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April, 2012 - Herbal and Health News

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Girls happy with bodies less depressed
upi.com - 4-30-12
Teen girls happy with the size and shape of their bodies report higher levels of self-esteem, U.S. researchers said.
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How Protective Parents Imperil Kids at the Playgroun
abcnews.go.com - 4-30-12
For parents who hover, a playground can look like a very dangerous place for their kids. But medical experts warn that parental efforts to keep their young children safe often backfire -- and end up harming them instead.
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How to live to a ripe old age: Regularly eating strawberries and blueberries can stave off mental decline by more than two years
dailymail.co.uk - 4-30-12
Eating blueberries and strawberries may stave off mental decline in later life, claim researchers.
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Deaths in childbirth rise amid struggle with complex cases
telegraph.co.uk - 4-30-12
The number of women dying in childbirth has risen dramatically as maternity units struggle to cope with rising numbers of older mothers and more complex cases, research has found.
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5 mind-bending facts about dreams
msnbc.msn.com - 4-30-12
When your head hits the pillow, for many it's lights out for the conscious part of you. But the cells firing in your brain are very much awake, sparking enough energy to produce the sometimes vivid and sometimes downright haunted dreams that take place during the rapid-eye-movement stage of your sleep.
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Cancer Survivors Told To Exercise, Eat Healthily, And Maintain Ideal Bodyweight
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-30-12
If you are a cancer survivor and you want to minimize your risk of that cancer recurring, or another cancer developing, you should eat a healthy diet, do plenty of exercise, and maintain a healthy body weight, says the American Cancer Society in its new guidelines. Colleen Doyle, MS, RD, Director of Nutrition and Physical Activity at the American Cancer Society, and co-author of the guidelines, says most of the recommendations come down to common sense and have been around for many years.
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Yoga May Help Prevent Adolescent Mental Problems
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-30-12
High school students who do yoga may derive psychological benefits, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School reported in the April issue of Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics. Leading author, Jessica Noggle, PhD of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston said that since mental health disorders usually develops in teenage years:
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Soft drinks: Public enemy No.1 in obesity fight?
cnn.com - 4-30-12
Pushing her meal cart into the hospital room, a research assistant hands out tall glasses of reddish-pink liquid, along with a gentle warning: "Remember, you guys have to finish all your Kool-Aid."
More...


Rodenticide poisons veterinary staff
upi.com - 4-30-12
Staff in four U.S. veterinary hospitals who treated dogs that ingested the rodenticide zinc phosphide were poisoned, but all have recovered, officials say.
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Chronic pain common in American adults
upi.com - 4-30-12
Nearly half of all adult Americans lived with chronic pain of one type or another last year, a survey found.
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Being Bullied Tied to Anxiety, Depression in Special-Needs Kids
healthday.com - 4-30-12
Special-needs youth with chronic medical conditions or developmental disabilities are at risk for anxiety and depression if they're excluded, ignored or bullied by other young people, a new small study says.
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Teen Impulsiveness Has Different Sources in ADHD, Substance Use
healthday.com - 4-30-12
Teens with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and teens who start using cigarettes, drugs or alcohol tend to share at least one personality trait: impulsiveness, experts say.
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Unruly Kids May Have a Mental Disorder
sciencedaily.com - 4-30-12
When children behave badly, it's easy to blame their parents. Sometimes, however, such behavior may be due to a mental disorder. Mental illnesses are the No. 1 cause of medical disability in youths ages 15 and older in the United States and Canada, according to the World Health Organization.
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Familiarity With Television Fast-Food Ads Linked to Obesity
sciencedaily.com - 4-30-12
There is a long-held concern that youths who eat a lot of fast food are at risk for becoming overweight. New research presented April 29, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Boston shows that greater familiarity with fast-food restaurant advertising on television is associated with obesity in young people.
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Eyes can become painfully sunburned
upi.com - 4-29-12
Ultraviolet rays from the sun or tanning beds can cause immediate as well as lasting damage to the eyes, U.S. experts say.
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Feds under Obama appear tougher on medical marijuana, disappointing voters
foxnews.com - 4-29-12
President Obama pledged during his 2008 campaign to take a hands-off approach to medical marijuana, but four years later raids and other tactics have forced as many as 200 medical-marijuana growers and distributors to cease operations, resulting in sharp criticism from likely voters and fellow Democrats.
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Deaths in childbirth rise amid struggle with complex cases
telegraph.co.uk - 4-29-12
A study of deaths found the rate of maternal deaths in London has doubled in five years, reaching twice the rate in the rest of the UK.
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African Malaria Parasite Is Genetically Resistant To Best Anti-Malarial Drugs
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-29-12
An online report in Malaria Journal reveals that scientists have discovered genetic mutations in the deadliest malaria parasite in Africa that makes them resistant to one of the most powerful anti-malarial drugs. The researchers point out that the finding is a stark reminder that even the best weapons against malaria could become obsolete.
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Women overestimate birth control success
upi.com - 4-29-12
Most U.S. women overestimate the effectiveness of oral contraceptives and condoms -- some think they are 100 percent effective, a study found.
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Breastfeeding linked to healthy infant gut
upi.com - 4-29-12
Whether a mother feeds her newborn breast milk or formula is linked to differences in bacterial colonization affecting the immune system, U.S. researchers say.
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Parents' Poor Math Skills May = Medication Errors
healthday.com - 4-29-12
Parents with poor math skills are more likely than others to give incorrect doses of medicine to their children, a new study finds.
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Low-Income Mothers May Overfeed Their Infants
healthday.com - 4-29-12
Poor mothers who are single or who have depression are more likely to overfeed their infants by adding cereal to baby bottles, a practice that can lead to excess weight gain in infants, a new study reveals.
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FDA Approves New Impotence Drug Stendra
healthday.com - 4-29-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday announced that it had approved Stendra, a new medication for erectile dysfunction.
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Big Girls Don’t Cry: Overweight Teens Who Are Satisfied With Their Bodies Are Less Depressed, Less Prone to Unhealthy Behaviors
sciencedaily.com - 4-29-12
A study to be published in the June 2012 issue of Journal of Adolescent Health looking at the relationships between body satisfaction and healthy psychological functioning in overweight adolescents has found that young women who are happy with the size and shape of their bodies report higher levels of self-esteem. They may also be protected against the negative behavioral and psychological factors sometimes associated with being overweight.
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Early quality child care, better in school
upi.com - 4-28-12
The quality of care children get before they start school is correlated with how well they do in school, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Dutch judge upholds ban on shops selling pot to tourists
ctv.ca - 4-28-12
Long famous for "coffee shops" where joints and cappuchinos share the menu, the Netherlands' famed tolerance for drugs could be going up in smoke. A judge on Friday upheld a government plan to ban non-Dutch residents from buying marijuana by introducing a "weed pass" available only to residents.
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Women who smoke during pregnancy 'may be more likely to have a child with Asperger's syndrome'
dailymail.co.uk - 4-28-12
Women who smoke during pregnancy could be more likely to have a child with high-functioning autism, say researchers. 'It has long been known that autism is an umbrella term for a wide range of disorders that impair social and communication skills,' said lead author Professor Amy Kalkbrenner from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
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Toddlers prefer live animals to toys: research
telegraph.co.uk - 4-28-12
Young children prefer live animals to playing with toys as a study has found humans have a natural affinity for wildlife.
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New beef brouhaha: Should you be grossed out by 'meat glue?'
msnbc.msn.com - 4-28-12
Still reeling from the specter of "pink slime," beef industry officials on Friday fought off another culinary creep-out: “meat glue.”
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Insufficient Sleep Affects 30% Of US Workers
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-28-12
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that 30% of the nation's workers are sleeping under 6 hours a day, which is less than the 7 to 9 hours that the National Sleep Foundation recommends for healthy adults.
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Soft drinks: Public enemy No.1 in obesity fight?
cnn.com - 4-28-12
Pushing her meal cart into the hospital room, a research assistant hands out tall glasses of reddish-pink liquid, along with a gentle warning: "Remember, you guys have to finish all your Kool-Aid."
More...


FDA Approves New Impotence Drug Stendra
healthday.com - 4-28-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday announced that it had approved Stendra, a new medication for erectile dysfunction.
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Some Schools Don't Let Kids Carry Asthma Inhalers
healthday.com - 4-28-12
Although all 50 states have laws that allow children with asthma to carry inhalers at school and 48 states have laws that let youngsters carry epinephrine pens for serious allergies, experts say that some kids are still being denied access to these lifesaving medications during the school day.
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Vitamin D May Affect Lung Transplant Success
healthday.com - 4-28-12
Vitamin D is important for the health of lung transplant patients, a new study suggests.
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Sperm Viability Greatly Reduced in Offspring of Animals Treated With Common Antibiotic Tetracycline
sciencedaily.com - 4-28-12
n a paper published April 27 in Nature's open access journal Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno report that male pseudoscorpions treated with the antibiotic tetracycline suffer significantly reduced sperm viability and pass this toxic effect on to their untreated sons. They suggest that a similar effect could occur in humans and other species.
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New Form of Intellectual Disability Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 4-28-12
Researchers at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) led a study discovering a gene for a new form of intellectual disability, as well as how it likely affects cognitive development by disrupting neuron functioning.
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Holstein with mad cow disease was lame, lying down
guardian.co.uk - 4-28-12
The cow that was recently discovered with mad cow disease through routine testing in California had been euthanized after it became lame and started lying down at a dairy, federal officials revealed Thursday.
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Having children may not make us happier... but it gives our lives more meaning, says research
dailymail.co.uk - 4-28-12
Having children brings an increased sense of meaning into people’s lives, according to the Prime Minister’s national happiness survey. The latest measure of the country’s well-being yesterday revealed that having children does not necessarily make people happier or more satisfied with their lot. But it does make them feel they have more of a reason for living.
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Breivik case 'shows insanity misconceptions'
bbc.co.uk - 4-28-12
Horrific crimes, such as the Anders Breivik case, illustrate the misconceptions the public has about mental illness, a leading expert says.
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U.S. teens lead in deaths, pot and obesity
upi.com - 4-28-12
U.S. teens smoke the most marijuana in the world, have the highest mortality in the world and have high binge drinking rates, a worldwide study found.
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G-spot found in dead women who was 83
upi.com - 4-27-12
A Florida gynecologist said he discovered the G-spot last fall during a post-mortem on an 83-year-old woman at a university in Poland.
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Obama Accused Of Lying About Medical Marijuana Laws
huffingtonpost.com - 4-27-12
President Obama is accused of lying about federal laws regarding marijuana. The charge, from Fire Dog Lake's Jon Walker, comes after the president's interview with Rolling Stone, published this month.
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Boy With Toxic Buildup, High Blood Pressure Gets Breakthrough Treatment
abcnews.go.com - 4-27-12
By the time Jonathan Oliphint was 3 years old, his parents realized he had neurological and cognitive delays. He also had high blood pressure that doctors could not control.
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How DAYLIGHT could reduce the risk of having a heart attack
dailymail.co.uk - 4-27-12
Forget CPR, aspirin and blood clot busters - treating a heart attack victim could be as simple as exposing them to light. Doctors say strong light or even just daylight could cut the risk of having a heart attack or suffering permanent damage after having one. They say that heart attack victims could recover quicker in hospital simply by being exposed to daylight.
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Smell 'alarm' prompts dementia sufferers to eat
telegraph.co.uk - 4-27-12
The aroma of Coronation chicken, fish and chips, and Bakewell tart could be pumped into the rooms of dementia sufferers to help their appetites, as part of a plan to make their lives easier.
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Diamond Pet Foods recalls 2nd batch of dry dog food
msnbc.msn.com - 4-27-12
Salmonella concerns prompted Missouri-based Diamond Pet Foods to recall a second batch of dry dog food produced at a South Carolina plant where production has been suspended, the company announced Thursday.
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Exercise, better diet may keep cancer from returning
msnbc.msn.com - 4-27-12
A cancer diagnosis often inspires people to exercise and eat healthier. Now the experts say there's strong evidence that both habits may help prevent the disease from coming back.
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Strawberries And Blueberries Halt Cognitive Decline In Elderly
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-27-12
Elderly individuals who eat plenty of strawberries and blueberries are less likely to experience cognitive decline, compared to those who rarely or never eat berries, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School reported in Annals of Neurology. According to their findings, the authors explained that adding flavonoids-rich berries to elderly people's diet could delay their cognitive decline by up to two-and-a-half years.
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Kids: Obesity, higher blood pressure link
upi.com - 4-27-12
Children who are heavier early in life are at an increased risk of hypertension and cardiometabolic problems later in life, Australian researchers say.
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Scientists Identify Gene Behind Pygmies' Short Stature
healthday.com - 4-27-12
Scientists have identified genes linked to the small stature of Western African Pygmies in Cameroon.
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Breakthrough in Understanding Macular Degeneration
sciencedaily.com - 4-27-12
University of Kentucky researchers, led by Dr. Jayakrishna Ambati, have made a major breakthrough in the "dry" form of age-related macular degeneration known as geographic atrophy (GA). GA is an untreatable condition that causes blindness in millions of individuals due to death of retinal pigmented epithelial cells.
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Vitamin D may help lower blood pressure
upi.com - 4-27-12
A study showed giving vitamin D supplements in Europe in winter can help lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension, Danish researchers said.
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Facial Defects Shown to Self-Repair
sciencedaily.com - 4-26-12
Developmental biologists at Tufts University have identified a "self-correcting" mechanism by which developing organisms recognize and repair head and facial abnormalities. This is the first time that such a mechanism has been reported for the face and the first time that this kind of flexible, corrective process has been rigorously analyzed through mathematical modeling.
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Rio de Janeiro has dengue fever epidemic
upi.com - 4-26-12
Officials in Rio de Janeiro say there have been more than 50,000 cases of dengue fever in the Brazilian city recently, including 500 in the last week.
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The Toxic Trio in "Nontoxic" Nail Polish
rodale.com - 4-26-12
California researchers find more reasons that we can't trust claims on cosmetics labels.
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California area tops 'most polluted cities' list
upi.com - 4-26-12
More than 90 percent of Californians live in areas with unhealthy air: the Central Valley, Los Angeles, Inland Empire, Sacramento and San Diego, a report said.
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A New 'Achilles' Heel' in Fungus That Causes Dandruff
sciencedaily.com - 4-26-12
Research on the fungus that ranks as one cause of dandruff -- the embarrassing nuisance that, by some accounts, afflicts half of humanity -- is pointing scientists toward a much-needed new treatment for the condition's flaking and itching.
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Progesterone might relieve menopause symptoms
msnbc.msn.com - 4-26-12
A hormone called progesterone helps reduce how frequently and how severely women experience hot flashes and night sweats after menopause somewhat, according to a new study.
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Measure on June ballot would treat pot like a farm crop
mercurynews.com - 4-26-12
Traditional farmers are rallying against a novel June ballot measure in Lake County that would extend "right to farm" protections to medical marijuana growers. Right-to-farm laws are intended to protect agricultural operations from nuisance complaints that could threaten their viability. This is the first time an attempt is being made to apply the law to marijuana cultivation, farming and pot advocates say.
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Teenagers drinking hand sanitizer to get drunk
usatoday.com - 4-26-12
Teenagers are showing up in Los Angeles emergency rooms after drinking inexpensive liquid hand sanitizers to get drunk. Cheap and easily accessible hand sanitizers contain 62 percent ethyl alcohol.
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Anti-depressants 'may do more harm than good'
dailymail.co.uk - 4-26-12
Common anti-depressants could be doing patients more harm than good, according to researchers examined the impact of the medications on the whole body.
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Could a bunch of watercress provide the ultimate boost before a workout?
dailymail.co.uk - 4-26-12
It is not normally thought of as an energy food. But watercress could give you the boost you need before going to the gym. Nutrients in the peppery leaves reduce exercise-related damage to DNA, research shows. While exercise has many benefits, it also leads to higher-than-usual production of free radicals - dangerous oxygen molecules said to have a hand in everything from ageing to diabetes and cancer.
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Aspirin cuts bowel cancer patient death by a third
telegraph.co.uk - 4-26-12
Taking a daily aspirin after being diagnosed with bowel cancer can reduce the chance of dying from the disease by almost a third, according to research published today.
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S. Korea curbs U.S. beef sales after confirmation of mad cow disease
cnn.com - 4-26-12
The first U.S. case of mad cow disease in six years sparked fears of illness that prompted at least one major South Korean retailer to suspend the sale of American beef.
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Silicosis Is Still A Major Killer Globally
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-26-12
Free crystalline silicon dioxide, or silica, is one of the most common minerals worldwide. It is used to manufacture many items, including glass, bottles, ceramics, but it is also a common additive in the production of foods where it is primarily used as a flow agent in powdered foods or to absorb water. Inhalation of silica dust is associated with developing various diseases including silicosis, a chronic inflammation and scarring of the lungs that damages lung function, lung cancer, tuberculosis, as well as other diseases of the airway.
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Prospect of 'autism drug' raised after early tests
bbc.co.uk - 4-26-12
The prospect of a drug to treat autism has been raised after symptoms of the condition were reduced in experiments on mice that were performed by the US National Institutes of Health.
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Life Transitions May Trigger Eating Disorders
healthday.com - 4-26-12
A lack of support following traumatic life events such as relationship problems, the loss of a loved one, abuse and sexual assault can trigger eating disorders, a small new study finds.
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Stopping Blood Thinners Raises Stroke Risk for Patients With Irregular Heartbeat
healthday.com - 4-26-12
When patients with atrial fibrillation stop taking anti-clotting drugs, their stroke risk goes up quickly, new research finds.
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Many Who First Misuse Prescription Pills Get Them From Friends, Family: Report
healthday.com - 4-26-12
A new U.S. government analysis shows that more than 70 percent of people who first misuse prescription medications get those pills from their friends or relatives.
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Anatomic Existence of the Elusive G-Spot Confirmed, Study Claims
sciencedaily.com - 4-26-12
For centuries, women have been reporting engorgement of the upper, anterior part of the vagina during the stage of sexual excitement, despite the fact the structure of this phenomenon had not been anatomically determined.
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Melanoma in women up eight-fold
upi.com - 4-26-12
U.S. women age 40 and under have been diagnosed with melanoma eight times more frequently than in the previous four decades, researchers say.
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Talking to Yourself May Help Your Brain
abcnews.go.com - 4-25-12
Next time you’re chattering away to no one, just tell yourself (out loud) that you’re boosting your brain power. A new study has found that talking to yourself actually improves your memory, at least temporarily.
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Teenager declared brain-dead by FOUR doctors makes miracle recovery moments before life support machine was switched off after father plead for second opinion
dailymail.co.uk - 4-25-12
Doctors described Steven Thorpe as 'truly a unique case' after he awoke from a two-week coma following a multiple car crash that claimed the life of his schoolfriend.
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Should you switch to goats' milk? Fans claim it's less fattening, packed with vitamins and won't trigger allergies
dailymail.co.uk - 4-25-12
Many people are turning to goats’ milk products as a ‘healthier’ alternative to dairy products — indeed the UK market is now worth £50 million a year. At around £1.40 per litre (compared with 52p for cows’ milk), goats’ milk is clearly not cheap — but is it worth the outlay?
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Big babies at higher risk of childhood cancer
telegraph.co.uk - 4-25-12
Big babies are more likely to develop certain types of leukaemia and other childhood cancers, British researchers have discovered.
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Why some can't tell left from right
msnbc.msn.com - 4-25-12
At some point most of us confuse left and right like we’re in a scene from an old Three Stooges one-reeler: “The one in your left hand!” “No, your other left!” Bonk!
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9 Farmer's Market Favorites Under Attack
rodale.com - 4-25-12
Can you imagine a summer without tomatoes? It could happen if chemical companies get their way and gain approval for two new types of corn and soy crops that rely on heavy applications of some of the most produce-unfriendly pesticides in the world.
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Underweight Infants Have Better Outcomes At Hospitals Recognized For Nursing Excellence
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-25-12
A study in the April 25 edition of JAMA shows that very low-birth-weight infants that were born in hospitals recognized for nursing excellence (RNE), compared with those that had not, had a substantially lower rate of hospital infection, severe intraventricular hemorrhage and death at 7-days, but no lower rates of death at 28-days or hospital stay mortality. The study included over 72,000 very low-birth-weight infants.
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Tinnitus Linked To Insomnia
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-25-12
Researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit have found a significant association between the severity of perceived tinnitus symptoms and insomnia.
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Unnecessary prostate cancer screening remains common
cnn.com - 4-25-12
When billionaire investor Warren Buffett revealed last week that he has been diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer, the reaction -- including from Buffett himself -- amounted to a collective shrug.
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Mad cow disease confirmed in California
cnn.com - 4-25-12
The nation's fourth case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as "mad cow disease," was found in a dairy cow in California, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Tuesday.
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Cooking oil, nuts help prevent cancer
upi.com - 4-25-12
Nuts, and vitamin E in soybean, canola and corn oils, help prevent colon, lung, breast and prostate cancers, U.S. researchers said.
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Men set to live as long as women, figures show
healthday.com - 4-25-12
The gap between male and female life expectancy is closing and men could catch up by 2030, according to an adviser for the Office for National Statistics.
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Botox Offers Little Relief for Migraine, Study Finds
healthday.com - 4-25-12
Botox is considered a preventive medication for debilitating migraine headaches, but a new review finds that it may only help people with chronic migraines or chronic daily headaches. And, even then, the effect appears to only be "small to modest."
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Pacemakers, Defibrillators Sources of Deadly Infections: Study
healthday.com - 4-25-12
Life-saving implantable pacemakers or defibrillators pose a risk for developing deadly infections, a new study suggests.
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Dark Chocolate May Lower Risk of Heart Disease
healthday.com - 4-25-12
Dark chocolate may lower your risk of heart disease by lowering levels of blood glucose and bad cholesterol while boosting levels of good cholesterol, a small new study suggests.
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'Watch-and-Wait' Approach Best When Water Breaks Before Labor: Study
healthday.com - 4-25-12
Rather than induce labor, pregnant women whose water breaks early may fare just as well if they are closely monitored by medical staff, a new study indicates.
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Cocaine Habit Might Speed Brain Aging
healthday.com - 4-25-12
Chronic cocaine use may speed up brain aging, a new study suggests.
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Stress May Be Tougher on Women's Hearts Than Men's: Study
healthday.com - 4-25-12
Heart blood flow increases in men when they experience mental stress, but does not change in women, a small new study suggests.
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Component of Pizza Seasoning Herb Oregano Kills Prostate Cancer Cells
sciencedaily.com - 4-25-12
Oregano, the common pizza and pasta seasoning herb, has long been known to possess a variety of beneficial health effects, but a new study by researchers at Long Island University (LIU) indicates that an ingredient of this spice could potentially be used to treat prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in American men.
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Violence Puts Wear and Tear On Kids' DNA
sciencedaily.com - 4-25-12
Children who have experienced violence might really be older than their years. The DNA of 10-year-olds who experienced violence in their young lives has been found to show wear and tear normally associated with aging, a Duke University study has found.
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'Junk DNA' Can Sense Viral Infection: Promising Tool in the Battle Between Pathogen and Host
sciencedaily.com - 4-25-12
Once considered unimportant "junk DNA," scientists have learned that non-coding RNA (ncRNA) -- RNA molecules that do not translate into proteins -- play a crucial role in cellular function. Mutations in ncRNA are associated with a number of conditions, such as cancer, autism, and Alzheimer's disease.
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Blood Transfusions Still Overused and May Do More Harm Than Good in Some Patients
sciencedaily.com - 4-25-12
Citing the lack of clear guidelines for ordering blood transfusions during surgery, Johns Hopkins researchers say a new study confirms there is still wide variation in the use of transfusions and frequent use of transfused blood in patients who don't need it.
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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients Had Reduced Activity in Brain’s 'Reward Center'
sciencedaily.com - 4-25-12
Chronic fatigue syndrome, a medical disorder characterized by extreme and ongoing fatigue with no other diagnosed cause, remains poorly understood despite decades of scientific study. Although researchers estimate that more than 1 million Americans are affected by this condition, the cause for chronic fatigue syndrome, a definitive way to diagnose it, and even its very existence remain in question. In a new study, researchers have found differing brain responses in people with this condition compared to healthy controls, suggesting an association between a biologic functional response and chronic fatigue syndrome.
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Dietary Changes Help Some Children With ADHD
sciencedaily.com - 4-25-12
Together with child and adolescent psychiatrists, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have just completed an extensive report which reviews the studies which have been done so far on the significance of diet for children and young people with ADHD. The report shows that there are potential benefits in changing the diets of children with ADHD, but that key knowledge in the area is still lacking.
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Some U.S. women living shorter lives
upi.com - 4-24-12
Women in hundreds of U.S. counties are living shorter lives than their mothers did, a county-by-county analysis of life expectancy found.
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Fukushima is Falling Apart: Are You Ready?
theintelhub.com - 4-24-12
Thirteen months have passed since the Fukushima reactors exploded, and a U.S. Senator finally got off his ass and went to Japan to see what is going on over there.
What he saw was horrific.
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French drink less than many think
upi.com - 4-24-12
Fifteen percent of young adults in France ages 18-24 drink alcohol, a so-called responsible drinking association says.
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When Maggots Are Faster Than Doctors
abcnews.go.com - 4-24-12
Creepy, crawly little creatures scurrying in and out of an open flesh wound. Many people would associate this scene with a horror film rather than a hospital. Nonetheless, some physicians do apply maggots to wounds that are difficult to heal.
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Why dieting makes you FAT: Research shows trying to lose weight alters your brain and hormones so you're doomed to pile it on again
dailymail.co.uk - 4-24-12
Michelle Underwood knows only too well the agony of failed diets. The 36-year-old mother-of-three from Woking, Surrey, has seen her weight yo-yo from 11st to 19st repeatedly over the past decade, as a succession of diets initially worked, then failed spectacularly — leaving her heavier and more desperate than ever.
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$182,000 for appendix removal? Why hospital bills vary widely
msnbc.msn.com - 4-24-12
Just how much does it cost to remove your appendix? Depending on your case and the hospital you go to, your bill could vary by tens of thousands of dollars, a new study suggests. The results show the charges for treating appendicitis at hospitals in California ranged from about $1,500 to more than $182,000.
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Safety Of Shingles Vaccine Confirmed
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-24-12
A new study of 193,083 adults, published in the Journal of Internal Medicine, reveals that the herpes zoster vaccine, also called the shingles vaccine, is safe for preventing shingles, a chickenpox virus rash which affects more than 1 million people annually in the United States.
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Geekiness and autism: Is there a connection?
cnn.com - 4-24-12
Laura Nagle loves physics. She peruses scientific papers for her own enjoyment, and she can sometimes work out the answers to cosmological mysteries in her head when she watches documentaries about the universe. She has read, in her estimation, about 12,000 books.
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Men set to live as long as women, figures show
bbc.co.uk - 4-24-12
The gap between male and female life expectancy is closing and men could catch up by 2030, according to an adviser for the Office for National Statistics.
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Miniature honeycomb 'grows nerve'
bbc.co.uk - 4-24-12
A "miniature honeycomb" - or scaffold - could one day be used to encourage damaged nerves to grow and recover, according to an international group of researchers.
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Migraine Guidelines: What Works, What Doesn't
healthday.com - 4-24-12
Dozens of medications are available to prevent debilitating migraine headaches, but most migraine sufferers don't use them, a new study finds.
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Strength Training May Give Boost to Seniors' Brains
healthday.com - 4-24-12
Elderly women noticing the first signs of memory decline might ward off full-blown dementia by engaging in routine strength training, new research suggests.
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Can Heavy Metal in Foods, Cosmetics Spur Breast Cancer Spread?
healthday.com - 4-24-12
Prolonged exposure to low levels of the heavy metal cadmium may fuel the growth of some breast cancer cells and encourage them to spread, preliminary research indicates.
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Thyroid Condition Linked to Heart Problems: Study
healthday.com - 4-24-12
New evidence suggests that a type of overactive thyroid condition appears to boost the risk of heart problems, especially atrial fibrillation (a form of irregular heartbeat) and premature death.
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Small Variations in Magnetic Fields Can Be Environmental Stresses
sciencedaily.com - 4-24-12
We are surrounded by a constantly changing magnetic field, be it Earth's or those emanating from devices, such as cell phones. Carlos Martino, an assistant professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, is interested in understanding how these magnetic-field fluctuations change biochemical reactions inside us.
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Families That Eat Together May Be the Healthiest, New Evidence Confirms
sciencedaily.com - 4-24-12
"Come and get it!" A phrase historically proclaiming that the communal meal is ready, is heard all too infrequently among contemporary American households, especially as children get older. Indeed, over 40% of the typical American food budget is spent on eating out, with family meals often being relegated to holidays and special occasions. Aside from negative effects on the family budget, eating out has been shown to be generally associated with poor food choices and bad health. Of particular interest to public health experts is growing scientific evidence that fewer family meals may translate to increased obesity risk and poor nutritional status, especially among children.
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Gut Organisms Could Be Clue in Controlling Obesity Risk
sciencedaily.com - 4-24-12
The international obesity epidemic is widespread, nondiscriminatory, and deadly. But do we really understand all of the factors underlying this alarming trend? The concept of energy balance (energy consumed = energy expended + energy stored) is undeniable, being driven by the first law of thermodynamics. Consequently, there is no contradiction that excessive calorie intake and plummeting levels of physical activity are largely to blame for our ever-expanding waistlines.
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Gum disease doesn't cause heart disease
upi.com - 4-24-12
An expert U.S. committee of cardiologists, dentists and infectious disease specialists found no conclusive evidence gum disease causes cardiovascular disease.
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Peripheral artery disease, depression link
upi.com - 4-23-12
People with depression may have a higher risk of peripheral artery disease -- narrowing of the arteries in the legs and pelvis, U.S. researchers say.
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FDA proposes rules for nanotechnology in food
usatoday.com - 4-23-12
Regulators are proposing that food companies that want to use tiny engineered particles in their packaging may have to provide extra testing data to show the products are safe.
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'Why second-time mothers should give birth at home': It's just as safe and cheaper for the NHS as well, claim experts
dailymail.co.uk - 4-23-12
Home births are the cheapest option for the NHS when the mother already has children, a study claims today. Second-time mothers who have a planned birth outside hospital need fewer interventions, such as forceps delivery, and it is just as safe for the baby.
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Aspirin could lead to cancer drugs that could beat disease without side-effects
dailymail.co.uk - 4-23-12
Cancer sufferers have been given hope of an improved treatment after scientists made a key breakthrough in identifying how aspirin protects against the disease.
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Antibiotics Kill Bacteria By Damaging Their DNA
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-23-12
MIT and Boston University researchers have discovered that while antibiotics attack many parts of bacteria cells, it is the damage they cause to their DNA that inflicts the fatal blow. They write about their findings in a paper published online on 20 April in the journal Science.
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Long-Lasting Fatigue After Breast Cancer Less Common Than Thought
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-23-12
Although breast cancer-related fatigue is common, it generally runs a self-limiting course and does not persist as long as people had thought; especially in cases of early-stage breast cancer, researchers reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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Mystery Skin Disease Kills 19 In Vietnam
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-23-12
A mystery skin infection, which has killed 19 people and affected hundreds, has left Vietnamese health authorities baffled. Vietnam is now asking for help from abroad to find out what exactly this disease is, what the cause is, and how to effectively treat it and stem its spread. Over 170 cases have been reported in Quang Ngai province, in the center of the country.
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Many boomers abuse alcohol after age 48
upi.com - 4-23-12
A U.S. survey indicates depression or anxiety to be the main reason older adults -- baby boomers age 50 and older -- say they abuse drugs or alcohol.
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Poll: Parents say kids don't want alcohol
upi.com - 4-23-12
Eight-five percent of parents in Texas say their teenage children are not interested in drinking, a Mothers Against Drunk Driving Texas survey indicates.
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Low-fat dairy may lower stroke risk
upi.com - 4-23-12
In a large study involving almost 75,000 adults in Sweden ages 45-83, those who ate low-fat dairy products had less risk of stroke, researchers said.
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Early milk feeds 'benefits premature babies'
bbc.co.uk - 4-23-12
At-risk premature babies would benefit from being given milk feeds earlier, a study has suggested.
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Tick Season Starting Early This Year
healthday.com - 4-23-12
Tick season has started earlier than normal due to the mild winter, which means hikers, gardeners and others who love the outdoors should take precautions to prevent becoming a meal for ticks, an expert says.
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'Ice Cream Headaches' Might Offer Clues to Migraines
healthday.com - 4-23-12
That "brain freeze" headache you experience when eating ice cream or other cold foods may be caused by a sudden change in brain blood flow, researchers report.
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Key Genes That Switch Off With Aging Highlighted as Potential Targets for Anti-Aging Therapies
sciencedaily.com - 4-23-12
Researchers have identified key genes that switch off with aging, highlighting them as potential targets for anti-aging therapies.
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Fat Outside of Arteries May Influence Onset of Coronary Artery Disease
sciencedaily.com - 4-23-12
Researchers at UC have confirmed that fat surrounding the outside of arteries in humans -- particularly the left coronary artery -- may influence the onset of coronary artery disease, or atherosclerosis, which is the leading cause of death in the U.S.
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Obama's pot promise a pipe dream?
politico.com - 4-22-12
President Barack Obama has turned out to be a real buzzkill. Back when he was running in 2008, Obama said he supported the “basic concept of using medical marijuana for the same purposes and with the same controls as other drugs” and that he was “not going to be using Justice Department resources to try to circumvent state laws.
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Marijuana Vending Machine by Calif. Company
abcnews.go.com - 4-22-12
A California company hopes to make medical marijuana a little easier to obtain and to control.
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Does giving antibiotics to animals hurt humans?
usatoday.com - 4-22-12
The bacon Americans have for breakfast is at the center of a 35-year debate over antibiotics. That's because the same life-saving drugs that are prescribed to treat everything from ear infections to tuberculosis in humans also are used to fatten the animals that supply the chicken, beef and pork we eat every day.
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Pollution from traffic, planes and power stations 'killing 13,000 Britons a year'
dailymail.co.uk - 4-22-12
Pollution from traffic, planes and power stations is killing almost 13,000 Britons a year, researchers claim. The alarming death toll is more than four times greater than the number killed on the roads.
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Doctors develop life-saving drugs from coral reefs
msnbc.msn.com - 4-22-12
The kaleidoscope of life in the coral reefs under the turquoise waters of the Florida Keys is a magnet for tourists, but it’s not just a pretty view. The same chemistry that helps corals and sponges survive is also helping people fight cancer.
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Birth defects a third more common in IVF babies
msnbc.msn.com - 4-22-12
Babies conceived through certain fertility treatment techniques are about one-third more likely to have a birth defect than babies conceived without any extra help from technology, according to a review of several dozen studies.
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Exercising Daily Lowers Alzheimer's Risk, Even If You Start Later In Life
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-22-12
The risk of Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline could be reduced by engaging in daily physical activity, even in those who are older than 80 years. Results of the researchers study from the Rush University Medical Center are published online in the April 18 issue of Neurology.
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FDA Proposes Guidelines For Nanomaterials In Food And Cosmetics
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-22-12
On Friday, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed two new draft guidelines for the evaluation and use of nanomaterials in food and cosmetics The documents are available for public comment for 90 days.
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Consuming Low-Fat Dairy Food May Reduce Your Risk Of Stroke
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-22-12
In a Swedish study published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke, people who drank low-fat milk and ate low-fat yogurt and cheese had a lower risk of stroke compared to those who consumed full-fat dairy foods.
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U.S. well being linked to marital status
upi.com - 4-22-12
U.S. well being is linked to marital status, with married people reporting the highest levels of well being and separated people the lowest, a survey indicates.
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Close Laundry Detergent Right After Use, Expert Says
healthday.com - 4-22-12
A new survey finds that most Americans remember to seal laundry detergent containers immediately after use, an important part of safe laundry practices.
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Mini-Sensor Measures Magnetic Activity in Human Brain
sciencedaily.com - 4-22-12
A miniature atom-based magnetic sensor developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has passed an important research milestone by successfully measuring human brain activity. Experiments reported this week verify the sensor's potential for biomedical applications such as studying mental processes and advancing the understanding of neurological diseases.
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New Zealand Woman's Coca-Cola Habit Cited in Death
abcnews.go.com - 4-21-12
Experts say a New Zealand woman's 2-gallon-a-day Coca-Cola habit probably contributed to her death, a conclusion that led the soft-drink giant to note that even water can be deadly in excessive amounts.
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Marijuana-infused wine produced at Calif. vineyards: Dangerous?
cbsnews.com - 4-21-12
Just in time for 4/20, reports have surfaced that an increasing number of California winemakers are turning to another locally produced intoxicant. The Daily Beast reports several California winemakers are creating blends of marijuana-infused wines on the sly.
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Tough new strain of hand, foot and mouth virus hitting U.S.
usatoday.com - 4-21-12
Worried parents are phoning their pediatricians, fearful of the spread of a nasty new strain of hand, foot and mouth virus, a common childhood disease.
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Rickets: The Facts
telegraph.co.uk - 4-21-12
Rickets is condition affecting bone development in children, which can lead to deformities. It is caused by a lack of vitamin D and calcium and can usually be easily treated. Find out more about the causes, symptoms and treatment of rickets here.
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Birth defects a third more common in IVF babies
msnbc.msn.com - 4-21-12
Babies conceived through certain fertility treatment techniques are about one-third more likely to have a birth defect than babies conceived without any extra help from technology, according to a review of several dozen studies.
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Women with heart trouble more likely to have baby girls
msnbc.msn.com - 4-21-12
Pregnant women with heart disease are more likely to give birth to girls than boys, according to a new study from Iran.
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Watching porn may shut down part of your brain
msnbc.msn.com - 4-21-12
Watching pornography would seem to be a vision-intensive task. But new research finds that looking at erotic movies can actually quiet the part of the brain that processes visual stimuli.
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10 Food Rules for Earth Day
rodale.com - 4-21-12
We all eat. It's kind of necessary for our survival, after all. And to survive, we spend a lot of money and energy making food choices every day that impact the future of planet. So this Earth Day, rather than focusing on lightbulbs or hybrid cars, take stock of your kitchen.
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Lime Juice, Sunlight Help Make Water Safer
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-21-12
In low-income countries, one way to make drinking water safer is to expose it to sunlight, but now scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, suggest adding lime juice can make the method more effective.
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Prisoner Body Weight Compared To General Population
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-21-12
A new study reveals that worldwide, male prisoners are slimmer than men in the general population, and female prisoners are more obese than the general population - apart from in the UK.
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FDA warns of fentanyl patch dangers to children
cnn.com - 4-21-12
Children explore their worlds by touching and tasting items within their reach. That can cause deadly results when the object of their curiosity contains a potentially lethal drug like pain relieving fentanyl.
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HPV cancer rate highest in West Virginia
upi.com - 4-21-12
Human papillomavirus-associated cancers among females range from 8.5 per 100,000 in Utah to 16.3 per 100,000 in West Virginia, federal health officials said.
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14 percent of women stay-at-home moms
upi.com - 4-21-12
Thirty-seven percent of U.S. women who have a child age 18 or under living in the household do not work outside the home, a survey indicates.
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How cruciferous vegetables prevent cancer
upi.com - 4-21-12
Cruciferous vegetables -- broccoli, cabbage, leafy greens, cauliflower -- help prevent breast and prostate cancer, U.S. researchers say.
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Early milk feeds 'benefits premature babies'
bbc.co.uk - 4-21-12
At-risk premature babies would benefit from being given milk feeds earlier, a study has suggested.
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Joint-Replacement Failure Rate Higher for Smokers: Studies
healthday.com - 4-21-12
Knee and hip replacements are more likely to fail in smokers than nonsmokers, according to two new studies.
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Lower Risk for Bowel Obstruction With Less Invasive Surgery: Study
healthday.com - 4-21-12
Patients are much more likely to develop small-bowel obstruction after abdominal or pelvic surgery if they have open surgery rather than minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery, a new study finds.
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Could Your Personality Be Reflected in Your Pooch?
healthday.com - 4-21-12
The breed of dog a person chooses may mirror his or her own personality and outlook, a new study suggests.
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Glaucoma Need Not Steal Sight, Experts Say
healthday.com - 4-21-12
Though glaucoma has been nicknamed the silent thief of sight, eye experts now say it generally doesn't have to be that way.
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Talking to Yourself Could Have Mental Benefits
healthday.com - 4-21-12
People who talk to themselves while searching for specific objects may be able to find them faster, researchers say.
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Aspirin: New Evidence Is Helping Explain Additional Health Benefits and Open Potential for New Uses
sciencedaily.com - 4-21-12
New evidence is helping explain additional health benefits of aspirin. Researchers in Canada, Scotland and Australia have discovered that salicylate, the active ingredient in aspirin, directly increases the activity of the protein AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), a key player in regulating cell growth and metabolism. AMPK which is considered a cellular fuel-gauge is switched on by exercise and the commonly used anti-diabetic medication metformin.
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19th Century Therapy for Parkinson's Disease May Help Patients Today
sciencedaily.com - 4-21-12
In the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot, the celebrated neurologist, developed a "vibration chair," to relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Charcot reported improvements in his patients, but he died shortly thereafter and a more complete evaluation of the therapy was never conducted. Now, a group of neurological researchers at Rush University Medical Center have replicated his work in a study to see if Charcot's observation holds true against modern scientific testing.
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Soda Consumption Increases Overall Stroke Risk
sciencedaily.com - 4-21-12
Researchers from Cleveland Clinic's Wellness Institute and Harvard University have found that greater consumption of sugar-sweetened and low-calorie sodas is associated with a higher risk of stroke. Conversely, consumption of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee was associated with a lower risk.
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Early Treatment Improves Outcomes in Rare, Often Undiagnosed Form of Encephalitis
sciencedaily.com - 4-21-12
A mysterious, difficult-to-diagnose, and potentially deadly disease that was only recently discovered can be controlled most effectively if treatment is started within the first month that symptoms occur, according to a new report by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The researchers analyzed 565 cases of this recently discovered paraneoplastic condition, called Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis, and determined that if initial treatments fail, second-line therapy significantly improves outcomes compared with repeating treatments or no additional treatments (76 percent versus 55 percent).
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Never too late to reduce Alzheimer's risk
upi.com - 4-20-12
U.S. researchers say that it's never too late -- even those age 80 and older -- to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease by exercising.
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Marijuana Advocates In The Netherlands Face Off With Cabinet
huffingtonpost.com - 4-20-12
Dutch coffee shop owners went to court Wednesday in a last ditch bid to block a government plan to stop foreigners from buying marijuana in the Netherlands.
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Asthma drug 'protects sufferers from life-threatening symptoms caused by common cold'
dailymail.co.uk - 4-20-12
Scientists are developing a drug that will protect asthma sufferers from life-threatening symptoms caused by the common cold.
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Ta ta tattoo! New laser method removes body art in less than half the time
dailymail.co.uk - 4-20-12
Countless people who get ill-advised tattoos when intoxicated by passion or drink face the problem of how to have them erased - and fast. Now doctors are singing the praises of a new technique that cuts the time of removing them from a year to a few months. Known as R20, the procedure involves passing a pulsing laser beam over the skin four times with a 20minute pause in between each pass.
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Gilead's New Hepatitis C Drug Impressive
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-20-12
An experimental hepatitis C drug from Gilead Sciences Inc. cleared the disease in 88% of patients, the company announced today. It is great news for sufferers of the disease, which wreaks havoc on the liver, slowly causing cirrhosis and liver failure. Other problems can include liver cancer, and life threatening esophageal and gastric varicose.
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Speed, Ecstasy tied to teen depression
cnn.com - 4-20-12
The short-lived high teenagers get from using amphetamines or the club drug MDMA - better known as Ecstasy - could lead to longer-lasting depression later on, a new study suggests.
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Owning a dog beneficial for pregnant women
upi.com - 4-20-12
Pregnant women who own dogs have increased physical activity and are more likely to meet guidelines for daily activity, researchers in Britain found.
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Stomach grumbling may not be indigestion
upi.com - 4-20-12
If stomach grumbling persists, it may be time to ask a doctor to check for irritable bowel syndrome, a U.S. gastroenterologist says.
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Breast cancer rules rewritten in 'landmark' study
bbc.co.uk - 4-20-12
What we currently call breast cancer should be thought of as 10 completely separate diseases, according to an international study which has been described as a "landmark".
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'No Regrets' Outlook May Make for Sunnier Old Age
healthday.com - 4-20-12
Riddled with regret over missed opportunities? You may want to let it go. A new study suggests that being able to set aside regret might make for happier years later in life.
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Measles Outbreaks in 2011 Were Worst in 15 Years: CDC
healthday.com - 4-20-12
There were 222 cases and 17 outbreaks of the measles in the United States last year, more than four times the usual annual rate, U.S. health authorities reported Thursday.
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Being Beside the Seaside Is Good for You
sciencedaily.com - 4-20-12
Exercise in the open air is good for you, but if you want to reap the full benefits you should head for the coast or the countryside rather than an urban park.
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How Thinking About Death Can Lead to a Good Life
sciencedaily.com - 4-20-12
Thinking about death can actually be a good thing. An awareness of mortality can improve physical health and help us re-prioritize our goals and values, according to a new analysis of recent scientific studies. Even non-conscious thinking about death -- say walking by a cemetery -- could prompt positive changes and promote helping others.
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Children grow up addicted to online porn sites: Third of 10-year-olds have seen explicit images
dailymail.co.uk - 4-19-12
A 'guinea pig’ generation of children is growing up addicted to hardcore internet pornography, MPs were warned last night. Four out of five 16-year-old boys and girls regularly access porn online while one in three ten-year-olds has seen explicit material, a disturbing cross-party report reveals.
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Marijuana Brownies Meet Haute Cuisine: California Cannabis Cooking's Renaissance
nbcbayarea.com - 4-19-12
Cooking with medical cannabis is nothing new, not for Californians nor for anyone who's attended a jam band concert anytime over the past 40-plus years (goo balls, anyone?). But now, marijuana cooking has gone mainstream, according to the East Bay Express. The first-ever High Times Cannabis Cookbook will be released on Friday, just in time for April 20, the newspaper reported. The 50 recipes will "challenge top chefs" as well as amateurs, the newspaper reported.
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The Cocktail Party Effect: How We Tune In to One Person at a Loud Party
abcnews.go.com - 4-19-12
It’s a familiar scene: you’re at a crowded party, but despite all the noise, you’re still able to make out the words of the one person with whom you’re talking.
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Danger of Dr Google: 25 per cent of women misdiagnose themselves on the internet
dailymail.co.uk - 4-19-12
When you’re faced with an unexplained medical problem, it can seem easier and quicker to go online for answers rather than wait for a doctor’s appointment. But researchers have found that one in four British women has misdiagnosed themselves on the internet – then bought the wrong product to try to cure their illness. ‘Dr Google’ is now the first port of call for women with health concerns, but it rarely provides an accurate diagnosis, the experts say.
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Protective instinct: Women less likely to take risks around babies (even if it's not theirs)
dailymail.co.uk - 4-19-12
The maternal instinct is one of the most powerful in nature - now scientists have found it applies to women even if they don't have children. Scientists found that women were significantly more cautious when they are partnered with small children in a gambling game measuring their attitude to risk.
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Myth, busted: You only use 10 percent of brain
msnbc.msn.com - 4-19-12
Good news for all those who ever had a teacher or a parent say “If you would just apply yourself you could learn anything! You’re only using 10 percent of your brain!”
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Daily activity can lower Alzheimer's risk, even in very old, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 4-19-12
Even people in their 80s may be able to lower the risk of Alzheimer’s simply by increasing how much they move around each day, a new study suggests.
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The Toxic Trio in "Nontoxic" Nail Polish
rodale.com - 4-19-12
Healthy cosmetics can be hard to find. Claims like "natural" and even "organic" aren't well regulated, and every few months, you hear of another report finding that lipstick is contaminated with lead and even baby shampoo contains cancer-causing dioxins.
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Hookworms And Allergies - Doctor Infects Himself For Experiment
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-19-12
In the first experiment of its kind to test the suggestion that hookworm infection can reduce some allergic responses, a UK doctor who specializes in medical entomology, infected himself with the parasite and then swallowed a pill camera to film the effect on his intestines.
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Opium study raises questions about painkillers
cnn.com - 4-19-12
About 20 million people are using the drug opium or one of its derivatives. A new study suggests new reasons for viewing this as problematic.
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Prostate cancer therapy, less side effects
upi.com - 4-19-12
A treatment for prostate cancer using high-intensity focused ultrasound is effective with fewer side effects than other treatment, British researchers say.
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In Britain, more die from auto fume than crashes
upi.com - 4-19-12
In Britain, more than 5,000 people die prematurely from lung cancer and heart disease each year due to auto emissions, more than die yearly from crashes.
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Breast cancer rules rewritten in 'landmark' study
bbc.co.uk - 4-19-12
What we currently call breast cancer should be thought of as 10 completely separate diseases, according to an international study which has been described as a "landmark".
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Half of Young Cigarette Smokers Also Smoke Pot: Survey
healthday.com - 4-19-12
More young cigarette smokers may also be lighting up joints than was previously thought, a new study finds.
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Use of Ecstasy, Speed by Teens Tied to Later Depression
healthday.com - 4-19-12
Teens who use the party drugs ecstasy (MDMA) and speed (methamphetamine and/or amphetamine) appear to face a notably higher risk of depression afterward, new Canadian research suggests.
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Lead Dust Is Linked to Violence, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-19-12
Childhood exposure to lead dust has been linked to lasting physical and behavioral effects, and now lead dust from vehicles using leaded gasoline has been linked to instances of aggravated assault two decades after exposure, says Tulane toxicologist Howard W. Mielke.
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Positive Feelings May Help Protect Cardiovascular Health
sciencedaily.com - 4-19-12
Over the last few decades numerous studies have shown negative states, such as depression, anger, anxiety, and hostility, to be detrimental to cardiovascular health. Less is known about how positive psychological characteristics are related to heart health. In the first and largest systematic review on this topic to date, Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers found that positive psychological well-being appears to reduce the risk of heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular events.
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Violence in Men Caused by Unequal Wealth and Competition, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-19-12
Violence in men can be explained by traditional theories of sexual selection. In a review of the literature, Professor John Archer from the University of Central Lancashire, a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, points to a range of evidence that suggests that high rates of physical aggression and assaults in men are rooted in inter-male competition.
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Electronic Cigarettes May Help Smokers' Memory While They Kick the Habit
sciencedaily.com - 4-19-12
Electronic cigarettes -- battery-operated devices that provide nicotine via inhaled vapour -- may help the memory as well as ease cravings as smokers quit their habit. These are the findings of research presented April 18 at the British Psychological Society's Annual Conference, held at the Grand Connaught Rooms, London (18-20 April 2012).
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Long-Term Exposure to Air Pollution Increases Risk of Hospitalization for Lung, Heart Disease
sciencedaily.com - 4-19-12
Older adults may be at increased risk of being hospitalized for lung and heart disease, stroke, and diabetes following long-term exposure to fine-particle air pollution, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). It is the first study to look at the link between long-term effects of exposure to fine particles in the air and rates of hospital admissions.
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Brain Scans Can Predict Weight Gain and Sexual Activity, Research Shows
sciencedaily.com - 4-19-12
At a time when obesity has become epidemic in American society, Dartmouth scientists have found that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scans may be able to predict weight gain. In a study published April 18, 2012, in The Journal of Neuroscience, the researchers demonstrated a connection between fMRI brain responses to appetite-driven cues and future behavior.
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Hair Regeneration from Adult Stem Cells
sciencedaily.com - 4-19-12
Research group headed by Professor Takashi Tsuji demonstrates regenerating "functional hair regeneration from adult stem cells" Substantial advance in the development of next-generation of "organ replacement regenerative therapies"
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Green-Glowing Fish Provides New Insights Into Health Impacts of Pollution
sciencedaily.com - 4-19-12
Understanding the damage that pollution causes to both wildlife and human health is set to become much easier thanks to a new green-glowing zebrafish.
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Even health-conscious people eat fast-food
upi.com - 4-18-12
Most health-conscious U.S. adults, who belong to a gym and buy local or organic food, had lunch in a fast-food restaurant in the last month, a survey found.
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Testosterone helps heart failure symptoms
upi.com - 4-18-12
Older men and women with heart failure could breathe better and exercise more after taking testosterone supplements, researchers in Canada said.
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Never Wake a Sleeping Baby? Why Depressed Moms Don’t Follow that Advice
time.com - 4-18-12
Researchers at Penn State found that depressed and worried moms were far more likely than other moms to rouse their babies unnecessarily in the middle of the night. Are they seeking emotional comfort?
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Weight-loss surgery may stem diabetes in some
usatoday.com - 4-18-12
Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicts that by 2050, people who have diabetes will comprise a third of the nation's population. Right now, 1 in 12 Americans has the disease.
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Anti-HIV Pill Could Be Cost Effective For High Risk Men
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-18-12
Stanford University researchers have concluded that a once a day pill designed to prevent the spread of HIV could prove cost effective for high risk members of the population. The drug, known as tenofovir-emtricitabine, reduces the risk of HIV infection by nearly fifty percent in a 2010 clinical trial, and the test subjects who reported taking the pill religiously, had upwards of seventy percent reduction in HIVB infection.
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Back Pain - Genetically Engineered Drug Less Effective
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-18-12
It appears that spinal injections of etanercept, a new type of anti-inflammatory genetically engineered drug, are not as effective in relieving the severe leg and lower back pain of sciatica, as steroid injections into the spine, the current standard of care, according to a new study reported in the 17 April issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.
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Prenatal air pollution linked to obesity
upi.com - 4-18-12
Air pollution may play a role in obesity among as many as 25 percent of children living in U.S. inner-city neighborhoods, researchers said.
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Sugar warning for 'healthy' soft drinks
bbc.co.uk - 4-18-12
People underestimate the amount of sugar in drinks which are perceived to be "healthy", research suggests.
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New prostate cancer treatment may reduce side-effects
bbc.co.uk - 4-18-12
A new technique to treat early prostate cancer may have far fewer side-effects than existing therapies, say experts.
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Testosterone Supplements Might Help Patients With Heart Failure
healthday.com - 4-18-12
Patients struggling with moderate to severe heart failure might benefit from testosterone supplementation to boost their ability to exercise, new Canadian research suggests.
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Social Factors May Affect Lifespan More Than Race, Location
healthday.com - 4-18-12
A group of socioeconomic factors such as education, income and work are better indicators of your chances of living to age 70 than race or geography, a new study shows.
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Overweight Pregnant Women at Higher Risk for Complications
healthday.com - 4-18-12
Pregnant women who are overweight and have slightly elevated blood-sugar levels are at increased risk for pregnancy complications, a new study shows.
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Researchers Develop Blood Test for Depression
healthday.com - 4-18-12
Researchers have developed a blood test that could one day help diagnose teens with depression.
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Brain Changes May Hamper Decision-Making in Old Age
healthday.com - 4-18-12
The ability to make decisions in new situations declines with age, apparently because of changes in the brain's white matter, a new imaging study says.
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Kidney Cancer Patients Fare Better With Tumor Removal Only
healthday.com - 4-18-12
Kidney cancer patients who have only the tumor removed, not the entire kidney, have higher survival rates, a new study finds.
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Most don't make end-life-of-life decisions
upi.com - 4-17-12
Physicians should discuss end-of-life issues, such as living wills and artificial nutrition, with terminally ill patients, U.S. medical professionals say.
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Wife's breast cancer can harm husband
upi.com - 4-17-12
Men who take care of a wife with breast cancer, even years after diagnosis and end of treatment, could have a weakened immune response, U.S. researchers found.
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New treatment for prostate cancer gives 'perfect results' for nine in ten men: research
telegraph.co.uk - 4-17-12
A new treatment for prostate cancer can rid the disease from nine in ten men without debilitating side effects, a study has found, leading to new hope for tens of thousands of men.
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Can a Dirt-Cheap Diabetes Drug Fight Cancer?
health.com - 4-17-12
Each year billions of dollars are spent in the search to find new cancer drugs. Very few of these would-be treatments end up being approved by the government and entering widespread use, which makes it all the more intriguing that one of the most promising new cancer drugs in years is, in fact, an old drug.
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Bigger Brain and Higher IQ Linked with Specific Genetic Variants
time.com - 4-17-12
Researchers have identified two genes that affect brain size and may be linked not only to IQ, but also to our risk of developing brain disorders like Alzheimer’s disease.
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Back study deals blow to pain drug etanercept
usatoday.com - 4-17-12
The genetically engineered drug, etanercept, hailed as a breakthrough in safe pain management, is no more effective in the long term than other back pain treatments, research published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds.
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Amazing 'chemo bath' saves cancer patients that doctors wrote off
dailymail.co.uk - 4-17-12
When Dawn Green was diagnosed with cancer four years ago, doctors delivered the crushing news there was nothing more they could do, and gave her just three months to live.
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Flesh-eating bacteria case spurs study, treatment
msnbc.msn.com - 4-17-12
A 5-year-old boy in Wisconsin who fell off his bike, skinned his chin and bit his lip was likely one of thousands of kids with a minor injury that day in 2008. But 36 hours later, this boy was in an intensive care unit fighting for his life, suffering from a very rare infection of "flesh-eating" bacteria, formally known as necrotizing fasciitis, which had developed in his right cheek, near his lip.
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Sepsis Common In USA Hospitals, Unawareness High
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-17-12
According to a 2010 survey, 66% of Americans had never heard of the word 'sepsis', and of the remaining third who had, 35% had no idea what it meant. The result is shocking considering that sepsis is the leading cause of mortality in U.S. hospitals, with 750,000 patients and over 250,000 deaths each year. The most dangerous form of sepsis, i.e. severe sepsis and septic shock has a combined mortality rate of 30 to 35%.
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Life stressors increase obesity risk in young girls
cnn.com - 4-17-12
When young girls live in a stressful home where violence, depression or other disruptions are common they are more likely to become obese by age 5, compared to children raised in more stable homes. And when preschool girls witness a couple of bad events at once, they have an even higher risk of becoming obese, according to research presented in this week's medical journal Pediatrics.
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Walking could be a useful tool in treating depression
bbc.co.uk - 4-17-12
Something as simple as going for a brisk stroll could play an important role in fighting depression, according to researchers in Scotland.
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HIV Raises Anal Cancer Risk in Women, Study Says
healthday.com - 4-17-12
Women with HIV are at increased risk for anal cancer, a new study finds.
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Fish Oil Supplements Won't Help in Multiple Sclerosis: Study
healthday.com - 4-17-12
Omega-3 fatty acid supplements don't appear to have any benefit on multiple sclerosis (MS), according a study by Norwegian researchers.
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Experimental Pill for Multiple Sclerosis Shows Promise
healthday.com - 4-17-12
An experimental pill reduced the number of lesions in the brains of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), researchers report.
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Surgery Rates Rising for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer: Study
healthday.com - 4-17-12
Surgery for non-melanoma skin cancer in the United States increased substantially from 2001 to 2006, mainly due to the increased use of a specific surgical procedure, a new study suggests.
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Tamiflu Made My Kid Hallucinate. I Think the Flu is Preferable to Delirium
time.com - 4-16-12
My 9-year-old son took Tamiflu and became a child possessed. I'd never heard about this potential side effect, which appears to be most common in kids.
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Prostate cancer treatment uses human DNA
upi.com - 4-16-12
Scientists say a prostate cancer treatment developed by a Danish company uses viruses with human DNA to stimulate the immune system to target cancer cells.
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Yellowfin tuna linked to salmonella outbreak in 20 states
usatoday.com - 4-16-12
A yellowfin tuna product used to make dishes like sushi and sashimi sold at restaurants and grocery stores has been linked with an outbreak of salmonella that has sickened more than 100 people in 20 states and the District of Columbia, federal health authorities said Friday.
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British scientists have gained fresh insight into the causes of male infertility that promise to provide new treatments for couples struggling to have children.
dailymail.co.uk - 4-16-12
Ever since the birth of her first child, Lily, 15 years ago, former Radio 2 presenter Emma Forbes has suffered back ache, although those two words barely do justice to the agony that has often left her bedbound, shedding tears of frustration, unable to walk or to rest, sleep or eat.
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Gel to boost male fertility being developed by scientists
telegraph.co.uk - 4-16-12
British scientists have gained fresh insight into the causes of male infertility that promise to provide new treatments for couples struggling to have children.
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Move over, Master Cleanse: juice fasting hits the get-thin-quick stage
msnbc.msn.com - 4-16-12
Thanks to her husband, Juli Alvarez is a dedicated liquid dieter. "I'm very conscious about what goes in my mouth, but then you get caught up in things, get lazy and eat one too many cupcakes," says the New Yorker whose husband is a pastry chef. "I wish I could say I never gain weight but I have gone up and down."
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Wallower, bottler or yeller? Understanding your anger style
msnbc.msn.com - 4-16-12
Ticked off. Fed up. Enraged. Call it what you will, but we've all been there. Anger is part of being human, says Norman Rosenthal, MD, professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University Medical School. "Problems start when you bottle it up, react now and think later, or feel that a destructive response is justified just because you're furious," he says.
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Biomarkers May Predict Chemo-Resistant Breast Cancers
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-16-12
Researchers at the University of Hull in the UK have identified a family of proteins that could potentially be used as biomarkers to predict resistance to chemotherapy in estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) breast cancer patients.
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Tree Nut Consumption Associated With Better Diet Quality In Children And Adults
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-16-12
In a study published in Nutrition Research, researchers looked at the association of out-of-hand nut (OOHN) consumption with nutrient intake, diet quality and the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome in both children and adults. Consumers of OOHN, including tree nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts), had higher intakes of energy, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (the good fats) and dietary fiber, and lower intakes of carbohydrates, cholesterol and sodium than non-consumers.
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Worrying Excessively, Usually Seen As Pathology, May Aid Survival Of The Species
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-16-12
Worrying may have evolved along with intelligence as a beneficial trait, according to a recent study by scientists at SUNY Downstate Medical Center and other institutions.
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Treating depression with electrodes inside the brain
cnn.com - 4-16-12
The first time Edi Guyton tried to commit suicide, she was 19 years old, wracked with depression and unable to deal with the social and academic pressure of college.
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Researchers ID Genes That May Determine Mental Illness
healthday.com - 4-16-12
Genes that increase or reduce the risk of certain mental illnesses and Alzheimer's disease have been identified by an international team of scientists.
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Memory in Adults Impacted by Versions of Four Genes
sciencedaily.com - 4-16-12
Two research studies, co-led by UC Davis neurologist Charles DeCarli and conducted by an international team that included more than 80 scientists at 71 institutions in eight countries, has advanced understanding of the genetic components of Alzheimer's disease and of brain development. Both studies appear in the April 15 edition of the journal Nature Genetics.
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U.S. adults cooking healthier at home
upi.com - 4-15-12
U.S. consumers are cooking more often, experimenting with food and cooking at home to help save money and eat healthier, a survey indicates.
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Parents are main influence on kid drinking
upi.com - 4-15-12
U.S. parents are the leading influence on their children's decisions not to drink alcohol, a survey indicated.
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Prostate cancer treatment uses human DNA
upi.com - 4-15-12
Scientists say a prostate cancer treatment developed by a Danish company uses viruses with human DNA to stimulate the immune system to target cancer cells.
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U.S. adults cooking healthier at home
upi.com - 4-15-12
U.S. consumers are cooking more often, experimenting with food and cooking at home to help save money and eat healthier, a survey indicates.
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Marijuana-growing to reap badly needed revenue and jobs? Spanish village decides not to do it
washingtonpost.com - 4-15-12
What about growing marijuana to pay off crushing municipal debt? One Spanish village put the idea to the vote Tuesday, and a majority of its citizens approved — but not the 75 percent needed.
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What’s the Healthiest Breakfast? Here’s What the Experts Say
time.com - 4-15-12
You've heard it before, breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Yet so many of us skip it. Consider these easy ideas from health experts who make their morning meal a priority.
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FDA Adds Sexual Side Effects to Propecia and Proscar Labels
time.com - 4-15-12
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) added new warnings on Wednesday to finasteride, the drug used to treat male pattern baldness and enlarged prostate, citing sexual side effects that continue to occur even after patients stop the treatment.
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Naloxone Debate: FDA Hears Testimony About Making an Overdose Antidote Nonprescription
time.com - 4-15-12
“Why didn’t I know about this when my child was alive?” That was the question raised over and over at a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hearing on Thursday by parents whose families make up the terrible statistics on opioid overdose, which now kills some 15,000 Americans each year.
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Sounding the sugar alarms
latimes.com - 4-15-12
When looking at the failings of the American diet, the new culprit is sugar. Some think that the no-sugar call is simplistic, though, and that there's no single villain.
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Marijuana-Laced Wine Grows More Fashionable in California Wine Country
thedailybeast.com - 4-15-12
Wines fermented with weed were a novelty in the early 1980s, but now quite a few California winemakers are producing cannabis cuvées on the sly—with cabernet the variety of choice.
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Unmarried Couples With Children Face Different Challenges
abcnews.go.com - 4-15-12
Babies, not wedding bells, were on Natasha Montero's mind. Both she and her boyfriend, Paul Taylor, were divorcees when the couple decided to move in together in 2010. They knew they'd eventually marry, but both were in their mid-30s, and Montero said a marriage certificate wasn't at the forefront of their minds.
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Could a cure for AIDS be on the horizon? Genetically engineered human stem cells can hunt down and 'kill' HIV inside the body
dailymail.co.uk - 4-15-12
Human stem cells can be genetically engineered into 'warrior' cells that fight HIV - and the new cells can attack HIV-infected cells inside a living creature. The breakthrough, by UCLA scientists, is hoped to be the first step towards a treatment that can eradicate HIV from an infected patient.
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Prostate cancer vaccine uses DNA to fight disease
telegraph.co.uk - 4-15-12
The first prostate cancer vaccine could be a step away after ministers gave their approval for a human trial of a new genetically modified therapy.
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Spreading Fungal Diseases Threaten Food Security, Biodiversity
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-15-12
The spread of existing and emerging fungal diseases in plants and animals poses a threat to global food security and biodiversity, according to a new study whose authors suggest halting fungal rot in the most important crops could feed an extra 600 million people a year.
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New guide for germs in U.S. beach sand
upi.com - 4-15-12
U.S. environmental scientists say they have created a reference guide for potentially harmful germs lurking in the sand used by children to build sand castles.
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Exercise May Boost Breast Cancer Patients' Quality of Life
healthday.com - 4-15-12
http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=663536
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Alternative Therapies Aren't Used as Substitutes for Asthma Meds: Study
healthday.com - 4-15-12
Almost one in five parents has turned to an alternative or complementary medicine or treatment for their child's asthma, but new research has found that parents are not abandoning traditional treatments in the process.
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Study Probes How Sad Movies Make Viewers Happy
healthday.com - 4-15-12
Watching sad movies makes people happier because it causes them to think about their loved ones, a new study finds.
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Symptomatic Behaviour in Childhood Strongly Predicts Psychiatric Treatment as a Young Adult
sciencedaily.com - 4-15-12
A survey on the mental health of eight-year-old children could help identify those individuals who are highly likely to require psychiatric treatment in their teens or early adulthood, shows a study conducted at the University of Helsinki. Should "mental health checkups" be made part of health care in schools?
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Obese women lose weight before pregnancy
upi.com - 4-14-12
Obese women who are planning pregnancies should lose weight first -- eating a healthy diet when pregnant is not enough, U.S. researchers advise.
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Many college athlete injuries from overuse
upi.com - 4-14-12
Sixty-two percent of overuse injuries in college athletes occurred in women -- after long training sessions or from repetitive movements, U.S. researchers say.
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Haiti begins vaccinating for cholera
upi.com - 4-14-12
More than a year after a cholera epidemic broke out in Haiti, health organizations began vaccinating Haitians for the disease.
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Age a factor when it comes to influenza
upi.com - 4-14-12
Researchers in Sweden said they demonstrated the 2009 (H1N1) swine flu affected age groups 10-19 and 20-29 the worst.
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Spring brings more fruits and vegetables
upi.com - 4-14-12
Produce sections in grocery stores may look the same from season to season, but spring brings many seasonal fruit and vegetables, a U.S. food expert says.
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Timing pregnancy is important health issue
upi.com - 4-14-12
Given that U.S. maternal mortality rates have nearly doubled, a U.S. researcher says timing pregnancy should be considered prevention healthcare.
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Marijuana brownies, tea legal — B.C. Supremes
seattlepi.com - 4-14-12
Authorized users of medical marijuana in Canada can make brownies and take cannabis in their tea in addition to smoking the weed, the British Columbia Supreme Court decided on Friday.
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Turmeric may protect heart after surgery
msnbc.msn.com - 4-14-12
A new study from Thailand suggests that extracts from turmeric spice, known for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, may help ward off heart attacks in people who've had recent bypass surgery.
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Why this year's tick season will be really bad
msnbc.msn.com - 4-14-12
Picnics, hikes, afternoons in the garden -- all wonderful ways to take advantage of the warmer weather. But keep in mind that along with fresh air and exercise, you're also potentially exposing yourself to tiny, unwanted visitors -- ticks! Luckily, with a few steps, you can minimize your exposure and keep yourself safe.
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8 Weeds You Can Eat
rodale.com - 4-14-12
If you think everything in your yard that isn't grass must be a nuisance, you're missing out on a free lunch. Those pesky weeds are loaded with antioxidants, vitamins and protein, sometimes even more nutritious than what you'll find at the grocery store. Here are some suggestions for finding free munchies in your backyard.
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Engineered Cells Suppress HIV In Living Tissue
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-14-12
For the first time, US scientists have shown that HIV-fighting cells engineered from human stem cells can suppress the virus in living human tissue in mice.
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Even Young Teens Show Signs of Sun Damage
healthday.com - 4-14-12
In a new study that used a special type of photography to unveil hidden signs of sun damage, middle schoolers showed evidence of levels of UV exposure that could raise their risk for melanoma later in life.
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Here Are Fruits, Veggies That Offer Best Bang for Your Buck
healthday.com - 4-14-12
Studies suggest that eating a diet that contains lots of fresh fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure and certain cancers.
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Obese Workers' Health Care Costs Top Those of Smokers
healthday.com - 4-14-12
Obese workers have even higher health costs than smokers, a new study finds.
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CT Scans Deliver More Radiation to Obese People: Study
healthday.com - 4-14-12
Obese and overweight patients who undergo CT scans are exposed to much more radiation than people of normal weight, researchers say.
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Strain of Common Toxoplasma Gondii Parasite Linked to Severe Illness in US Newborns
sciencedaily.com - 4-14-12
Scientists have identified which strains of the Toxoplasma gondii parasite, the cause of toxoplasmosis, are most strongly associated with premature births and severe birth defects in the United States. The researchers used a new blood test developed by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, to pinpoint T. gondii strains that children acquire from their acutely infected mothers while in the womb.
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Chemicals in make-up and plastics linked to diabetes: research
telegraph.co.uk - 4-14-12
A study in Sweden has found that people with 'modest' levels of the chemicals in their blood are twice as likely to develop diabetes. The chemicals called phthalates are used in products such as clingfilm as it can be a softening agent in plastics but they can be used in cosmetics such as self tans and perfumes.
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Eating nuts can help stave off obesity, says study
dailymail.co.uk - 4-14-12
Dieters often dismiss them because of their high fat content, but research suggests that snacking on nuts can help keep you slim.
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Chemical in fake tan and make-up is linked to obesity and diabetes
dailymail.co.uk - 4-14-12
A chemical used in make-up and self tanning lotions has been linked to obesity. Scientists found that those who were exposed to phthalates, colourless man-made substances included in a variety of common consumer products, were more prone to weight gain.
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Pot Groups See Obama 2012 Flip-Flop on Medical Marijuana
usnews.com - 4-13-12
President Barack Obama touted a progressive attitude on medical marijuana on the campaign trail, but since taking office, Obama's administration has hardened its stance and supporters of the drug are crying foul on the flip-flop.
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Alzheimer's Disease: Music Brings Patients 'Back to Life'
abcnews.go.com - 4-13-12
Henry Dryer sits slumped over the tray attached to his wheelchair. He doesn't speak, and rarely moves, until a nursing home worker puts his headphones on.
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Chinese medicines contain traces of endangered animals
telegraph.co.uk - 4-13-12
A study of 15 samples seized by Australian border officials found that four contained either Asiatic black bear or Saiga antelope, both of which are illegal to trade under international law.
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7 Science-Backed Signs Your Marriage Has Staying Power
abcnews.go.com - 4-13-12
Merely spending time together doesn't cement a marriage, but there's strong science suggesting that sharing new experiences, celebrating a partner's successes and offering empathy and the right kind of support when needed can help make a marriage last.
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More children born to unmarried parents
usatoday.com - 4-13-12
A growing number of firstborns in the USA have unmarried parents, reflecting dramatic increases since 2002 in births to cohabiting women, according to government figures out today.
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Menthol smokers have more strokes, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 4-13-12
New research suggests that among smokers, those who prefer mentholated cigarettes tend to have more strokes than non-menthol smokers.
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Move over, Master Cleanse: juice fasting hits the get-thin-quick stage
msnbc.msn.com - 4-13-12
Thanks to her husband, Juli Alvarez is a dedicated liquid dieter. "I'm very conscious about what goes in my mouth, but then you get caught up in things, get lazy and eat one too many cupcakes," says the New Yorker whose husband is a pastry chef. "I wish I could say I never gain weight but I have gone up and down."
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Mental Illness Linked To Chronic Physical Illness Risk
healthday.com - 4-13-12
A study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) reveals that individuals aged 18 and older who had any mental illness, major depressive episodes or serious mental illness in the past year, are more likely to develop diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, cardiovascular disease, or have a stroke, than those not experiencing mental illness.
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Scant Evidence That Insect Bite Remedies Work
healthday.com - 4-13-12
A UK review in the April Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin (DTB) says there is scant evidence that over-the-counter remedies for simple insect bites work, suggesting that in most cases, no treatment at all is enough.
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Baldness Drug May Cause Sexual Side Effects: FDA
healthday.com - 4-13-12
Two Merck & Co. drugs -- one to treat hair loss in men, the other to treat an enlarged prostate gland -- will get revised labels warning of potential sexual side effects that can last even after patients stop taking the drugs, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Thursday.
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Head, Body Lice Are Genetically Very Similar
healthday.com - 4-13-12
Genetic evidence suggests that head and body lice are the same species, a new study says.
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Key to New Antibiotics Could Be Deep Within Isolated Cave
sciencedaily.com - 4-13-12
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in one of the deepest, most isolated caves in the world could mean good news in the battle against superbugs. Researchers from McMaster and the University of Akron have discovered a remarkable prevalence of such bacteria in New Mexico's Lechuguilla Cave, a place isolated from human contact until very recently.
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Moms' weight, blood sugar endanger babies
upi.com - 4-13-12
Women who are just above average for weight and blood sugar are at a higher risk of bad pregnancy outcomes than previously known, U.S. researchers found.
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Lab-grown egg cells would change fertility
upi.com - 4-13-12
Scottish researchers say they are ready to ask for a license to fertilize human eggs that will generate an unlimited supply grown from stem cells.
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Nail polishes mislabeled as 'safe'
upi.com - 4-13-12
Mislabeled nail products could potentially harm the health of workers in more than 48,000 California nail salons and their customers, a government report said.
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Medical Marijuana Pits States Versus Feds
abcnews.go.com - 4-12-12
The sun has now warmed the rich soil of California's Central Valley. It's time to plant. But for one of the valley's most profitable crops, this year's forecast is decidedly chilly.
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Study: 20% of U.S. healthcare wasted
upi.com - 4-12-12
Twenty percent of the more than $2.2 trillion spent on healthcare in the United States each year is wasted, two healthcare experts suggest.
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Dementia cases 'to double by 2030' says World Health Organisation
dailymail.co.uk - 4-12-12
The number of people suffering dementia around the globe is expected to nearly double to 65.7million sufferers by 2030, the World Health Organisation has warned.
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Warning over online 'smart drugs' that can kill
telegraph.co.uk - 4-12-12
An increase in the use of 'smart drugs' to boost intelligence, lose weight, improve mood and increase fitness has prompted experts to warn they often contain harmful banned substances that can cause serious side effects.
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Mystery sapovirus strikes nursing homes, new tests reveal
msnbc.msn.com - 4-12-12
For sheer misery, few germs can cause the chaos of norovirus in a nursing home. The gut bug can spread rapidly through food, on surfaces or person-to-person, afflicting victims with violent diarrhea, vomiting and stomach pain.
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Niceness, Generosity May Have A Genetic Component
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-12-12
US researchers suggest genes that influence certain hormones contribute to niceness and generosity in people, depending on how they perceive and feel about the world around them.
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Next Generation Vaccines May "Trick" Immune Cells
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-12-12
By discovering how vital immune cells known as dendritic cells recognize dead and damaged cells, researchers think they may have found a new approach for next generation vaccines that "trick" cells into launching an immune response. Such vaccines would be more effective and result in fewer side-effects, they suggest.
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Women Risk Metabolic Syndrome Through Lack Of Exercise
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-12-12
The results of a national US study suggest that women are at greater risk for developing metabolic syndrome than men because they are less likely to do at least 30 minutes of exercise a day. It found that although regular physical activity is linked to better health in both sexes, it appears to make a bigger difference for women.
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The power of perceptions: Imagining the reality you want
cnn.com - 4-12-12
Viktor Frankl was a Jewish psychiatrist who spent three years during World War II living under unspeakable circumstances in several of the most notorious Nazi concentration camps.
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U.S. teen birth rate lowest since 1946
upi.com - 4-12-12
Fewer babies were born to U.S. teenagers ages 15-19 in 2010 -- 367,752 -- than in any year since 1946's 322,380, federal health officials said.
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Forget pricey shampoo, beans good for hair
upi.com - 4-12-12
Hair isn't essential for life so those with a poor diet may ingest enough nutrients for vital organs, but not enough for good hair, a U.S. food expert says.
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Ecstasy may affect mom-to-be's baby
upi.com - 4-12-12
Ecstasy, a drug being tested for therapeutic benefits but most often used in raves and clubs, may affect a pregnant woman's baby, U.S. researchers say.
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Huntington's disease 'lowers' cancer risk
bbc.co.uk - 4-12-12
People with Huntington's disease, a debilitating brain condition, appear have a "protection" from cancer, according to a study in Sweden.
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Shift workers 'risking' diabetes and obesity
bbc.co.uk - 4-12-12
Shift workers getting too little sleep at the wrong time of day may be increasing their risk of diabetes and obesity, according to researchers.
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Study Shows New Option for Kids With Tough-to-Treat Leukemia
healthday.com - 4-12-12
Additional chemotherapy may a better option than bone marrow transplant for some children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who don't respond to an initial intense regimen of chemotherapy called "induction therapy," a new study says.
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FDA Seeks to Limit Antibiotics in Animal Feed
healthday.com - 4-12-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday called on food producers, drug companies and veterinarians to help limit the use of antibiotics in farm animals.
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Spouses of Cancer Patients May Have Raised Risk of Heart Disease, Stroke
healthday.com - 4-12-12
The spouses of cancer patients are at increased risk of heart disease and stroke, a new study suggests.
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Drug May Prevent Pancreatitis After Digestive Procedure
healthday.com - 4-12-12
A simple anti-inflammatory drug significantly cuts the risk of painful pancreatitis after patients undergo a specialized scope exam of the digestive tract, a new study suggests.
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Distinct Brain Cells Recognize Novel Sights
sciencedaily.com - 4-12-12
The brain's ability to learn to recognize objects plays out in the inferior temporal cortex. A new study offers a possible explanation of how two classes of neurons play distinct roles to help that happen.
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Achilles Heel of Dengue Virus Identified: Target for Future Vaccines
sciencedaily.com - 4-12-12
A team of scientists from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Vanderbilt University have pinpointed the region on dengue virus that is neutralized in people who overcome infection with the deadly pathogen. The results challenge the current state of dengue vaccine research, which is based on studies in mice and targets a different region of the virus.
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Trouble Coping With the Unfamiliar as You Age? Blame Your White Matter
sciencedaily.com - 4-12-12
If you are an aging baby boomer and you've noticed it's a bit harder to drive to unfamiliar locations or to pick a new brand of olive oil at the supermarket, you can blame it on the white matter in your brain.
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New Pregnancy Risk for Babies and Moms: Overweight Moms With Moderately High Blood Sugar Raise Health Risk
sciencedaily.com - 4-12-12
Pregnant women who are overweight with moderately elevated blood sugar never set off any alarms for their physicians. The big concern was for women who were obese or who had gestational diabetes because those conditions are known to cause a host of health risks to the mom and baby.
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Death and Taxes Collide as Fatal Crashes Mount on IRS Filing Day
bloomberg.com - 4-11-12
Death and taxes aren’t only certain, they also seem to share a same deadline in the U.S., according to a study that points to the role of stress in fatal accidents.
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Secret sugars in your food: From two cubes in a salad to 16-and-a-half in bottled water, what you're eating without realising it
dailymail.co.uk - 4-11-12
Are you feeling virtuous about your healthy breakfast of wholegrain cereal washed down with a glass of orange juice?
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The 20 Best Organic Foods
rodale.com - 4-11-12
Walk into an average grocery store and you face a choice—47,000 choices of products, actually. And their labels advertise terms such as low fat, high fiber, free range, and organic. Some matter, some don't. But those labels aren't even the most confusing part: Many scientists say organic is more nutritious than conventionally grown food, while others say it's not.
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An Important Role In Nutrition Played By Beans, Pulses And Legumes
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-11-12
Beans, pulses and legumes can be classified as either vegetables or proteins under the new USDA dietary guidelines, giving them an important role in a person's daily diet, an expert panel said at the Institute of Food Technologists' Wellness 12 meeting.
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At Breakfast, Eating Low Glycemic Index Foods Can Control Blood Sugar Throughout The Day
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-11-12
Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar throughout the morning and after the next meal of the day, researchers said at the Institute of Food Technologists' Wellness 12 meeting.
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Blood Pressure Medicine Nifedipine Increases Risk For Heart Attacks And Death
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-11-12
Despite the fact that nifedipine increases the risk of heart attacks and death, doctors still prescribe this immediate-release blood pressure drug to elderly patients.
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In Alzheimer's Patients, Pulse Pressure Elevation Could Presage Cerebrovascular Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-11-12
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System have shown that elevated pulse pressure may increase the risk of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in older adults with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Their study has been published in the early online edition of Journal of Alzheimer's Disease in advance of the June 5 print publication.
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Unhealthy Snacks, Sodas And Watching TV - A Threat To Childhood Health
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-11-12
With more than one in eight northern European children being overweight and over 25% of children in parts of southern Europe, obesity amongst European pre-schoolers is hitting record levels. The highest levels are in Spain where 38% of young girls are now classified as overweight or obese.
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Evidence Of Banned Antibiotics Found In Poultry Products
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-11-12
In a joint study, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Arizona State University found evidence suggesting that a class of antibiotics previously banned by the U.S. government for poultry production is still in use. Results of the study were published in Environmental Science & Technology.
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Sexual Dysfunction Reported By 4 Out Of 5 Female Dialysis Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-11-12
Other studies indicate that sexual dysfunction is also common in men on hemodialysis. More than 350,000 people in the United States receive this type of therapy.
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Brain Mechanism For Reward Enjoyment - New Insight
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-11-12
Anhedonia is the inability to gain pleasure from typically pleasurable experiences. It is a common characteristic amongst many individuals who suffer from depression, schizophrenia and some other mental illnesses. However, what causes the condition still remains unclear.
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Non-toxic Claims On Many Nail Varnishes Are False
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-11-12
A considerable number of so-called "non-toxic nail care products" do, in fact, contain toxins, the DTSC (California Department of Toxic Substance Control) has warned in a new study released today.
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Mike Wallace's public battle with depression
cnn.com - 4-11-12
Since his death at age 93 Saturday, much has been written about hard-edged ex-"60 Minutes" reporter Mike Wallace's epic verbal battles with world leaders, swindlers and alleged crime bosses. But in 2005, Wallace made news of his own when he acknowledged his longtime war with depression – a fight that nearly caused him to take his own life.
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Eat more 'superfoods' to lose weight
cnn.com - 4-11-12
When you're on a diet, food consumes your life. You can't eat carbohydrates, so you think about them constantly. You can't dig into your co-worker's candy drawer, so M&M's float across your computer screen like a desert mirage.
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Diabetes blood pressure control warning
bbc.co.uk - 4-11-12
Half of people with diabetes are failing to keep control of their blood pressure, risking "damaging" complications, figures suggest.
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Certain Birth Control Pills May Carry Higher Blood Clot Risk: FDA
healthday.com - 4-11-12
U.S. health officials announced Tuesday that birth controls pills containing drospirenone -- a man-made version of the hormone progesterone -- may be associated with a higher risk of blood clots and will require new labels.
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High Blood Pressure May Be Especially Lethal for Blacks
healthday.com - 4-11-12
Black people with high blood pressure are twice as likely to suffer sudden cardiac death than whites or other racial groups who suffer hypertension, according to a new study.
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Short Walks May Ease Fatigue in Pancreatic Cancer Patients
healthday.com - 4-11-12
Regular walking can help reduce fatigue in some pancreatic cancer patients, a new study suggests.
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Online Tool Could Diagnose Autism Quickly, Developers Say
healthday.com - 4-11-12
A new online procedure could cut from hours to minutes the amount of time it takes to accurately diagnose autism in young children, resulting in earlier treatment, a new report by Harvard Medical School researchers says.
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Sibling Had a Stroke? Your Risk Might Rise, Too
healthday.com - 4-11-12
One clue to your risk for a stroke may come from a look at your siblings' experience with the brain attacks, a new study says.
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Study Links Toxic Component in Herbal Remedies to Kidney Failure and Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 4-11-12
Aristolochic acid (AA), a component of a plant used in herbal remedies since ancient times, leads to kidney failure and upper urinary tract cancer (UUC) in individuals exposed to the toxin.
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Personality, Habits of Thought and Gender Influence How We Remember
sciencedaily.com - 4-11-12
We all have them -- positive memories of personal events that are a delight to recall, and painful recollections that we would rather forget. A new study reveals that what we do with our emotional memories and how they affect us has a lot to do with our gender, personality and the methods we use (often without awareness) to regulate our feelings.
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Symptoms That Mimic Epilepsy Linked to Stress, Poor Coping Skills
sciencedaily.com - 4-11-12
Based on their clinical experience and observations, a team of Johns Hopkins physicians and psychologists say that more than one-third of the patients admitted to The Johns Hopkins Hospital's inpatient epilepsy monitoring unit for treatment of intractable seizures have been discovered to have stress-triggered symptoms rather than a true seizure disorder.
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Antioxidant May Disrupt Alzheimer's Disease Process
sciencedaily.com - 4-11-12
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is now the sixth leading cause of death among Americans, affecting nearly 1 in 8 people over the age of 65. There is currently no treatment that alters the course of this disease. However, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that changes in the way the body handles iron and other metals like copper and zinc may start years before the onset of AD symptoms.
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Frequent Dental X-Rays Linked to Most Common Brain Tumor
sciencedaily.com - 4-11-12
People who received frequent dental x-rays in the past have an increased risk of developing the most commonly diagnosed primary brain tumor in the United States.
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Pelvic Muscle Training Effective in Treating Urinary Incontinence for Women
sciencedaily.com - 4-11-12
A type of exercise called pelvic floor muscle training is effective for treating adult women with urinary incontinence (the involuntary loss of urine) without risk of side effects, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).
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Aspirin Reduces Cancer Risk: Is It Time to Include It in Cancer Prevention Guidelines?
sciencedaily.com - 4-11-12
A new report by American Cancer Society scientists says new data showing aspirin's potential role in reducing the risk of cancer death bring us considerably closer to the time when cancer prevention can be included in clinical guidelines for the use of aspirin in preventative care.
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Terminal cancer treated too aggressively
upi.com - 4-11-12
The best hospitals in the United States don't do much better than local community hospitals when it comes to caring for dying cancer patients, researchers say.
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Radioactive particles from Japan detected in California kelp
latimes.com - 4-10-12
Radioactive particles released in the nuclear reactor meltdown in Fukushima, Japan, following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami were detected in giant kelp along the California coast, according to a recently published study.
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A fog of drugs and war
latimes.com - 4-10-12
More than 110,000 active-duty Army troops last year took antidepressants, sedatives and other prescription medications. Some see a link to aberrant behavior.
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Urine not as sterile as doctors thought
upi.com - 4-10-12
Doctors have long believed normal urine is sterile, but U.S. researchers found bacteria can be present in the bladders of healthy women.
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Mamma mia! Why there are 20,000 pregnant MEN in Britain
dailymail.co.uk - 4-10-12
At first glance, the NHS appears to be dealing with something of a modern medical miracle. According to national statistics gathered on NHS care, nearly 20,000 male patients in England required midwifery services between 2009 and 2010.
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'Universal' vaccine that could beat 90 per cent of cancers is tested on humans for first time
dailymail.co.uk - 4-10-12
A vaccine that targets a molecule in 90 per cent of all cancers has been tested on humans for the first time. Results from the safety trial - on patients with blood cancer - found all had greater immunity to the disease after receiving the vaccine. Three of the seven patients who have completed the treatment are now free of the condition.
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Forget Viagra, the 'Cuddle drug' could be the new way to boost performance in the bedroom
dailymail.co.uk - 4-10-12
Taking a chemical that helps mothers bond with their babies may not immediately strike you as the best way to improve a man’s libido.
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Scientists: Corn Seed Coating Possible Bee-Killing Culprit
rodale.com - 4-10-12
Italian researchers are the latest to identify a common chemical coating applied to corn seeds as a possible culprit in the colony collapse disorder epidemic that has been wiping out honeybee populations around the world.
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Breakthrough Raises Hope Of Preventing Wet AMD
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-10-12
A new study led by Trinity College Dublin, in Ireland, finds that controlling or raising levels of the immune system component IL-18 in the retinas of patients with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), could prevent it progressing into the wet form of the disease. The researchers write about their findings in the 8 April online issue of Nature Medicine.
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Life expectancy may affect life decisions
upi.com - 4-10-12
Decisions about marriage, divorce, abortion or having a child may subconsciously influence how long people think they will live, a Canadian researcher says.
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Most Americans don't eat enough beans
upi.com - 4-10-12
Most Americans do not get nearly enough of beans, pulses -- crops harvested only for the dry seed -- and legumes in their diets, a U.S. panel of experts found.
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Urinary Incontinence Drugs May Be More Trouble Than They're Worth
healthday.com - 4-10-12
For women with urinary incontinence, the available treatments may cause more problems than they solve and many stop taking the medications because of side effects that can include dry mouth and constipation, a new analysis indicates.
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Could Menthol Cigarettes Pose Even Higher Stroke Risk?
healthday.com - 4-10-12
Menthol cigarettes may pose an even greater risk for stroke than other types of cigarettes, especially for women and non-black smokers, says a new, large study.
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Children Born to Obese Moms May Face Higher Autism Risk: Study
healthday.com - 4-10-12
Children born to obese or very overweight mothers are at higher risk of having autism or developmental delays, new research suggests.
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Head and Body Lice Appear to Be the Same Species, Genetic Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 4-10-12
A new study offers compelling genetic evidence that head and body lice are the same species. The finding is of special interest because body lice can transmit deadly bacterial diseases, while head lice do not.
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Black Flies May Have a Purpose After All
sciencedaily.com - 4-10-12
Black flies drink blood and spread disease such as river blindness-creating misery with their presence. A University of Georgia study, however, proves that the pesky insects can be useful.
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Consumerism and Its Antisocial Effects Can Be Turned On -- Or Off
sciencedaily.com - 4-10-12
Money doesn't buy happiness. Neither does materialism: Research shows that people who place a high value on wealth, status, and stuff are more depressed and anxious and less sociable than those who do not.
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Most say they'll never get seriously ill
upi.com - 4-9-12
Sixty-two percent of U.S. employees say it's not likely they or a family member will be diagnosed with a serious illness like cancer, a survey indicates.
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STUDY: Radioactive kelp found along local shoreline
presstelegram.com - 4-9-12
Fish along the Orange County coast may have been affected by radioactivity that fell on California in the days after Japan's 2011 nuclear disaster, local researchers say.
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Odwalla Chocolate Protein Drink Recalled
abcnews.go.com - 4-9-12
Odwalla Inc. says it is voluntarily recalling its Odwalla Chocolate Protein Monster beverage because four customers who have peanut allergies experienced severe allergic reactions after drinking it.
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Women over 40 told: 'Don't take IVF success for granted'
dailymail.co.uk - 4-9-12
Women in their 40s expect fertility treatment to rewind their ‘biological clock’, and are upset when they find out they can’t have babies, warns a top fertility specialist. Demand for IVF from older women is rising dramatically, but they don’t realise the chances of success are limited, said Pasquale Patrizio, of the Yale Fertility Center in the U.S.
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Pain medication may hinder heart attack recovery, study finds
telegraph.co.uk - 4-9-12
Giving heart attack patients pain relief may actually hinder their recovery, according to researchers who say the stabbing ache in the chest actually stimulates the body to repair itself.
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First bite warning: Foods that make you do bad things
msnbc.msn.com - 4-9-12
It's a common slipup: After weeks of eating well, hitting the gym, and skipping dessert, you're on track to lose those five pounds. You deserve a reward, some candy, a (non-diet) soda, or a side of fries. But hours later, the scene around you looks like "The Hangover" meets the Food Network.
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Ten-Fold Increase Seen In Illicit Drug Use In 50- To 64-Year-Olds In England Since 1993
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-9-12
Until now, illicit drug use has not been common in older people. However, it is likely to become more common as generations that use drugs more frequently reach an older age.
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Many Who Suffer With Rheumatoid Arthritis Are Plagued By Lower GI Problems
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-9-12
Add lower gastrointestinal (GI) problems such as ulcers, bleeding and perforations to the list of serious complications facing many rheumatoid arthritis patients. They are at greater risk for GI problems and gastrointestinal-related death than people without the disease, a Mayo Clinic study shows. Researchers say their findings point out the need for new ways to prevent and treat lower GI disease in rheumatoid arthritis patients; the incidence of lower gastrointestinal complications is rising even as upper GI problems decrease significantly among rheumatoid arthritis patients.
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Nanostars Deliver Cancer Drugs Direct To Nucleus
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-9-12
Scientists at Northwestern University in the US have developed a simple, specialized, star-shaped gold nanoparticle that can deliver drugs directly to the nucleus of a cancer cell. They write about their work in a paper published recently in the journal ACS Nano.
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Report Suggests That Your Supermarket May Affect Your Weight
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-9-12
The study, conducted in Paris from 2007 to 2008, found that participants who shop at discount supermarkets, in supermarkets in areas with poorly educated consumers, or in supermarkets far from their own neighborhood had higher body mass indices (BMI) and waist circumferences. As Basile Chaix indicates, "shopping at discount supermarkets was more strongly associated with higher body weight and abdominal fat among low educated than among high educated participants."
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Prisons can be overwhelmed by influenza
upi.com - 4-9-12
Correctional facilities should consider implementing measures to prevent and contain influenza among prisoners and staff, U.S. health officials advised.
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McDonald's patrons unhappy with health
upi.com - 4-9-12
The customers of McDonald's, Taco Bell and Wendy's report they are most unhappy with their health, a U.S. survey indicates.
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Brain sensitive to cheap, high-cal food
upi.com - 4-9-12
A major reason for the increase in obesity may be a heightened sensitivity to heavily advertised and accessible high-calorie foods, Canadian researchers say.
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Gene Discovery May Move Personalized Stomach Cancer Treatment Forward
healthday.com - 4-9-12
An international team of researchers has identified hundreds of new genes that are mutated in stomach cancer, in a finding they say could lead to treatments tailored to the genetic make-up of individual stomach tumors.
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Scientists Pinpoint Childhood Obesity Genes
healthday.com - 4-9-12
For the first time, scientists have isolated mutations at two gene locations that seem to predispose children to becoming obese.
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Sugar Production Switch in Liver May Offer Target for New Diabetes Therapies
sciencedaily.com - 4-9-12
In their extraordinary quest to decode human metabolism, researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have discovered a pair of molecules that regulates the liver's production of glucose -- -- the simple sugar that is the source of energy in human cells and the central player in diabetes.
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Cheaters Have Higher Risk for STDs than People in 'Open' Relationships
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 4-8-12
People who cheat on their partners are more likely to have unsafe sex than those in open relationships who don't need to hide their sexual straying, a new study finds.
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Shilajit is unproven yet touted as a panacea for many ills
latimes.com - 4-8-12
It has a smoky, bitter taste, a deeply unpleasant odor and bears a close resemblance to black gobs of tar. Pricey tar, mind you: 10 grams (a month's supply) will set you back $80.
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Drug-Resistant Malaria Is Spreading, and It Could Be a Public Health Disaster
healthland.time.com - 4-8-12
Malaria remains one of the world’s great unnecessary killers. More than 650,000 people succumb to the disease each year — that’s more than one per minute — mostly in the poor nations of sub-Saharan Africa, but as deadly as malaria is, it doesn’t have to kill.
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Are Medical Marijuana Raids the Price We Must Pay for National Health Care?
healthland.time.com - 4-8-12
While federal agents were raiding a medical marijuana dispensary and the nation’s first pot trade school in Oakland, run by one of California’s most prominent legalization advocates, less than a mile a way, a gunman was murdering seven people at a Christian nursing school. The feds couldn’t have predicted the rampage, but it’s hard to imagine a starker illustration of misplaced law enforcement priorities.
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Study: Long use of any hormones poses breast cancer risk
usatoday.com - 4-8-12
New research suggests that long-term use of any type of hormones to ease menopause symptoms can raise a woman's risk of breast cancer.
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New injection could offer hope to millions of arthritis sufferers
dailymail.co.uk - 4-8-12
An injection could help cure the crippling symptoms of arthritis, say scientists. A study found that a molecule, called kartogenin, encourages damaged cartilage to regenerate.
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100 may now be sick from salmonella in sushi
msnbc.msn.com - 4-8-12
At least 100 people have now been sickened by an outbreak of salmonella possibly linked to sushi, government health officials said Friday. Nearly a quarter of them are from New York, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Eating Berries May Lower Men's Parkinson's Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-8-12
Men who regularly consume foods rich in flavonoids, such as berries, apples, certain vegetables, tea and red wine, may significantly reduce their risk for developing Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the journal Neurology this week that saw no such effect among women.
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Doctor: Why we're making changes to autism diagnosi
cnn.com - 4-8-12
For the several years doctors around the country have been working to update the manual. The DSM-5 is expected to be published in May 2013, and the proposed changes to the definition of autism have caused some controversy. Dr. Bryan H. King is one of the doctors working on revising that chapter.
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Egg with shell intact can have Salmonella
upi.com - 4-8-12
Eggs with clean, un-cracked shells may occasionally contain the bacteria Salmonella that can cause an intestinal infection, U.S. health officials said.
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Study: Some homophobia self-phobia?
upi.com - 4-8-12
Fear, anxiety and aversion some heterosexuals hold toward homosexuals may grow out of their own repressed same-sex desires, U.S. and British researchers say.
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Multitasking while eating may fuel obesity
upi.com - 4-8-12
The U.S. culture of multitasking, especially while eating, might fuel America's widening obesity problem, a food expert said.
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Scientists Redraw the Blueprint of the Body's Biological Clock
sciencedaily.com - 4-8-12
The discovery of a major gear in the biological clock that tells the body when to sleep and metabolize food may lead to new drugs to treat sleep problems and metabolic disorders, including diabetes.
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Foods that Improve Memory
naturalsociety.com - 4-8-12
A bad memory can be a serious handicap to anyone — particularly when it affects your daily life. Bad memory is also a characteristic of poor health, it can actually indicate that your brain is functioning slowly. There are many things that you can do to help improve your memory (like slim down your waistline), but one simple technique that you can do right away is to add healthy foods into your diet. Here is a list of some of the best foods that can help boost your memory and increase overall brain function:
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Gene mutation contributes to autism
upi.com - 4-7-12
U.S. researchers estimate there are likely about 1,000 or more genes that contribute to autism spectrum disorder risk, but mutations might be the key.
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Scientists rewrite rules of human reproduction
independent.co.uk - 4-7-12
The first human egg cells that have been grown entirely in the laboratory from stem cells could be fertilised later this year in a development that will revolutionise fertility treatment and might even lead to a reversal of the menopause in older women.
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Soy may alleviate menopause hot flashes
upi.com - 4-7-12
Two daily servings of soy might reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes by up to 26 percent compared with a placebo, U.S. researchers found.
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Founder of pot school calls it quits citing financial woes after federal raid
foxnews.com - 4-7-12
The founder of a Northern California medical marijuana training school said Friday he was giving up his downtown Oakland-based pot businesses after a federal raid bankrupted him.
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Women cannot rewind the 'biological clock', says study
dailymail.co.uk - 4-7-12
A growing number of women are unaware of the risks of delaying motherhood, say scientists. A report highlighted that those aged 45 or older often assume that pregnancy can instantly be achieved later in life with the help of reproductive technologies, such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF), but many find treatments fail.
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Life won't be the same without antibiotics
telegraph.co.uk - 4-7-12
Your child falls and grazes her elbow. It’s common enough, and no cause for concern: soon forgotten once the tears are mopped up. But before long, it could be a potential death sentence.
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A Ray Of Sunshine For The Critically Ill: Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With Increased Mortality In Intensive Care Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-7-12
Scientists have long believed that vitamin D, which is naturally absorbed from sunlight, has an important role in the functioning of the body's autoimmune system. Now Prof. Howard Amital of Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sheba Medical Center has discovered that the vitamin may also affect the outcomes of patients in intensive care.
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Our Brains On Food: From Anorexia To Obesity And Everything In Between
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-7-12
The brains of people with anorexia and obesity are wired differently, according to new research. Neuroscientists for the first time have found that how our brains respond to food differs across a spectrum of eating behaviors - from extreme overeating to food deprivation. This study is one of several new approaches to help better understand and ultimately treat eating disorders and obesity.
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Anti-psychotic may treat anorexia nervosa
upi.com - 4-7-12
Olanzapine, an anti-psychotic drug, offers promise as a possible treatment for people with anorexia nervosa, U.S. researchers said.
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New risk statements on benzocaine label
upi.com - 4-7-12
Health Canada officials asked companies to add new risk statements to the packaging and labeling of licensed benzocaine.
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Planning Pregnancy May Cut Birth Defects
healthday.com - 4-7-12
Women who'd like to become pregnant -- especially those who are taking medications for chronic conditions -- may need to add something to their to-do list: Plan, plan, plan.
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Emotional Trauma May Hurt Toddlers' Later Learning
healthday.com - 4-7-12
Suffering emotional trauma such as witnessing domestic violence or being abused early in life may inhibit children's intellectual development, according to a new study.
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Food Ingredients Most Prone to Fraudulent Economically Motivated Adulteration
sciencedaily.com - 4-7-12
In new research published in the April Journal of Food Science, analyses of the first known public database compiling reports on food fraud and economically motivated adulteration in food highlight the most fraud-prone ingredients in the food supply; analytical detection methods; and the type of fraud reported. Based on a review of records from scholarly journals, the top seven adulterated ingredients in the database are olive oil, milk, honey, saffron, orange juice, coffee, and apple juice.
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Facebook can lead to 'addiction', especially among the poorly educated - and heavy users feel less happy about their lives
dailymail.co.uk - 4-7-12
Facebook is a habit-forming activity - but users who spend a lot of time on the site say they feel less happy with their lives.
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Signs of Dyslexia Start Before Reading, Study Finds
abcnews.go.com - 4-6-12
Signs of dyslexia may begin even before a child tries to read, according to new research published in the journal Current Biology.
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Painkiller Sales Soar Around US, Fuel Addiction
abcnews.go.com - 4-6-12
Sales of the nation's two most popular prescription painkillers have exploded in new parts of the country, an Associated Press analysis shows, worrying experts who say the push to relieve patients' suffering is spawning an addiction epidemic.Sales of the nation's two most popular prescription painkillers have exploded in new parts of the country, an Associated Press analysis shows, worrying experts who say the push to relieve patients' suffering is spawning an addiction epidemic.
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Black women have trouble clearing cervical cancer virus
usatoday.com - 4-6-12
Provocative new research might help explain why black women are so much more likely than whites to develop and die from cervical cancer: They seem to have more trouble clearing HPV, the virus that causes the disease.
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Is autism in children down to mutation in sperm that's more common in older fathers?
dailymail.co.uk - 4-6-12
Many cases of autism are caused by faulty sperm and eggs, with older men more likely to father a child with the condition, researchers believe.
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Eating berries can cut men's risk of Parkinson's disease by 40 per cent
dailymail.co.uk - 4-6-12
Eating strawberries, blue- berries, blackcurrants and blackberries could help to protect against Parkinson’s disease, researchers suggest. Men who ate the fruits along with other foods rich in flavonoids were found to be 40 per cent less likely to develop the brain disease.
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Dirty dentures? Dangerous MRSA may be lurking, dentists say
msnbc.msn.com - 4-6-12
Here’s some bad news for the estimated 20 million people in the U.S. who wear full or partial dentures: There’s a good chance your choppers are covered with thin layers of icky, sticky bacteria known as biofilms.
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Birth control shots tied to breast cancer risk, study says
msnbc.msn.com - 4-6-12
Recent use of the injectable contraceptive Depo-Provera for at least a year was associated with a doubling of young women’s breast cancer risk, a new study has found.
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Womb Cancer Deaths Rise 20%, UK
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-6-12
Deaths from womb cancer (cancer of the uterus) in the UK have gone up by nearly 20% in the last ten years. The trend follows a steep rise in the number of women diagnosed with cancer of the uterus, and is accompanied by improvements in survival rates, according to new figures from Cancer Research UK released on Thursday.
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Iodine At Borderline Among Childbearing Women, CDC
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-6-12
Young American women of childbearing age have borderline levels of iodine, that is only just above what would be regarded as iodine deficiency, according to a new report released this week by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
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5 medical tests you often don't need
cnn.com - 4-6-12
Forty-five tests and procedures routinely performed on patients are often unnecessary, according to a report released Wednesday by nine physician groups, the Consumers Union, and the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation.
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Genetic research reveals pieces of autism puzzle
cnn.com - 4-6-12
As the number of children with autism has increased over the past couple of decades, so have efforts to find causes behind this neurodevelopmental disorder. Research published Wednesday provides new clues about genetic glitches that may contribute to the development of autism among children.
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Study Finds Antibiotics Best for Appendicitis
healthday.com - 4-6-12
For people suffering from uncomplicated appendicitis, a course of antibiotics may be just as good as having the appendix removed, British researchers report.
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False-Positive Mammogram Results May Turn Out Not to Be: Study
healthday.com - 4-6-12
Women who have a false-positive result on their mammogram may be at higher long-term risk of developing breast cancer than those whose initial test is negative, according to a new Danish study.
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Potential for a 'Moderate' New England 'Red Tide' in 2012
sciencedaily.com - 4-6-12
New England is expected to experience a "moderate" regional "red tide" this spring and summer, report NOAA-funded scientists working in the Gulf of Maine to study the toxic algae that causes the bloom. The algae in the water pose no direct threat to human beings, however the toxins they produce can accumulate in filter-feeding organisms such as mussels and clams -- which can cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in humans who consume them.
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Handheld Plasma Flashlight Rids Skin of Notorious Pathogens
sciencedaily.com - 4-6-12
A group of Chinese and Australian scientists have developed a handheld, battery-powered plasma-producing device that can rid skin of bacteria in an instant.
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Banned Antibiotics Found in Poultry Products
sciencedaily.com - 4-6-12
In a joint study, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Arizona State University found evidence suggesting that a class of antibiotics previously banned by the U.S. government for poultry production is still in use. Results of the study were published March 21 in Environmental Science & Technology.
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Heightened Sensitivity to Cheap, High-Calorie Food Is Linked With Obesity
sciencedaily.com - 4-6-12
Obesity is increasing worldwide in adults and children and is currently viewed by many as one of the most serious threats to public health. It is likely that solutions to the obesity pandemic will require changes in public policy and that scientific insight into obesity will be invaluable for guiding those changes. Now, a new review of human brain imaging studies published by Cell Press in the journal Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism suggests that a major reason for the dramatic increase in obesity may be a heightened sensitivity to heavily advertised and easily accessible high-calorie foods.
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Partner aggression affects parenting
upi.com - 4-6-12
The level of aggression between partners around the time their child is born affects how a mother will parent three years later, U.S. researchers said.
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Medicare fraud crackdown intensifies
upi.com - 4-6-12
Criminals face sentences 20 percent to 50 percent longer for Medicare fraud involving more than $1 million, under the Affordable Care Act, U.S. officials say.
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Arizona Medical Marijuana Law: Gov. Jan Brewer Signs Measure To Ban Medical Marijuana On College Campuses
huffingtonpost.com - 4-5-12
Arizona's Republican Governor Jan Brewer signed into law on Tuesday a bill to ban medical marijuana from being used on the campuses of state universities and community colleges in the latest salvo in a long-running battle over legalization of the drug.
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The 'baloney mass index': Why BMI can give false readings and it means 40% of people in U.S are heavier than first thoughtThe 'baloney mass index': Why BMI can give false readings and it means 40% of people in U.S are heavier than first thought
dailymail.co.uk - 4-5-12
The obesity problem in the U.S is far worse than previously thought, according to a study. Researchers found 39 per cent of Americans currently classed as slightly overweight using the Body Mass Index calculator are actually obese.
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6 signs you need more sleep
msnbc.msn.com - 4-5-12
Need a reason to hit the snooze button a few more times? Sleep is as vital for survival as food, according to Dr. Mary Susan Esther, president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). And chances are you're more likely to burn the midnight oil to finish all your work (and play) than you are to pass up dinner. But chronic lack of sleep can lead to a host of health problems, such as high blood pressure, obesity, depression, irregular hormone production, a weakened immune system, memory lapses, constant irritability, and decreased concentration and reaction times.
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Caffeine, Exercise May Cut Skin Cancer Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-5-12
A new study of mice reported at a meeting in Chicago this week, suggests caffeine and exercise may cut the risk of developing skin cancers caused by exposure to the sun.
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Why Cancers Become Resistant To Chemotherapy
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-5-12
Genetic mutations in cancer cells can lead to resistance to treatment, thereby potentially resulting in relapse. However, a new article, published in the magazine section of the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology, suggests that the converse may also happen. Steven Frank from the University of California, Irvine, and Marsha Rosner from the University of Chicago, propose that it may often be the case that a few cells become resistant before any genetic change, and then later acquire the genes to stabilize that resistance.
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The Antidepressant Effects Of Testosterone
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-5-12
Testosterone, the primary male sex hormone, appears to have antidepressant properties, but the exact mechanisms underlying its effects have remained unclear. Nicole Carrier and Mohamed Kabbaj, scientists at Florida State University, are actively working to elucidate these mechanisms.
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How girls and boys differ when it comes to autism
cnn.com - 4-5-12
Autism (now better known as autism spectrum disorder or ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused, at least in part, by genetic factors.
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First-generation Mexican-Americans thinner
upi.com - 4-5-12
First-generation Mexican-American children of immigrant parents weigh less than second- and third-generation Mexican-American kids, U.S. researchers said.
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More Fake Avastin Found in U.S., FDA Says
healthday.com - 4-5-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says it has confirmed another counterfeit version of the cancer drug bevacizumab, most commonly known as Avastin, is being sold in the United States.
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Potential Method to Control Obesity: Red Wine, Fruit Compound Could Help Block Fat Cell Formation
sciencedaily.com - 4-5-12
A compound found in red wine, grapes and other fruits, and similar in structure to resveratrol, is able to block cellular processes that allow fat cells to develop, opening a door to a potential method to control obesity, according to a Purdue University study.
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62% of Men and 37% of Women Over the Age of 65 Are Sexually Active, Spanish Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 4-5-12
A study based on the National Health and Sexuality Survey, involving nearly 2000 people, describes the sexual practices of senior citizens in Spain. The most common are kisses, caresses and vaginal penetration. The main causes of sexual inactivity are physical illness and widowerhood.
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Mystery of Human Consciousness Illuminated: Primitive Consciousness Emerges First as You Awaken from Anesthesia
sciencedaily.com - 4-5-12
Awakening from anesthesia is often associated with an initial phase of delirious struggle before the full restoration of awareness and orientation to one's surroundings. Scientists now know why this may occur: primitive consciousness emerges first.
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Early-Life Exposure to BPA Affects Adult Learning, Animal Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-5-12
In testing the effects of the controversial chemical bisphenol A (BPA) on zebrafish, UW-Milwaukee scientist Daniel Weber found himself in familiar territory.
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Sexually Abused Boys at Risk for More Unsafe Sex, Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 4-5-12
Young males who have been sexually abused are five times more likely to cause teen pregnancy compared to those with no abuse history, according to University of British Columbia research.
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Doctors call for end to five cancer tests, treatments
news.yahoo.com - 4-5-12
In a move that threatens to further inflame concerns about the rationing of medical care, the nation's leading association of cancer physicians issued a list on Wednesday of five common tests and treatments that doctors should stop offering to cancer patients.
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Agents raid leader of medical marijuana movement
bostonherald.com - 4-4-12
Federal agents struck at the heart of California’s medical marijuana movement Monday, raiding the nation’s first pot trade school and a popular dispensary, both run by one of the state’s most prominent and provocative activists, Richard Lee.
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The Radiation Warnings You Won’t Get from the Mainstream Propaganda Machine
shtfplan.com - 4-4-12
Radiation from the Fukushima Nuclear Plant disaster in Japan is now actively in the ecosystem all along the North American west coast… even the sea weed is now radiated. The Vancouver Sun reported one year ago that the seaweed tested from waters off the coast of British Columbia were 4 times the amount considered safe. No further test results were released after the initial report.
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DNA Testing Not So Potent for Prevention, Study Says
abcnews.go.com - 4-4-12
When scientists developed the ability to catalog a person’s genes, many hailed whole genome sequencing as modern medicine’s best tool to predict and prevent serious diseases, such as cancer. But according to a new study, whole genome sequencing is not the magic bullet for prevention – at least not yet.
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For every life that is saved by breast cancer screening up to TEN women suffer 'unnecessary treatment' including breast removals
dailymail.co.uk - 4-4-12
Thousands of women are undergoing unnecessary treatment for breast cancer including chemotherapy and even breast removal following screening, researchers have found. Academics from Harvard School of Public Health studied the results from 40,000 women who were screened in Norway.
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Women who fall pregnant when they're dieting 'more likely to have obese child'
dailymail.co.uk - 4-4-12
Women who fall pregnant while dieting are more likely to have a child that could become obese or diabetic in later life, a study suggests.
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Intelligent people take less sick leave, researchers find
telegraph.co.uk - 4-4-12
Intelligent people take less sick leave, according to atudy showing a "clear" link between low intellectual ability and long-term work absence.
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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Linked To Genetics
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-4-12
Research from UCLA is showing that the reason some people exhibit post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), while others are seemingly able to cope with life threatening situations more easily, is at least in part, down to their genes.
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Metformin Helps Some Cancer Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-4-12
A popular diabetes drug, metformin, appears to help patients with several types of cancer, including cancer of the prostate, liver and pancreas, researchers are revealing or are about to reveal at the American Association For Cancer Research Meeting, 2012, Chicago, USA. Two separate studies showed that metformin, also known by its brand name Glucophage, prolongs life expectancy for patients with early-stage pancreatic cancer, slows down prostate cancer growth, and appears also to help prevent primary liver cancer.
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Many Preschoolers Do Not Play Outdoors Daily
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-4-12
A study published Online First by Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, a JAMA Network publication reveals that approximately half of preschool-aged children are not being taken outside to play each day.
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Kitchen cures doctors swear by
cnn.com - 4-4-12
Whether you have a head cold, an upset stomach, or an itchy rash, fast (cheap!) relief may be sitting on your kitchen shelf.
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Liver helps body fight infection
upi.com - 4-4-12
The liver responds to increase defenses in the blood that prevent localized infections from spreading throughout the body, Boston University researchers said.
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Women having more drunken-driving crashes
upi.com - 4-4-12
The liver responds to increase defenses in the blood that prevent localized infections from spreading throughout the body, Boston University researchers said.
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US obesity 'higher than thought'
bbc.co.uk - 4-4-12
The obesity problem in the US may be much worse than previously thought, according to researchers.
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Antibiotics Linked to Retinal Detachment Risk
healthday.com - 4-4-12
People taking antibiotics called fluoroquinolones may be at a small risk of an eye condition called retinal detachment, a new study suggests.
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Taller, Heavier Women May Face Higher Ovarian Cancer Risk
healthday.com - 4-4-12
Taller, heavier women may be at an increased risk of ovarian cancer, research suggests.
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Promising Vaccine Targets On Hepatitis C Virus
sciencedaily.com - 4-4-12
A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has found antibodies that can prevent infection from widely differing strains of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in cell culture and animal models.
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Autistic Kids Born Preterm, Post-Term Have More Severe Symptoms
sciencedaily.com - 4-4-12
For children with autism, being born several weeks early or several weeks late tends to increase the severity of their symptoms, according to new research out of Michigan State University.
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Infection Linked to Dangerous Blood Clots in Veins and Lungs
sciencedaily.com - 4-4-12
Research shows iOlder adults who get infections of any kind -- such as urinary, skin, or respiratory tract infections -- are nearly three times more likely to be hospitalized for a dangerous blood clot in their deep veins or lungs, University of Michigan Health System research shows.
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Obesity Adds More to Health Care Costs Than Smoking, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-4-12
Obesity adds more to health care costs than smoking does, reports a study in the March Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).
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CDC: U.S. vitamin intake OK, but with gaps
upi.com - 4-3-12
The U.S. population has good levels of vitamins A and D and folate but some groups need to increase their levels of vitamin D and iron, health officials say.
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Chronic Stress Feeds Common Cold, Study Finds
abcnews.go.com - 4-3-12
Stress makes the common cold more miserable and harder to kick by letting inflammation linger, a new study found.
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Oaksterdam University Raided by Feds
nbcbayarea.com - 4-3-12
Oakland's Oaksterdam University was taken over by federal officials Monday morning. Officers wearing U.S. Marshals, IRS and DEA jackets swarmed the Oakland medical marijuana facility on Broadway before 8 a.m. Investigators put yellow crime tape around the entire building. Just after 9 a.m. agents brought out burlap bags, some of them overflowing with pot, to a waiting white container truck.
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Medical marijuana activists puzzle over intent of federal raid
latimes.com - 4-3-12
Medical marijuana activists were puzzling Monday over a federal raid on one of the nation’s most prominent pot legalization advocates, suggesting it may be intended to send a signal that no one was safe as the Obama administration tries to crack down on dispensaries.
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Rising Melanoma Rate Hits Young Women Hardest
abcnews.go.com - 4-3-12
More young adults -- particularly young women -- are developing melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer. But the odds of surviving melanoma have improved over time, a new study found.
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FDA rejects call to ban BPA from food packaging
usatoday.com - 4-3-12
The Food and Drug Administration has rejected a petition from environmentalists that would have banned the plastic-hardening chemical bisphenol-A from all food and drink packaging, including plastic bottles and canned food.
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Fast food 'gives you the blues', study finds
telegraph.co.uk - 4-3-12
Research has revealed eating junk food has a negative effect on mental health, making those who consume it regularly feel depressed.
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Outgrowing autism? Study looks at why some kids 'bloom'
msnbc.msn.com - 4-3-12
Karen Melville remembers when her son Danny was diagnosed with autism so severe that his doctor feared he might never even talk, much less go to school. “It was like a freight train hit,” said Melville, a 39-year-old mother of two who lives in Brunswick, Ohio.
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Association Between Alcohol And Diabetes Supported By Study
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-3-12
Subjects in a cohort in Sweden, some of whom had been exposed to a community intervention program to prevent diabetes, were evaluated 8-10 years after baseline for the presence of diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose metabolism ("pre-diabetes") in relation to a baseline report of alcohol consumption.
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Dieting During Pregnancy Increases Risk Of Obesity And Diabetes For Offspring
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-3-12
If you're expecting, this might make you feel a little better about reaching for that pint of ice cream: New research published online in the FASEB Journal suggests that twins, and babies of mothers who diet around the time of conception and in early pregnancy, may have an increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes throughout their lives. This study provides exciting insights into how behavior can lead to epigenetic changes in offspring related to obesity and disease.
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Antipsychotics Heart Attack Risk Among Elderly With Dementia
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-3-12
A study published Online First by Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, reveals that antipsychotic drugs can increase the risk of heart attack in older patients with dementia. Older patients with dementia are often prescribed antipsychotics in order to control symptoms, such as hallucinations, physical aggression, and agitation. Earlier studies have indicated that the use of antipsychotic agents (APs) was associated to an increased risk of stroke, as well as death from all causes. As a result, safety warnings were issued in several countries.
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HIV Infection From Two Strains Increase Immune Response
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-3-12
The March 29 issue of the online Open Access journal PLoS Pathogens reveals that women with HIV superinfection, i.e. who have been infected by two different strains of HIV from two different sexual partners have more potent antibody responses that inhibit the virus from replicating compared to women who have only been infected once.
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When to see a fertility specialist
upi.com - 4-3-12
Healthy women unsuccessful in conceiving after several months of unprotected sex should consider getting help from a specialist, U.S. fertility experts said.
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Routine Mammography May Lead to Overdiagnosis: Study
healthday.com - 4-3-12
As many as one-quarter of breast cancers identified through routine mammography are "overdiagnosed," according to a new study that could reignite the debate about screening guidelines.
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U.S. Women Could Be More Obese Than Believed
healthday.com - 4-3-12
The way that obesity is currently measured greatly underestimates the actual number of women who are obese, a new study suggests.
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Many Preschoolers Not Getting Enough Outdoor Play
healthday.com - 4-3-12
Roughly half of America's preschool-aged children are not getting a daily dose of parentally supervised outdoor playtime, a new study reveals.
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Why Stress Might Make You Sick
healthday.com - 4-3-12
A new study involving the common cold may help explain why stress, which dampens the immune system, seems to trigger inflammation in many people.
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Death Cap Mushroom Poison to Arrest Pancreatic Cancer in Mice, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 4-3-12
Scientists of the German Cancer Research Center have coupled the fungal toxin amanitin to an antibody which recognizes a cancer-typical target molecule. Like a guided missile, the antibody carries its poisonous load to target cancer cells. The poison-loaded antibody arrested the growth of various types of cancer cells in the culture dish and even caused the complete disappearance of transplanted pancreatic tumors in experimental mice.
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Too Dog Tired to Avoid Danger: Like Humans, Dogs Engage in Riskier Behaviors When Their Self-Control Is Depleted
sciencedaily.com - 4-3-12
Like humans, dogs engage in riskier behaviors when their self-control is depleted.
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Babies treated in the womb for obesity: Overweight mothers-to-be get diabetes pill to cut the risk of having a fat child
dailymail.co.uk - 4-2-12
Babies are being medicated in the womb in an attempt to prevent them from being born obese. In a world first, dangerously overweight mothers-to-be in four British cities have started taking a diabetes drug during their pregnancy.
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Children may learn coping with poverty
upi.com - 4-2-12
Although the poor have a higher risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer, many children who grow up poor have good health as adults, Canadian searchers say.
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Vaccine to stop heart attacks could be here in 5 years
canada.com - 4-2-12
A vaccine delivered in an injection or nasal spray to prevent heart attacks could be available within five years.
Scientists have discovered that the drug stimulates the body's immune system to produce antibodies which prevent heart disease by stopping fat building up in the arteries.
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New imaging tool, better prostate scan
upi.com - 4-2-12
U.S. researchers say a novel, non-invasive imaging tool can measure prostate-specific antigen in prostate cancer models and visualize bone metastasis.
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Cargo-Carrying Bacteria
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-2-12
To the ranks of horses, donkeys, camels and other animals that have served humanity as pack animals or beasts of burden, scientists are now enlisting bacteria to ferry nano-medicine cargos throughout the human body. They reported on progress in developing these "backpacking" bacteria - so small that a million would fit on the head of a pin - at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society.
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Risk Of Heart Disease In Type 2 Diabetes May Be Reduced By Vitamin D-Fortified Yogurt
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-2-12
Daily intake of vitamin D-fortified doogh (Persian yogurt drink) improved inflammatory markers in type 2 diabetics and extra calcium conferred additional anti-inflammatory benefits, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM).
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HIV 'Superinfection' Boosts Immune Response
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-2-12
Women who have been infected by two different strains of HIV from two different sexual partners - a condition known as HIV superinfection - have more potent antibody responses that block the replication of the virus compared to women who've only been infected once. These findings, by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, are published online March 29 in PLoS Pathogens.
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Heavy baby girls have higher heart risk
upi.com - 4-2-12
Heavier baby girls are more likely to develop diabetes and metabolic risk when they grow up compared with chubby boys, Australian researchers say.
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Kidney cancers: Major rise 'linked to obesity'
bbc.co.uk - 4-2-12
Obesity is fuelling a major increase in the number of cases of kidney cancers diagnosed in Britain, experts say.
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healthday.com - 4-2-12

healthday.com - 4-2-12
New research highlights a dramatic increase in the rates of melanoma, a potentially fatal form of skin cancer, among young adults, with young women being hit the hardest.
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Long-Term Estrogen Therapy Does Up Breast Cancer Risk: Study
healthday.com - 4-2-12
Several weeks after a study suggested that women who take estrogen-only hormone replacement to treat menopause symptoms may be at lower risk for developing breast cancer, another, much-larger study finds that when used for longer than 10 years, estrogen-only regimens actually raise a woman's long-term risk for breast cancer.
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HPV Infection Lasts Longer in Young Black Women: Study
healthday.com - 4-2-12
Human papillomavirus infection tends to lasts longer in college-aged black women than whites, possibly setting them up for a higher risk of cervical cancer, according to a new study.
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Consumer Reports Warns of Lax Testing for Medical Devices
abcnews.go.com - 4-1-12
Consumer Reports advises patients to do their homework before having medical devices implanted in their bodies. Companies that sell defibrillators, stents or other such products can get approval from the Food and Drug Administration without their undergoing rigorous testing, Consumer Reports warned in a new report.
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Discovery Of Key Component In Mother's Egg Critical For Survival Of Newly Formed Embryo
medicalnewstoday.com - 4-1-12
An international team led by scientists at A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) discovered that a protein, called TRIM28, normally present in the mother's egg, is essential right after fertilisation[1], to preserve certain chemical modifications or 'epigenetic marks' on a specific set of genes. This newly published study paves the way for more research to explore the role that epigenetics might play in infertility.
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Hearing loss linked to higher falling risk
upi.com - 4-1-12
Hearing loss, already linked to dementia and other health ills, is also associated with an increased risk of falling, U.S. researchers said.
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Most dietitians take dietary supplements
upi.com - 4-1-12
Like many other U.S. healthcare professionals, registered dietitians report using dietary supplements as part of their health regimen, researchers said.
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Many wearing contact lenses risk infection
upi.com - 4-1-12
Using tap water for lens cleaning and wearing lenses while showering can leave contact lens wearers open to infections, U.S. ophthalmologists warn.
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Diabetes Drug Metformin Might Also Help Fight Cancer
healthday.com - 4-1-12
A diabetes medication used by millions is now showing promise against a variety of different cancers.
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Comfy Mice Lead to Better Science: Are Cold Mice Affecting Drug Testing?
sciencedaily.com - 4-1-12
Nine out of 10 drugs successfully tested in mice and other animal models ultimately fail to work in people, and one reason may be traced back to a common fact of life for laboratory mice: they're cold, according to a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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Are Boys Turning in to Girls Because of Man Made Chemicals?
scienceray.com - 4-1-12
Cases of accelerated puberty in young girls and the "transgender" phenomenon) are occurring with increasing frequency.
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FDA Deletes 1 Million Signatures for GMO Labeling Campaign
naturalsociety.com - 4-1-12
While the Food and Drug Administration has seemingly reached the limit for unbelievable behavior, the company’s decisions continue to astound and appall consumers and health activists alike. In the agency’s latest decision, undoubtedly amazing thousands of individuals yet again, the FDA virtually erased 1 million signatures and comments on the ‘Just Label It’ campaign calling for the labeling of genetically modified foods.
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