for this Thanksgiving than they had a few years ago, a survey indicates.
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Breast reduction: Higher risk older women
upi.com - 11-23-11
Complications following breast reduction surgery, particularly infections, are more common in women age 50 or older than in younger women, U.S. researchers say.
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Meditation Can 'Turn Off' Regions of the Brain
healthday.com - 11-23-11
A new study finds that people skilled at meditation seem able to turn off areas of the brain associated with daydreaming and psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.
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ER Visits for Energy-Drink Ills Soar in U.S.
healthday.com - 11-23-11
As the popularity of non-alcoholic "energy" drinks skyrockets, so do related health problems, a new study finds.
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Study Links Coffee to Lower Risk of Endometrial Cancer
healthday.com - 11-23-11
Women who drink moderate to high amounts of coffee may reduce their risk for endometrial cancer, new research reveals.
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Laser Removal May Be Advantageous for Treating Precancerous Skin Lesions
sciencedaily.com - 11-23-11
Carbon dioxide laser ablation (removal) may have a role as an alternative treatment for a common precancerous skin lesion known as lentigo maligna when surgery or radiation therapy is not feasible, according to a report in the November/December issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
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Babies Who Eat Fish Before Nine Months Are Less Likely to Suffer Pre-School Wheeze, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 11-23-11
Children who started eating fish before nine months of age are less likely to suffer from pre-school wheeze, but face a higher risk if they were treated with broad spectrum antibiotics in the first week of life or their mother took paracetamol during pregnancy. Those are the key findings from a large-scale Swedish study published in the December issue of Acta Paediatrica.
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Darpa: Do Away With Antibiotics, Then Destroy All Pathogens
wired.com - 11-23-11
Last year, federal officials warned that Americans were on the verge of “a post-antibiotic era.” And that’s exactly what the Pentagon’s far-out research agency is after.
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More sore throats in people on acne medication
reuters.com - 11-22-11
Young adults who take oral antibiotics for acne may be more likely to get sore throats, according to a new study.
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Why eating too quickly is a fast track to an early grave
dailymail.co.uk - 11-22-11
Eat too fast and you’re much more likely to become obese. That was the finding of a New Zealand study published last week.
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Bowel cancer wonder drug searches out and kills tumours without the side effects
dailymail.co.uk - 11-22-11
A two-in-one drug that seeks out and destroys tumours while being kind to the rest of the body has been developed by researchers.
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Why are so many children being born with sex defects?
dailymail.co.uk - 11-22-11
Growing up in a remote community on the west coast of Scotland in the Fifties, there was little opportunity for a boy with an embarrassing problem to discuss it with anyone.
‘You can imagine how people would have reacted,’ says Wilf Stevenson, 64, now Lord Stevenson of Balmacara. ‘It is not a subject easy to raise even now.’
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Boiling breast tumours kills them in 10 minutes: Doctors develop treatment using targeted electrical current
dailymail.co.uk - 11-22-11
Doctors have developed a new treatment that kills breast cancer cells by ‘cooking’ them — and it works in just minutes.
The procedure uses a targeted electrical current to heat tumours to 70-90c (160-190f).
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Obesity. Bloating. Bowel problems. Headaches. It's blamed for everything these days - so should you stop eating bread?
dailymail.co.uk - 11-22-11
From hot buttered toast to the simple sandwich, bread was once the staple of the British diet. But today it’s suffering from a serious image crisis — it’s become something of a health bogeyman, a food to be avoided and resisted.
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Sense Of Smell May Improve With Training
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-22-11
People who notice their sense of smell is not as good as it used to be may wish to take note of what scientists training laboratory rats concluded: a failing sense of smell can improve, however, it can also get worse, depending on the type of training. Drs Julie Chapuis and Donald A Wilson from New York University (NYU) Langone School of Medicine write about their findings in the 20 November online issue of Nature Neuroscience. They hope their discovery will help develop new ways to reverse the loss of smell that occurs with age or disease.
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Bacteria Behind Common Infections Appropriate Immune Molecules Sent To Destroy Them
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-22-11
Some infectious bacteria like NTHI, which is responsible for conjunctivitis or "pink eye", middle ear infections and sinusitis, defend themselves from immune attack by appropriating the very molecules sent to destroy them. Researchers describe how they discovered the mechanisms that enable this in NTHI (short for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae) in an article published this month in the journal PLoS Pathogens.
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Teen Births Hit Record Low, C-Sections Down, CDC Reports For 2010
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-22-11
Teen births in the US hit a record low in 2010, and for the first time in a decade, C-sections appear to be falling, according to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
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The power of nostalgia at Thanksgiving
cnn.com - 11-22-11
You've been thinking about it for weeks. Mounds of turkey piled high with buttery mashed potatoes, dripping with gravy.
Green bean casserole and pumpkin pie. Or sweet potato casserole and pecan pie. Cranberries. Collard greens. Stuffing.
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How meditating may help your brain
cnn.com - 11-22-11
When you're under pressure from work and family and the emails don't stop coming, it's hard to stop your mind from jumping all over the place.
But scientists are finding that it may be worth it to train your brain to focus on something as simple as your breath, which is part of mindfulness meditation.
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Cancer survival: Macmillan hails major improvement
bbc.co.uk - 11-22-11
Overall median survival rates for cancer in England and Wales have increased from one year to nearly six in the last four decades, figures show.
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Aids-related deaths 'down 21% from peak', says UNAids
bbc.co.uk - 11-22-11
Aids-related deaths are at the lowest level since their 2005 peak, down 21%, figures from UNAids suggest.
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More frequent sex, happier married couples
upi.com - 11-22-11
Almost 80 percent of couples who engaged in marital sex more than once a month said they were very happy, U.S. researchers say.
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Time of day affects heart attack severity
upi.com - 11-22-11
The severity of a heart heart -- and subsequent recovery -- depends on what time of day the heart attack occurs, U.S. researchers say.
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Thin People May Be at Greater Risk for Post-Surgery Death
healthday.com - 11-22-11
Thin people appear to have a higher risk of dying within 30 days of an operation than heavier people, researchers have found.
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Could Weight Loss Be Early Sign of Alzheimer's?
healthday.com - 11-22-11
People with early evidence of Alzheimer's disease are more likely to be underweight than people who don't have this type of dementia, a new study suggests.
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Tweaking a Gene Makes Muscles Twice as Strong: New Avenue for Treating Muscle Degeneration in People Who Can't Exercise
sciencedaily.com - 11-22-11
An international team of scientists has created super-strong, high-endurance mice and worms by suppressing a natural muscle-growth inhibitor, suggesting treatments for age-related or genetics-related muscle degeneration are within reach.
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High school sports can cause brain injury
upi.com - 11-22-11
A routine hit to the head during a high school football or hockey game may result in subtle injury even if there is no concussion, U.S. researchers say.
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Chicken jerky treats linked to mystery illnesses, deaths in dogs
msnbc.msn.com - 11-22-11
Chicken jerky treats may be to blame for dozens of new reports of mysterious illnesses and some deaths in dogs, prompting a renewed warning for pet owners by the Food and Drug Administration.
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UCLA-Developed Mouthwash A ‘Smart Bomb’ Against Cavities?
losangeles.cbslocal.com - 11-21-11
It’s one of the most common conditions affecting over nearly half of children in the United States but now a mouthwash concocted by a UCLA microbiologist may render cavities and tooth decay a thing of the past.
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Gene linked to separation anxiety, study says
usatoday.com - 11-21-11
Scientists who identified a gene linked to separation anxiety say their finding could lead to more targeted treatments for anxiety disorders.
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Afternoon Sleepiness? Protein, Not Sugar, Keeps Us Awake
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-21-11
A new study finds that protein, not sugar, stimulates certain brain cells into keeping us awake, and also, by telling the body to burn calories, keeping us thin. Study leader Dr Denis Burdakov, from the University of Cambridge in the UK, and colleagues, write about their findings in the 17 November issue of Neuron. They suggest their discovery will increase understanding of obesity and sleep disorders.
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Most adults say they've had sex in public
upi.com - 11-21-11
More than half of responding U.S. adults admit to having sex in public, with cars being the top location, an Internet survey indicates.
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Happiness = College, marriage, good job
upi.com - 11-21-11
People who go to college, get married and have a good job that makes about $75,000 are most apt to be happy, U.S. researchers found.
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Near poor live paycheck to paycheck
upi.com - 11-21-11
More than half of the near poor in the United States are white, half live in homes headed by a married couple, and half live in the suburbs, researchers say.
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Holiday Foods May Trigger GERD Symptoms
healthday.com - 11-21-11
Holiday foods and feasts can cause trouble for the estimated 30 million Americans with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but there are things they can do to be comfortable and symptom-free, experts advise.
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Seniors' Memory Doesn't Seem to Improve With Sleep: Study
healthday.com - 11-21-11
A good night's sleep doesn't seem to improve older adults' memory, according to a new study.
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Weak Spot Discovered On Deadly Ebolavirus
sciencedaily.com - 11-21-11
Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and the US Army's Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases have isolated and analyzed an antibody that neutralizes Sudan virus, a major species of ebolavirus and one of the most dangerous human pathogens.
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Retail Insurance Broker Offers Medical Marijuana Coverage
sfgate.com - 11-20-11
Many medical marijuana business owners don't know insurance is available for their unique operations. Growers, delivery services and collectives continue to run the risk of no insurance simply because they don't know it's available. Well, the good news is Breeze Ins. Services has new coverage options for collectives, growers, hydroponic stores, landlords, delivery companies and recommendation offices.
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Poll: Public supports medical marijuana, but not full pot legalization
cbsnews.com - 11-20-11
According a recent CBS News poll conducted at the end of October, a slim majority of 51 percent continues to think that marijuana use should be illegal. But support for specifically allowing doctors to prescribe marijuana for serious medical conditions - or legalized "medical" marijuana - is far stronger: 77 percent Americans think it should be allowed.
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LGBT seniors face harder, lonelier aging
upi.com - 11-20-11
Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender baby boomers take good care of themselves as they age, but when elderly they often lack help from children and others.
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Blood type may affect stroke risk, study finds
usatoday.com - 11-20-11
Your blood type might affect your risk for stroke. People with AB and women with B were a little more likely to suffer one than people with O blood — the most common type, a study found.
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As experts say screening has failed, the 'check it yourself' breast cancer survival guide
dailymail.co.uk - 11-20-11
There is growing disquiet in the medical community. The NHS breast-cancer screening programme, which invites all women to have three-yearly X-rays (mammograms) from the age of 50, has been said by some doctors to ‘do more harm than good’.
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Honey: The 'bee penicillin' that could even beat MRSA
dailymail.co.uk - 11-20-11
It is often hailed as a natural, healthy sweetener – but in most cases, honey bought from supermarkets today is simply sugar syrup with no nutritional value at all. To reap the true benefits of what was dubbed ‘the food of the gods’ by the Ancient Greeks, you have to look for the raw variety.
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Computer that can read promises cancer breakthroughs
telegraph.co.uk - 11-20-11
Called CRAB, the system is able to trawl through millions of peer-reviewed articles for clues to the causes of tumours. Already, it has uncovered a potential reason why some chemicals induce pancreatic cancer only in men.
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Female Orgasm - Brain Activity Captured In FMRI Imaging Device
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-20-11
Brain activity during a female orgasm has been described as secondary to an epileptic seizure, after researchers from Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA recorded the upsurge of oxygen utilization in a 5-minute period of brain networking activity with a fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) scanner.
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Why Did I Come In Here? How Walking Through Doorways Makes Us Forget
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-20-11
Ever done this: entered a room purposefully, then stood there feeling like an idiot while you try and remember what you came for? Well, now scientists think they have an explanation: going through doorways causes the mind to "file away" the current activity.
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Taking Antibiotics For Viral Infections Can Do More Harm Than Good, CDC
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-20-11
Did you know that taking antibiotics when you or your child has a virus may do more harm than good? According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where children are concerned, antibiotics are the most common cause of emergency department visits for adverse drug events. This is one of several messages the CDC has been putting out this week as part of a worldwide push to raise awareness about antibiotic resistance, and how inappropriate use of these bacteria-fighting drugs is fuelling the problem.
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Myth that antibiotics cure coughs and colds still rife
bbc.co.uk - 11-20-11
A quarter of people wrongly believe antibiotics work on most coughs and colds, a Health Protection Agency survey has found.
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Those in the East U.S. report most colds
upi.com - 11-20-11
Some 10 percent in the East reported a cold in October, while those in the East and West were slightly more likely to report the flu, a U.S. survey says.
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Metabolic syndrome + WTC dust = hurt lungs
upi.com - 11-20-11
Metabolic syndrome biomarkers predict subsequent decline in lung function after exposure to World Trade Center dust, U.S. researchers say.
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Watch What You Eat After Teeth-Whitening, Expert Says
healthday.com - 11-20-11
Eating certain foods and avoiding others can help keep your teeth white after you've used an at-home whitening kit or had cosmetic bleaching, an expert says.
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How Legionnaires' bacteria cause disease
upi.com - 11-19-11
A bacterium that causes Legionnaires' disease manipulates cells to generate amino acids it needs to grow and infect the lungs, U.S. researchers say.
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Teen self-harm behavior studied
upi.com - 11-19-11
Eight percent of all teenagers indulge in cutting, burning and other self-harm behaviors but most grow out of it, a study in a British medical journal said.
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Study: STD complication may double infertility risk
usatoday.com - 11-19-11
Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) -- a complication of sexually transmitted diseases -- is marked by inflammation of the reproductive organs. The condition affects more than 800,000 women in the United States each year and one in 10 of them becomes infertile, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Mystery disease diagnosed at clinic of last resort
msnbc.msn.com - 11-19-11
Thanks to the medical detectives at the nation’s first mystery disease clinic, Louise Benge now knows why her legs feel like they’ve turned to stone.
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"Think Hard Before Using Antibiotics" Message To UK Hospitals
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-19-11
Timed to coincide with European Antibiotics Awareness Day on Friday 18th November, the UK's Department of Health is urging hospitals to "think hard before using antibiotics". The message reflects a call by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) for more prudent use of antibiotics, as latest figures show that resistance to antibiotics, including the carbapenems - the major last line of defence against multidrug-resistant bacteria - is increasing across Europe.
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How Schizophrenia Gene Linked To Psychiatric Disorders Impairs Brain Development
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-19-11
Researchers have discovered how the gene variant DISC1, which is linked to schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, impairs a particular signalling pathway in neurons that is crucial for normal brain development. Li-Huei Tsai, director of MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, and colleagues, write about their findings in the 17 November issue of the journal Neuron.
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Cancer drug Avastin loses US approval
bbc.co.uk - 11-19-11
US drug regulators have rescinded approval of a breast cancer drug, saying it is not effective enough to justify the risks of taking it.
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U.S.: 19 million new STDs each year
upi.com - 11-19-11
There are 19 million new sexually transmitted infections every year, costing the U.S. healthcare system $17 billion annually, federal health officials say.
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Promising therapy for prostate cancer type
healthday.com - 11-19-11
A genetic Achilles' heel in an aggressive type of prostate cancer may be treated by a drug already being tested to treat other cancers, U.S. researchers say.
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U.S. Voters May Prefer Low-Pitched Male Voice
healthday.com - 11-19-11
Voters prefer male political candidates with a lower-pitched voice because it's seen as a sign of dominance and leadership, according to Canadian researchers.
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Nanoparticles Used as Additives in Diesel Fuels Can Travel from Lungs to Liver
sciencedaily.com - 11-19-11
Recent studies conducted at Marshall University have demonstrated that nanoparticles of cerium oxide -- common diesel fuel additives used to increase the fuel efficiency of automobile engines -- can travel from the lungs to the liver and that this process is associated with liver damage.
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Thanksgiving foods some of healthiest
upi.com - 11-18-11
The traditional Thanksgiving meal has so many antioxidants and healthy foods, it's a shame Americans tend to only eat it on holidays, a U.S. dietitian said.
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Smoking highest in Kentucky, lowest Utah
upi.com - 11-18-11
U.S. smoking rates range from a high of 29 percent in Kentucky to a low of 11 percent in Utah, a Gallup poll indicates.
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Does Your Dog Need a Flu Shot?
abcnews.go.com - 11-18-11
Dog owners may be vigilant when it comes to protecting their pooches from rabies and heartworm disease, but veterinarians in certain parts of the country are sounding the alarm about canine influenza, which is on the rise in some areas.
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Antibiotic-resistant infections spread through Europe
independent.co.uk - 11-18-11
The world is being driven towards the "unthinkable scenario of untreatable infections", experts are warning, because of the growth of superbugs resistant to all antibiotics and the dwindling interest in developing new drugs to combat them.
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‘Nice Guy Molesters’ Believe They’re ‘Child Lovers’
abcnews.go.com - 11-18-11
That was Sandusky’s explanation after being accused of 40 counts of child molestation charges. He enjoys kids. He started the popular and successful Second Mile charity; he says he even felt like a kid himself sometimes.
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Two-thirds of Americans drink, but tastes vary by region
usatoday.com - 11-18-11
An earlier version of this story omitted 2011 Gallup data on alcohol consumption. Gallup says 64% of Americans consumed alcohol in 2011, down slightly from 67% in 2010.
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Superbugs are becoming 'untreatable' doctors warn
telegraph.co.uk - 11-18-11
The overuse of antibiotics have led to a rise in the number of bacterial infections which are resistant to all drugs, experts said.
The problem will threaten even the most basic hospital treatments that will become highly dangerous without effective antibiotics, it was warned.
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The economy may be killing your sex life
msnbc.msn.com - 11-18-11
The fertility rate is dropping, statistics say. People are simply having fewer children. Experts think the reason can be traced to financial planning by would-be parents wary of their futures.
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Green Tea May Lower "Bad" Cholesterol, New Analysis
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-18-11
A new analysis of published studies finds that consuming green tea, either as a beverage or in capsule form, is linked to significant but modest reductions in total and LDL or "bad" cholesterol, but the researchers found no link with HDL or "good" cholesterol and triglycerides. Dr Olivia J. Phung, of the College of Pharmacy at Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, California, and colleagues, write about their findings in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.
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New Study Ties Blood Type To Stroke Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-18-11
Some blood types appear to be linked to a higher risk for stroke than others said researchers presenting the results of their study at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011 in Orlando, Florida, on Wednesday.
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Cancer Flourishes On Recycled Cell Waste
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-18-11
Cancer cells flourish on recycled cell waste, and preventing their access to this natural "Pac-Man" process appears to stop tumors growing and spreading. This remarkable finding is the result of a new study from researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York who write about their work in the 16 November issue of Science Translational Medicine.
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U.S. teen birth rate at record low in 2010
upi.com - 11-18-11
The birth rate for U.S. teenagers ages 15-19 declined for three years to hit a record low in 2010, health officials say.
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Southeast overuses antibiotics the most
upi.com - 11-18-11
A pattern of outpatient antibiotic overuse in parts of the United States -- particularly the Southeast -- could accelerate drug resistance, researchers say.
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Bipolar Kids May Focus on Different Facial Features
healthday.com - 11-18-11
Children with bipolar disorder and a similar condition called severe mood dysregulation spend less time looking at the eyes when trying to identify facial features, compared to children without the psychiatric disorders, researchers say.
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Mom-to-Be's Mental State May Affect Child's Development
healthday.com - 11-18-11
A fetus is sensitive to, and can be affected by, the expectant mother's mental state, a new study suggests.
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More Americans Living to 90, U.S. Census Finds
healthday.com - 11-18-11
More Americans are living to 90 and beyond, and by 2050 their ranks could reach almost 9 million, a new U.S. Census Bureau report finds.
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19 Million New STD Infections Reported Annually, CDC Says
healthday.com - 11-18-11
The 19 million new cases of syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia diagnosed in the United States each year cost the nation's health care system $17 billion annually, according to an annual report released Thursday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Alcohol Consumption by Adolescents May Increase Breast Cancer Risk in Those With a Family History of the Disease
sciencedaily.com - 11-18-11
Breast cancer patients often wonder what their daughters might do to reduce their risk of also developing cancer. Are there dietary intakes or behaviors that can be modified by their daughters to lower their own chances of getting the disease? A new study published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, sought information relevant to this question.
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One in four American women take medication for a mental disorder
dailymail.co.uk - 11-18-11
More than one in four American women took at least one drug for conditions like anxiety and depression last year, according to an analysis of prescription data.
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Online Hookups Blamed For Jump In Sexually Transmitted Disease
stlouis.cbslocal.com - 11-18-11
The accelerated pace of cyber courtship is getting part of the blame for an increase in sexually transmitted diseases.
“You don’t have to spend a week in a bar to find somebody your comfortable with,” said St. Louis Health Director Pam Walker, “People are doing it online and they’re doing it faster.”
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Freezing patients who are bleeding to death can prevent brain damage and buy time
dailymail.co.uk - 11-17-11
Freezing patients who are bleeding to death could prevent brain damage and buy surgeons valuable time, scientists say.
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High dose vitamin D pills 'can double heart condition risk'
telegraph.co.uk - 11-17-11
Taking high doses of vitamin D could more than double the chance of having a type of serious heart complaint, according to results of a large-scale survey.
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Prostate cancer may be tied to the Pill in water supply
msnbc.msn.com - 11-17-11
Birth control pills contain the female hormone estrogen, and in recent years, some experts have raised concerns about the presence of estrogen and similar compounds in foods and the water supply. The new study may raise those concerns further, though the authors said the findings are preliminary.
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Pizza is a vegetable? Congress says yes
msnbc.msn.com - 11-17-11
Congress wants to keep pizza and french fries on school lunch lines, fighting back against an Obama administration proposal to make school lunches healthier.
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Body Language Of Empathy Is Genetically Wired Say Scientists
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-17-11
A new study suggests it takes only 20 seconds of observation to detect whether a total stranger is genetically wired to display prosocial behavior consistent with empathy, compassion and trustworthiness. The study appears in the 14 November issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Scarring Is Necessary Part Of Heart Healing
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-17-11
A new study from the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill School of Medicine suggests that scarring of heart tissue is a necessary part of healing and we should be careful about interrupting it as it can further weaken the heart. The researchers write about their finding in the 15 November online issue of The EMBO Journal.
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Delay cord clamping for baby health, say experts
bbc.co.uk - 11-17-11
Waiting a few minutes after delivery to cut the umbilical cord is best for a newborn's health, research suggests.
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Teen sex may hurt health later as adults
upi.com - 11-17-11
Sex during adolescence may have lasting negative effects on the body, most likely because it occurs when the nervous system is developing, U.S. researchers say.
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1 of 6 boys, 1 of 4 girls, sexually abused
upi.com - 11-17-11
In the United States, about one out of six boys and one out of four girls are sexually abused -- most by a man who is not a relative, government officials say.
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Researchers: People tend to lie in e-mail
upi.com - 11-17-11
People tend to lie when using computers for instant messaging and e-mail to communicate compared with face-to-face conversations, U.S. researchers say.
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Study: Video games may change brain
upi.com - 11-17-11
Fourteen-year-old teens who play video games a lot have a larger pleasure center in the brain, researchers in Germany said.
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Some expect to work until retiring at 80
upi.com - 11-17-11
Three-quarters of middle-class adults say they expect to work during retirement, with 25 percent saying they'll be punching the clock at 80, a U.S. survey says.
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Higher Legal Drinking Age May Mean Safer Lives for Women
healthday.com - 11-16-11
Entering adulthood in a place and time where the legal drinking age is 18, not 21, seems to put women, but not men, at a long-term higher risk for homicide and suicide, a new study finds.
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Older ER Patients Less Likely to Get Pain Meds, Data Shows
healthday.com - 11-16-11
Elderly patients are less likely than middle-aged patients to receive pain medications in U.S. hospital emergency departments, even when they have severe pain.
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Women More Prone to 'Broken Heart' Syndrome: Study
healthday.com - 11-16-11
Broken heart syndrome -- a temporary heart condition brought on by extreme physical or emotional stress -- occurs overwhelmingly in women compared to men, a new study suggests.
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Healthy Heart Habits May Also Guard Against Cancer
healthday.com - 11-16-11
People who are diligent about keeping their heart healthy have a good chance of staving off cancer as well, researchers report.
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Even Without Weight Loss, Mediterranean Diet Helps Heart: Study
healthday.com - 11-16-11
A new study offers further evidence that a Mediterranean-style diet is good for your heart.
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One in 12 Teens Engages in Self-Harm: Report
healthday.com - 11-16-11
One in 12 teens deliberately harm themselves, but 90 percent give up the behavior by the time they're young adults, a new study shows.
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Even the Cleanest Wastewater Contributes to More 'Super Bacteria', Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 11-16-11
A new University of Minnesota study reveals that treated municipal wastewater -- even wastewater treated by the highest-quality treatment technology -- can result in significant quantities of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, often referred to as "superbacteria," in surface waters.
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Vintage Leather Football Helmets Often as Protective as Modern Helmets in Common, Game-Like Hits
sciencedaily.com - 11-8-11
Old-fashioned "leatherhead" football helmets from the early 1900s are often as effective as -- and sometimes better than -- modern football helmets at protecting against injuries during routine, game-like collisions, according to Cleveland Clinic researchers.
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Knee arthritis strikes at younger age, weight loss may help
usatoday.com - 11-8-11
Arthritis of the knee is striking Americans at younger ages, new research has found, but shedding a few pounds if you're overweight may reduce your risk.
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Babies on obesity path? New sign may offer answer
usatoday.com - 11-8-11
Researchers say there's a new way to tell if infants are likely to become obese later on: Check to see if they've passed two key milestones on doctors' growth charts by age 2.
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Fight the flu and boost your immune system, one bite at a time
usatoday.com - 11-8-11
If you don't have good nutrition, you're missing a key weapon against colds and flu. Basics include the famously nutrient-dense leafy greens, berries and nuts. You may be surprised by these six other top immune boosters suggested by Tonia Reinhard, registered dietitian and author of Superfoods, and Joel Fuhrman, M.D., author of Super Immunity. Note: Don't expect immediate results. Fuhrman says you'll need superior nutrition for a few months to see a real effect on your body's defenses.
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Live liver donors 'can have digestive problems and depression years after surgery'
dailymail.co.uk - 11-8-11
People who have donated part of their liver for transplant could be prone to health complications years after surgery, warn scientists.
According to a survey by University Hospital Essen in Germany almost half of the 83 liver donors questioned reported health complaints ranging from digestive problems to severe depression.
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Six out of ten Alzheimer's cases are undiagnosed... as two thirds of adults don't know difference between old age and dementia
dailymail.co.uk - 11-8-11
Six out of ten people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia go undiagnosed, figures revealed yesterday.
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American parents caught selling chickenpox-infected lollipops
telegraph.co.uk - 11-8-11
Prosecutors in Tennessee have been forced to issue a warning that sending viruses or diseases by post is illegal, after parcels of the infectious sweets were discovered on sale over the internet.
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You gotta have friends? Most have just 2 true pals
msnbc.msn.com - 11-8-11
If asked how many friends you have, some may have trouble distinguishing between the lengthy list of Facebook friends and those close pals you confide in. Well, it turns out, Americans' lists of the close type has shrunk to two, down from three confidantes 25 years ago, a new study suggests.
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Depressed Dads Have Impact On Children's Emotional And Behavioral Problems
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-8-11
A child who lives in a household with a father with depressive symptoms or other mental health conditions has a higher risk of having behavioral or emotional problems, compared to other children, researchers from New York School of Medicine reported in the journal Pediatrics.
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Stroke risks also linked to mental decline
cnn.com - 11-8-11
If you’re at risk for a stroke, you're more likely to suffer from mental decline, according to a study published Monday in the journal Neurology.
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Teen drug use highest among Native Americans; Asians lowest
cnn.com - 11-8-11
White, Hispanic, Native American and mixed-race teenagers have higher rates of substance use and abuse than African American and Asian teens according to a new study in the Archives of General Psychiatry. They also are affected more by substance-related disorders.
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Light 'promising' in cancer fight
bbc.co.uk - 11-8-11
Light is a "promising" tool in the fight against cancer, say researchers in the US.
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Kids with H1N1 and MRSA up death risk
upi.com - 11-8-11
Children hit by both H1N1 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have a significantly higher risk of dying from the flu, U.S. researchers say.
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U.S. school peers sex harassment common
upi.com - 11-8-11
Peer-to-peer sexual harassment -- considered a type of bullying -- is experienced by almost half of U.S. middle and high school students, a report found.
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School Soda Bans Don't Keep Kids From Sugary Drinks
healthday.com - 11-8-11
Laws that specifically ban sugar-rich sodas in schools -- but not other high-calorie drinks -- do not reduce consumption of these obesity-generating beverages, a new study shows.
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Scientific Brilliance Doesn't Always Peak Young
healthday.com - 11-8-11
The image of the brilliant young scientist making groundbreaking discoveries is iconic, especially in the fields of physics, chemistry and math.
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Brain Parasite Directly Alters Brain Chemistry
sciencedaily.com - 11-8-11
Research shows infection by the brain parasite Toxoplasma gondii, found in 10-20 per cent of the UK's population, directly affects the production of dopamine, a key chemical messenger in the brain.
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Erasing Signs of Aging in Human Cells Now a Reality
sciencedaily.com - 11-8-11
Scientists have recently succeeded in rejuvenating cells from elderly donors (aged over 100). These old cells were reprogrammed in vitro to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and to rejuvenated and human embryonic stem cells (hESC): cells of all types can again be differentiated after this genuine "rejuvenation" therapy. The results represent significant progress for research into iPSC cells and a further step forwards for regenerative medicine.
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Smaller increase in children's weight in Fukushima
nhk.or.jp - 11-8-11
A survey shows that some children in Fukushima Prefecture have smaller average weight gains this year compared to the year before. A pediatrician says the results indicate the negative effects of the nuclear plant accident in March.
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Slow death
fukushima-diary.com - 11-8-11
Dörte Siedentopf has been travelling in regions around Chernobyl for 20 years to help victims, she is member of the IPPNW and speaks about the slow death in Belarus and what could happen in Japan after Fukushima.
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Government Ignored 1998 Report Finding up to 100 Cancer Deaths from TSA Naked Body Scanners Per Year
naturalsociety.com - 11-8-11
Has the government known since 1998 that the TSA body scanners could be giving you cancer? An explosive report has exposed the carcinogenic effects of X-ray body scanners, finding that up to 100 United States airline passengers each year could get cancer from the machines.
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Reefer Madness
nytimes.com - 11-7-11
MARIJUANA is now legal under state law for medical purposes in 16 states and the District of Columbia, encompassing nearly one-third of the American population. More than 1,000 dispensaries provide medical marijuana; many are well regulated by state and local law and pay substantial taxes. But though more than 70 percent of Americans support legalizing medical marijuana, any use of marijuana remains illegal under federal law.
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R.I. sees no teen pot increase
upi.com - 11-7-11
Rhode Island did not find increases in adolescent marijuana use related to the state's 2006 legalization of medical marijuana, researchers say.
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People rationalize if no alternative
upi.com - 11-7-11
People who feel they're stuck with something are more likely to be content than people who think there is a way out, U.S. and Canadian researchers say.
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Teachers: Many not ready for kindergarten
upi.com - 11-7-11
Most U.S. kindergarten teachers think most young children are unprepared for school when they enter kindergarten, a survey indicates.
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North Texas Researchers Creating Ultimate Flu Shot
dfw.cbslocal.com - 11-7-11
North Texas researchers are on the brink of revolutionizing the way we fight the flu.
Every year, scientists try to guess which strain of the flu will cause the most people to get sick. They use that particular flu bug to make a flu vaccine. But what if you could get one shot that would tackle every single type of flu?North Texas researchers are on the brink of revolutionizing the way we fight the flu.
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More people landing in the ER after abusing muscle relaxant
usatoday.com - 11-7-11
The number of people winding up in the emergency room because of the misuse or abuse of the prescription muscle relaxant carisoprodol has more than doubled, a new federal report warns.
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Genetically modified rice created to produce human blood
telegraph.co.uk - 11-7-11
The protein, extracted from rice plants containing human genes, could be used in hospitals to treat burns victims and help patients who have suffered severe blood loss.
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Why fingernails-on-a-chalkboard is the worst sound in the world
msnbc.msn.com - 11-7-11
Screeeeeeeech. Even imagining the sound of a person's fingernails scraping down a chalkboard is tortuous. Now, new research helps suggest why the noise is such a special kind of awful.
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Wine, beer can trigger reaction, asthma
healthday.com - 11-7-11
It's rare, but allergies to alcohol can cause symptoms such as red itchy eyes, nasal congestion, upset stomach and breathing problems, U.S. researchers say.
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Americans spend 3 percent of time active
healthday.com - 11-7-11
Sedentary U.S. adults are advised to take breaks from sitting in front of the computer and TV and fill that break time with exercise, researchers say.
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Air Fresheners, Scented Candles May Spur Allergic Reactions
healthday.com - 11-7-11
Pumpkin spice candles and pine-scented air fresheners may evoke the holiday season for some. For others, those airborne fragrances trigger allergy symptoms -- from runny, itchy noses and sneezing to asthma attacks.
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Even Homes Without Pets Have Pet Allergens
healthday.com - 11-7-11
By taking steps to reduce pet allergens in their homes, pet owners can reduce the spread of pet allergens to people who may be allergic, experts say.
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Knee Arthritis Striking at Younger Ages, But Weight Loss May Help
healthday.com - 11-7-11
Arthritis of the knee is striking Americans at younger ages, new research has found, but shedding a few pounds if you're overweight may reduce your risk.
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Volunteers End Simulated Mission to Mars
sciencedaily.com - 11-7-11
The record-breaking simulated mission to Mars has ended with smiling faces after 17 months. Mars500's six brave volunteers stepped out of their 'spacecraft' Nov. 4, 2011 to be welcomed by the waiting scientists -- happy that the venture had worked even better than expected.
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Dirt Prevents Allergy, Danish Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 11-7-11
If infants encounter a wide range of bacteria they are less at risk of developing allergic disease later in life. This is the conclusion of research from the University of Copenhagen, which suggests completely new factors in many modern lifestyle diseases.
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Casual sex fuelling cervical cancer rise
telegraph.co.uk - 11-6-11
The incidence in women in their 20s almost doubled between 1992 and 2006 - rising 43 per cent - even though rates in all other age groups have dropped.
The figures, from a Manchester University study, show the cervical cancer rate per 100,000 women aged 20 to 29 rose from 5.5 to 7.9.
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What Is Heart Disease?
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-6-11
Heart disease is an umbrella term for any type of disorder that affects the heart. Heart disease means the same as cardiac disease but not cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease refers to disorders of the blood vessels and heart, while heart disease refers to just the heart.
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Dr. Andrew Weil: Depression - my experience
cnn.com - 11-6-11
Depression has many forms. Worst among them is the kind characterized by deep, soul-crushing despair, so eloquently described in novelist William Styron's 1992 book, “Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness.”
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Knee Arthritis Striking at Younger Ages, But Weight Loss May Help
healthday.com - 11-6-11
Arthritis of the knee is striking Americans at younger ages, new research has found, but shedding a few pounds if you're overweight may reduce your risk.
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Studies Suggest Link Between Smog, Joint Disease
healthday.com - 11-6-11
Exposure to certain types of air pollution is associated with an increased risk for the painful joint disease known as rheumatoid arthritis, new research suggests.
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Psychological Traumas Experienced Over Lifetime Linked to Adult Irritable Bowel Syndrome
sciencedaily.com - 11-6-11
The psychological and emotional traumas experienced over a lifetime--such as the death of a loved one, divorce, natural disaster, house fire or car accident, physical or mental abuse -- may contribute to adult irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to the results of a study unveiled at the American College of Gastroenterology's (ACG) 76th Annual Scientific meeting in Washington, DC.
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Why Measles Spreads So Quickly
sciencedaily.com - 11-6-11
Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered why measles, perhaps the most contagious viral disease in the world, spreads so quickly. The virus emerges in the trachea of its host, provoking a cough that fills the air with particles ready to infect the next host. The findings may also help in the fight against ovarian, breast and lung cancers.
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Skin 'Sees' UV Light, Starts Producing Pigment
sciencedaily.com - 11-6-11
In a new study, biologists report that melanocyte skin cells detect ultraviolet light using a photosensitive receptor previously thought to exist only in the eye. This eye-like ability of skin to sense light triggers the production of melanin within hours, more quickly than previously thought, in an apparent rush to protect against damage to DNA.
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Medical Marijuana: a Local Issue
wsj.com - 11-6-11
We’ve talked plenty of pot at the federal and state levels here at Law Blog, but there are some serious local battles over medical marijuana unfolding in California, fueled by referendum movements, something permitted by state law.
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Heathcare CEO pay still healthy
upi.com - 11-6-11
Until the past decade it was taboo to pay non-profit hospital heads large salaries, but a California hospital executive makes $750,000 a year, researchers say.
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Sitting without breaks ups cancer risk
upi.com - 11-5-11
Sitting for long periods of time is associated with health risks -- even for people who are regularly physically active, an Australian researcher says.
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People with autism superior in many areas
upi.com - 11-5-11
Many people with autism have qualities and abilities that may exceed those of people who do not have the condition, Canadian researchers say.
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No single food lowers cancer risk
upi.com - 11-5-11
No single food protects against cancer, but there is strong evidence eating produce, whole grains and beans helps lower cancer risk, U.S. researchers say.
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Putting baby in cot after birth causes stress levels to double
telegraph.co.uk - 11-5-11
Researchers claim that the long-established practice of putting newborns in a nearby cot or nursery to give their mothers some rest immediately after birth can distress them.
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Too many meds may be more problem than cure
usatoday.com - 11-5-11
Medication can, indeed, do a lot toward curing, preventing or easing many ills. But taking a fistful of pills each day creates its own set of medical risks, prompting concern among a growing number of physicians and pharmacists that people are simply taking too many medications for their own good.
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Suncream may interfere with skin's natural defence to UV light
dailymail.co.uk - 11-5-11
Suncream may actually block the body's natural defence against harmful UV rays, a surprising new study has found.
Scientists from Brown University have discovered that human skin contains sensors that detect radiation from the sun.
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More Young American Adults Living With Parents
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-5-11
A new report from the US Census Bureau reveals that more young American adults are living with their parents, especially men, a trend that does not appear to be linked to the recession. The new data comes from America's Families and Living Arrangements: 2011, a series of tables from the 2011 Current Population Survey, details of which were released on Thursday.
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How Light-Sensitive Brain Cells Keep Us Awake
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-5-11
US scientists have found a group of brain cells that controls whether light arouses us (or not). They suggest the cells rely on a neurotransmitter to tell them whether they should be active or not in response to light. You can read about their study in the 26 October issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.
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Common Breast Cancer Gene Test May Be Flawed, Study Says
healthday.com - 11-5-11
A widely used breast cancer test may not be accurate in identifying a gene that is critical in determining which life-saving treatment a woman should get.
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Drugs to Make You Look Beautiful -- But at What Price?
healthday.com - 11-5-11
Skimpy eyelashes, balding pates and wrinkles aren't diseases, but they may as well be in a society that "medicalizes" normal conditions by producing drugs not to cure or heal, but to enhance, some health experts contend.
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Cutting off prostate cancer's food supply
upi.com - 11-5-11
Researchers at the Centenary Institute in Sydney say they have discovered a potential future treatment for prostate cancer by starving tumor cells.
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People eat more fast-food as income rises
upi.com - 11-5-11
People's consumption of fast-food becomes more common as their earnings increase from low to middle incomes, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Despite economy, more buying organics
upi.com - 11-5-11
Seventy-eight percent of U.S. families say they are choosing organic foods, an increase from last year despite hard economic times, a survey indicates.
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Diagnosticians run higher malpractice risk
upi.com - 11-4-11
Diagnostic physicians may be at higher malpractice risk due to communication failures among doctors, U.S. researchers said.
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Anti smoking drug may increase suicide risk, study says
cnn.com - 11-4-11
The popular quit-smoking drug Chantix may increase the risk of suicide and suicidal thoughts in some patients, says a new report.
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Prostate cancer found in 2,000-year-old Egyptian mummy
dailymail.co.uk - 11-4-11
Scientists believe they have discovered the oldest case of prostate cancer in Egypt after scans on a 2,250-year-old mummy showed the man died a slow and painful death from the disease.
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29th person dies in cantaloupe listeria outbreak
usatoday.com - 11-4-11
The death toll in an outbreak of listeria in cantaloupe has reached 29 after federal health authorities say an eighth person has died in the state of Colorado.
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Smoking 'primes the brain for cocaine cravings'
dailymail.co.uk - 11-4-11
Smoking may increase the chances of someone abusing cocaine later in life by priming the brain to be more receptive to the Class A drug, say scientists.
The landmark study, from the National Institute on Drug Abuse in Maryland, is the first to show how nicotine can change the brain in a way that enhances the behavioural effects of cocaine.
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Handful of nuts a day can help beat belly fat
dailymail.co.uk - 11-4-11
A handful of nuts a day can keep hunger at bay and beat belly fat, according to scientists.
This is the first time a link between eating nuts and higher levels of serotonin - a substance that decreases appetite, boosts happiness and improves heart health - has been detected.
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Could zinc help prevent autism?
telegraph.co.uk - 11-4-11
Japanese researchers who took hair samples from nearly 2,000 diagnosed autistic children, aged from birth to three, found almost half of them had a zinc deficiency.
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Diabetes shame plus denial a risky combo
msnbc.msn.com - 11-4-11
Mary Hyde, 64, recalls her mother’s response after hearing Hyde had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.
“I told you not to eat all those sweet rolls when you were a teenager.”
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Vegetarian Diet, Exercise, Reduces Diabetes Risk In African Americans
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-4-11
New research published online recently suggests that following a vegetarian diet and exercising at least three times a week significantly reduces the risk of diabetes among African Americans, who are normally twice as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes as non-Hispanic whites. You can read about the study, led by Dr Serena Tonstad, a professor at Loma Linda University in California, online in the October edition of Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases.
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Most Premature Deaths In UK Are Due To Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-4-11
New figures released today from the leading charity Cancer Research UK show that cancer is the biggest cause of premature deaths in the UK. The new analysis, based on 2009 registers, shows cancer is responsible for killing 40% of men and women in the UK who die prematurely between the ages of 25 and 74.
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Study: Legal Medical Marijuana Doesn't Encourage Kids to Smoke More Pot
healthland.time.com - 11-4-11
Despite warnings from opponents of medical marijuana, legalizing the drug for medical purposes does not encourage teens to smoke more pot, according to new research that compared rates of marijuana use in Massachusetts and Rhode Island after the latter state changed its laws.
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Signs of ageing halted in the lab
bbc.co.uk - 11-4-11
The onset of wrinkles, muscle wasting and cataracts has been delayed and even eliminated in mice, say researchers in the US.
More...


Too Much Sitting Raises Odds for Cancer: Study
healthday.com - 11-4-11
The hours Americans spend sitting may be increasing their risk for cancer, just as the time they spend exercising can reduce the risk, according to new research.
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Weighing Weight-Loss Programs
healthday.com - 11-4-11
A new British study finds that commercial weight-loss programs are more effective and less costly than primary care-based programs led by specially trained staff.
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Study Finds No Link Between Dyslexia and IQ
healthday.com - 11-4-11
A new study that found no association between dyslexia and IQ calls into question the widespread practice of classifying children as dyslexic based on differences between their reading abilities and their IQ scores, researchers report.
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Babies Understand Thought Process of Others at 10 Months Old, Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 11-4-11
New research from the University of Missouri indicates that at 10 months, babies start to understand another person's thought process, providing new insights on how humans acquire knowledge and how communication develops.
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Continuous Use of Nitroglycerin Increases Severity of Heart Attacks, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 11-4-11
When given for hours as a continuous dose, the heart medication nitroglycerin backfires -- increasing the severity of subsequent heart attacks, according to a study of the compound in rats by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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Obese teens may need more vitamin D
upi.com - 11-4-11
Obese adolescents face an increased risk for vitamin D deficiency because they absorb vitamin D less efficiently than lean teens, U.S. researchers say.
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EPA to remove rodent poison products
upi.com - 11-4-11
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it will take steps to remove 20 rodent control products from the marketplace because they contain toxic chemicals.
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Organ transplant may double cancer risk
upi.com - 11-4-11
People who get kidney, liver, heart, lung or other organ transplants have an overall cancer risk double that of the general population, U.S. researchers say.
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New device uses light to screen for melanoma, detect earlier
usatoday.com - 11-3-11
Dermatologists will soon get some high-tech help deciding which suspicious-looking moles should be removed and checked for melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.
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Doctors treat patients' superbug infections... with transplant of FAECES from a healthy relative
dailymail.co.uk - 11-3-11
It may sound bizarre but scientists have successfully treated patients suffering from a superbug with a transplant of faecal matter.
The procedure involves taking a stool sample from a healthy person - usually a close relative - mixing it with saline and transferring it into the colon of the person infected with the superbug C.diff.
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The strange eating habits of Steve Jobs
msnbc.msn.com - 11-3-11
No matter your opinion on the legacy of Steve Jobs, we can likely all agree on this: Dude had some unconventional health habits. The new biography by Walter Isaacson details some of the weirder ones, from extremely restrictive diets to questionable personal hygiene. (A personal favorite: One of his go-to stress relievers during Apple's early days was soaking his bare feet in the company toilets.)
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MDR-AB Bacteria Found In 48% Of All Patient Rooms
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-3-11
A new study has revealed that Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-AB) was found in almost half (48%) of patients rooms who were infected or colonized with the germ. The report is published in the November issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).
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16 Signs You May Have HIV
health.com - 11-3-11
Within a month or two of HIV entering the body, 40% to 90% of people experience flulike symptoms known as acute retroviral syndrome (ARS).
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Signs of ageing halted in the lab
bbc.co.uk - 11-3-11
The onset of wrinkles, muscle wasting and cataracts has been delayed and even eliminated in mice, say researchers in the US.
More...


It's Possible to Come Down With Two Flu Viruses at Once
healthday.com - 11-3-11
A rare occurrence of people becoming infected with seasonal and pandemic flu strains at the same time has been confirmed by researchers.
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Teen Pot Use Unaffected by Medical Marijuana Law: Study
healthday.com - 11-3-11
The legalization of medical marijuana in some states has raised concerns that it will increase the availability and appeal of the drug among youth, but new research suggests no such link.
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Findings Offer New Clues Into the Addicted Brain
sciencedaily.com - 11-3-11
What drives addicts to repeatedly choose drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, overeating, gambling or kleptomania, despite the risks involved? Neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have pinpointed the exact locations in the brain where calculations are made that can result in addictive and compulsive behavior.
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New Drug Shows Promise Against Multiple Sclerosis
sciencedaily.com - 11-3-11
An experimental drug called Ocrelizumab has shown promise in a Phase 2 clinical trial involving 220 people with multiple sclerosis (MS), an often debilitating, chronic autoimmune disease that affects an increasing number of people in North America. It usually strikes young adults and is more common in women than in men.
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Expert: Alcohol implicated in suicides
upi.com - 11-3-11
Teen suicide tends to be an impulsive act and alcohol can lead to an increase in that impulsiveness, a physician in Ireland said.
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Food stamp use up 62 percent in recession
upi.com - 11-3-11
The percentage of Americans receiving food stamps increased 61.2 percent between 2007, when the recession began, and 2010, U.S. researchers say.
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Loneliness may cause fitful sleep: study
reuters.com - 11-2-11
People who are lonely may be more likely to have sleepless nights, researchers said Tuesday in a study that suggests loneliness may not only cause unhappiness, it may be bad for your health.
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Could we face the return of CJD? Experts fear it may lie dormant in thousands
dailymail.co.uk - 11-2-11
Holly Mills was a lively teenager about to start university. But with her whole life ahead of her, she suddenly found herself in the grip of tragedy.
Within the space of just a few months, the gregarious 18-year-old had become so severely brain damaged that she was unable to move or communicate.
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Red wine ingredient protects against heart disease and diabetes
dailymail.co.uk - 11-2-11
An active ingredient in red wine could protect people at high risk from heart disease and diabetes, according to scientists.
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Meditation improves the immune system, research shows
telegraph.co.uk - 11-2-11
The practice - an essential part of Buddhist and Indian Yoga traditions - has entered the mainstream as people try to find ways to combat stress and improve their quality of life.
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Half of hospital rooms rife with drug-resistant bug, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 11-2-11
Nearly half of hospital rooms of patients infected with drug-resistant strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are contaminated with the bacteria, a small new survey shows. Surfaces such as bedrails, drawer handles and touchpads are particularly prone to harboring the germ.
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Deaths from painkiller overdose triple in decade
msnbc.msn.com - 11-2-11
A new government report shows the number of overdose deaths from powerful painkillers have more than tripled over a decade.
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FDA Says ADHD Medications Are OK
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-2-11
Good news for parents with over active children, the FDA confirmed that a study, which included more than one million children and young adults (2-24 years), showed that cardiovascular problems are not associated with ADHD medications.
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Social Stress During Adolescence Means Higher Risk Of Diseases Later In Life
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-2-11
According to a study published online in the Springer's journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine, adolescents who experience social and financial stress are associated with increased risk for disease, such as higher blood pressure, body weight and cholesterol levels later on in life. Dr. Per E. Gustafsson from Umea University in Sweden and his team found out that social and financial stress in youths leads to physiological problems later in life, independently of how difficult their life is in the meantime.
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Glowing brain tumour trial begins
bbc.co.uk - 11-2-11
The idea of making brain cancers glow to help surgeons operate is being tested in the UK.
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World getting more obese; U.S. No. 1
upi.com - 11-2-11
Obesity is not just a U.S. issue although Americans are still the fattest, a Gallup poll indicates.
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Chinese herb in prostate cancer trial
upi.com - 11-2-11
An ancient Chinese herbal remedy is being tested in a clinical trial as a prostate cancer treatment drug, U.S. researchers say.
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Exercise Might Help Thwart 'Obesity Gene'
healthday.com - 11-2-11
Folks genetically predisposed to obesity can reduce their odds of piling on the pounds by staying physically active, a new study suggests.
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As Few As 3 Drinks a Week May Up Breast Cancer Risk
healthday.com - 11-2-11
Women who have as few as three alcoholic drinks a week may have a moderately increased risk of developing breast cancer, a new study finds.
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Putting the Body Back Into the Mind of Schizophrenia
sciencedaily.com - 11-2-11
A study using a procedure called the rubber hand illusion has found striking new evidence that people experiencing schizophrenia have a weakened sense of body ownership and has produced the first case of a spontaneous, out-of-body experience in the laboratory.
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Older Men With Higher Testosterone Levels Lose Less Muscle Mass as They Age
sciencedaily.com - 11-2-11
A recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) found that higher levels of testosterone were associated with reduced loss of lean muscle mass in older men, especially in those who were losing weight. In these men, higher testosterone levels were also associated with less loss of lower body strength.
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U.S. Government Glossed Over Cancer Concerns As It Rolled Out Airport X-Ray Scanners
propublica.org - 11-2-11
On Sept. 23, 1998, a panel of radiation safety experts gathered at a Hilton hotel in Maryland to evaluate a new device that could detect hidden weapons and contraband. The machine, known as the Secure 1000, beamed X-rays at people to see underneath their clothing.
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Mozart may improve doctors' colon results
upi.com - 11-1-11
A U.S. study found physicians who listen to Mozart while doing colonoscopies increase their detection rates of precancerous polyps, researchers say.
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Ovarian Cancer Spread Fuelled By Abdominal Fat Cells
medicalnewstoday.com - 11-1-11
Fat cells in the omentum, a large fatty pad of tissue that drapes over the intestines in the abdomen, fuel the spread of ovarian cancer by providing nutrients and energy for rapid tumor growth, according to a new study published online in Nature Medicine at the weekend.
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Women smokers may have higher colon risk
upi.com - 11-1-11
Women are still at an elevated risk for colorectal cancer even after quitting smoking, U.S. researchers found.
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Half in U.S. have cataracts by age 65
upi.com - 11-1-11
Cataracts, the main cause of blindness among older adults, affects more than 22 million in the United States, half of those age 65 and older, a researcher says.
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Nail salons may hold hepatitis risk
upi.com - 11-1-11
Nail salon or barbershop nail files, brushes, finger bowls, foot basins, buffers, razors, clippers and scissors may transmit hepatitis, U.S. researchers say.
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Alcohol may impact gut health
upi.com - 11-1-11
Consumption of even the slightest amount of alcohol could have an impact on gut health, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Yoga Gets Women With Back Pain Moving: Study
healthday.com - 11-1-11
Another study finds that yoga classes can improve back function among people with chronic or recurrent lower back pain.
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Gender Differences: Viewing TV Coverage of Terrorism Has More Negative Effect On Women, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 11-1-11
Exposure to television coverage of terrorism causes women to lose psychological resources much more than men, which leads to negative feelings and moodiness. This has been shown in a new study, conducted at the University of Haifa and soon to be published in Anxiety, Stress & Coping, that examined the differences between men and women in a controlled experiment environment.
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Healthy Mouth Bacteria Provide Ideal Conditions for Gum Disease
sciencedaily.com - 11-1-11
Normal bacteria which live in our mouths provide the catalyst for the development of gum disease, a debilitating condition which leads to painful gums and the loosening of teeth, new research from Queen Mary, University of London has found.
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Obese People Regain Weight After Dieting Due to Hormones, Australian Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 11-1-11
Worldwide, there are more than 1.5 billion overweight adults, including 400 million who are obese. In Australia, it is estimated more than 50 per cent of women and 60 per cent of men are either overweight or obese. Although restriction of diet often results in initial weight loss, more than 80 per cent of obese dieters fail to maintain their reduced weight. Obese people may regain weight after dieting due to hormonal changes, a new study has shown.
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Blood From a Stone? No. Blood From Rice? Sure
foxnews.com - 11-1-11
Researchers in China believe they have found a way to produce and harvest large quantities of human serum albumin (HSA) -- a blood protein that is widely used in drug and vaccine production -- from ordinary grains of rice.
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Steve Jobs's last words: 'Oh wow. Oh wow. Oh wow'
guardian.co.uk - 11-1-11
The last words of the late, much-lauded and much-quoted Steve Jobs have been revealed almost a month after the Apple co-founder died at the age of 56.
Jobs, who once memorably described death as "very likely the single best invention of life", departed this world with a lingering look at his family and the simple, if mysterious, observation: "Oh wow. Oh wow. Oh wow."
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