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March, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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How healthy is your county? New report tells
msnbc.msn.com - 3-31-11
Startling differences in the health of residents living just a few miles apart are highlighted in a new health rankings report that assesses wellness in nearly all the nation's 3,000-plus counties.
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Evidence of food dye-ADHD link weak, FDA told
cnn.com - 3-31-11
A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee began weighing evidence Wednesday on whether dye additives in food affects behavior in children. The panel listened to testimony from doctors and scientists who contend that studies, although small in many cases, do show that some kids begin to show signs of hyperactivity once they are exposed to certain dye mixtures.
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Exposure to pesticides leads to poor semen quality, infertility
naturalnews.com - 3-31-11
The organochloride pesticides used every day on many conventional food crops is responsible for lowering semen quality and causing infertility, according to a new study out of Spain. Clemente Aguilar from the Medical Research Laboratory of the University Hospital San Cecilio, Granada, and several colleagues from the University of Granada, discovered that even low-level exposure to common pesticides damages sperm and leads to fertility problems.
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No Scalpel: Minimally Invasive Breakthrough for Men's Enlarged Prostates Improves Symptoms
sciencedaily.com - 3-31-11
A new interventional radiology treatment that blocks blood supply to men's enlarged prostate glands shows comparable clinical results to transurethral resection of the prostate (or TURP), considered the gold standard (or most common) treatment. However, this minimally invasive treatment -- prostatic artery embolization -- has none of the risks associated with TURP, such as sexual dysfunction, urinary incontinence, blood loss and retrograde ejaculation, noted researchers at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 36th Annual Scientific Meeting in Chicago.
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Mothers' Hard Work Pays Off With Big Brains for Their Babies
sciencedaily.com - 3-31-11
Brain growth in babies is linked to the amount of time and energy mothers 'invest', according to new research.
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54 Beneficial Compounds Discovered in Pure Maple Syrup
sciencedaily.com - 3-31-11
University of Rhode Island researcher Navindra Seeram has discovered 34 new beneficial compounds in pure maple syrup and confirmed that 20 compounds discovered last year in preliminary research play a key role in human health.
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Liver disease deaths 'higher among diabetics'
bbc.co.uk - 3-31-11
People with diabetes are 70% more likely to die from liver disease than those without the condition, according to new research.
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Praying for Others Seems to Help Anger Fade
healthday.com - 3-31-11
Saying a prayer for another person may help people control their negative emotions after being insulted by a stranger, researchers report.
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Little Oversight on Ingredients in 'Senior' Dog Food, Experts Say
healthday.com - 3-31-11
Even though most Americans might believe that "senior" dog food is formulated differently than food for young adult dogs and pups, experts say that brands can vary widely in their ingredients and there are no requirements for what goes in foods for older canines.
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Longer Breast-Feeding May Be Key to Bigger Brains
healthday.com - 3-31-11
Longer periods of pregnancy and breast-feeding in mammals are associated with larger brain growth in offspring, which explains why human babies remain dependent on their mother for so long, say researchers.
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Childhood Mental Health Woes Could Hurt Adult Romance, Finance
healthday.com - 3-31-11
Adults who experienced psychological problems during childhood tend to earn less money and are less likely to establish long-lasting relationships, a new study indicates.
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New Drug May Boost Hepatitis C Treatment
healthday.com - 3-31-11
Adding the new drug boceprevir to the current two-drug treatment for hepatitis C appears significantly more effective than the standard therapy, according to two new studies.
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Get Some Sleep: Using acupressure, yoga, tai chi
cnn.com - 3-30-11
Ten to 15% of Americans suffer from chronic insomnia, defined as the inability to get to sleep or stay asleep, or the inability to get refreshing sleep.
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Sixth study in recent months links mercury in flu shots to brain damage, autism
naturalnews.com - 3-30-11
The toxic effects of the mercury, also known in vaccines as Thimerosal, have once again been confirmed, this time by researchers from the University of Brazil. Marking the sixth major study in recent months to condemn the use of mercury in medicine, the new study reveals that mercury causes serious brain damage, and is linked to autism and other developmental diseases in children and Alzheimer's disease in adults.
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Herb fenugreek could be natural Viagra, new study finds
naturalnews.com - 3-30-11
Erectile dysfunction (ED), the politically correct term for what used to be called impotence, is the ongoing inability to maintain an erection firm enough, or that lasts long enough, for sex. A lack of sexual desire may also accompany ED.
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Mother's Obesity May Lead to Infertility in the Next Generation
sciencedaily.com - 3-30-11
Levels of the hormone ghrelin are low in obese women and a recent study accepted for publication in Endocrinology, a publication of The Endocrine Society, reports that mice whose mothers had low ghrelin levels were less fertile due to a defect in implantation.
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Human Virus Linked to Deaths of Endangered Mountain Gorillas; Finding Confirms That Serious Diseases Can Pass to Gorillas from People
sciencedaily.com - 3-30-11
For the first time, a virus that causes respiratory disease in humans has been linked to the deaths of wild mountain gorillas, reports a team of researchers in the United States and Africa.
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Deciphering Hidden Code Reveals Brain Activity
sciencedaily.com - 3-30-11
By combining sophisticated mathematical techniques more commonly used by spies instead of scientists with the power and versatility of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a Penn neurologist has developed a new approach for studying the inner workings of the brain. A hidden pattern is encoded in the seemingly random order of things presented to a human subject, which the brain reveals when observed with fMRI. The research is published in the journal NeuroImage.
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Death rates 'higher' among young adults than children
bbc.co.uk - 3-30-11
Premature deaths are now more likely to occur in adolescence and early adulthood than in childhood, a new global report claims.
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Younger, Poorer People More Prone to Problem Gambling
healthday.com - 3-30-11
Problem gambling is more common among American adults than alcohol dependence, a new study suggests.
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Some Type 1 Diabetics Seem Shielded Against Complications
healthday.com - 3-30-11
While complications from type 1 diabetes are common, they aren't inevitable. New research suggests that some people with the disease apparently have an inherent protection against serious complications, such as eye, kidney and heart disease.
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Benefits of Radiation Therapy Outweigh Risks of a Second Cancer: Study
healthday.com - 3-30-11
The odds a second cancer will develop after radiation treatment for a first cancer are relatively low, U.S. National Cancer Institute researchers report.
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AAPM: At Any Age Depression Dx Tracks Opioid Use
medpagetoday.com - 3-29-11
Teens and young adults with mental health disorders may be more likely to become chronic users of opioid drugs, according to results of a large study reported here.
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AAPM: RF Zaps Some Low Back Pain
medpagetoday.com - 3-29-11
Low back pain caused by degenerative spondylolisthesis can be successfully treated by minimally-invasive radiofrequency therapy, researchers reported here.
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Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms
health.com - 3-29-11
Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90% of those people have type 2 diabetes.
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Tonic water, white bread, painkillers - the unlikely passion killers sapping your sex drive
dailymail.co.uk - 3-29-11
As many as two million British men - and almost twice as many women - are said to suffer from low libido.
So claim the drug companies, for whom sexual problems represent a potentially huge new market; Viagra sales alone are worth £316million a year worldwide.
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New drug hope for lung cancer sufferers
telegraph.co.uk - 3-29-11
The experimental treatment aims to stop the growth of deadly tumours by blocking a protein that allows them to develop.
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More scientific evidence that antioxidants can fight cancer
naturalnews.com - 3-29-11
For the first time, scientists have discovered a genetic pathway suggesting that antioxidants may help in the treatment of cancer, according to a study conducted by researchers from Thomas Jefferson University and published in the journal Cancer Biology & Therapy.
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Whole grain cereal may help control blood pressure
usatoday.com - 3-29-11
Eating breakfast cereal - especially whole grain cereal - may reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure, a new study suggests.
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Many Elderly Men Are Undergoing Unnecessary PSA Screenings, Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 3-29-11
A new study on the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based prostate cancer screening in the United States found that many elderly men may be undergoing unnecessary prostate cancer screenings. Using data from surveys conducted in 2000 and 2005, researchers report that nearly half of men in their seventies underwent PSA screening in the past year -- almost double the screening rate of men in their early fifties, who are more likely to benefit from early prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Further, men aged 85 and older were screened just as often as men in their early fifties.
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First Identification of Nicotine as Main Culprit in Diabetes Complications Among Smokers
sciencedaily.com - 3-29-11
Scientists report the first strong evidence implicating nicotine as the main culprit responsible for persistently elevated blood sugar levels -- and the resulting increased risk of serious health complications -- in people who have diabetes and smoke. In a presentation at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), they said the discovery also may have implications for people with diabetes who are using nicotine-replacement therapy for extended periods in an attempt to stop smoking.
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Pioneering Treatment Could Help People With Severe Depression
sciencedaily.com - 3-29-11
Pioneering neurosurgical treatment, which very accurately targets brain networks involved in depression, could help people who suffer with severe and intractable depression.
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Will We Hear the Light? Surprising Discovery That Infrared Can Activate Heart and Ear Cells
sciencedaily.com - 3-29-11
University of Utah scientists used invisible infrared light to make rat heart cells contract and toadfish inner-ear cells send signals to the brain. The discovery someday might improve cochlear implants for deafness and lead to devices to restore vision, maintain balance and treat movement disorders like Parkinson's.
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Acute myeloid leukaemia genes' role discovered
bbc.co.uk - 3-29-11
Three groups of mutations which cause acute myeloid leukaemia, a cancer of the white blood cells, have been identified by scientists.
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Healthy Lifestyles Could Halve Cases of Dangerous Irregular Heartbeat
healthday.com - 3-29-11
The lives of millions of aging Americans are threatened by an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, which raises their risk for stroke. But a new report finds that the condition doesn't have to arise as often as it does.
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Medical Marijuana Might Slow Thinking Among MS Patients
healthday.com - 3-29-11
As the debate over medical marijuana use continues, a new study among multiple sclerosis patients -- who often use the drug to relieve pain and muscle spasticity -- adds to the argument that smoking pot clouds thinking skills.
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Love Study: Brain Reacts To Heartbreak Same As Physical Pain
medicalnewstoday.com - 3-29-11
Love hurts, and that is not just a saying for the broken hearted. Heartbreak is a very strange distress. It is exquisitely painful, and yet we cannot find an injury on our body. New research finds that when you reminisce about the one that got away, the brain actually triggers sensations that you also feel in times of "real" physical pain, making heartbreak truly, physically painful to add to the emotional distress it sometimes causes.
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Facebook Being Blamed For Spike In Teen Depression
wfmz.com - 3-29-11
With more than 500 million members, Facebook is one of the most popular way friends stay in touch.
But is staying connected all the time a good idea? A new report is blaming Facebook for a spike in teen depression.
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Happiness peaks in our eighties
telegraph.co.uk - 3-28-11
Traditional wisdom states that our younger years are the best of our lives, with the milestone of 40 meaning we are "over the hill" and already on the wane.
But in fact satisfaction and optimism steadily increase after middle age, easily eclipsing the earlier years and peaking as late as the eighties, according to research.
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Male hormone production occurs in the bones, study finds
naturalnews.com - 3-28-11
The bones in men's bodies serve a much greater purpose than simply the "mere assembly of inert calcified tubes," says a new study out of Columbia University. Published in the journal Cell, the study says that a skeletal hormone known as osteocalcin helps maintain proper testosterone production in males, and that this bone function ensures that germ cells successfully mature into healthy sperm.
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Obesity rates double worldwide as more countries embrace American junk foods, indoor lifestyles
naturalnews.com - 3-28-11
Worldwide rates of obesity have doubled since 1980, but levels of cholesterol and blood pressure are strikingly different between rich and poor countries, according to a study conducted by researchers from Imperial College London and published in The Lancet.
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Study: More than half of store receipts and nearly all money bills contain dangerously high levels of toxic BPA
naturalnews.com - 3-28-11
Avoiding exposure to Bisphenol-A (BPA), the endocrine-disrupting plastics chemical linked to reproductive problems and other serious health issues, means more than just drinking out of BPA-free bottles and limiting consumption of canned foods. A new study put out by the Washington Toxics Coalition (WTC) says that more than half of store receipts are coated in large amounts of powdered BPA - and nearly all dollar bills contain BPA residue.
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Walnuts Are Top Nut for Heart-Healthy Antioxidants
sciencedaily.com - 3-28-11
A new scientific study positions walnuts in the number one slot among a family of foods that lay claim to being among Mother Nature's most nearly perfect packaged foods: Tree and ground nuts. In a report given in Anaheim, California at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society on March 27, scientists presented an analysis showing that walnuts have a combination of more healthful antioxidants and higher quality antioxidants than any other nut.
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Nicotine Raises Blood Sugar Levels in Lab
healthday.com - 3-28-11
Smoking is damaging to everyone's health, but the nicotine in cigarettes may be even more deadly for people who have diabetes.
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Japan workers pulled out of reactor, as radiation soars
bbc.co.uk - 3-27-11
Reports from Japan say radioactivity in water at reactor 2 at the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant is 10 million times the usual level.
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Study Highlights How Moms' Depression, Anger Stresses Kids
healthday.com - 3-27-11
Even very young children can get stressed by depressed parents who display negative emotions toward them, researchers confirm.
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Stress May Alter Gut Bacteria to Hinder Immune System
healthday.com - 3-27-11
Researchers have found that stress can alter the balance of bacteria that live in the intestine, leading to immune system problems.
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Interest in Toys May Predict Success of Autism Home Therapy
healthday.com - 3-27-11
The level of interest toddlers with early signs of autism show in toys may predict how well they will respond to a parent-guided treatment program, a new study suggests.
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Natural tree compound effective at treating MRSA, skin cancer
naturalnews.com - 3-27-11
It is often considered to be a "trash tree" by farmers who fight to eliminate it in order to protect the viability of their land. But the Eastern Red Cedar contains certain powerful compounds that fight methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the deadly hospital "superbug" that is resistant to most antibiotics, according to a new report.
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Cookware chemicals disrupt hormones, lead to early menopause, study finds
naturalnews.com - 3-27-11
The type of cookware you use can make all the difference in determining the health of you and your family. Researchers from West Virginia University (WVU) recently found that perfluorocarbons (PFCs), an artificial chemical commonly used in non-stick cookware, can disrupt hormonal balance and lead to early menopause in women.
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Fukushima engineer confesses to participating in criminal coverup, says flawed steel in Reactor 4 has always
naturalnews.com - 3-27-11
Just days after the 9.1 mega-earthquake and tsunami hit off the east cost of Japan, a former employee of Hitachi Ltd. (6501) came forward saying that he helped cover up a flawed steel protective vessel that was installed in the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Reactor 4 core in 1974. Mitsuhiko Tanaka told Bloomberg that the defective steel in the $250 million vessel was a very serious "time bomb" just waiting to go off, as it represents the key protective unit for the reactor's core.
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'Genes for pre-eclampsia' discovered
bbc.co.uk - 3-27-11
Scientists say they have identified genetic errors that appear to increase a pregnant woman's chance of getting the potentially life-threatening condition called pre-eclampsia.
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'Elephant in Living Room' Warns About Exotic Pets
abcnews.go.com - 3-26-11
Two lion cubs -- Lambert and then Lacey -- filled the hole in Terry Brumfield's heart after the Piketon, Ohio, truck driver was seriously injured in an accident and slipped into a deep depression.
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Pulling an All-Nighter Can Bring on Euphoria and Risky Behavior
sciencedaily.com - 3-26-11
A sleepless night can make us cranky and moody. But a lesser known side effect of sleep deprivation is short-term euphoria, which can potentially lead to poor judgment and addictive behavior, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.
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BrainGate Neural Interface System Reaches 1,000-Day Performance Milestone
sciencedaily.com - 3-26-11
Demonstrating an important milestone for the longevity and utility of implanted brain-computer interfaces, a woman with tetraplegia using the investigational BrainGate system continued to control a computer cursor accurately through neural activity alone more than 1,000 days after receiving the BrainGate implant, according to a team of physicians, scientists, and engineers developing and testing the technology at Brown University, the Providence VA Medical Center, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).
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Laughter, Music May Lower Blood Pressure, Study Says
healthday.com - 3-26-11
Laughter and music not only lift the mood, they might also drop blood pressure among middle-aged adults, a new study suggests.
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Two-thirds of alcohol wipes contaminated with bacteria
msnbc.msn.com - 3-25-11
Two-thirds of tested samples of alcohol prep pads tied to a massive recall, serious infections and death were contaminated with dangerous bacteria, including tainted products from eight of 10 separate lots, according to a new government report.
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Pecans promote heart health, lower cholesterol levels
naturalnews.com - 3-25-11
The health benefits offered by pecans are greater than previously believed, according to a new study published in The Journal of Nutrition. Researchers from Loma Linda University (LLU) in California have identified a host of beneficial antioxidants found in pecans that benefit the heart, lower bad cholesterol levels, and protect against disease-causing inflammation.
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New study - Chinese herbal medicine may treat cancer and rheumatoid arthritis
naturalnews.com - 3-25-11
For centuries, traditional Chinese healers have used a medicinal plant usually called thunder god vine, or lei gong teng, as a therapy for a host of health problems including rheumatoid arthritis. Now, in a new report just published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, scientists from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have revealed there is solid evidence the plant (known by the botanical name Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F) has potential anti-tumor and other healing properties -- and they think they now know how it works. Thunder god vine (lei gong teng) contains compounds that help control the "machinery" of genes on the cellular level.
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The deep psychology behind your health
naturalnews.com - 3-25-11
The relationship between psychological health and physical health has long been established. Even most medical doctors today warn against the dangers of mental stress that flows from overwork, chronic family conflict, unhealthy compensating or general maladjustment to the demands of life. This is old news.
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Plant Oil May Hold Key to Reducing Obesity-Related Medical Issues, Researcher Finds
sciencedaily.com - 3-25-11
Scientists have known for years that belly fat leads to serious medical problems, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and stroke. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found a plant oil that may be able to reduce belly fat in humans.
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Novel Immune Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer Developed
sciencedaily.com - 3-25-11
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center have discovered a novel way of treating pancreatic cancer by activating the immune system to destroy the cancer's scaffolding. The strategy was tested in a small cohort of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, several of whose tumors shrank substantially. The team believes their findings -- and the novel way in which they uncovered them -- could lead to quicker, less expensive cancer drug development.
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High Levels of PFCs Might Bring Early Menopause
healthday.com - 3-25-11
Women with higher levels of certain chemicals used in many household products have lower levels of estrogen and are more likely to experience early menopause, a new study finds.
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'Mini Strokes' Linked to Doubled Heart Attack Risk: Study
healthday.com - 3-25-11
Having a "mini stroke," known as a transient-ischemic attack (TIA), appears to double the risk for a heart attack later, according to Mayo Clinic researchers.
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More Added Sugars, More Pounds?
healthday.com - 3-25-11
As Americans' intake of sugars added to processed and home-cooked foods rises, so, too, does body weight, according to a study that followed Minnesota residents for 27 years.
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Short Course of Hormone Therapy Boosts Prostate Cancer Survival: Study
healthday.com - 3-25-11
Just six months of hormone therapy, along with radiation, cuts the risk of dying from locally advanced prostate cancer in half when compared to radiation alone, researchers report.
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Drug-Resistant 'Super Bug' Hits LA County Hospitals, Nursing Homes
losangeles.cbslocal.com - 3-25-11
A deadly drug-resistant bacteria is spreading to more patients in nursing and long-term care facilities in Los Angeles County, according to local health officials.
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Quality of life more important than length of time left
telegraph.co.uk - 3-24-11
The majority surveyed in a Europe-wide poll said being in pain would be their biggest concern if they knew they were going to die, ahead of becoming a burden on others.
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Study: 700,000 people, mostly children, end up in ER every year for pharmaceutical drug poisoning
naturalnews.com - 3-24-11
Besides motor vehicle accidents, the second leading cause of injury death in the US is drug-related poisoning, according to a new study published in The American Journal of Emergency Medicine. The study indicates that nearly 700,000 people end up in emergency rooms (ER) every year from pharmaceutical drug poisoning -- and most of these visits involve young children.
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Omega 3s significantly reduce risk of macular degeneration
naturalnews.com - 3-24-11
Loading up on omega-3 fatty acids can significantly reduce your risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a new report published in the journal Archives of Ophthalmology. Data indicates that among women consuming varying levels of omega-3s, those getting the most are 38 percent less likely to develop the eye disease than those getting the least.
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Arthritis Drug Could Help Beat Melanoma Skin Cancer, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 3-24-11
A breakthrough discovery by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Children's Hospital Boston promises an effective new treatment for one of the deadliest forms of cancer.
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Bees Could Reveal Key to Dementia
sciencedaily.com - 3-24-11
Norwegian researcher Gro Amdam has succeeded in reversing the aging process in the bee brain -- findings which she believes may bring hope to people with dementia.
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Drug Prevents Type 2 Diabetes in Majority of High-Risk Individuals
sciencedaily.com - 3-24-11
A pill taken once a day in the morning prevented type 2 diabetes in more than 70 percent of individuals whose obesity, ethnicity and other markers put them at highest risk for the disease, U.S. scientists report.
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Sexual preference chemical found in mice
bbc.co.uk - 3-24-11
A chemical in the brain controls sexual preference in mice, according to scientists in China.
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Genes' 'On/Off' Switches Yield Clues to Breast Cancer
healthday.com - 3-24-11
Scientists may have developed a new way of predicting when breast cancer will spread.
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Study: Most obese moms, kids underestimate their weight
cnn.com - 3-24-11
Roughly two-thirds of adults and one-third of children in the U.S. are now overweight or obese. Aside from contributing to rising rates of diabetes and other chronic illnesses, this widespread weight problem also appears to be changing our perception of what's considered heavy.
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Americans' Exposure to Mercury From Fish Won't Harm Hearts: Study
healthday.com - 3-23-11
Though repeatedly linked to neurological deficits in children and unborn babies, Americans' level of exposure to mercury from sources such as fish is not associated with a higher risk of heart disease, stroke or other cardiovascular disease, a new study suggests.
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FDA Bans Milk, Vegetable, Fruits From Nuclear Plant Crisis-Affected Areas in Japan
abcnews.go.com - 3-23-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said today it will stop all milk products and vegetable and fruit products imported from the Japan's prefectures of Fukushima, Ibaraki, Tochigi and Gunma from entering the U.S. -- a response to public fears about radiation from Japan's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.
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Sprouts: An ideal emergency preparedness food
naturalnews.com - 3-23-11
Given the rapidity with which critical global events are unfolding, preparedness just makes good sense. The question isn't whether or not to be prepared - it's what to be prepared for? Earthquakes, nuclear accidents, tsunamis, power outages and gasoline shortages have been on this week's menu. Each, of course, has its own specific type of preparedness protocols. But, no matter what kind of unexpected event looms large, there is always a need for food. Food shortages could result from any of the aforementioned potential scenarios, as well as from any number of scenarios that I haven't mentioned. There are any number of ways to approach food shortage preparedness, but my preferred method is sprouts! Sprouts are, in my mind, the number one, perfect survival ration. I think that sprouting seeds belong in every household's emergency kit. Let's look at some of the reasons that I think this.
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USDA refuses to enforce organic standards, allows synthetic omega-3s in Horizon organic milk
naturalnews.com - 3-23-11
The US Department of Agriculture is once again deliberately shirking its responsibility to properly oversee the integrity of the certified organic program. After admitting in a recent letter that a chemically-derived, synthetic omega-3 fatty acid additive produced by Martek Biosciences Corporation is not legitimately organic, the USDA also said it does not plan to take any enforcement action against companies that use it in certified organic products. The Cornucopia Institute (CI), a leading organic industry watchdog, continues to call the USDA out on the matter, exposing the fact that the additive not only has a questionable safety record, but also does not belong in any organic product.
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Stress Affects the Balance of Bacteria in the Gut and Immune Response
sciencedaily.com - 3-23-11
Stress can change the balance of bacteria that naturally live in the gut, according to research published this month in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity.
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Spinal Cord Processes Information Just as Areas of Brain Do, Research Finds
sciencedaily.com - 3-23-11
Patrick Stroman's work mapping the function and information processing of the spinal cord could improve treatment for spinal cord injuries.
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Forensics: Overweight People Really Are Big-Boned
sciencedaily.com - 3-23-11
One of the blind spots in forensic science, particularly in identifying unknown remains, is the inability of experts to determine how much an individual weighed based on his or her skeleton. New research from North Carolina State University moves us closer to solving this problem by giving forensic experts valuable insight into what the shape of the femur can tell us about the weight of an individual.
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Poor Diet Linked to Early Signs of Heart Risks in Obese Kids
healthday.com - 3-23-11
Obesity often saddles teenagers with a wide variety of conditions that boost the risk of heart disease, such as inflammation, insulin resistance and signs of trouble in the metabolic system, a small new study suggests.
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Fiber May Lessen Lifetime Risk for Heart Problems
healthday.com - 3-23-11
New research suggests that middle-age and younger adults who eat high amounts of fiber are less likely to suffer from heart disease over their lives.
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Whole Grain Cereal May Help Control Blood Pressure
healthday.com - 3-23-11
Eating breakfast cereal -- especially whole grain cereal -- may reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure, a new study suggests.
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Study: Infrequent Sex Can Raise Risk of Heart Attack, Death
healthday.com - 3-23-11
People who engage in physical activity only once in a while -- and that includes sex -- have a higher risk of suffering a heart attack or sudden cardiac death, at least in the one or two hours right after they've exerted themselves, experts say.
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Hearing loss 'incredibly common' as Boomers grow older
usatoday.com - 3-22-11
Those heady nights of cranking up the stereo and rocking out to the loudest music bearable may be over for many Baby Boomers, but the fallout - age-related hearing loss - may be just beginning.
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A Dose of Safflower Oil Each Day Might Help Keep Heart Disease at Bay
sciencedaily.com - 3-22-11
A daily dose of safflower oil, a common cooking oil, for 16 weeks can improve such health measures as good cholesterol, blood sugar, insulin sensitivity and inflammation in obese postmenopausal women who have Type 2 diabetes, according to new research.
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Major Clue in Long-Term Memory-Making
sciencedaily.com - 3-22-11
You may remember the color of your loved one's eyes for years. But how? Scientists believe that long-term potentiation (LTP) -- the long-lasting increase of signals across a connection between brain cells -- underlies our ability to remember over time and to learn, but how that happens is a central question in neuroscience.
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Spacebound Bacteria Inspire Earthbound Remedies
sciencedaily.com - 3-22-11
Recent research aboard the Space Shuttle is giving scientists a better understanding of how infectious disease occurs in space and could someday improve astronaut health and provide novel treatments for people on Earth.
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Could a Type of Ear Infection Help Make Kids Obese?
healthday.com - 3-22-11
New research hints at a surprising culprit for excess weight gain in kids: a certain type of ear infection.
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Richer White Women More Prone to Melanoma, Study Finds
healthday.com - 3-22-11
Affluent young white women -- who presumably have more opportunities for tanning -- are nearly six times as likely to develop the lethal skin cancer melanoma as their poorest counterparts, a new study indicates.
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War on drugs has failed, say former heads of MI5, CPS and BBC
telegraph.co.uk - 3-21-11
The "war on drugs" has failed and should be abandoned in favour of evidence-based policies that treat addiction as a health problem, according to prominent public figures including former heads of MI5 and the Crown Prosecution Service.
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More scientific proof for folk remedies: tansy is a natural anti-viral herpes treatment
naturalnews.com - 3-21-11
While many mainstream doctors still scoff at the idea that traditional, natural healing modalities -- including therapies with plants -- could actually work, hard scientific evidence is accumulating which proves the medicinal properties of plants. For example, NaturalNews recently reported on a study showing that the common weed milkweed can completely cure many skin cancers(http://www.naturalnews.com/031339_m...). Now comes word from UK and Spanish scientists that another plant long used in folk medicine, tansy, can treat herpes.
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Cancer on the rise globally as developing nations eat American foods and use American products
naturalnews.com - 3-21-11
Cancer rates are increasing worldwide but especially in economically developing countries, according to a report released by the American Cancer Society in honor of World Cancer Day and published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.
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Major Clue in Long-Term Memory-Making
sciencedaily.com - 3-21-11
You may remember the color of your loved one's eyes for years. But how? Scientists believe that long-term potentiation (LTP) -- the long-lasting increase of signals across a connection between brain cells -- underlies our ability to remember over time and to learn, but how that happens is a central question in neuroscience.
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Masked Fears: Are Fears That Are Seemingly Overcome Only Hidden?
sciencedaily.com - 3-21-11
Fear is a natural part of our emotional life and acts as a necessary protection mechanism. However, fears sometimes grow beyond proportions and become difficult to shed. Scientists from Freiburg, Basel and Bordeaux have used computer simulations to understand the processes within the brain during the formation and extinction of fears.
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Protein found in brain cells may be key to autism
bbc.co.uk - 3-21-11
Scientists have shown how a single protein may trigger autistic spectrum disorders by stopping effective communication between brain cells.
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Outgrowing Milk Allergy May Take Some Babies Longer Than Expected
healthday.com - 3-21-11
Children may not be outgrowing their allergy to milk as quickly as experts previously have believed.
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Firstborn Kids Seem to Have More Food Allergies, Hay Fever
healthday.com - 3-21-11
Firstborn children may be more likely to suffer from certain types of allergies, finds a new study.
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Study Ties Asthma to Higher Odds for Diabetes, Heart Disease
healthday.com - 3-21-11
People with asthma may have a higher risk of developing diabetes and heart disease, according to a new study that looked at the relationship between asthma and four other inflammatory conditions.
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Technique to deliver drugs directly to the brain developed that could help Alzheimer's sufferers
dailymail.co.uk - 3-21-11
Scientists have developed a new way to deliver drugs directly to the brain, raising hopes that more effective treatments could be used to help Alzheimer’s disease sufferers.
Any attempt to get drugs into the brain is hampered by the blood-brain barrier - the natural defence against potentially harmful chemicals floating around the body.
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Rationing and chores... How Fifties woman was so much healthier than us
dailymail.co.uk - 3-21-11
Their diets suffered under rationing – and they certainly knew less about the dangers of smoking. But women were still healthier in the Fifties than they are today, researchers say.
Although they ate more saturated fat and were more likely to smoke, they took far more exercise – largely because household chores were more onerous – which meant their hearts were healthier.
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Easter eggs cost up to 140% more this year, thanks to the soaring price of chocolate
dailymail.co.uk - 3-21-11
Easter eggs are costing up to 140 per cent more this year because of the soaring price of chocolate.
On average, buyers must shell out 21 per cent more for treats compared with last year, but price rises for some popular brands are much higher.
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Prescription Drugs: The Heath Ledger Effect
abcnews.go.com - 3-20-11
Combining drugs can turn deadly. One drug may alter another's breakdown rate or amplify its effects. "Even if some of the desired effects—such as pain relief—are synergistic, all drugs have negative side effects too. And synergistic side effects can be deadly," says Ellen Unterwald, Ph.D., director of the center for substance abuse at Temple University school of medicine.
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Natural molasses treatment works just as well as toxic methyl bromide at mitigating weeds and pests, says USDA
naturalnews.com - 3-20-11
For many decades, farmers have used methyl bromide, a highly-toxic fumigant, as an agricultural treatment to eliminate weeds, pests, and harmful pathogens. But now, scientists from the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) have found an alternative solution that works just as well as methyl bromide -- molasses, chicken litter, and natural anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD).
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Tai Chi Beats Back Depression in the Elderly, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 3-20-11
The numbers are, well, depressing: More than 2 million people age 65 and older suffer from depression, including 50 percent of those living in nursing homes. The suicide rate among white men over 85 is the highest in the country -- six times the national rate.
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Severe Eczema Linked to Lasting Milk, Egg Allergy in Kids
healthday.com - 3-20-11
Children with more severe cases of the skin condition known as eczema are less likely than others to outgrow their milk or egg allergy, the results of a new study suggest.
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Outgrowing Milk Allergy May Take Some Babies Longer Than Expected
healthday.com - 3-20-11
Children may not be outgrowing their allergy to milk as quickly as experts previously have believed.
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Beware of 'fake' potassium iodide: FDA
cnn.com - 3-19-11
In the wake of the crisis in Japan, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is advising consumers to beware of inadvertently buying fake iodide products that are supposed to help protect against radiation.
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Understanding Radiation Sickness: What Can Happen in the Worst Case?
abcnews.go.com - 3-19-11
As the situation at Japan's nuclear reactors continues to deteriorate, many in Japan and around the world are confronting real fears about the effects of radiation.
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Allergies? Pollen Also Appears Outside Flowering Season
sciencedaily.com - 3-19-11
Researchers from the University of Extremadura (Spain) have shown that the pollen levels of certain plants, such as grasses and cupressaceae, can appear before or after the peak moment of flowering. This phenomenon is caused by the "resuspension" of pollen, and its dispersal over large distances, and this is of great use in predicting allergies.
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New Insight Into the Brain's Ability to Reorganize Itself
sciencedaily.com - 3-19-11
When Geoffrey Murphy, Ph.D., talks about plastic structures, he's not talking about the same thing as Mr. McGuire in The Graduate. To Murphy, an associate professor of molecular and integrative physiology at the University of Michigan Medical School, plasticity refers to the brain's ability to change as we learn.
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Tuberculosis vaccine target found
bbc.co.uk - 3-19-11
A protein which could be targeted for a tuberculosis vaccine has been discovered by scientists at Imperial College London.
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Trace Amounts of Radiation Reach California; No Health Risk, Experts Say
healthday.com - 3-19-11
Trace amounts of radiation apparently from the crippled nuclear power plant in Japan have started to reach California, but they pose no health risks, according to news reports.
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MOX plutonium fuel used in Fukushima's Unit 3 reactor two million times more deadly than enriched uranium
naturalnews.com - 3-18-11
Largely absent from most mainstream media reports on the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster is the fact that a highly-dangerous "mixed-oxide" (MOX) fuel in present in six percent of the fuel rods at the plant's Unit 3 reactor. Why is MOX a big deal? According to the Nuclear Information Resource Center (NIRS), this plutonium-uranium fuel mixture is far more dangerous than typical enriched uranium -- a single milligram (mg) of MOX is as deadly as 2,000,000 mg of normal enriched uranium.
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Self-Administered Light Therapy May Improve Cognitive Function After Traumatic Brain Injury
sciencedaily.com - 3-18-11
At-home, daily application of light therapy via light-emitting diodes (LEDs) placed on the forehead and scalp led to improvements in cognitive function and post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with a traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a groundbreaking study published in Photomedicine and Laser Surgery, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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A Mutation Causing Wrinkled Skin of Shar-Pei Dogs Is Linked to Periodic Fever Disorder
sciencedaily.com - 3-18-11
An international investigation has uncovered the genetics of the Shar-Pei dog's characteristic wrinkled skin. The researchers, led by scientists at Uppsala University and the Broad Institute, have connected this mutation to a periodic fever disorder and they propose that the findings could have important human health implications.
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Depression Drugs -- SSRIs -- May Reorganize Brain Plasticity, New Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 3-18-11
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) such as Prozac are regularly used to treat severe anxiety and depression. They work by immediately increasing the amount of serotonin in the brain and by causing long term changes in brain function. However it can take weeks of treatment before a patient feels any effect and both beneficial effects and side effects can persist after treatment is stopped.
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Whey Protein May Help Build Muscles
webmd.com - 3-17-11
Eating whey protein may help build muscle mass even if the dairy substance is taken a day after a workout session, a new study indicates.
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ADHD May Boost Creativity in Adults
webmd.com - 3-17-11
An attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis can make many aspects of learning more challenging for children and teens, but some adults with ADHD show signs of enhanced creativity, a study suggests.
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Why Some Microbial Genes Are More Promiscuous Than Others
sciencedaily.com - 3-17-11
While most organisms get their genes from their parents just like people do, bacteria and other single-celled creatures also regularly pick up genes from more distant relatives. This ability to 'steal' snippets of DNA from other species -- known as lateral gene transfer -- is responsible for the rapid spread of drug resistance among disease-causing bacteria.
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'Ivory Wave' May Be New Legal High After 'Miaow Miaow' (Mephedrone) Ban
sciencedaily.com - 3-17-11
A new legal high has emerged that seems to be replacing the banned substance mephedrone or "miaow miaow," warns a critical care paramedic in Emergency Medicine Journal.
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Neuro Signals Study Gives New Insight Into Brain Disorders
sciencedaily.com - 3-17-11
Research into how the brain transmits messages to other parts of the body could improve understanding of disorders such as epilepsy, dementia, multiple sclerosis and stroke.
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Zooming in on the Weapons of Salmonella
sciencedaily.com - 3-17-11
Some of the most dreaded diseases in the world such as plague, typhoid and cholera are caused by bacteria that have one thing in common: they possess an infection apparatus which is a nearly unbeatable weapon. When attacking a cell of the body, they develop numerous hollow-needle-shaped structures that project from the bacterial surface. Through these needles, the bacteria inject signal substances into the host cells, which re-program the latter and thereby overcome their defense. From this time on it's easy game for the pathogens; they can invade the cells unimpeded and in large numbers.
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Gene therapy 'treats' Parkinson's disease
bbc.co.uk - 3-17-11
Treating Parkinson's disease with gene therapy has been shown to be successful in clinical trials for the first time, say US researchers.
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Less Is More With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Drug
healthday.com - 3-17-11
A lower dose of the drug cytarabine work as well as the high doses that are typically used to treat acute myeloid leukemia, and with fewer side effects, a new Dutch study finds.
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When Nurse Staffing Drops, Mortality Rates Rise: Study
healthday.com - 3-17-11
When nurse staffing levels fell below target levels in a large hospital, more patients died, a new study discovered.
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Japan's Nuke Disaster Unlikely to Threaten U.S., Experts Say
healthday.com - 3-16-11
Although remnants of the tsunami that devastated the nuclear complex in Japan did manage to reach America's shores, it's highly unlikely that any radiation from the unfolding disaster across the Pacific Ocean will make it to North America, experts say.
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Iodine supplement supplies wiped out by nuclear fallout fear - here are the foods that contain high levels of natural iodine
naturalnews.com - 3-16-11
It's happening everywhere now: Potassium Iodide supplements are getting wiped out as people concerned about the possibility of radiation fallout are purchasing them for their own protection. Yesterday evening, we posted a story about an alternative source of iodine -- Nascent Iodine -- and now it has been completely sold out everywhere in North America, too. (Our store was sold out within minutes and now the product is back-ordered with 1,000 more bottles arriving on Monday and another 1,000 four days later.) The U.S. Surgeon General has even publicly supported the idea of buying potassium iodide as a "precaution" in case the radioactive fallout reaches the United States.
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Iodine for Radiation Exposure: Practical Solutions You Need to Know
naturalnews.com - 3-16-11
It is an especially important moment for parents around the world to sit up and take notice of what they will need to do to protect their children against the toxicities that are threatening them from many sources. Now we have a nuclear energy plant with four reactors going completely out of control and medical and health officials are out to lunch. They have no idea about chemical, heavy metal and radiation toxicities believing idiotically as they do, that low levels are safe when we know perfectly well, through hard science, that that is not the case. With the disaster in Japan getting worse by the day parents all over the northern hemisphere need to going rush to get iodine into their medical cabinets right now.
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Insulin-Releasing Switch Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 3-16-11
Johns Hopkins researchers believe they have uncovered the molecular switch for the secretion of insulin -- the hormone that regulates blood sugar -- providing for the first time an explanation of this process. In a report published online March 1 in Cell Metabolism, the researchers say the work solves a longtime mystery and may lead to better treatments for type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease.
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Study reveals lymph node removal surgery useless for many breast cancer patients
naturalnews.com - 3-16-11
The common practice of removing the lymph nodes of breast cancer patients does nothing to reduce the rate of cancer recurrence, according to a study conducted by researchers from the John Wayne Cancer Institute and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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Unprecedented View of Protein Folding May Help Develop Brain Disease Therapies
sciencedaily.com - 3-16-11
When vital proteins in our bodies are misfolded, debilitating diseases can result. If researchers could see the folding happen, they might be able to design treatments for some of these diseases or even keep them from occurring. But many of our most critical proteins are folded, hidden from sight, inside tiny molecular chambers. Now researchers at Stanford have gotten the first-ever peek inside one of these protein-folding chambers as the folding happened, and the folding mechanism they saw surprised them.
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A Good Sense of Smell Is More a Product of Training Than Good Genes
sciencedaily.com - 3-16-11
Do you need to be an expert to have a good nose? It turns out the answer is yes! Having a good nose is not something we are born with, but instead just a matter of training.
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Almost 15 Million Americans Now Caring for Loved One With Alzheimer's
healthday.com - 3-16-11
Nearly 15 million Americans are caring for someone with Alzheimer's or another form of dementia, and the number is rising, according to a report released Tuesday.
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Whether Chronic Diseases Are Diagnosed May Depend on Where You Live
healthday.com - 3-16-11
The likelihood of Medicare patients being diagnosed with a chronic disease may depend on where they live, a disparity that makes it more difficult to assess the quality of care patients receive, a new study finds.
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Want to keep your heart and lungs healthy? Don't sit next to the photocopier
dailymail.co.uk - 3-15-11
The main trigger for a heart attack is not vigorous exercise or stress — it’s air pollution, according to a study published in The Lancet this month.
Researchers found spending time in traffic, whether as a driver or pedestrian, tops the list of 'last straw' risk factors that bring on a heart attack.
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The dark side of white teeth: DIY whiteners can be dangerously addictive, cause chemical burns and leave teeth yellower than before
dailymail.co.uk - 3-15-11
When my five-year-old son suddenly exclaimed: ‘Why are your teeth so dirty, Mummy?’, I knew it was time to do something.
Years of drinking coffee and red wine had left my teeth stained and grey. It had bothered me — I’d started wearing only dark tops (white made my teeth look lemon-yellow) and grimacing at friends through closed lips.
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Eating fish can reduce risk of blindness
telegraph.co.uk - 3-15-11
Research shows that eating omega-3 fatty acids – most commonly found in oily fish such as tinned salmon and tuna – can help prevent the onset of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition that leads to the gradual loss of vision.
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Mediterranean diet reduces risk of metabolic syndromeMediterranean diet reduces risk of metabolic syndrome
usatoday.com - 3-15-11
The Mediterranean diet, long known to be heart-healthy, also reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that boost the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, according to a new review.
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Watch out for toxic ingredients in sunscreen
naturalnews.com - 3-15-11
The majority of sunscreens are toxic, environmental groups have warned.
"You want to look out for sunscreens with oxybenzone," said Jane Houlihan of the Environmental Working Group.
Research has implicated oxybenzone as a likely carcinogen, as well as a chemical that is probably absorbed into the body.
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Untested nanoparticles showing up in thousands of consumer products
naturalnews.com - 3-15-11
Since 2006, the use of nanoparticles in consumer products has skyrocketed by over 600 percent. Nanotechnologies, which involve the manipulation of elements and other matter on the atomic and molecular scale, are now used in over 1,300 commercial and consumer products. And that number is expected to jump nearly three-fold by 2020. But are these nanoparticles safe for humans and the environment, particularly when used in food-related applications?
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Mass honeybee deaths now occurring worldwide, says UN
naturalnews.com - 3-15-11
For several decades, colony collapse disorder (CCD) -- a mysterious condition where entire bee colonies die for seemingly no obvious reason -- has been inflicting bee populations across both Europe and the US. But scientists from the United Nations (UN) say the phenomenon is now a global crisis, afflicting bees across China, Japan, and Africa, as well as in other places.
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Multiple Taste Cell Sensors Contribute to Detecting Sugars
sciencedaily.com - 3-15-11
A new research study dramatically increases knowledge of how taste cells detect sugars, a key step in developing strategies to limit overconsumption. Scientists from the Monell Center and collaborators have discovered that taste cells have several additional sugar detectors other than the previously known sweet receptor.
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Multiple Taste Cell Sensors Contribute to Detecting Sugars
sciencedaily.com - 3-15-11
A new research study dramatically increases knowledge of how taste cells detect sugars, a key step in developing strategies to limit overconsumption. Scientists from the Monell Center and collaborators have discovered that taste cells have several additional sugar detectors other than the previously known sweet receptor.
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Mental Decline May Start Years Before Alzheimer's
healthday.com - 3-15-11
When Alzheimer's disease actually starts is often not clear, but it now appears that it may be preceded by rapid cognitive decline for up to six years before it becomes evident, a new study suggests.
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Reactor Disaster Poses Health Risks
medpagetoday.com - 3-14-11
The steam plume drifting from the Fukushima, Japan, nuclear plant that exploded after Friday's 8.9-magnitude earthquake and the looming possibility of a meltdown there have U.S. scientists warning of possible serious health risks.
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Could breastfeeding make baby brighter? Just four weeks on mother's milk can benefit brain
dailymail.co.uk - 3-14-11
Babies who are breastfed grow up to be more intelligent, scientists suggested yesterday.
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She's a lifesaver: Meet Lilly, the cat that can predict epileptic fits
dailymail.co.uk - 3-14-11
After suffering an unusually severe epileptic fit, Nathan Cooper came within a whisker of death – but was saved by his cat Lilly.
For Lilly is also a highly sensitive medical early warning system.
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Stem cell injection 'reverses glaucoma'
telegraph.co.uk - 3-14-11
Scientists at Cambridge University believe the technique, which uses stem cells, could even cure blindness one day.
They have already had success in rats and hope to start trials in humans within five years.
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FDA grants monopoly over preterm labor prevention drug: 15,000 percent price increase then announced
naturalnews.com - 3-14-11
Still think the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has your best interests in mind? According to new reports, the agency has arbitrarily decided to grant exclusive approval to KV Pharmaceutical to produce the one-and-only FDA-approved premature birth prevention drug -- which is really just a modified, patented version of the common hormone progesterone -- administered to women with a high risk of preterm delivery. So what used to cost women as little as $10 to buy from their local compounding pharmacy will now cost $1,500, thanks to the FDA.
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Help support those devastated by the massive quake, tsunami in Japan
naturalnews.com - 3-14-11
By now, most everyone is aware of the massive and devastating 8.9 earthquake that recently hit off the east coast city of Honshu, Japan, and the monstrous tsunami that followed. Combined with continuing aftershocks and several other earthquake incidents that occurred both before and after what has been dubbed the biggest earthquake to hit Japan in recorded history, much of the nation has been left in ruin. Homes and businesses have been leveled, and many people are missing, injured, or dead. These people need our help, and if you feel compelled to help support emergency aid efforts in Japan, NaturalNews has a few trustworthy options you may want to consider.
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Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
healthday.com - 3-14-11
With spring allergy season looming, people need to know the facts about controlling their allergies, says the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.
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Crisis Worsens at Crippled Nuke Plant in Japan: Reports
healthday.com - 3-14-11
The crisis at earthquake-ravaged Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex continued to worsen Sunday, as government officials acknowledged the threat of multiple meltdowns at the site's three reactors, and more than 200,000 people were evacuated from the area to avoid radiation contamination, according to news reports.
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TSA to retest airport body scanners for radiation
usatoday.com - 3-13-11
The Transportation Security Administration announced Friday that it would retest every full-body X-ray scanner that emits ionizing radiation - 247 machines at 38 airports - after maintenance records on some of the devices showed radiation levels 10 times higher than expected.
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U.S. Has Highest Bipolar Rate in 11-Nation Study
health.com - 3-13-11
About 2.4% of people around the world have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder at some point in their lifetime, according to the first comprehensive international figures on the topic.
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More Caution Needed in Translating Early Research
medpagetoday.com - 3-13-11
The pattern of boom-and-bust in bringing novel therapeutics to market may have something to do with the way researchers translate their results from preclinical to clinical studies, two ethicists suggest.
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Molecules Work the Day Shift to Protect the Liver from Accumulating Fat
sciencedaily.com - 3-13-11
The liver normally makes and stores fat, which is required in moderation for normal body function. However, if the process goes awry, excess fat in the liver can cause major liver damage. In fact, fatty liver is a leading cause of liver failure in the United States, and is often brought on by obesity and diabetes. In turn, the increasing prevalence of these diseases has brought with it an epidemic of liver disease.
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Americans Have Higher Rates of Most Chronic Diseases Than Same-Age Counterparts in England
sciencedaily.com - 3-12-11
Researchers have announced in the American Journal of Epidemiology that despite the high level of spending on healthcare in the United States compared to England, Americans experience higher rates of chronic disease and markers of disease than their English counterparts at all ages. Why health status differs so dramatically in these two countries, which share much in terms of history and culture, is a mystery.
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A Blood Test for Lung Cancer?
sciencedaily.com - 3-12-11
Norwegian researchers have discovered genes that increase not only one's risk of lung cancer, but perhaps one's urge to smoke as well. Now these researchers are working on developing a blood test for lung cancer.
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Why Low Birth Weight Is Linked to Obesity Later in Life: Study Provides Explanation
sciencedaily.com - 3-12-11
Providing further understanding of the link between low birth weights and obesity later in life, researchers found nutritionally deprived newborns are "programmed" to eat more because they develop less neurons in the region of the brain that controls food intake, according to an article published in the journal Brain Research.
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New Details About Medically Important Protein Family
sciencedaily.com - 3-12-11
Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have determined a new structure from a medically important superfamily of proteins. The structure should help instruct the design of a new kind of therapeutics for conditions ranging from Parkinson's disease to inflammation.
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Keys to Long Life? Not What You Might Expect
sciencedaily.com - 3-12-11
Cheer up. Stop worrying. Don’t work so hard. Good advice for a long life? As it turns out, no. In a groundbreaking study of personality as a predictor of longevity, University of California, Riverside researchers found just the opposite.
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Passive smoking increases stillbirth risk, says study
bbc.co.uk - 3-12-11
Fathers-to-be should stop smoking to protect their unborn child from the risk of stillbirth or birth defects, scientists say.
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Invisible and Odorless, Radon Poses Risks to Lungs
healthday.com - 3-12-11
It may be hard to think of radiation as a present and serious environmental health concern in the United States, much less one with the potential to affect nearly every home in the country.
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Think You Have a Perfect Partner? That's a Good Sign
healthday.com - 3-12-11
Forget that warning about rose-colored glasses setting you up for disappointment in romantic relationships.
Those who are unrealistically idealistic about their partners are more satisfied with their marriage than the realists, new research contends.
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CDC: 1 in 20 Americans Is a Cancer Survivor
abcnews.go.com - 3-11-11
By the third grade, Dan Pardi of Norwood, Mass., could say he'd collected more than 100,000 baseball cards. And that he'd survived cancer.
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Natural farming increases yields over conventional
naturalnews.com - 3-11-11
Farmers across Hawaii are turning to "natural farming," a technique developed by South Korean farmer Han Kyu Cho that eschews the use of artificial fertilizers and pesticides in favor of efficient use of on-site materials. Best of all, Cho's method leads to better crop yields, healthier land and healthier people.
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Maine town becomes first to declare food sovereignty
naturalnews.com - 3-11-11
The town of Sedgwick, Maine, currently leads the pack as far as food sovereignty is concerned. Local residents recently voted unanimously at a town hall meeting to pass an ordinance that reinforces its citizens' God-given rights to "produce, process, sell, purchase, and consume local foods of their choosing," which includes even state- and federally-restricted foods like raw milk.
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Potential Alzheimer's Treatment? Newly Discovered Role for Enzyme in Neurodegenerative Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 3-11-11
Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are partly attributable to brain inflammation. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet now demonstrate in a paper published in Nature that a well-known family of enzymes can prevent the inflammation and thus constitute a potential target for drugs.
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Roundworm Could Provide New Treatment for Sepsis
sciencedaily.com - 3-11-11
Research by the University of Liverpool has found that systemic inflammation caused by sepsis can be suppressed by a protein which occurs naturally in a type of roundworm.
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Depression May Increase the Risk of Kidney Failure
sciencedaily.com - 3-11-11
Depression is associated with an increased risk of developing kidney failure in the future, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society Nephrology (CJASN). Approximately 10% of the US population will suffer from depression at some point during their lifetime.
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Aging Rates, Gender Gap in Mortality Similar Across All Primates
sciencedaily.com - 3-11-11
Humans aren't the only ones who grow old gracefully, says a new study of primate aging patterns.
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Sunlight Can Influence the Breakdown of Medicines in the Body
sciencedaily.com - 3-11-11
A study from the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet has shown that the body's ability to break down medicines may be closely related to exposure to sunlight, and thus may vary with the seasons. The findings offer a completely new model to explain individual differences in the effects of drugs, and how the surroundings can influence the body's ability to deal with toxins.
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Doubts emerge over heart risk to 'apple shape'
bbc.co.uk - 3-11-11
Doubts have been raised over the idea that being overweight and "apple shaped" increases heart attack risk.
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Can Coffee Cut a Woman's Stroke Risk?
healthday.com - 3-11-11
Women who have at least one cup of coffee -- or even five cups -- daily may be reducing their risk of stroke by as much as 25 percent, new Swedish research shows.
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Depression Seems to Increase Risk of Kidney Failure: Study
healthday.com - 3-11-11
Depression appears to increase the risk of kidney failure, according to a new study.
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Fat Alone, Not Where It Sits, May Be Key to Heart Problems
healthday.com - 3-11-11
In a finding that contradicts earlier research, an international study suggests that being obese boosts the likelihood of a heart attack or stroke regardless of where the excess fat is stored in the body.
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Alcohol no longer the No.1 cause of pancreatitis
msnbc.msn.com - 3-10-11
In many older studies, long-standing inflammation of the pancreas was most often due to alcohol — but in the U.S. at least that pattern is changing, a new study shows.
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Complex migraines: Searing pain, disrupted speech
cnn.com - 3-10-11
Barbara A. Mosgrave of Annandale, Virginia, doesn't remember the first time it happened. It's still a blur. But she thinks the episodes began about 50 years ago. At least that's when she remembers someone telling her she was talking gibberish.
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Do You Live in the Diabetes Belt?
everydayhealth.com - 3-10-11
The number of Americans with type 2 diabetes has been rising for years. About 8 percent of the U.S. population has been diagnosed with diabetes, and about 90 to 95 percent of this group is affected by type 2 diabetes - the kind most connected with lifestyle habits. Experts estimate that another 6 million Americans have type 2 diabetes but have not been diagnosed.
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Killer gas puts 200,000 homes at risk of lung cancer, government warns
telegraph.co.uk - 3-10-11
Around 200,000 households are at risk from lung cancer caused by high levels of the invisible natural gas radon, according to figures from the Health Protection Agency.
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Grocery-shopping mistakes to steer clear of
usatoday.com - 3-10-11
Determined to improve your family's diet? Take a closer look at what's in your grocery cart. USA TODAY's Michelle Healy turned to Cynthia Held, a registered dietitian in Hagerstown, Md., who conducts personalized grocery shopping tours to help clients better learn how to shop for nutrition and health. She highlights five common mistakes consumers make.
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New discovery: "good" gut bacteria can control organ functions
naturalnews.com - 3-10-11
Researchers have long known that the "good" bacteria in the human gut help digest food and keep "bad" pathogens, including an overgrowth of yeast, in check. But could beneficial bacteria be doing even more to build good health? The surprising answer is, most likely, yes.
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Medical Microcamera the Size of a Grain of Salt Gives Razor-Sharp Images, Very Inexpensively
sciencedaily.com - 3-10-11
There have been gloves and shavers for one-off use for a long time. In future, there will also be disposable endoscopes for minimally invasive operations on the human body. A new microcamera is what makes it possible. It is as large as a grain of salt, supplies razor-sharp pictures and can be manufactured very inexpensively.
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Scientists Discover Anti-Anxiety Circuit in Brain Region Considered the Seat of Fear
sciencedaily.com - 3-10-11
Stimulation of a distinct brain circuit that lies within a brain structure typically associated with fearfulness produces the opposite effect: Its activity, instead of triggering or increasing anxiety, counters it.
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England 'healthier than the US'
bbc.co.uk - 3-10-11
People living in England enjoy better health than Americans, despite less investment in healthcare, research published in the US has revealed.
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New Drug May Trim Insulin Injections to Just 3 a Week
healthday.com - 3-10-11
A preliminary study reports that people with diabetes were able to get injections of a new insulin drug just three times a week without major ill effects.
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FDA Approves 1st New Lupus Drug in More Than 5 Decades
healthday.com - 3-10-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday gave lupus patients their first new treatment option in more than 50 years when it approved Benlysta as a way to ease the painful symptoms of this debilitating autoimmune disorder.
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How taking a catnap helps you live longer
dailymail.co.uk - 3-9-11
A 45-minute catnap helps lower blood pressure, American researchers reported last week. They said a daytime snooze could improve heart health, particularly if you’re not getting as much sleep as you should at night.
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Cornflakes cancer scare: Cereal makers drop recycled cardboard boxes containing deadly oils
dailymail.co.uk - 3-9-11
Breakfast cereals, pasta, rice and other foods packed in cardboard boxes could be tainted with toxic chemicals, researchers warn.
The substances appear to be leaching from the recycled paper used to make most cardboard boxes.
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Study: Alcohol May Fight Rheumatoid Arthritis
health.com - 3-9-11
Moderate drinking has been linked to a variety of health benefits, including a reduced risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. According to a new study, drinking alcohol may also ease the pain of—and lower the risk of developing—rheumatoid arthritis, a potentially crippling autoimmune disorder.
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Right-Handers, but Not Left-Handers, Are Biased to Select Their Dominant Hand
sciencedaily.com - 3-9-11
The vast majority of humans -- over 90% -- prefer to use their right hand for most skilled tasks. For decades, researchers have been trying to understand why this asymmetry exists. Why, with our two cerebral hemispheres and motor cortices, are we not equally skilled with both hands?
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Genetic Makeup and Duration of Abuse Reduce the Brain's Neurons in Drug Addiction
sciencedaily.com - 3-9-11
A study conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory demonstrated that drug addicted individuals who have a certain genetic makeup have lower gray matter density -- and therefore fewer neurons -- in areas of the brain that are essential for decision-making, self-control, and learning and memory.
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Mediterranean Diet: A Heart-Healthy Plan for Life
sciencedaily.com - 3-9-11
The Mediterranean diet has proven beneficial effects not only regarding metabolic syndrome, but also on its individual components including waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol levels, triglycerides levels, blood pressure levels and glucose metabolism, according to a new study published in the March 15, 2011, issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The study is a meta-analysis, including results of 50 studies on the Mediterranean diet, with an overall studied population of about half a million subjects.
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Mediterranean Diet: A Heart-Healthy Plan for Life
sciencedaily.com - 3-9-11
The Mediterranean diet has proven beneficial effects not only regarding metabolic syndrome, but also on its individual components including waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol levels, triglycerides levels, blood pressure levels and glucose metabolism, according to a new study published in the March 15, 2011, issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The study is a meta-analysis, including results of 50 studies on the Mediterranean diet, with an overall studied population of about half a million subjects.
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Drugs for heartbeat problem may cut dementia risk
bbc.co.uk - 3-9-11
Treating stroke survivors for a heartbeat problem called atrial fibrillation (AF) might prevent many patients from going on to develop dementia, UK experts believe.
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Sleep Deprivation May Encourage Risky Decisions
healthday.com - 3-9-11
Sleep deprivation may lead to overly optimistic thinking that fails to properly consider the potential consequences of financial risks, a new study suggests.
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Hospitals Urged to Check for Depression Before Discharging Heart Patients
healthday.com - 3-9-11
People who've been hospitalized for heart problems appear to suffer less depression and anxiety in the weeks and months after discharge if they participate in a basic depression management program before leaving the hospital, a new study suggests.
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Simply Watching a CPR Video Might Save Lives
healthday.com - 3-9-11
A 60-second video showing what to do when someone's heart stops beating could help save lives, according to a new study that found those who viewed the demonstration were much more likely to take action than those who did not.
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NSAID Use Tied to Men's Sexual Performance
medpagetoday.com - 3-8-11
The regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with higher odds of erectile dysfunction, a cross-sectional study showed.
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How Self-Stigma Hurts People With Depression
health.com - 3-8-11
People who suffer from mental illness, including depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, face a litany of challenges: dark moods, an inability to enjoy life’s pleasures, powerful prescription medication, isolation, and social stigma. Making things worse, many also experience the pain of self-stigma, an under-reported condition in which the patient internalizes social myths and prejudices about mental illness. Experts say self-stigma can impede a depressed or mentally ill person’s ability to recover.
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What makes us happy?
telegraph.co.uk - 3-8-11
The pursuit of lasting happiness has long been a subject of interest for scientists and surveys alike.
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Black cohosh safe for your liver, review finds
naturalnews.com - 3-8-11
A safety review published in the journal Menopause has confirmed that black cohosh, a natural plant alternative to conventional hormone replacement therapy (HRT), is safe and will not cause liver damage. Some recent reports have questioned the dietary supplement's safety, but the new study confirms that menopausal women can safely use black cohosh to help alleviate hot flashes, night sweats, and other menopause symptoms.
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Mega-doses of vitamin D help prevent breast cancer and other diseases, study finds
naturalnews.com - 3-8-11
Current government recommendations of 400 or 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D a day are insufficient to prevent serious diseases like breast cancer, a new study published in the journal Anticancer Research has found. Researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine and Creighton University (CU) School of Medicine discovered that when much higher doses of vitamin D are taken daily, the risks associated with developing several major diseases are reduced by about half.
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Study: Living on a farm helps prevent asthma, allergies
naturalnews.com - 3-8-11
Dirty, dusty farm life appears to be better for your health than sanitized city life, according to a recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers from Munich University Children's Hospital in Germany found that asthma rates among farm children was less than half the rate of other children, and experts believe the multitude of diverse microbes found in farm environments is responsible.
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Solving a Traditional Chinese Medicine Mystery: Discovery of Molecular Mechanism Reveals Antitumor Possibilities
sciencedaily.com - 3-8-11
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have discovered that a natural product isolated from a traditional Chinese medicinal plant commonly known as thunder god vine, or lei gong teng, and used for hundreds of years to treat many conditions including rheumatoid arthritis works by blocking gene control machinery in the cell. The report, published as a cover story of the March issue of Nature Chemical Biology, suggests that the natural product could be a starting point for developing new anticancer drugs.
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'Nano-Velcro' Technology Used to Improve Capture of Circulating Cancer Cells
sciencedaily.com - 3-8-11
Circulating tumor cells, which play a crucial role in cancer metastasis, have been known to science for more than 100 years, and researchers have long endeavored to track and capture them. Now, a UCLA research team has developed an innovative device based on Velcro-like nanoscale technology to efficiently identify and "grab" these circulating tumor cells, or CTCs, in the blood.
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Eating Apples Extends Lifespan of Test Animals by 10 Percent
sciencedaily.com - 3-8-11
Scientists are reporting the first evidence that consumption of a healthful antioxidant substance in apples extends the average lifespan of test animals, and does so by 10 percent. The new results, obtained with fruit flies -- stand-ins for humans in hundreds of research projects each year -- bolster similar findings on apple antioxidants in other animal tests.
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World's first tissue-engineered urethras hailed success
bbc.co.uk - 3-8-11
The world's first tissue-engineered urinary tubes or urethras, grown in the lab using patients' own cells, have been hailed a success by medical experts.
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Cartoon Branding Affects Kids' Cereal Choice, Regardless of Taste
healthday.com - 3-8-11
Children prefer cereals that feature popular media characters such as Shrek on the package, regardless of how they taste, researchers say.
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Headache Relief: Best-Ever Home Remedies
abcnews.go.com - 3-7-11
More than 45 million Americans not only get headaches, but they also get them time and time again. Some people are born with biology that makes them headache prone. Most of these are tension headaches, which account for 90% of all headaches. The pain is typically generalized all over the head, and you may feel a dull ache or a sense of tightness.
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CDC links prescription painkillers in pregnancy to birth defects
usatoday.com - 3-7-11
Moms-to-be who take prescription opioid painkillers such as codeine, hydrocodone or oxycodone (Oxycontin) may increase the risk of birth defects in their newborns, according to a new U.S. government report.
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Is it healthy to drink diet soft drinks? The answer is fizzy
usatoday.com - 3-7-11
For many people, diet soda is an easy way to enjoy a guilt-free, calorie-free sweet treat.
But some recent news has raised new concerns about whether it's healthy to drink calorie-free carbonated soft drinks.
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Scientists Link 13 New Gene Regions to Heart Disease Risk
healthday.com - 3-7-11
In what may be the largest global investigation of its kind, scientists have implicated 13 new gene regions in the onset of heart vessel plaque build-up, a condition that often leads to fatal heart attacks.
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Noninvasive Test May Identify Down Syndrome Early On
healthday.com - 3-7-11
A simple blood test may one day offer a safe way to detect Down syndrome during pregnancy, researchers say.
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Study: Regular Use of Painkillers Linked to ED
webmd.com - 3-6-11
Men who take painkillers regularly to treat pain such as the aches that come with age may be increasing their risk for another common condition of aging, erectile dysfunction (ED), a study suggests.
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Does topical fluoride really protect tooth enamel? Study suggests NO
naturalnews.com - 3-6-11
A popular mantra in American dentistry claims that topical fluoride treatments help to protect teeth from cavities by forming a protective shield on the enamel of teeth. However, a new study published in the American Chemical Society (ACS) journal Langmuir has found that the "protective layer" created by fluoride is actually 100 times thinner than previously believed, which may render it practically useless as a cavity-preventing intervention.
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Zooming in on the Weapons of Salmonella
sciencedaily.com - 3-6-11
Some of the most dreaded diseases in the world such as plague, typhoid and cholera are caused by bacteria that have one thing in common: they possess an infection apparatus which is a nearly unbeatable weapon. When attacking a cell of the body, they develop numerous hollow-needle-shaped structures that project from the bacterial surface. Through these needles, the bacteria inject signal substances into the host cells, which re-program the latter and thereby overcome their defense. From this time on it's easy game for the pathogens; they can invade the cells unimpeded and in large numbers.
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Hope for early bowel cancer DNA test
bbc.co.uk - 3-6-11
Scientists have discovered what could be the first step towards a DNA test to detect the early signs of bowel cancer.
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Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
healthday.com - 3-6-11
A diet rich in foods that are loaded with potassium can reduce your risk for a stroke by 21 percent and may also lower your risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.
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To Eat More Fruit, Picture a Fruit Salad
healthday.com - 3-6-11
Creating a healthy eating action plan and visualizing yourself carrying it out may help improve the way you eat, researchers suggest.
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Scientists Use Stem Cells, Skin Cells to Create Brain Cells Lost to Alzheimer's
healthday.com - 3-6-11
In what experts are calling a significant step forward in Alzheimer's research, scientists have for the first time turned human embryonic stem cells and a form of human skin cell into a type of brain cell that's lost to Alzheimer's disease.
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Tomatoes combat killer diseases - and are even more potent when cooked
dailymail.co.uk - 3-6-11
Eating tomatoes can help reduce the risk of cancer, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, scientists have revealed.
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Memory cells killed by Alzheimer's grown in laboratory
telegraph.co.uk - 3-5-11
Brain cells that are most vulnerable to attack from Alzheimer's Disease have been grown by scientists for the first time in a breakthrough that could help reverse memory loss.
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One in ten Britons 'taking pills to get to sleep'
telegraph.co.uk - 3-5-11
One in ten people is taking pills to get to sleep at least three times a week, according to research that suggests a lack of rest is storing up serious health risks for millions of Britons.
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FDA warns of birth defects with Topamax
usatoday.com - 3-5-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning women of child-bearing age that the epilepsy drug Topamax can increase the risk of birth defects around the mouth.
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Easy, Accurate Way to Predict Food Allergies Developed, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 3-5-11
An online calculator that predicts, within seconds, the presence of the three major food allergies in children has been developed by researchers at University College Cork. They have devised a new 'Cork-Southampton calculator' that gives 96% accuracy compared to current methods that are 61% -81% accurate. The research will be published online March 3 in the journal, Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology.
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Bone-Creating Protein Could Improve Dental Implant Success
sciencedaily.com - 3-5-11
Using a bone-creating protein to augment the maxillary sinus could improve dental implant success, according to Georgia Health Sciences University researchers.
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New Light-Sensing Mechanism Found in Neurons
sciencedaily.com - 3-5-11
A UC Irvine research team led by Todd C. Holmes has discovered a second form of phototransduction light sensing in cells that is derived from vitamin B2. This discovery may reveal new information about cellular processes controlled by light.
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Cancer rise and sperm quality fall 'due to chemicals'
bbc.co.uk - 3-5-11
Sperm quality significantly deteriorated and testicular cancers increased over recent years, a Finnish study says.
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Parents Tend to Focus on Joy, Not Costs, of Raising Children
healthday.com - 3-5-11
Many parents exaggerate their levels of parental joy to justify and accept the high cost of raising children, new research suggests.
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Scientists Use Stem Cells, Skin Cells to Create Brain Cells Lost to Alzheimer's
healthday.com - 3-5-11
In what experts are calling a significant step forward in Alzheimer's research, scientists have for the first time turned human embryonic stem cells and a form of human skin cell into a type of brain cell that's lost to Alzheimer's disease.
More...


Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
healthday.com - 3-5-11
A diet rich in foods that are loaded with potassium can reduce your risk for a stroke by 21 percent and may also lower your risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.
More...


Sleep Deprivation Risks: 1 in 20 Fall Asleep at Wheel, CDC Says
abcnews.go.com - 3-4-11
Americans are sleepy -- so sleepy that fatigue takes over in some of the most dangerous situations. About one in 20 survey participants reported they'd dozed off while driving at least once in a month. And more than one-third of the those surveyed said they inadvertently fell asleep at least once in a day.
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Memory cells killed by Alzheimer's grown in laboratory
telegraph.co.uk - 3-4-11
Brain cells that are most vulnerable to attack from Alzheimer's Disease have been grown by scientists for the first time in a breakthrough that could help reverse memory loss.
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Cancer Patients' Partners Become Ill Themselves, Swedish Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 3-4-11
People who are married to or cohabiting with a cancer patient suffer more illness in the year following their spouse or partner’s cancer diagnosis, according to a recent study.
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Susceptibility Factor for Bipolar Disorder Identified
sciencedaily.com - 3-4-11
A new study provides fascinating insight into the genetic basis of bipolar disorder, a highly heritable mood disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. The research, published online February 24 in the American Journal of Human Genetics, identifies a previously unrecognized susceptibility factor for bipolar disorder.
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Liver, Not Brain, May Be Origin of Alzheimer’s Plaques
sciencedaily.com - 3-4-11
Unexpected results from a Scripps Research Institute and ModGene, LLC study could completely alter scientists' ideas about Alzheimer's disease -- pointing to the liver instead of the brain as the source of the "amyloid" that deposits as brain plaques associated with this devastating condition. The findings could offer a relatively simple approach for Alzheimer's prevention and treatment.
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Easy, Accurate Way to Predict Food Allergies Developed, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 3-4-11
An online calculator that predicts, within seconds, the presence of the three major food allergies in children has been developed by researchers at University College Cork. They have devised a new 'Cork-Southampton calculator' that gives 96% accuracy compared to current methods that are 61% -81% accurate. The research will be published online March 3 in the journal, Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology.
More...


1 in 3 Americans Gets Less Than 7 Hours of Sleep: CDC
healthday.com - 3-4-11
More than one-third of Americans routinely sleep fewer than seven hours a night, which affects their concentration and general health, new government research shows.
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FDA Orders Prescription Cold, Allergy Medicines Off the Market
aolhealth.com - 3-3-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration ordered more than 500 prescription cough, cold and allergy products off the market Wednesday, saying its office had not evaluated the medication for safety, effectiveness and quality.
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New study links pain relievers to erectile dysfunction
usatoday.com - 3-3-11
Men who regularly take pain relievers such as ibuprofen and aspirin may be at increased risk for erectile dysfunction, new research suggests.
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Carts one of dirtiest places in grocery store, study says
usatoday.com - 3-3-11
A University of Arizona researcher says you may want to grab one of those disinfectant wipes right before you grab a grocery cart.
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Treat ulcers with probiotics, not antibiotics
naturalnews.com - 3-3-11
Ulcers caused by the Helicobacter pylori bacterial strain may be more effectively treated by beneficial probiotics rather than by conventional antibiotics, according to a new study published in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Researchers from Spain say that probiotic strains like Bifidobacterium have an incredible success rate in fighting inflammatory bowel diseases like ulcers.
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Gac superfruit improves vision, immune function
naturalnews.com - 3-3-11
he bright-red Gac superfruit from Vietnam, also known as Momordica cochinchinensis, may not yet be all that popular throughout North America, but in Southeast Asia and China it is widely cultivated and consumed for its unique taste and myriad health benefits. These benefits include improvements in vision, reproductive function, immunity, skin health, prostate health, and heart health.
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Smoking Increases Risk of Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 3-3-11
Postmenopausal women who smoke or used to smoke have up to a 16% higher risk of developing breast cancer compared to women who have never smoked, finds research published online in the British Medical Journal.
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Scientists Show How Men Amp Up Their X Chromosome
sciencedaily.com - 3-3-11
Vive la différence? Not at the level of DNA. Men must increase gene expression on their lone X-chromosome to match the two X's possessed by women. A new study explains just how men manage to do that.
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Spinal Cord Injury: Human Cells Derived from Stem Cells Restore Movement in Animal Models
sciencedaily.com - 3-3-11
For the first time, scientists discovered that a specific type of human cell, generated from stem cells and transplanted into spinal cord injured rats, provide tremendous benefit, not only repairing damage to the nervous system but helping the animals regain locomotor function as well.
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Obesity rate lower in Canada than in US, study shows
bbc.co.uk - 3-3-11
Canada has a significantly lower rate of obesity than does the US, a new US government study has shown.
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Ibuprofen 'cuts Parkinson's disease risk'
bbc.co.uk - 3-3-11
People who take ibuprofen on a regular basis have a lower risk of developing Parkinson's disease, research suggests.
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Tight Blood Sugar Control May Put Some Diabetics at Risk
healthday.com - 2-3-11
Intensive blood sugar control doesn't benefit people with both type 2 diabetes and heart disease -- and it may harm them, researchers say.
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Diabetes Ups Death Risk Overall, Study Shows
healthday.com - 2-3-11
People with diabetes are 80 percent more likely to die prematurely than those without the disease -- and it's not just diabetes that's killing them.
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Binge-drinking is in the genes: Scientists isolate brain chemical that makes us crave alcohol
dailymail.co.uk - 3-2-11
It has long been believed that alcoholism runs in the family - now scientists have pinpointed why.
They have identified a binge-drinking gene, offering new hope in combating the growing social problem, it was revealed today.
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Can you get hooked on diet soda?
cnn.com - 3-2-11
First thing every morning, Ellen Talles starts her day by draining a supersize Styrofoam cup filled with Diet Coke and crushed ice. The 61-year-old from Boca Raton, Fla., drinks another Diet Coke in the car on the way to work and keeps a glass nearby "at all times" at her job as a salesclerk. By the end of the day she has put away about 2 liters.
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100,000 'received wrong diabetes diagnosis'
telegraph.co.uk - 3-2-11
Around 100,000 people in England have been diagnosed with the wrong type of diabetes or told they have the disease when they do not, according to research.
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40 million Americans suffer from a work-related anxiety disorder
naturalnews.com - 3-2-11
In 2005, the National Institute of Health reported that 40 million Americans suffer from an anxiety disorder. The data collected indicated that much of this anxiety originated in dissatisfaction toward, or downright hatred of, their work. The 2000 annual Attitudes in the American Workplace VI Gallup Poll reported that 80 percent of workers feel significant, negative stress on the job, and 25 percent report having felt like screaming or shouting because of job stress.
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Scientists say higher vitamin D intake will slash cancer, MS, and diabetes risk by half
naturalnews.com - 3-2-11
In findings just published in the journal Anticancer Research, scientists at the University of California (UC) San Diego School of Medicine and Creighton University School of Medicine in Omaha have reported that most people need a much higher intake of vitamin D. And that simple step added to your life could slash your risk of developing serious diseases -- including cancer -- by about 50 percent.
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Tanning Bed Exposure Can Be Deadly When Complicated by Medication Reactions
sciencedaily.com - 3-2-11
Tanning bed exposure can produce more than some tanners may bargain for, especially when they self-diagnose and use the radiation to treat skin eruptions, according to research conducted by the Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Dermatology.
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Meditation Beats Dance for Harmonizing Body and Mind
sciencedaily.com - 3-2-11
The body is a dancer's instrument, but is it attuned to the mind? A new study from the University of California, Berkeley, suggests that professional ballet and modern dancers are not as emotionally in sync with their bodies as are people who regularly practice meditation.
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Songbird's Strategy for Changing Its Tune Could Inform Rehab Efforts
sciencedaily.com - 3-2-11
It takes songbirds and baseball pitchers thousands of repetitions -- a choreography of many muscle movements -- to develop an irresistible trill or a killer slider. Now, scientists have discovered that the male Bengalese finch uses a simple mental computation and an uncanny memory to create its near-perfect mate-catching melody -- a finding that could have implications for rehabilitating people with neuromuscular diseases and injuries.
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Male depression 'set to increase'
bbc.co.uk - 3-2-11
Psychiatrists have warned that the number of men with depression could rise because of changes in Western society.
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Exercise cuts risk of developing bowel cancer polyps
bbc.co.uk - 3-2-11
People who lead an active lifestyle are up to three times less likely to develop polyps which can develop into bowel cancer, according to a study.
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Study Finds Smoking Linked to Breast Cancer Risk
healthday.com - 3-2-11
Both smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke appear to increase the risk for breast cancer among postmenopausal women, new research shows.
More...


Pot Use in Youth Ups Risk of Psychotic Symptoms in Later Life
healthday.com - 3-2-11
Smoking marijuana as a teenager or young adult raises your risk of having psychotic symptoms later in life, a new Dutch study shows.
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Half of men may have HPV, study shows
msnbc.msn.com - 3-1-11
Half of men in the general population may be infected with human papillomavirus or HPV, the human wart virus that causes cervical and other cancers, strengthening the case for vaccinating boys against HPV, U.S. researchers said on Monday.
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How steroids could give you diabetes
dailymail.co.uk - 3-1-11
When Tony Martin was prescribed new drugs for his asthma and nasal polyps, he hoped they'd help him manage the respiratory problems he'd suffered for years.
In fact, as a result of the treatment he developed type 2 diabetes.
More...


More on the criminal brain: Nature vs. nurture
pagingdrgupta.blogs.cnn.com - 3-1-11
Whether a criminal's nature is biologically ingrained, and perhaps even inherited, is a highly controversial notion that's now getting serious scientific attention. We had a flood of questions and comments last week about recent research on the topic, which shows that it may be possible to predict which children are likely to become criminals or psychopaths based on brain anatomy and genetics.
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Parents warned against giving paracetamol and ibuprofen for mild fever
telegraph.co.uk - 3-1-11
Parents should not give children with a mild fever regular spoonfuls of paracetamol and ibuprofen, doctors advise today, as they warn that doing so could extend their illness or put their health at risk.
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FDA's crackdown on raw-milk cheese based on flawed data analysis
grist.org - 3-1-11
Has there been a serious jump in illnesses from raw-milk cheese recently? You might think so if you've read recent major pieces in The New York Times and The Washington Post -- or the study put together by product liability law firm Marler Clark, which documented 54 illnesses attributed to raw milk cheese in 2010.
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Fish Oil Seems to Help Cancer Patients Preserve Muscle
doctorslounge.com - 3-1-11
Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy may be able to avoid the accompanying muscle loss and malnutrition by taking fish oil supplements that contain omega-3 fatty acids, new research suggests.
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Napping May Help With Blood Pressure Management
sciencedaily.com - 3-1-11
A daytime sleep could have cardiovascular benefits according to new research by Ryan Brindle and Sarah Conklin, PhD, from Allegheny College in Pennsylvania in the US. Their study, looking at the effect of a daytime nap on cardiovascular recovery following a stress test, found that those participants who slept for at least 45 minutes during the day had lower average blood pressure after psychological stress than those who did not sleep.
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Breast Cancer Incidence Rates No Longer Declining in US Women
sciencedaily.com - 3-1-11
A sharp decline in breast cancer incidence rates among non-Hispanic white women in the U.S. after a dramatic drop in the use of postmenopausal hormone therapy did not continue through 2007, according to a new study from the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute. While there are several possible explanations for the recent stabilization, it may indicate that the decrease in breast cancers thought to be related to postmenopausal hormone use has bottomed out.
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Markedly Higher Vitamin D Intake Needed to Reduce Cancer Risk, Researchers Say
sciencedaily.com - 3-1-11
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Creighton University School of Medicine in Omaha have reported that markedly higher intake of vitamin D is needed to reach blood levels that can prevent or markedly cut the incidence of breast cancer and several other major diseases than had been originally thought.
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Kids' Fevers May Not Always Need Treatment
healthday.com - 3-1-11
Few things send a parent's fears soaring as quickly as a child's rapidly rising temperature.
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