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April, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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Study: Avastin, Lucentis equally effective for eyes
usatoday.com - 4-30-11
A new study shows that a cheaper drug for a common eye disease is as effective as a more expensive one approved for the condition.
The results are expected to lead many doctors and patients to turn away from the pricier Lucentis and instead use $50 shots of Avastin for an age-related condition called wet macular degeneration.
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Containing the Costs of Pet Care
nytimes.com - 4-30-11
DEBORAH NOCELLA, a 43-year-old mother in Park Slope, says she feels as if she takes the family's two dogs to the vet almost as often as she takes them to the neighborhood dog run.
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Letting teen drink under parent's watch backfires
msnbc.msn.com - 4-30-11
As prom night approaches and parents begin to worry about what might happen during after hour parties, some might be tempted to try to teach their high schoolers to drink responsibly - by allowing them to consume alcohol under supervision.
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New EU regulations on herbal medicines come into force
bbc.co.uk - 4-30-11
New European Union rules come into force today banning hundreds of traditional herbal remedies.
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Breast Cancer Recurrence Rates Appear Different When Radiation Used
healthday.com - 4-30-11
Patients with early stage breast cancers are commonly treated with surgery or surgery plus radiation, and radiation is widely believed to cut local recurrence rates by about half.
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Spring babies 'are more likely to suffer from anorexia'
dailymail.co.uk - 4-29-11
People born in the Spring are more likely to suffer anorexia, claim researchers.
The largest study of its kind provides 'clear evidence' that the season of birth - and therefore the season when babies are conceived - affects the chances of getting the eating disorder.
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Obese don't realise they have weight problem, says NHS
telegraph.co.uk - 4-29-11
Many obese people don't realise they have a problem as they are surrounded by the overweight, according to the Department of Health.
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Cayenne Pepper May Burn Calories, Curb Appetite
webmd.com - 4-29-11
Red cayenne pepper may help burn calories and curb appetite, especially in people who aren't used to eating it, says a new study that was partly supported by the National Institutes of Health and the McCormick Spice Company.
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Simple checklist may spot signs of autism by age 1
msnbc.msn.com - 4-29-11
A simple checklist that parents fill out in the waiting room may help doctors someday screen for warning signs of autism as early as a baby's first birthday.
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Help reduce your risk of breast cancer with vitamin D
naturalnews.com - 4-29-11
New research out of the Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) in Washington, DC, has found yet another link between high vitamin D intake and a reduced risk of breast cancer. Presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the findings reveal that high doses of vitamin D are linked to a 50 percent reduction in tumor cases, and a 75 percent reduction in overall cancer growth among those who already have the disease.
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Tall, Obese Men More Prone to Leg Clots: Study
healthday.com - 4-29-11
Men who are both obese and tall face a much higher risk for developing potentially fatal blood clots, though overall the risk remains quite small, according to a new study.
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Powerful Women as Likely to Cheat as Men, Study Finds
healthday.com - 4-29-11
Women in powerful positions are just as likely as men to cheat on their spouses, according to new research.
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Bringing Partner Into Anorexia Treatment May Aid Recovery
healthday.com - 4-29-11
Margie Hodgin of Turnersville, N.C., was in her early forties when she developed anorexia nervosa, and she knows how isolating the condition can be.
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Concern Over 'Excessive' Doses of Thyroid Drugs for Older Patients
sciencedaily.com - 4-29-11
Many older adults may be taking "excessive" doses of drugs for thyroid problems which can lead to an increased risk of fractures, finds a study published online in the British Medical Journal.
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Electrical Oscillations Found to Be Critical for Storing Spatial Memories in Brain
sciencedaily.com - 4-29-11
Biologists at UC San Diego have discovered that electrical oscillations in the brain, long thought to play a role in organizing cognitive functions such as memory, are critically important for the brain to store the information that allows us to navigate through our physical environment.
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Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Have Evolved a Unique Chemical Mechanism, New Discovery Reveals
sciencedaily.com - 4-29-11
For the first time, scientists have been able to paint a detailed chemical picture of how a particular strain of bacteria has evolved to become resistant to antibiotics. The research is a key step toward designing compounds to prevent infections by recently evolved, drug-resistant "superbugs" that often are found in hospitals, as well as in the general population.
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Super-Fruits: Tropical Blueberries Extremely High in Healthful Antioxidants, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-29-11
The first analysis of the healthful antioxidant content of blueberries that grow wild in Mexico, Central and South America concludes that some of these fruits have even more healthful antioxidants than the blueberries -- already renowned as "super fruits" -- sold throughout the United States. These extreme super fruits could provide even more protection against heart disease, cancer and other conditions, the report suggests.
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The brain really can be half asleep, claims research
telegraph.co.uk - 4-28-11
Moments of absent mindedness such as losing your keys could be the result of tiny parts of the brain taking "naps" to recharge, a study finds.
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British men among fattest in Europe
telegraph.co.uk - 4-28-11
British men are among the fattest in Europe, while as a nation we do less exercise than almost every other nation on the planet, according to a report by the World Health Organisation (WHO).
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Eating armadillos blamed for leprosy in the South
msnbc.msn.com - 4-28-11
With some genetic sleuthing, scientists have fingered a likely culprit in the spread of leprosy in the southern United States: the nine-banded armadillo.
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Anorexia nervosa 'link to spring birth'
bbc.co.uk - 4-28-11
Babies born in spring are slightly more likely to develop anorexia nervosa, while those born in the autumn have a lower risk, say researchers.
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US spent $307 billion on prescription drugs in 2010
naturalnews.com - 4-28-11
Americans spent $307.4 billion on prescription drugs in 2010, according to a recent report from consulting firm IMS Health. Although this figure is a 2.3 percent reduction from last year, it's still a huge portion of the U.S. economy to be spending on prescription medications, many of which are ineffective at best and extremely dangerous at worst.
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Higher Oxygen Levels Improve Preemie Survival: Study
healthday.com - 4-28-11
Babies born prematurely need supplemental oxygen to survive, but just how much has been a matter of debate.
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Morning Heart Attacks Cause More Damage, Study Finds
healthday.com - 4-28-11
If you suffer a heart attack in the morning, it is likely to be more severe than having one at any other time of day, a Spanish research team reports.
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Cholesterol Drugs May Improve Blood Flow After Stroke
sciencedaily.com - 4-28-11
Cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins may help clot-busting drugs treat strokes, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
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Get a Whiff of This: Low-Cost Sensor Can Diagnose Bacterial Infections
sciencedaily.com - 4-28-11
Bacterial infections really stink. And that could be the key to a fast diagnosis. Researchers have demonstrated a quick, simple method to identify infectious bacteria by smell using a low-cost array of printed pigments as a chemical sensor. Led by University of Illinois chemistry professor Ken Suslick, the team published its results in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
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Number of 100-year-olds is booming in US
myway.com - 4-28-11
Not too long ago, Lonny Fried's achievement would have dropped jaws. TV and newspaper reporters would have showed up at her door. She would have been fussed over and given a big party.
But turning 100 isn't such a big deal anymore.
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Do women inherit their mother's health? From breast cancer to obesity, how your genes count more than your lifestyle
dailymail.co.uk - 4-27-11
Researchers recently discovered that the age at which a girl starts having periods is mainly influenced by when her mother started menstruating.
Scientists at the Institute of Cancer Research at the University of London discovered there was a 57 per cent likelihood a girl would begin menstruating within three months of the date her mother started. It had been thought that diet, particularly eating a lot of meat, played a greater role than genes.
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The health risks of taking ecstasy
telegraph.co.uk - 4-27-11
Ecstasy has been the drug of choice for club-goers over the past two decades, and the combination of taking pills while dancing all night has led to most reported deaths.
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Natural cures that really work
cnn.com - 4-27-11
Will placing a tea bag on a cold sore make it disappear? Can you ease hot flashes with herbs? And does putting yogurt on your nether parts have a prayer of curing a yeast infection?
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Patients who enter hospitals are at high risk of potentially deadly infections or medical mistakes
naturalnews.com - 4-27-11
Americans may be putting their lives at risk every time they are admitted into a hospital. Hospitals are responsible for protecting and restoring our health, but they have instances of professional negligence and fatal errors.
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Antidepressants Work Overall, But Some Symptoms May Persist
healthday.com - 4-27-11
Antidepressants may not improve all symptoms of depression, according to a new study.
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Girls Less Likely Than Boys to Be on Kidney Transplant List
healthday.com - 4-27-11
Girls are much less likely than boys to be placed on a kidney transplant waiting list, a new study finds.
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Vitamin E, Diabetes Drug May Not Ease Obesity-Linked Liver Trouble in Kids
healthday.com - 4-27-11
Neither vitamin E nor the diabetes medication metformin worked any better than a placebo in treating fatty liver disease in children, according to new research.
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Evidence-Based Heart Attack Care Reduces Deaths: Study
healthday.com - 4-27-11
The increased use of evidence-based treatments for heart attacks, such as clot-busting drugs and rapid angioplasty, has led to a decrease in deaths, a new study finds.
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Vitamin D May Help Explain Racial Differences in Blood Pressure
sciencedaily.com - 4-27-11
High blood pressure, or hypertension, is more common and often more deadly in blacks than in whites, and a new University of Rochester study shows that low vitamin D levels among black people might be a powerful factor that contributes to the racial differences in hypertension.
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Holistic Exercise: 4 Types of Exercise that Improve your Body and Mind
botanical.com - 4-27-11
We often assume that exercise has to be physically and mentally taxing in order to be beneficial. The old adage, "No pain, no gain," is treated as dogma, and as a result many people take an almost masochistic approach to working out. But while there is nothing wrong with emphasizing hard work in your exercise program, it does not need to be painful. Holistic exercise takes the opposite approach, employing workout techniques that keep the body fit while contributing to a sense of relaxation and spiritual balance. Here are just four types of holistic exercise that can hold countless benefits without the self-punishment too often associated with physical fitness.
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Men's and Women's Immune Systems Respond Differently to PTSD
sciencedaily.com - 4-27-11
Men and women had starkly different immune system responses to chronic post-traumatic stress disorder, with men showing no response and women showing a strong response, in two studies by researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco.
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IQ tests measure motivation - not just intelligence
bbc.co.uk - 4-26-11
Intelligence tests are as much a measure of motivation as they are of mental ability, says research from the US.
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San Francisco votes to allow small-scale commercial farming in residential areas, no conditional use permit needed
naturalnews.com - 4-26-11
The passage of an urban farming amendment in San Francisco has sparked a wave of joy among backyard farmers from across the Bay Area. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors recently voted to amend the city's zoning code in such a way that now allows backyard growers to freely cultivate produce and sell it without having to purchase a conditional use permit (CUP), which can run upwards of $3,000. And the victory could also help spur many other urban areas to take the same route in allowing urban gardens on residential land.
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Common Painkillers May Blunt Antidepressants
healthday.com - 4-26-11
Common over-the-counter painkillers such as ibuprofen, aspirin and naproxen may reduce the effectiveness of antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, according to a mouse and human study from The Rockefeller University in New York City.
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Heart-Healthy Omega-3s Not Healthy for Prostate: Study
healthday.com - 4-26-11
High levels of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids in the blood may be associated with an increased risk for developing aggressive prostate cancer, while elevated levels of unhealthy trans-fatty acids may lower the risk, a new study suggests.
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Higher Levels of Social Activity Decrease the Risk of Cognitive Decline
sciencedaily.com - 4-26-11
If you want to keep your brain healthy, it turns out that visiting friends, attending parties, and even going to church might be just as good for you as crossword puzzles.
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Narcotic Pain Relief Drug Overdose Deaths a National Epidemic
sciencedaily.com - 4-26-11
Unintentional overdose deaths in teens and adults have reached epidemic proportions in the U.S. In some 20 states in 2007 the number of unintentional drug poisoning deaths exceeded either motor vehicle crashes or suicides, two of the leading causes of injury death. Prescription opioid pain medications are driving this overdose epidemic. Opioid pain medications were also involved in about 36 percent of all poisoning suicides in the U.S. in 2007.
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Tai Chi Appears to Benefit Quality of Life for Patients With Chronic Heart Failure, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 4-26-11
Tai chi exercise appears to be associated with improved quality of life, mood and exercise self-efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure, according to a report in the April 25 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
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Protein Levels Could Signal That a Child Will Develop Diabetes, Researchers Believe
sciencedaily.com - 4-26-11
Decreasing blood levels of a protein that helps control inflammation may be a red flag that could help children avoid type 1 diabetes, researchers say.
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Kids with ADHD more likely to use drugs, analysis finds
usatoday.com - 4-25-11
Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are up to three times more likely than other kids to use, abuse or become dependent on substances such as nicotine, cocaine and marijuana in adolescence and as young adults, new research suggests.
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Skinasty, the sequel: When Stephanie Beacham's skin cancer came back she turned to a new light treatment for a cure
dailymail.co.uk - 4-25-11
Stephanie Beacham could be forgiven for thinking she was suffering from deja vu. Sitting in front of a mirror brushing her hair, the glamorous actress was chatting to her partner, the dashing Dr Bernie Greenwood, who was staring rather intently at her nose.
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Half of men feel worse after prostate removal
msnbc.msn.com - 4-25-11
A new study shows nearly half of men feel worse after having their prostate gland removed due to cancer, although three-quarters would do it again given the same circumstances.
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How Viagra can mess up your marriage
msnbc.msn.com - 4-25-11
Be careful what you wish for, I think as my husband reaches again for his new toy. Tragically, it's not a Ferrari or the latest Mac laptop - it's his Penis 2.0-the new, pharmaceutically enhanced model.
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What Makes a Face Appealing to the Opposite Sex?
healthday.com - 4-25-11
While it may be true that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, a new computer model helps reveal what's behind peoples' ideas of facial attractiveness.
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Study Suggests Another Look at Testosterone-Prostate Cancer Link
sciencedaily.com - 4-25-11
The long-standing prohibition against testosterone therapy in men with untreated or low-risk prostate cancer merits reevaluation, according to a new study published in The Journal of Urology.
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Move Over Prozac: New Drug Offers Hope for Depression
sciencedaily.com - 4-25-11
The brain chemistry that underlies depression is incompletely understood, but research suggests that aberrant signaling by a chemical called Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor through its receptor TrkB, may contribute to anxiety and depression. Here, researchers describe a screen for stable small molecules that could specifically inhibit TrkB action. They identified one they dubbed ANA-12, which had potent behavioral effects when administered to mice that suggest it will have antidepressant and anti-anxiety activity in humans.
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What a stinker! World's smelliest flower opens for the first time in a DECADE
dailymail.co.uk - 4-24-11
For botanists, it doesn't get more exciting than this - after 75 years, the Titan Arum plant has unfurled its leaves and is in full bloom.
For curious crowds who gathered, they perhaps realised that a once-in-a-lifetime look is more than enough - thanks to its pungent odour of rotting flesh.
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Study: Fussy Babies Linked to ADHD Risk
webmd.com - 4-24-11
Babies who cry excessively and have difficulty sleeping and feeding may be at increased risk for behavioral problems during childhood, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a study shows.
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Diet 'can reverse kidney failure' in mice with diabetes
bbc.co.uk - 4-24-11
A controlled diet high in fat and low in carbohydrate can repair kidney damage in diabetic mice, according to US scientists.
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Hospital Infection Raises Death Risk for Bowel Patients
healthday.com - 4-24-11
Patients hospitalized for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a six-fold increased risk of death if they become infected with Clostridium difficile bacteria, a new study finds.
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Treat Depression to Boost Diabetes Self-Care: Study
healthday.com - 4-24-11
Treating diabetes patients' depression boosts their overall health, according to a new study.
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Study Adds Weight to Link Between Calcium Supplements and Heart Problems
sciencedaily.com - 4-23-11
New research published online in the British Medical Journal adds to mounting evidence that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular events, particularly heart attacks, in older women.
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Botox may deaden perception, study says
usatoday.com - 4-23-11
Botox may smooth your wrinkles, but it can dull your ability to understand the emotions of others, a new study suggests.
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The jab that will help Nature to beat osteoporosis by building new bone
telegraph.co.uk - 4-23-11
A jab to treat osteoporosis by helping to build new bone, potentially reducing the frequency of treatments for sufferers from once a day to once every three months, has been developed.
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British girls worst binge drinkers in western world
telegraph.co.uk - 4-23-11
British teenage girls have the worst binge drinking culture in the western world, leading to rises in teenage pregnancies and bullying, according to a report.
Half of all 15-year-old girls have been drunk at least twice - almost double the average for other developed countries - while more than a quarter of 16 and 17 year old girls admits drinking to lift their spirits.
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The 10 Most Prescribed Drugs
webmd.com - 4-23-11
The 10 most prescribed drugs in the U.S. aren't the drugs on which we spend the most, according to a report from the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics.
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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Hits Teens, Too
healthday.com - 4-4-11
Chronic fatigue syndrome, often thought to be a condition that only afflicts adults, affects adolescents as well but is often overlooked, according to a new Dutch report in Pediatrics.
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Toward New Medications for Chronic Brain Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 4-23-11
A needle-in-the-haystack search through nearly 390,000 chemical compounds had led scientists to a substance that can sneak through the protective barrier surrounding the brain with effects promising for new drugs for Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. They report on the substance, which blocks formation of cholesterol in the brain, in the journal, ACS Chemical Biology.
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Anti-Depressants Boost Brain Cells After Injury in Early Studies
sciencedaily.com - 4-23-11
Anti-depressants may help spur the creation and survival of new brain cells after brain injury, according to a study by neurosurgeons at the University of Rochester Medical Center.
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Learning to play music as a child boosts brain as a pensioner
telegraph.co.uk - 4-22-11
Hours spent practising the piano as a child could pay off in more ways than one, scientists have found.
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CDC: Smoking may be banned in all states by 2020
msnbc.msn.com - 4-22-11
By 2020, every state may have bans on smoking in restaurants, bars and the workplace, federal health officials predicted Thursday, based on the current pace of adopting anti-smoking laws.
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Chronic Kidney Disease Tied to Heart Problems in Elderly
healthday.com - 4-22-11
Chronic kidney disease is common among Americans over 80 years of age and is often linked with heart disease, a new study says.
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ACE Inhibitors Seem to Raise Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence
healthday.com - 4-22-11
Two commonly used blood pressure medications seem to have opposite effects on the chances of breast cancer recurring in women with a personal history of the disease.
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Newer 'Pill' Linked to Higher Risk of Blood Clots
healthday.com - 4-22-11
Newer forms of birth control pills may carry a higher risk of serious blood clots than earlier oral contraceptives.
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Antidepressants May Not Improve All Symptoms of Depression, Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 4-22-11
Even people who show a clear treatment response with antidepressant medications continue to experience symptoms like insomnia, sadness and decreased concentration, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found after analyzing data from the largest study on the treatment of depression.
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Prenatal Pesticide Exposure Tied to Lower IQ in Children, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 4-22-11
In a new study suggesting pesticides may be associated with the health and development of children, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley's School of Public Health have found that prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides -- widely used on food crops -- is related to lower intelligence scores at age 7.
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Cancer Cell Proliferation: A New Ending to an Old 'Tail'
sciencedaily.com - 4-22-11
In stark contrast to normal cells, which only divide a finite number of times before they enter into a permanent state of growth arrest or simply die, cancer cells never cease to proliferate. Now, scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have uncovered an important clue to one of the mechanisms underlying cancer cell immortality.
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Radioactive iodine found in breast milk of Japanese mothers
telegraph.co.uk - 4-22-11
The breast milk of four Japanese mothers has been found to contain small quantities of radioactive iodine.
The government faced calls for a full investigation into the impact of the nuclear disaster on mothers and babies following the discovery.
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Hand-cleaning gels do NOT kill dangerous farm germs... only old-fashioned soap and water will protect you, experts say
dailymail.co.uk - 4-21-11
Families visiting farms over the Easter weekend should wash their hands with soap and water because hand-sanitising gels will not protect them from killer germs.
The Health Protection Agency (HPA) said hand gels and wipes do not kill dangerous bacteria like E coli, which can be picked up from petting sheep and goats.
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Bacteria Divide People Into 3 Types, Scientists Say
nytimes.com - 4-21-11
In the early 1900s, scientists discovered that each person belonged to one of four blood types. Now they have discovered a new way to classify humanity: by bacteria. Each human being is host to thousands of different species of microbes. Yet a group of scientists now report just three distinct ecosystems in the guts of people they have studied.
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Diving May Damage Blood Vessels
medpagetoday.com - 4-21-11
Repeat scuba dives appear to harm the endothelium, particularly when breathing the mix of gases popular with recreational divers, according to a small study.
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Low-carb, high-fat diet could replace dialysis
msnbc.msn.com - 4-21-11
A type of low-carb, high-fat diet that's typically used to manage seizures for children with epilepsy could reverse kidney disease in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics, a new animal study suggests.
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Nanoparticles destroy soil and the environment, study finds
naturalnews.com - 4-21-11
Though some might argue that nanotechnology offers benefits not afforded by normal molecules, the environmental and human health consequences of this "breakthrough" technology appear dire, to say the least. New research published in the Journal of Hazardous Materials explains that nanoparticles damage beneficial soil bacteria and ultimately ruin plants' ability to uptake necessary nitrogen.
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Babies' Persistent Fussiness Could Mean Behavioral Woes Ahead
healthday.com - 4-21-11
Excessive sleeping, feeding or crying troubles during infancy are associated with a greatly increased risk for behavioral problems later in childhood, research suggests.
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Couch-Potato Kids: It Shows in Their Eyes, Researchers Say
healthday.com - 4-21-11
Young children who spend too much time watching TV or playing computer games have narrower eye arteries than kids who are more physically active, new Australian research reports.
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Desk job 'doubles bowel cancer risk'
telegraph.co.uk - 4-20-11
Having a desk job for more than a decade doubles the risk of a major type of bowel cancer, according to new research.
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3 stages of Alzheimer's disease introduced
cnn.com - 4-20-11
Alzheimer's disease begins long before family and friends notice differences in the patient's memory and behavior, doctors who treat the condition said Monday. By the time an official diagnosis is made, the person's function is usually significantly impaired and treatment rarely helps.
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New warning: dangerous antibacterial soap chemical found in fish
naturalnews.com - 4-20-11
The current mania over putting anti-bacterial chemicals in everything from cleaning wipes and hand soap to detergent and toothpaste has resulted in the widespread contamination of the environment with two related toxins often found in these products -- triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan.
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High levels of GMO agrochemicals found in breast milk of Brazilian mothers
naturalnews.com - 4-20-11
The pesticides and herbicides used to treat genetically-modified organisms (GMO) are showing up in significant amounts in rainwater, water wells, and even mothers' breast milk, according to new research out of Brazil. Particularly among residents living near massive GMO monoculture operations, research reveals that 100 percent of women tested positive for at least one agrochemical in their breast milk, and cumulatively tested at agrochemical levels much higher than what is even permitted in cow's milk.
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Radiation exposure chart admits cancer radiotherapy delivers fatal dose to patients
naturalnews.com - 4-20-11
Thanks to the Fukushima catastrophe, we've all been learning a lot about the laws of physics lately -- especially about radiation. To help explain it all, the folks over at InformationIsBeautiful.com have created a radiation explanation chart that shows the relative levels of harm from various doses of radiation (link below).
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Children With HIV at Higher Risk of Drug Resistance
healthday.com - 4-20-11
About 1 in 8 children infected with HIV experiences triple-class virological failure -- meaning the virus becomes resistant to multiple drugs -- within five years of starting antiretroviral treatment, a European study shows.
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FDA Looks to Crack Down on Misuse of Opioid Painkillers
healthday.com - 4-20-11
U.S. health officials unveiled Tuesday a new plan to try to curb misuse of extended-release and long-acting opioid pain killers such as OxyContin, morphine and methadone.
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Women Taking Calcium Supplements May Risk Heart Health, Researchers Say
healthday.com - 4-20-11
More evidence is emerging that women who take calcium supplements to prevent bone deterioration may, in fact, be risking their heart health.
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Right-Handedness Prevailed 500,000 Years Ago
sciencedaily.com - 4-20-11
Right-handedness is a distinctively human characteristic, with right-handers outnumbering lefties nine-to-one. But how far back does right-handedness reach in the human story? Researchers have tried to determine the answer by looking at ancient tools, prehistoric art and human bones, but the results have not been definitive.
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How Peppermint Helps to Relieve Irritable Bowel Syndrome
sciencedaily.com - 4-20-11
University of Adelaide researchers have shown for the first time how peppermint helps to relieve Irritable Bowel Syndrome, which affects up to 20% of the population.
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Happiness is U-shaped ... which explains why the middle-aged are grumpy
telegraph.co.uk - 4-19-11
Satisfaction with life starts to drop as early as a person's late 20s and does not begin to recover until well past 50, says Bert van Landeghem, an economist at Maastricht University in Belgium.
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AIDS prevention pill study halted; no benefit seen
usatoday.com - 4-19-11
Researchers are stopping a study that tests a daily pill to prevent infection with the AIDS virus in thousands of African women because partial results show no signs that the drug is doing any good.
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Cleaning 'could be making people depressed'
telegraph.co.uk - 4-19-11
Researchers found that cleaner homes and offices are leaving lower levels of dirt and bacteria which could lead to weaker immune systems and, in turn, brain function being impaired.
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The young generation are 'addicted' to mobile phones
telegraph.co.uk - 4-19-11
Some said they feel so bereft without their iPhone or Blackberry that it evokes similar feelings to the "phantom limb" syndrome suffered by amputees.
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AIDS Trial Halted: Anti-HIV Pill Fails to Protect Women
healthland.time.com - 4-19-11
AIDS prevention got a boost last year when researchers reported that the daily combination anti-HIV pill Truvada, which is designed to treat the disease, may actually be able to prevent HIV infection among healthy, high-risk gay men.
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Mother's diet 'can make kids fat'
bbc.co.uk - 4-19-11
A mother's diet during pregnancy can alter the DNA of her child and increase the risk of obesity, according to researchers.
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Discover the amazing power of maqui berry, the antioxidant superfruit
naturalnews.com - 4-19-11
Deep in the Patagonia region of southern Chile grows a wild berry known as maqui that natives have been eating for ages. This powerful superfruit, which is now beginning to make its way into the U.S., is considered to be the most antioxidant-rich superfruit in the world. Its nutrient profile offers amazing protection against cholesterol buildup and disease-causing inflammation in a way unmatched by most other fruits.
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New record: 26 million Americans now have diabetes
naturalnews.com - 4-19-11
More Americans than ever now have type 2 diabetes, according to statistics recently released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Twenty-six million Americans now have the disease, which is ten percent more than in 2008. And a shocking 79 million others have pre-diabetes, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that indicate pending insulin-production failure.
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CT scans used to monitor success of cancer treatments cause more cancer, study finds
naturalnews.com - 4-19-11
Men diagnosed with testicular cancer often choose to undergo regular computed tomography (CT) scans that monitor progress after treatment. But a new study published in the journal Cancer explains that these CT scans actually cause secondary cancers, and suggests that doctors consider this important fact before flippantly recommending it to their patients.
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Low Glucose Levels May Raise Death Risk Among Older People
healthday.com - 4-19-11
New research finds that older diabetics with better control of their blood sugar face less chance of such diabetes-related complications as heart attacks, amputation and kidney disease.
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Can Common Virus, Lack of Sunlight Boost MS Risk?
healthday.com - 4-19-11
Infection with mononucleosis -- the easily spread virus that's the bane of many college students -- and little exposure to sunlight may combine to boost a person's risk for developing multiple sclerosis, a new study suggests.
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Starting HIV Drugs Earlier May Delay AIDS But Not Death
healthday.com - 4-19-11
New research suggests that HIV-infected patients are most likely to stay clear of AIDS longer if they start drug therapy when their immune systems are still relatively strong.
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Too Many Parents Think Injuries Are 'Part of the Game'
healthday.com - 4-19-11
With another season of warm-weather sports under way, experts are cautioning that many parents don't take sports injury prevention seriously enough -- that they consider commonplace sprains, bruises and pulled muscles "just part of the game."
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Immediate Treatment Can Alleviate Future Back Problems, Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-19-11
Immediate treatment by a physiotherapist, bypassing a waiting list, can reduce problems with recurring low back pain, reveals a thesis from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
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MRI May Predict Which Adults Will Develop Alzheimer's
sciencedaily.com - 4-19-11
Using MRI, researchers may be able to predict which adults with mild cognitive impairment are more likely to progress to Alzheimer's disease, according to the results of a study published online and in the June issue of Radiology.
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Suicide Rates Rise and Fall With the Economy: CDC
healthday.com - 4-18-11
Suicides in the United States appear to increase in hard times and decrease during years of prosperity, according to a new government report.
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Estrogen's Role in Breast Cancer Can Fluctuate
healthday.com - 4-18-11
Is estrogen breast cancer's friend or foe?
A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which analyzed data from the massive Women's Health Initiative, suggested the latter when it found a reduced risk of breast cancer in women who had been on short-term estrogen therapy.
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*%@$*! How swearing can help you to beat pain
dailymail.co.uk - 4-18-11
Few of us can help turning the air blue when we stub our toe and are left in agony. But while our bad language may embarrass us, it seems that it is also helping us beat the pain.
Researchers have found that swearing in such circumstances can act as a powerful painkiller - at least, for those who don't normally use expletives.
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Incurable brain tumor breakthrough - St. John's wort compound discovered as promising treatment
naturalnews.com - 4-18-11
Around 10,000 Americans are diagnosed with a malignant glioma every year. And, unfortunately, they received an almost inevitable death sentence. Gliomas, types of tumors which grow in the brain or spine, are virtually incurable and the average one-year survival rate after diagnosis is only about 50 percent.
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New documentary investigates war being waged by biotechnology companies against scientists who expose the truth about GMOs
naturalnews.com - 4-18-11
In order to maintain its massive charade of deception in claiming that genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) are the safe, practical solution to the world's food problems, the biotechnology industry has had to silence and destroy the lives of many in the scientific community. In the hard-hitting new documentary Scientists Under Attack - Genetic Engineering in the Magnetic Field of Money, German filmmaker Bertram Verhaag explores the heavy hand of the biotechnology industry in steering "science" towards its own interests, and eliminating the actual, legitimate science that exposes genetic engineering (GE) as the fraud that it is.
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Do Immune System Ills Help Drive Type 2 Diabetes?
sciencedaily.com - 4-18-11
New research suggests that the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes may be linked to an immune system reaction gone awry.
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Why Does Brain Development Diverge from Normal in Autism Spectrum Disorders?
sciencedaily.com - 4-18-11
Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder on the autism spectrum, is marked by relatively normal development in infancy followed by a loss of loss of cognitive, social and language skills starting at 12 to 18 months of age. It is increasingly seen as a disorder of synapses, the connections between neurons that together form brain circuits. What hasn't been clear is why children start out developing normally, only to become progressively abnormal.
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Nanofiber Spheres Carrying Cells Injected Into Wounds to Grow Tissue
sciencedaily.com - 4-18-11
For the first time, scientists have made star-shaped, biodegradable polymers that can self-assemble into hollow, nanofiber spheres, and when the spheres are injected with cells into wounds, these spheres biodegrade, but the cells live on to form new tissue.
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All those tweets, apps, updates may drain brain
sfgate.com - 4-18-11
Human minds evolved to constantly scan for novelty, lest we miss any sign of food, danger or, on a good day, mating opportunities.
But the modern world bombards us with stimuli, a nonstop stream of e-mails, chats, texts, tweets, status updates and video links to piano playing cats.
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Chemicals Were Injected Into Wells, Report Says
nytimes.com - 4-17-11
Oil and gas companies injected hundreds of millions of gallons of hazardous or carcinogenic chemicals into wells in more than 13 states from 2005 to 2009, according to an investigation by Congressional Democrats.
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How Little Sleep Can You Get Away With?
nytimes.com - 4-17-11
We all know that we don't get enough sleep. But how much sleep do we really need? Until about 15 years ago, one common theory was that if you slept at least four or five hours a night, your cognitive performance remained intact; your body simply adapted to less sleep. But that idea was based on studies in which researchers sent sleepy subjects home during the day - where they may have sneaked in naps and downed coffee.
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Pets Get Depressed, Too
everydayhealth.com - 4-17-11
Just like people, healthy pets of all shapes and sizes can get down in the dumps. "Dogs, cats, horses, rabbits, and even iguanas can experience depression," says Kathleen Dunn, DMV, a veterinarian at the Pet Health Center at North Shore Animal League America in Port Washington, N.Y.
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Lowering Cholesterol, Blood Pressure May Reduce Alzheimer's Risk
health.com - 4-17-11
Treating traditional risk factors for heart disease such as hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes may also prevent the progression of mild memory and cognitive problems into full-blown Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.
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Super bug breakthrough -- manuka honey may reverse antibiotic resistance
naturalnews.com - 4-17-11
In less than a week, three different research studies have been released about antibiotic-resistant super bugs. Two were issued as nothing less than dire warnings. For example, as NaturalNews covered earlier, UK scientists are calling for the "urgent need for global action" due to the discovery of a spreading phenomenon -- a gene that is turning bacteria into not just super bugs but SUPER superbugs.
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Radiation disease - here are the symptoms and causes
naturalnews.com - 4-17-11
What does radiation do to us? It burns the cells, kind of like burning down a house. It is well known that radiation burns our cells by creating too much free radical damage. Now of course this is like talking Greek to medical officials and professors because if they knew this they would be on the bullhorn telling the public what to do to minimize free radical damage.
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Scientists warn that drugs of the future will be designed specifically to control the human mind
naturalnews.com - 4-17-11
It may sound like something out of a science fiction plot, but Oxford researchers say that modern conventional medicine is gradually developing ways to change the moral states of humans through pharmaceutical drugs, and thus control the way people think and act in various life situations. These new drugs will literally have the ability to disrupt an individual's personal morality, and instead reprogram that person to believe and do whatever the drug designer has created that drug to do.
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GSK study suggests its antidepressant drugs cause suicidal tendencies
naturalnews.com - 4-17-11
A new study released by drug giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) suggests that its very own antidepressant drug Paxil (paroxetine) is linked to an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and tendencies among adult patients. The findings appear to confirm those of previous studies and cases that have linked selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) like Paxil to suicides, suicide attempts, and even murders.
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Problem Drinking May Make Hospital Infections More Deadly
healthday.com - 4-17-11
Hospital patients with alcohol use disorders who develop health care-associated infections are more likely to die from the infections, have longer hospital stays and higher hospital costs than those without alcohol disorders, a new study finds.
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Alcoholic Parents May Predispose Kids to Drinking Problem
healthday.com - 4-17-11
Children of parents with an alcohol use disorder (AUD) are at increased risk for the same type of problem, says a new study from Denmark.
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Doctors Lax in Monitoring Potentially Addicting Drugs, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-17-11
Few primary care physicians pay adequate attention to patients taking prescription opioid drugs -- despite the potential for abuse, addiction and overdose, according to a new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.
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Stigma Weighs Heavily on Obese People, Contributing to Greater Health Problems
sciencedaily.com - 4-17-11
The discrimination that obese people feel, whether it is poor service at a restaurant or being treated differently in the workplace, may have a direct impact on their physical health, according to new research from Purdue University.
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Vitamin D May Help Reduce Heart Risk in African-Americans
sciencedaily.com - 4-17-11
In recent years supplementation with Vitamin D has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in people who are deficient in the vitamin. Now new research from the Georgia Prevention Institute at Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta indicates that supplementation with the "sunshine vitamin" may be particularly beneficial for overweight African-American adults, a population at increased risk for both CVD and Vitamin D deficiency.
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Armed agents kidnap child from mother who used holistic treatments instead of pharmaceutical drugs to treat condition
naturalnews.com - 4-16-11
Maryanne Godboldo of Detroit, Mich., recently learned the hard way that freedom of choice in medicine is no longer tolerated by the medical mafia in the supposed "land of the free." Recently, armed officers from the Special Response Team (SRT) of the Detroit Police Department (DPD), at the command of Child Protective Services (CPS), unlawfully kicked down the door of Godboldo's home and kidnapped her 13-year-old child. Her crime? Maryanne chose to follow the lead of a doctor's recommendation to take her daughter off a pharmaceutical drug treatment recommendation for psychosis that was worsening the child's symptoms, and instead chose to use natural remedies to treat the condition.
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Alcohol-Energy Drink Combo Riskier Than Booze Alone, Study Says
healthday.com - 4-16-11
Combining the caffeine jolt of energy drinks with the intoxicating effects of alcohol is riskier than drinking alcohol alone, a new study suggests.
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Long-Term Users of Ecstasy Risk Structural Brain Damage, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-16-11
Long term users of the popular recreational drug ecstasy (MDMA) risk structural brain damage, suggests preliminary research published online in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry.
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Patients' Own Cells Yield New Insights Into the Biology of Schizophrenia
sciencedaily.com - 4-16-11
After a century of studying the causes of schizophrenia-the most persistent disabling condition among adults-the cause of the disorder remains unknown. Now induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from schizophrenic patients have brought researchers from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies a step closer to a fundamental understanding of the biological underpinnings of the disease.
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US Meat and Poultry Is Widely Contaminated With Drug-Resistant Staph Bacteria, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 4-16-11
Drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, a bacteria linked to a wide range of human diseases, are present in meat and poultry from U.S. grocery stores at unexpectedly high rates, according to a nationwide study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).
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Whole-Exome Sequencing of Skin Cancer Completed: Most Comprehensive View of Melanoma's Genetic Landscape
sciencedaily.com - 4-16-11
A team led by researchers at the National Institutes of Health is the first to systematically survey the landscape of the melanoma genome, the DNA code of the deadliest form of skin cancer. The researchers have made surprising new discoveries using whole-exome sequencing, an approach that decodes the 1-2 percent of the genome that contains protein-coding genes.
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Shortage of Leukemia Drug Forcing Hospitals to Turn Some Patients Away
abcnews.go.com - 4-15-11
A critical shortage of a leukemia drug has cancer centers across the country worried about how to treat many of their patients.
So far, oncologists in 30 states have reported a shortage of cytarabine, a drug that is key to treating certain types of leukemia. The situation, doctors say, is dire.
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Young girls' waistlines have grown by four inches in 30 years due to rising obesity
dailymail.co.uk - 4-15-11
Girls' waistlines have expanded by almost four inches in 30 years, figures show.
Rising levels of obesity mean that the average 11-year-old's waist is more than 27.6in, compared to 23.2in during the late 1970s.
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Elderly 'must expect to sell their homes to pay for care'
telegraph.co.uk - 4-15-11
The Commission on Funding of Care and Support collated evidence on the system from hundreds of organisations and concluded that free care is unrealistic.
It is likely pensioners will be forced to sell their homes to release equity if they need care in later life, the report's authors said.
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Medication-Related Injuries on the Rise
nytimes.com - 4-15-11
The number of people treated in hospitals in the United States for problems related to medication errors has surged more than 50 percent in recent years.
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Study: Popular Alzheimer's Drug Ineffective for Mild Cases
health.com - 4-15-11
A drug widely used to treat mild Alzheimer's disease appears to provide no benefit to this group of early-stage patients, according to a new analysis of previously conducted research.
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'Premature birth gene' discovered
bbc.co.uk - 4-15-11
A gene linked to premature births has been discovered by scientists in the US and Finland.
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Aspirin, ibuprofen linked to erectile dysfunction
naturalnews.com - 4-15-11
A new study published in The Journal of Urology says that men who regularly take over-the-counter (OTC) non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) like ibuprofen and aspirin are more likely to develop erectile dysfunction (ED) than men who do not take the drugs. The study counters the widespread public notion that it is safe to take NSAIDs regularly to treat pain, and it is also a sobering wake-up call to the dangers of flippant NSAID use.
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Suicide Rates Rise and Fall With the Economy: CDC
healthday.com - 4-15-11
Suicides in the United States appear to increase in hard times and decrease during years of prosperity, according to a new government report.
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Polluted Air Leads to Disease by Promoting Widespread Inflammation
sciencedaily.com - 4-15-11
Chronic inhalation of polluted air appears to activate a protein that triggers the release of white blood cells, setting off events that lead to widespread inflammation, according to new research in an animal model.
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Symptom-Free Herpes Contagious 10% of the Time
health.com - 4-14-11
People who carry the genital herpes virus but have no visible symptoms-and may not even be aware they're infected-are still capable of spreading the virus about 10 percent of the time, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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Bipolar disorder is not just one disease
cnn.com - 4-14-11
Although the symptoms of bipolar disorder can vary significantly from person to person, mental health professionals have identified four main subtypes of the illness that together are referred to as bipolar spectrum disorders: bipolar I, bipolar II, bipolar not otherwise specified, and cyclothymia.
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Brain scans fuel hope of early Alzheimer's detection
bbc.co.uk - 4-14-11
Brain scans may be able to indicate potential Alzheimer's patients years before symptoms appear, according to the results of a small study.
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Bees 'entomb' pesticide-tainted pollen in effort to protect themselves from extinction
naturalnews.com - 4-14-11
A crucial lifeblood to agriculture, bees continue to face threats of extinction by things like pollution and pesticides, both of which are implicated in causing mass bee die-offs, also known as "colony collapse disorder" or CCD. And scientists say that because of this massive onslaught of toxins, bees are actually entombing, or sealing off, their hive cells in an attempt to quarantine polluted pollen and prevent it from destroying the entire colony.
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Vitamin D deficiency inhibits lung growth, function
naturalnews.com - 4-14-11
Australian researchers have identified a clear link between vitamin D deficiency and inhibited lung function. Published in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the new study reveals that inadequate circulating blood levels of vitamin D are responsible for both altered lung structure and decreased lung function.
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Natural bioflavonoids kill hepatitis C virus
naturalnews.com - 4-14-11
Hepatitis C is an infectious disease of the liver that can cause miserable symptoms including fatigue, lack of appetite, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Caused by a virus, hepatitis C affects about 200 million people worldwide. In the U.S. alone, one to two percent of the population is infected. Not only can this infectious disease cause scarring of the liver, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure, but a significant number of people with hepatitis C also develop sometimes fatal liver disease or cancer.
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Studies Highlight Challenge of Controlling Resistant Bacteria in Hospitals
healthday.com - 4-14-11
Two new studies highlight the complexities hospitals face in controlling and containing the spread of potentially lethal bacteria that are resistant to many antibiotics.
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Obesity, Disparities in Care Help Drive U.S. Stillbirths: Studies
healthday.com - 4-14-11
While the rate of stillbirths in the United States has dropped over the past few decades, this tragic outcome is still a reality for far too many couples, experts say.
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Experimental Alzheimer's Disease Drugs Might Help Patients With Nerve Injuries
sciencedaily.com - 4-14-11
Drugs already in development to treat Alzheimer's disease may eventually be tapped for a different purpose altogether: re-growing the ends of injured nerves to relieve pain and paralysis. According to a new Johns Hopkins study, experimental compounds originally designed to combat a protein that builds up in Alzheimer's-addled brains appear to make crushed or cut nerve endings grow back significantly faster, a potential boon for those who suffer from neuropathies or traumatic injuries.
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New Drug May Reduce Seizures in Epilepsy
sciencedaily.com - 4-14-11
A new drug called perampanel appears to significantly reduce seizures in people with hard-to-control epilepsy, according to results of the first clinical trial to test the higher 12 mg dose of the drug. The late-breaking research will be presented at the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, April 9-16, 2011, in Honolulu.
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Brain Nerve Stimulation Could Speed Up Learning, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-14-11
In a breakthrough that may aid treatment of learning impairments, strokes, tinnitus and chronic pain, UT Dallas researchers have found that brain nerve stimulation accelerates learning in laboratory tests.
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Eating oily fish while pregnant 'cuts chances of post-natal depression'
dailymail.co.uk - 4-13-11
Eating fish during pregnancy could cut a woman's odds of developing post-natal depression.
Research suggests that omega-3 fatty acids, which are particularly abundant in oily fish such as salmon, protect against the baby blues.
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Europeans warned to avoid drinking milk or eating vegetables due to high radiation levels
naturalnews.com - 4-13-11
The radiation risk from Fukushima is "no longer negligable," says CRIIRAD, the French research authority on radioactivity. It is now warning expectant mothers and young children to avoid drinking milk or rainwater. They should also avoid certain types of vegetables and cheese due to the dangerously high levels of radiation they may contain thanks to the radioactive fallout spreading across the globe.
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Public school bans students from bringing lunches from home, forces them to eat cafeteria food
naturalnews.com - 4-13-11
Individual responsibility and personal freedom are becoming a thing of the past in the nation's public schools, as strict control over what students can and cannot eat -- or bring to school to eat -- escalates to near-dictatorial levels. The Chicago Tribune reports that for the past six years, Little Village Academy on Chicago's West Side has prohibited students from bringing their own lunches from home, a policy that many say subverts parental authority and violates students' rights.
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Cancer-detecting dogs could be coming to a hospital near you
naturalnews.com - 4-13-11
Emerging cancer screening methods could soon be as simple as asking your best furry friend if you have the disease. Japanese researchers have published a study in the British Medical Journal which claims that cancer cells actually emit some kind of unique scent from the body, and that dogs can be trained to detect it.
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Brisk Walk Can Boost Blood Flow to the Brain: Report
healthday.com - 4-13-11
Moderate aerobic exercise helps boost blood flow to the brain in older women, new research reveals.
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An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
healthday.com - 4-13-11
Eating apples every day may be good for your cardiovascular health, new research suggests.
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New Compounds Show Promise Against Hepatitis C Infection
sciencedaily.com - 4-13-11
Approximately 270-300 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C, and about 1%-2% of the U.S. population is infected. This infectious disease can lead to scarring of the liver, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure. A significant number of infected patients develop liver disease or cancer. The current standard treatment is interferon, which has only a 50% success rate. Compounding the 50% failure rate are severe side effects which lead many people to discontinue treatment.
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Persons With Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2, but Without Symptoms, Still Shed Virus
sciencedaily.com - 4-13-11
Persons who have tested positive for herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) but do not have symptoms or genital lesions still experience virus shedding during subclinical (without clinical manifestations) episodes, suggesting a high risk of transmission from persons with unrecognized HSV-2 infection, according to a study in the April 13 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on infectious disease and immunology.
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Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Rapidly Between Bacteria
sciencedaily.com - 4-13-11
The part of bacterial DNA that often carries antibiotic resistance is a master at moving between different types of bacteria and adapting to widely differing bacterial species, shows a study made by a research team at the University of Gothenburg in cooperation with Chalmers University of Technology.
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Honey Can Reverse Antibiotic Resistance, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-13-11
Manuka honey could be an efficient way to clear chronically infected wounds and could even help reverse bacterial resistance to antibiotics, according to research presented at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Conference in Harrogate.
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Why covering your child in suntan lotion could give them rickets
dailymail.co.uk - 4-12-11
Poppy Brett thought she would just have to accept that her son Jago didn't have the energy to keep up with his friends, didn't like playing football and always seemed tired.
Their GP could find nothing wrong with him: he slept 12 hours a night and had a healthy diet. It never occurred to his mother that the factor 25 sun cream she slathered on him in the summer might be to blame for his exhaustion.
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Higher vitamin D dose could help elderly protect eyesight
telegraph.co.uk - 4-12-11
A study of older women found that those who had the highest levels of the vitamin, found in oily fish and eggs as well as dietary supplement pills, were nearly 60 per cent less likely to contract age-related macular degeneration.
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AACR: Multiple Risk Factors Identified for Ovarian Cancer
medpagetoday.com - 4-12-11
Just as the histology of ovarian cancer is heterogeneous, risk factors associated with the major disease subtypes also differ, researchers reported here.
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Why old people hit the sack so early
msnbc.msn.com - 4-12-11
Hormones that circulate in the blood could explain why older people have different sleep patterns than younger people, a new study suggests.
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Why it's harder to multitask as you get older
cnn.com - 4-12-11
There you are with a phone in one hand and a drawer handle in the other, and after reading a few incoming texts you've completely forgotten why you went to open the drawer in the first place. These kinds of moments that happen to all of us, even 20-somethings. They're related to natural brain aging.
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Pharmaceutical drugs causing spike in diseases they supposedly treat
naturalnews.com - 4-12-11
A recent U.S. News & World Report piece highlights new studies that point to serious problems down the road for the over-medicated population. According to reports, more than 60 percent of American adults now take at least one drug every day for a chronic health problem, and more than half of seniors take at least three medications every day. But the end result is more diseases like diabetes, heart disease, obesity, arthritis and cancer.
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Sperm counts continue to plummet, say researchers
naturalnews.com - 4-12-11
Environmental pollution, plastic chemicals, pharmaceutical drugs, pesticides, unhealthy diets, radiation-emitting technologies -- these and many other factors are contributing to an epidemic decline in sperm counts among modern men, say researchers. According to reports, an estimated eight million US couples now have fertility problems, and about half of these cases involve men with poor sperm quality.
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Mechanism for Esophageal Cancer Uncovered
sciencedaily.com - 4-12-11
A gene thought to be associated with cancer development can be a tumor suppressor gene in mice, researchers have discovered. Understanding which genes are involved in spreading cancer could lead to future therapies.
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Light, Chemistry, Action: New Technique to Target Skin Cancers?
sciencedaily.com - 4-12-11
Targeted photodynamic therapy can completely eradicate some models of cancer, according to the latest research by UK and Swiss scientists, published in the current issue of the British Journal of Cancer.
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Vision Loss in Eye Disease Slowed Using Novel Encapsulated Cell Therapy
sciencedaily.com - 4-12-11
A phase 2 clinical trial for the treatment of a severe form of age-related macular degeneration called geographic atrophy (GA) has become the first study to show the benefit of a therapy to slow the progression of vision loss for this disease. The results highlight the benefit of the use of a neurotrophic factor to treat GA and provide hope to nearly one million Americans suffering from GA.
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Blueberries May Inhibit Development of Fat Cells
sciencedaily.com - 4-12-11
The benefits of blueberry consumption have been demonstrated in several nutrition studies, more specifically the cardio-protective benefits derived from their high polyphenol content. Blueberries have shown potential to have a positive effect on everything from aging to metabolic syndrome. Recently, a researcher from Texas Woman's University (TWU) in Denton, TX, examined whether blueberries could play a role in reducing one of the world's greatest health challenges: obesity.
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Doctors Often Wouldn't Follow Their Own Advice: Study
healthday.com - 4-12-11
When faced with a choice of treatments, primary care doctors often choose a different option than they would recommend to their patients, a new study finds.
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Braids, Weaves May Lead to Balding in Black Women
healthday.com - 4-12-11
A new study of middle-aged black women finds that almost 30 percent suffer from baldness and scarring in the center of their scalps, possibly because braids and weaves pull their hair too tight.
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New Pill for MS Shows Promise in Clinical Trial
healthday.com - 4-12-11
A new oral medication for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) shows promise in slowing disease progression, limiting brain atrophy and reducing MS relapses, a recently completed two-year clinical trial demonstrates.
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The Women's Health Initiative and the Body Politic
nytimes.com - 4-11-11
In 1898, German doctors fed fresh cow ovaries to a young woman suffering from severe hot flashes after having her ovaries removed. It was a milestone of sorts in women's medicine, leading to crude hormone treatments and eventually commercially prepared drugs to relieve the symptoms of menopause.
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9 Causes of Hair Loss in Women
abcnews.go.com - 4-11-11
Everyone loses hair. It happens during your morning shower, while you're blowing it dry, or when you give it a quick brush-and that's normal. "On average, we lose fifty to a hundred hairs a day," says Francesca Fusco, MD, a New York City dermatologist who specializes in hair loss. "That's just hair going through its cycles, and there will be a new one to replace it." But hair loss may be a sign of a more serious medical condition that needs an evaluation by a dermatologist and possible treatment. Here are nine causes of hair loss and how to deal with them.
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Scientists use computer to 'read' human thoughts
usatoday.com - 4-11-11
After hooking up a computer to human brains, scientists were able to program the computer to "read" the thoughts of disabled patients, thereby enabling them to control the cursor on the screen.
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Research: Unemployment plays role in early deaths
usatoday.com - 4-11-11
In the new study, investigators analyzed 40 years of data from 20 million people in 15 countries and found that being unemployed increases a person's risk of premature death by 63%. The quality of a nation's health-care system did not affect this level of risk, the study authors noted.
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Many Eco-friendly bulbs contain toxic chemicals
naturalnews.com - 4-11-11
Though the notion now borders on political incorrectness among many environmentalists, the simple incandescent light bulb is still the cleanest, most non-toxic form of consumer lighting available. A new study published by the University of California - Irvine (UCI) has found that popular energy-saving LED light bulbs are filled with high levels of lead, arsenic, and various other toxic chemicals.
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Scientists Develop 'Universal' Virus-Free Method to Turn Blood Cells Into 'Beating' Heart Cells
sciencedaily.com - 4-11-11
Johns Hopkins scientists have developed a simplified, cheaper, all-purpose method they say can be used by scientists around the globe to more safely turn blood cells into heart cells. The method is virus-free and produces heart cells that beat with nearly 100 percent efficiency, they claim.
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Ozone Reduces Fungal Spoilage of Fruits and Vegetables
sciencedaily.com - 4-11-11
Storing fruits and vegetables in ozone-enriched environments reduces spoilage explains a scientist at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Conference in Harrogate. Dr Ian Singleton explains how ozone treatment could be a safe, effective replacement for pesticides as it leaves no residue on foods.
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'Organic' Label Seems to Make Food Taste Better
healthday.com - 4-11-11
An "organic" label on foods is enough to make people believe the food items are healthier and tastier, new research suggests.
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Heavy Teens at Increased Risk of Heart Disease Years Later
health.com - 4-10-11
Teenage boys who are even slightly overweight face an increased risk of heart disease later in life, even if they slim down as adults, according to a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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High-dose vitamin pills 'could stop women conceiving'
telegraph.co.uk - 4-10-11
Women who take high-dose vitamin pills could be reducing their chances of getting pregnant, a fertility expert has warned.
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Arsenic and toxic metals found in baby foods
telegraph.co.uk - 4-10-11
Last night there were calls for urgent new safety rules to control the presence of the poisons in foods intended for young children.
The findings come as officials at the Food Standards Agency and the European Commission are conducting an urgent review to establish new limits for the long term exposure of these contaminants in food.
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New study says plant-based foods help prevent cancer
naturalnews.com - 4-10-11
Researchers from the University of Minnesota Hormel Institute now admit that plant-based foods are highly beneficial in helping to prevent cancer, particularly among those who have the highest risk of developing the disease. Published in the journal Nature Reviews Cancer, their study says that plant phytochemicals -- which include powerful nutrients and antioxidants like selenium, resveratrol, beta-carotene, and lycopene, -- are a viable option in cancer prevention.
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Colgate accused of stealing, patenting ancient Indian toothpaste formula
naturalnews.com - 4-10-11
Highly-populated, developing nations like India are the target of many Western corporations because these countries represent a brand new avenue for reaping huge profits. And corporations often unscrupulously hijack the traditions of those countries in the process. The Colgate Palmolive company is one such corporation that is the subject of a legal dispute alleging that it stole an ancient Indian toothpaste formula and patented it as its own.
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Pharmaceutical drugs causing spike in diseases they supposedly treat
naturalnews.com - 4-10-11
A recent U.S. News & World Report piece highlights new studies that point to serious problems down the road for the over-medicated population. According to reports, more than 60 percent of American adults now take at least one drug every day for a chronic health problem, and more than half of seniors take at least three medications every day. But the end result is more diseases like diabetes, heart disease, obesity, arthritis and cancer.
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New study - You can literally spice up your love life with spices
naturalnews.com - 4-10-11
Drugs for pumping up sex lives come with a long list of potentially bothersome and even dangerous side effects. But scientists from the University of Guelph have come up with evidence natural aphrodisiacs exist. In fact, if you want to spice up your sex life, try doing it literally -- with spices.
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Seventy-five percent of prostate cancer cases treated with aggressive drugs and surgery -- even when it's useless to do so
naturalnews.com - 4-10-11
More than 75 percent of men diagnosed with prostate cancer are treated aggressively, even though most prostate cancers are slow-growing and will never pose a risk to a man's life, according to a study conducted by researchers from The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.
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Fighting Malaria With African Plant Extracts
sciencedaily.com - 4-10-11
Plants used in traditional African medicine may have an effect on the malaria parasite as well as the mosquitoes that spread the disease. A Norwegian pilot project is now indexing and testing these plants.
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Drinking over recommended limit 'raises cancer risk'
bbc.co.uk - 4-10-11
Drinking more than a pint of beer a day can substantially increase the risk of some cancers, research suggests.
More...


Hormone Linked to Absence of Periods in Women With Low Body Fat
healthday.com - 4-10-11
A lack of leptin contributes to the absence of menstrual periods in women with extremely low levels of body fat, but treatment with a synthetic form of the hormone may restore both the menstrual cycle and fertility, a new study indicates.
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UK Teen Tanning Bed Ban: Coming to America?
abcnews.go.com - 4-9-11
The bronzed cast of MTV's "The Jersey Shore" might not be amused. England and Wales have banned the use of tanning booths for those under 18 years of age, enforcing it with a fine up to $32,000.
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Student 'addiction' to technology 'similar to drug cravings', study finds
telegraph.co.uk - 4-9-11
Researchers found nearly four in five students had significant mental and physical distress, panic, confusion and extreme isolation when forced to unplug from technology for an entire day.
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Scientists issue urgent world-wide warning on bacteria with superbug gene
naturalnews.com - 4-9-11
Nuclear meltdowns. Oil spills. More strife in Africa and the Middle East. GMO tainted crops. So what else could happen? Unfortunately, another problem has surfaced that has scientists calling for the "urgent need for global action". This time, it's worrisome news about a gene that turns bacteria into not just superbugs -- but SUPER superbugs.
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You're not alone: How underestimating others' negative feelings can increase your own
naturalnews.com - 4-9-11
Do you ever feel like everyone else is always having fun and enjoying life while you feel dull and uninteresting? Or perhaps you sometimes feel as though you are the only one with any real problems while everyone else's life is a skate in the park? A new study out of Stanford University has found that many people tend to underestimate the problems and pain that others feel while amplifying their own, which can lead to excessive and unnecessary negative feelings, and even depression.
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New study says plant-based foods help prevent cancer
naturalnews.com - 4-9-11
Researchers from the University of Minnesota Hormel Institute now admit that plant-based foods are highly beneficial in helping to prevent cancer, particularly among those who have the highest risk of developing the disease. Published in the journal Nature Reviews Cancer, their study says that plant phytochemicals -- which include powerful nutrients and antioxidants like selenium, resveratrol, beta-carotene, and lycopene, -- are a viable option in cancer prevention.
More...


Is Beauty Found in the Whites of the Eyes? 'Red Eyes' Associated With the Sad and Unattractive
sciencedaily.com - 4-9-11
Beauty is said to be in the eye of the beholder, but a new study reveals that the reverse is also true; unattractiveness is in the eye of the beheld. Research published in Ethology finds that people with bloodshot eyes are considered sadder, unhealthier and less attractive than people whose eye whites are untinted, a cue which is uniquely human.
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Parkinson's May Have Links to Certain Cancers, Study Suggests
healthday.com - 4-9-11
People with Parkinson's disease appear to be at increased risk for melanoma and prostate cancer, and this greater risk may extend to their close and distant relatives, a new study suggests.
More...


Coping With Graves' Disease Lasts a Lifetime
healthday.com - 4-9-11
At first, everyone thought that Sasha Asumaa's problems were those of a typical teenage girl.
The 16-year-old was always tired and had trouble sleeping. She was moody and grumpy. Teenage stuff.
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With the Thyroid, Too Much or Too Little Sparks Trouble
healthday.com - 4-9-11
The human body's intricate framework of interconnected systems, which work together to maintain health and life, depend on one small, butterfly-shaped gland that weighs less than half an ounce.
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Nearly 20% of Lung Cancer Patients Keep Smoking
healthday.com - 4-9-11
Many patients diagnosed with lung cancer -- as well as their family caregivers -- continue to smoke even though doing so may jeopardize their recovery and long-term health outcome, says a study sponsored by the U.S. National Cancer Institute.
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In Pain? Try Meditation
news.health.com - 4-8-11
You don't have to be a Buddhist monk to experience the health benefits of meditation. According to a new study, even a brief crash course in meditative techniques can sharply reduce a person's sensitivity to pain.
More...


When a headache really is a brain tumor
cnn.com - 4-8-11
It's become a classic scenario: You have a headache and after Googling it, you find out a headache can be a sign of a brain tumor.
If you rush to the emergency room suspicious that you have a tumor or something else deadly serious, chances are you're being paranoid. But sometimes you're not being paranoid -- you're being right.
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Synthetic drugs send thousands to ER
usatoday.com - 4-8-11
Until he tried a marijuana look-alike product called "K2," David Rozga's most dubious decision was getting a Green Bay Packers tattoo on his shoulder.
Then the 18-year-old athlete and band standout got high on the fake pot last June and complained to a friend "that he felt like he was in hell," his father said.
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Caffeine and Diabetes: Helpful or Harmful?
sciencedaily.com - 4-8-11
A growing body of research suggests that caffeine disrupts glucose metabolism and may contribute to the development and poor control of type 2 diabetes, a major public health problem. A review article in the inaugural issue of Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science, a quarterly peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers, examines the latest evidence, contradicting earlier studies suggesting a protective effect of caffeine.
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Fish Oil Boosts Responses to Breast Cancer Drug Tamoxifen, Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 4-8-11
Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women, with more than 200,000 women diagnosed each year. Being exposed to estrogen over a long period of time is one factor that can increase a woman's risk of developing the disease. One way a woman can combat this risk factor is by taking the breast cancer drug tamoxifen, which interferes with the activity of estrogen. Now, researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center have found that omega-3 fatty acids -- abundant in fish -- could be a safe and beneficial booster for tamoxifen therapy.
More...



sciencedaily.com - 4-8-11

sciencedaily.com - 4-8-11
Cave life is known to favor the evolution of a variety of traits, including blindness and loss of eyes, loss of pigmentation, and changes in metabolism and feeding behavior. Now researchers have added sleeplessness to that list.
More...


Simple Chemical Cocktail Shows First Promise for Limb Re-Growth in Mammals
sciencedaily.com - 4-8-11
Move over, newts and salamanders. The mouse may join you as the only animal that can re-grow their own severed limbs. Researchers are reporting that a simple chemical cocktail can coax mouse muscle fibers to become the kinds of cells found in the first stages of a regenerating limb.
More...


Drinking over the limit 'raises cancer risk'
bbc.co.uk - 4-8-11
Drinking more than a pint of beer a day can substantially increase the risk of some cancers, research shows.
More...


Scientists Use Computer to 'Read' Human Thoughts
healthday.com - 4-8-11
After hooking up a computer to human brains, scientists were able to program the computer to "read" the thoughts of disabled patients, thereby enabling them to control the cursor on the screen.
More...


Report: Hospital Errors May Be Far More Common Than Suspected
healthday.com - 4-8-11
A new method for identifying medical errors contends that as many as 90 percent of hospital mistakes are overlooked.
More...


Video Games Might Aid in Stroke Rehab
healthday.com - 4-8-11
Playing video games while recovering after a stroke appears to promote arm strength and function, Canadian researchers find.
More...


USC Researchers Say Pollution May Be Harming Our Brains
losangeles.cbslocal.com - 4-8-11
New research suggests that pollution in Southern California may be harming our brains.
We already know that pollution can do harm to our lungs, but research from the University of Southern California suggests that residents here are even worse off thanks to our traffic-polluted freeways.
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Ecstasy use leads to brain damage and loss of memory, groundbreaking research reveals
dailymail.co.uk - 4-7-11
Ecstaasy users risk damage to the brain leading to significant memory loss, a groundbreaking study has found.
The research is the first to show how long-term use of the Class-A drug causes the hippocampus, the brain's 'memory store', to shrink.
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The latest super food? Tangerines 'a tonic for your heart'
dailymail.co.uk - 4-7-11
We all know how an apple a day is supposed to keep the doctor away - now it seems the same is true for tangerines.
According to research, eating the fruit could protect against heart attacks, diabetes and stroke as well as staving off obesity.
More...


Could Cancer Prevention Someday Be As Easy As Eating Strawberries?
abcnews.go.com - 4-7-11
Preventing esophageal cancer could someday be as easy as eating strawberries, according to preliminary new research.
At the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, researchers presented data that suggests eating freeze-dried strawberries is the key.
More...


Restless legs may be sign of heart risks
usatoday.com - 4-7-11
The nighttime twitching of restless legs syndrome may be more than an annoyance: New research suggests that in some people, it could be a sign of hidden heart problems.
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New EU policy welcomes untested GMOs into food chain despite widespread rejection by farmers
naturalnews.com - 4-7-11
After much deliberation, the European Union (EU) Commission has decided to scrap its zero tolerance policy concerning the contamination of its animal feed supply with genetically-modified organisms (GMO). Despite the fact that, year after year, farmers continue to dump GM crops and consumers continue to reject them, the Commission has decided to cave to pressure placed upon it by U.S. biotechnology giants like Monsanto.
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Memory Problems May Be Sign of Stroke Risk
sciencedaily.com - 4-7-11
People who have memory problems or other declines in their mental abilities may be at higher risk for stroke, according to a study released February 9 that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 63rd Annual Meeting in Honolulu April 9 to April 16, 2011.
More...


Brain Development Switch Could Affect Schizophrenia, Other Conditions
sciencedaily.com - 4-7-11
An international team of scientists lead by researchers from Duke University and Johns Hopkins University have discovered a key "switch" in the brain that allows neurons to stop dividing so that these cells can migrate toward their final destinations in the brain.
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Common Dietary Fat and Intestinal Microbes Linked to Heart Disease
sciencedaily.com - 4-7-11
A new pathway has been discovered that links a common dietary lipid and intestinal microflora with an increased risk of heart disease, according to a Cleveland Clinic study published in the latest issue of Nature.
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Control the Cursor With Power of Thought
sciencedaily.com - 4-7-11
The act of mind reading is something usually reserved for science-fiction movies but researchers in America have used a technique, usually associated with identifying epilepsy, for the first time to show that a computer can listen to our thoughts.
More...


Money woes 'linked to rise in depression'
bbc.co.uk - 4-7-11
Economic problems may be fuelling a rise in depression in England, it has been suggested.
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Coffee Addiction May Be Grounded in Genes
healthday.com - 4-7-11
Genetics may help determine how much caffeine one craves, new research indicates, with differences in two specific genes driving people to consume more -- or less -- of the world's most popular stimulant.
More...


Study Probes Potential Link Between Welding, Parkinson's Disease
healthday.com - 4-7-11
Manganese in welding fumes may affect welders' brains over time, according to a new, small study.
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'Retail Therapy' Might Really Work
healthday.com - 4-7-11
A shopping trip-a-day may help keep the doctor away, not to mention the Grim Reaper, a new study from Taiwan suggests.
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Teen Weight Affects Later Heart Disease Risk: Study
healthday.com - 4-7-11
What you weigh in your teen years can have far-reaching effects on your heart health in the future, suggests new research.
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Link Between Chronic Depression and Accelerated Immune Cell Aging
sciencedaily.com - 4-6-11
Certain cases of major depression are associated with premature aging of immune cells, which may make people more susceptible to other serious illness, according to findings from a new UCSF-led study.
More...


One Step Closer to a Diagnostic Test for Schizophrenia
sciencedaily.com - 4-6-11
Scientists in Finland have revealed metabolic abnormalities that are associated with schizophrenia. This may be an important step towards development of a clinical test of the disease.
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Bad Bugs Slideshow: Identifying Bugs and Their Bites
webmd.com - 4-6-11
Many bugs give us reason for pause, including poisonous spiders, chiggers, bees and lice. But few get under our skin - quite literally - like the tick. If you enjoy the outdoors, be careful of ticks - they can attach as you brush past grass and plants. Ticks don't always carry diseases, and most bites are not serious. But they can carry diseases including Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.
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Are your joints older than you? How modern life can make you creaky before your time - whatever your lifestyle
dailymail.co.uk - 4-6-11
Creaky joints are something we accept as an inevitable part of ageing. But a recent survey has now found that most people in the UK have joints that are ageing faster than the rest of their body.
The average person has joints 12 years older than their actual chronological age, according to the study of 13,000 people.
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Opioids Now Most Prescribed Class of Medications in America
healthday.com - 4-6-11
Two reports by addiction researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the National Institute on Drug Abuse show a drastic shift in prescribing patterns impacting the magnitude of opioid substance abuse in America. The reports, published in JAMA, recommend a comprehensive effort to reduce public health risks while improving patient care, including better training for prescribers, pain management treatment assessment, personal responsibility and public education.
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Risks of Estrogen Hormone Therapy Seen to Fade After Treatment Ends
healthday.com - 4-6-11
In the latest analysis from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, researchers report that risks to postmenopausal women who were taking estrogen-only hormone therapy faded rapidly after they ended the treatment.
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Bone Marrow Cells That Transform Into Skin Cells Could Revolutionize Approach to Wound Treatment
sciencedaily.com - 4-5-11
Researchers at King's College London and Osaka University in Japan have identified specific bone marrow cells that can transform into skin cells to repair damaged skin tissue, according to a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Drink can make you happy or sad depending on your make-up
telegraph.co.uk - 4-5-11
Scientists have discovered that some people physically get a buzz from alcohol while others find it makes them depressed.
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Selenium detoxifies the body of toxic mercury and reverses aging
naturalnews.com - 4-5-11
A recent study published in the journal Neurotoxicology says that the essential element selenium effectively scours the body of toxic mercury buildup and mitigates its neurotoxic effects. Selenium also visibly helps to improve mobility and athletic ability as the body ages, according to the research.
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Study: Pesticides, toxins can absorb directly into crops through soil
naturalnews.com - 4-5-11
A recent study put forth by Nanjing Agricultural University and funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China provides further insight into the delicate relationship between plants and the soil in which they are grown. An experiment involving ryegrass shed light on how environmental toxins, chemical pesticides, and other pollutants are fully capable of absorbing directly into plants and distributing throughout plant cells.
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Autism: Exceptional Visual Abilities Explained
sciencedaily.com - 4-5-11
Researchers directed by Dr. Laurent Mottron at the University of Montreal's Centre for Excellence in Pervasive Development Disorders (CETEDUM) have determined that people with autism concentrate more brain resources in the areas associated with visual detection and identification, and conversely, have less activity in the areas used to plan and control thoughts and actions. This might explain their outstanding capacities in visual tasks.
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Facial Structures of Men and Women Have Become More Similar Over Time
sciencedaily.com - 4-5-11
sciencedaily.comResearch from North Carolina State University shows that they really don't make women like they used to, at least in Spain. The study, which examined hundreds of Spanish and Portuguese skulls spanning four centuries, shows that differences in the craniofacial features of men and women have become less pronounced.
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Autistic brains "organised differently" say scientists
bbc.co.uk - 4-5-11
People with autism use their brains differently from other people, which may explain why some have extraordinary abilities to remember and draw objects in detail, according to new research.
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Chemical found which 'makes bone marrow repair skin'
bbc.co.uk - 4-5-11
The chemical which summons stem cells from bone marrow to the site of a wound has been discovered by scientists in the UK and Japan.
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Could Pop Music Be Linked to Depression?
healthday.com - 4-5-11
A preliminary study of American kids suggests a connection between listening to pop music and suffering from major depressive disorder.
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Too Many Hours at Work Might Harm the Heart
healthday.com - 4-5-11
It may be time to add a long workday to the list of risk factors for heart disease.
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Compulsive Eaters May Have 'Food Addiction,' Study Finds
healthday.com - 4-5-11
People who are compulsive eaters show similar activity in the same brain regions as people who are addicted to drugs or alcohol, according to new research.
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ADHD and Prenatal Alcohol Exposure: Comparing Profiles of Learning and Memory Impairments in Two Groups of Children
sciencedaily.com - 4-4-11
While children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are known to have deficits in verbal learning and recall, the specifics of these deficits remain unclear. This study compared the verbal learning and memory performance of children with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) with that of children with attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), finding that both groups of children have difficulty with learning and memory but in different ways.
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Magnesium Deficiency: Not Always a Nutritional Problem
sciencedaily.com - 4-4-11
Researchers and scientists of the Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin, in cooperation with the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, and colleagues from the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and the Czech Republic have succeeded in identifying a genetic cause of magnesium deficiency.
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Mummies Show Heart Disease Is an Ancient Problem
healthday.com - 4-4-11
The earliest known case of coronary artery disease has been found in the 3,550-year-old mummy of an Egyptian princess. She lived between 1580 and 1550 B.C., and died in her early 40s, say researchers.
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Study Links Smoking, Breast Cancer in Older Women
healthday.com - 4-4-11
There's a significant link between smoking and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, but it depends on their body weight, researchers report.
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Add Cancer to Health Risks of Diabetes: Study
healthday.com - 4-4-11
Diabetes is already linked to a number of complications, but emerging evidence suggests an increased risk of cancer can be added to that list.
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Common household materials contains a toxic brew of dangerous chemicals
naturalnews.com - 4-3-11
A new report from HealthyStuff.org has revealed that many common household materials are full of dangerous chemicals that cause asthma, birth defects, learning disabilities, reproductive problems, liver toxicity, and cancer. According to tests conducted by the non-profit Ecology Center, vinyl flooring and wallpaper in particular are loaded with phthalates, organotins, and lead, which are all a serious health threat.
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Politics v. Science: Understanding Cannabis Therapeutics Before it is Censored
naturalnews.com - 4-3-11
A milestone quietly occurred last month, and one the federal government would prefer to ignore. Yet, it could mean a step in the right direction for hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of people who use a centuries-old botanical medicine: cannabis, otherwise know as marijuana.
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Does Stress Reduction Benefit Cancer Patients' Health?
healthday.com - 4-3-11
Reducing cancer patients' stress may benefit their health, a new study finds.
Researchers investigated whether chronic stress associated with cancer diagnosis accelerated shortening of telomeres. These structures on the ends of chromosomes protect the chromosome from deteriorating, breaking apart or joining with other chromosomes, which can lead to mutations.
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Study Hints at Link Between Antidepressants and Heart Trouble
healthday.com - 4-3-11
Men taking antidepressants may be at risk for atherosclerosis, which can increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke, a small, preliminary study suggests.
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Yoga May Also Calm a Dangerous Irregular Heartbeat
healthday.com - 4-3-11
In a small preliminary study, the ancient art of yoga appeared to halve the number of episodes of a potentially dangerous irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation.
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One-third of Americans are lacking vitamin D
usatoday.com - 4-2-11
About one-third of Americans are not getting enough vitamin D, a government report says.
The report, out Wednesday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, parallels what many other studies have suggested in recent years: that a large chunk of the population is at risk for low vitamin D levels.
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Eco-farming outperforms GMOs at improving crop yields and growing more food, says report
naturalnews.com - 4-2-11
A new United Nations (UN) report blows a major hole in the modern myth that genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) are the answer to improving crop yields and ending world hunger. A UN Special Rapporteur explains that small-scale eco-farming reliant on natural growing methods works better than GMO and other pesticide-based agricultural systems at producing more and better food -- and if implemented on a wider scope, small-scale farming could double the world's food production capacity within ten years.
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Probiotic Bacteria Could Help Treat Crohn's Disease
sciencedaily.com - 4-2-11
New research suggests that infection with a probiotic strain of E. coli bacteria could help treat an reduce the negative effects of another E. coli infection that may be associated with Crohn's disease. Researchrs from the University of Auckland, New Zealand publish their results in the April 2011 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.
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How Brain's Memory Center Repairs Damage from Head Injury
sciencedaily.com - 4-2-11
Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have described for the first time how the brain's memory center repairs itself following severe trauma -- a process that may explain why it is harder to bounce back after multiple head injuries.
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Skywalker Enzyme Ensures Optimal Communication Between Neurons
sciencedaily.com - 4-2-11
Patrik Verstreken (VIB/K.U.Leuven) has discovered the mechanism that ensures neurons can continue to send the right signals for long consecutive periods -- a process that is disrupted in neurological diseases such as Parkinson's. Verstreken and his colleagues discovered that an enzyme called Skywalker controls the subtle balance in communication.
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Cat Allergy Vaccine Safe and Effective, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-2-11
Good-bye itching, watering eyes and sneezing. McMaster University researchers have developed a vaccine which successfully treats people with an allergy to cats.
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Prostate screening has no benefit
bbc.co.uk - 4-2-11
Prostate cancer screening does not save lives, according to a 20-year study, published in the British Medical Journal.
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Is It a Cold? Or an Allergy?
healthday.com - 4-2-11
Colds and allergies can cause similar symptoms, and finding out which condition you have is the first step in getting relief, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).
More...


Antidepressant might cause suicidal thoughts
msnbc.msn.com - 4-1-11
A new report from the drug company GlaxoSmithKline concludes that its antidepressant Paxil might make adults with major depression more likely to become suicidal.
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Study: Fresh food diet cuts exposure to chemical BPA
usatoday.com - 4-1-11
Adults and children can reduce their exposure to hormone-disrupting chemicals, including bisphenol-A (BPA), by eating more fruits and vegetables and less food from plastic containers and metal cans, a study today says.
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Food manufacturers continue to disguise inflation by gradually shrinking product sizes
naturalnews.com - 4-1-11
It is a tactic that has been long employed to avoid having to directly raise prices for consumers, but one that has become increasingly more obvious in recent days. In response to rapid inflation and rising food costs, many food manufacturers are continuing to shrink or otherwise redesign their product packaging in an effort to disguise the fact that actual food prices are increasing. In the end, consumers get less product than they think they are getting, even if prices appear to remain the same.
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Eskimo study shows power of omega-3s to protect health, even in obese
naturalnews.com - 4-1-11
Overweight and worried about your health risks? You should be. Obesity has become an epidemic in the US and it goes hand in hand with a host of other modern-day "epidemics", including diabetes and heart disease.
More...


Japan radiation detected in at least 15 states and in milk samples in Washington state
naturalnews.com - 4-1-11
Radioactive isotopes unique to the Fukushima disaster are now being detected in at least 15 US states, according to recent reports from CNN. And the Associated Press (AP) has issued a report claiming that milk samples taken in Washington state have tested positive for low levels of the same radioactive component, Iodine-131, raising concerns about the true widespread effects of the Fukushima nuclear fallout.
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Patients in Their 50s With Diabetes Have Nearly Double the Risk for Developing 'Geriatric' Ailments, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 4-1-11
Middle-aged adults with diabetes are much more likely to develop age-related conditions than their counterparts who don't have diabetes, according to a new study by the University of Michigan Health System and VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System.
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Brain Scans Reveal Differences in Brain Structure in Teenagers With Severe Antisocial Behavior
sciencedaily.com - 4-1-11
Brain scans of aggressive and antisocial teenage boys with conduct disorder (CD) have revealed differences in the structure of the developing brain that could link to their behaviour problems.
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Through the Looking Glass: Research Into Brain's Ability to Understand Mirror-Image Words Sheds Light on Dyslexia
sciencedaily.com - 4-1-11
Human beings understand words reflected in a mirror without thinking about it, just like those written normally, at least for a few instants. Researchers from the Basque Centre on Cognition, Brain and Languages (Spain) have shown this in a study that could also help to increase our understanding of the phenomenon of dyslexia.
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Fruit Fly's Response to Starvation Could Help Control Human Appetites
sciencedaily.com - 4-1-11
Biologists at UC San Diego have identified the molecular mechanisms triggered by starvation in fruit flies that enhance the nervous system's response to smell, allowing these insects and presumably vertebrates -- including humans -- to become more efficient and voracious foragers when hungry.
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Migraine heart link in children
bbc.co.uk - 4-1-11
Children who see flashing lights during a migraine have twice the normal likelihood of having a hole-in-the-heart, a study suggests.
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When Pets Outlive Owners, 'Retirement Homes' Offer Refuge
healthday.com - 4-1-11
Betty Kyle knew that after she passed away her daughters did not want to care for her menagerie of four Italian greyhounds, two donkeys, a goat and horse.
More...


FDA Panel Delays Action on Dyes Used in Foods
healthday.com - 4-1-11
Foods that contain dyes used to enhance color don't need warning labels, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel said Thursday.
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Prostate Cancer Screening Doesn't Cut Death Rates: Study
healthday.com - 4-1-11
A 20-year study from Sweden suggests that screening for prostate cancer does not substantially reduce the risk of death from the disease.
More...


 



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