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May, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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Young athletes use fewer drugs, but more alcohol
reuters.com - 5-31-11
Teens who exercise and play team sports are less likely to be smokers or use marijuana and other drugs than their peers, but they do drink more alcohol, a study said.
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Putting a Crimp in the Hookah
nytimes.com - 5-31-11
Kevin Shapiro, a 20-year-old math and physics major at the University of Pennsylvania, first tried a hookah at a campus party. He liked the exotic water pipe so much that he chipped in to buy one for his fraternity house, where he says it makes a useful social lubricant at parties.
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Will taking an aspirin a day save YOUR life?
dailymail.co.uk - 5-31-11
Aspirin is the most widely used drug in the world - 100 billion tablets are consumed annually.
It was taken to the Antarctic by Captain Scott, to the top of Mount Everest by Edmund Hillary and to the Moon by the Apollo astronauts.
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The Changing Politics of Doctors
nytimes.com - 5-31-11
Doctors were once overwhelmingly male and conservative. But today the politics of the medical profession are changing, as more doctors abandon independent practice for salaried jobs and more women are graduating from medical school, reports Gardiner Harris in the latest installment of his Doctors, Inc. series.
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Get Some Sleep: Memory loss, personality change not always dementia
cnn.com - 5-31-11
Charlie did not really want to come to the sleep doctor. "I sleep just fine," he told me gruffly at our first consultation. Many studies show that approximately 50 percent of people over the age of 65 have complaints about their sleep, but this 75-year-old man declared that he was not one of them. However, his internal medicine doctor and his daughter had insisted that he have his sleep looked into. They felt that his memory had deteriorated over the past year and they wondered if he could have a sleep disorder that was robbing him of quality sleep and making him confused and forgetful in the daytime.
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Big Pharma attempting to corner the market on medical marijuana
naturalnews.com - 5-31-11
As DEA raids and IRS harassment continue on state-approved medical marijuana, Big Pharma eyes the profitability of cannabis and prepares to muscle in, using its lobbyists and government connections to ensure a monopoly on legal sales of the drug.
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Take Steps to Prevent Pulmonary Embolisms
healthday.com - 5-31-11
In the wake of tennis star Serena Williams' potentially fatal pulmonary embolism after surgery this spring, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons has a reminder: it's sometimes possible to prevent the condition.
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Ants Give New Evidence for Interaction Networks
sciencedaily.com - 5-31-11
Be it through the Internet, Facebook, the local grapevine or the spread of disease, interaction networks influence nearly every part of our lives.
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Scientists Trick the Brain Into Experiencing Barbie-Doll Size
sciencedaily.com - 5-31-11
Imagine shrinking to the size of a doll in your sleep. When you wake up, will you perceive yourself as tiny or the world as being populated by giants? Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden may have found the answer.
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Nuclear Radiation Affects Sex of Babies, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-31-11
Ionizing radiation is not without danger to human populations. Indeed, exposure to nuclear radiation leads to an increase in male births relative to female births, according to a new study by Hagen Scherb and Kristina Voigt from the Helmholtz Zentrum München.
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Skin patch could cure peanut allergy
telegraph.co.uk - 5-30-11
Researchers believe it presents one of the best possible ways of finding an effective treatment for a life threatening reaction to peanuts.
Developed by two leading paediatricians the device releases minute doses of peanut oil under the skin.
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Acupuncture has significant impact on mystery illnesses
telegraph.co.uk - 5-30-11
One in five patients has symptoms which are undiagnosed by medicine, and the cost of treating them is twice that as of a diagnosed patient.
A team from the University of Exeter examined 80 patients, and investigated the benefit of acupuncture being added to their usual care.
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Women who lose weight more attractive than their slim counterparts
telegraph.co.uk - 5-30-11
Researchers have found that the stigma of being fat lingers with women long after they have shed the pounds.
But for men this is a positive thing as they see larger women as more friendly, approachable and emotionally stable than their thin counterparts.
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Woozy from wifi? 'Electrosensitive' say modern life makes them ill
msnbc.msn.com - 5-30-11
Much of modern life - the buzzing of cell phones, the humming of laptops, the ubiquity of wifi - is enough to give anyone a headache. But what if electromagnetic waves really did make you sick?
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6 weird signs you're way too stressed out
msnbc.msn.com - 5-30-11
In his recent book, "On the Brink," former Secretary of the Treasury Henry Paulson admits to getting so stressed out during the height of the 2008 financial meltdown that he would start to dry-heave, sometimes in private and other times in front of congressmen and staffers. Paulson isn't alone. Physical symptoms of stress, such as dry heaving, can manifest themselves in weird ways when the affairs of life get too overwhelming. And sometimes, you may not even realize that stress is the cause.
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E. coli infections kill 6, sicken hundreds in Germany, officials say
cnn.com - 5-30-11
An E. coli outbreak linked to some raw vegetables has killed at least six people and sickened hundreds in Germany, national and global health authorities said Monday.
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E.coli cucumber scare: Germany seeks source of outbreak
bbc.co.uk - 5-30-11
Germans have been warned not to eat cucumbers until tests identify the source of a deadly E.coli outbreak which local officials say has killed 13 people.
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Longer Maternity Leave Ups Breast-Feeding Rates
healthday.com - 5-30-11
Women who stay home longer after having a baby are more likely to breast-feed their babies, a new study indicates.
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Pediatricians Group Raps Energy and Sports Drinks for Kids
healthday.com - 5-30-11
Although sports drinks and energy drinks are marketed heavily toward children and teens, a leading association of pediatricians is sounding the alarm about these beverages for kids.
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Stress Doesn't Boost Risk for Multiple Sclerosis
healthday.com - 5-30-11
Although stress can exacerbate multiple sclerosis (MS), it doesn't actually increase a person's risk for developing the disease in the first place, new research indicates.
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What Is a Laboratory Mouse?
sciencedaily.com - 5-30-11
Mice and humans share about 95 percent of their genes, and mice are recognized around the world as the leading experimental model for studying human biology and disease. But, says Jackson Laboratory Professor Gary Churchill, Ph.D., researchers can learn even more "now that we really know what a laboratory mouse is, genetically speaking."
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People With Body-Image Disorders Process 'Big Picture' Visual Information Abnormally
sciencedaily.com - 5-30-11
People suffering from body dysmorphic disorder, or BDD -- a severe mental illness characterized by debilitating misperceptions that one appears disfigured and ugly -- process visual information abnormally, even when looking at inanimate objects, according to a new UCLA study.
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Sweet Defence Against Lethal Bacteria: Synthesizing a Potential Vaccine Candidate for an Antibiotic-Resistant Pathogen
sciencedaily.com - 5-30-11
There is now a promising vaccine candidate for combating the pathogen which causes one of the most common and dangerous hospital infections. An international team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam has developed a vaccine based on a carbohydrate against the Clostridium difficile bacterium, which is known to cause serious gastrointestinal diseases mainly in hospitals. The sugar-based vaccine elicited a specific and effective immune response in mice. Moreover, the scientists have also discovered strong indications that the substance can stimulate the human immune system to form antibodies against the bacterium.
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Obesity Greater Risk for Fatty Liver Than Moderate Amounts of Alcohol, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-30-11
Being overweight and resistant to insulin constitute a greater risk for fatty liver than was previously thought, according to a study from Linköping University in Sweden that is now being published in the journal Annals of Medicine.
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Researchers Show Aging Brain's Reduced Ability to Respond to Experience
sciencedaily.com - 5-30-11
Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have published new data on why the aging brain is less resilient and less capable of learning from life experiences. The findings provide further insight into the cognitive decline associated with aging and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's.
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Eight Hours of Resistance: Why Do Cancer Cells Easily Give in to the Temptation to Divide?
sciencedaily.com - 5-30-11
Temptations to exceed the speed limit are always plentiful, but only reckless drivers give in to such impulses. Likewise, numerous growth factors always abound in our bodies, but only cancerous cells are quickly "tempted" by these chemicals to divide again and again. Healthy cells, in contrast, divide only after being exposed to growth factors for eight continuous hours. What happens during these eight hours in a healthy cell that resists the call to divide? And even more important, what fails to work properly in the cancerous cell during these same hours? Why do cancerous cells give in so easily to the influence of growth factors, dividing so readily?
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Fukushima Risks Chernobyl 'Dead Zone'
bloomberg.com - 5-30-11
Radioactive soil in pockets of areas near Japan's crippled nuclear plant have reached the same level as Chernobyl, where a "dead zone" remains 25 years after the reactor in the former Soviet Union exploded.
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Bug attack: Our experts' guide to taking the sting out of being bitten
dailymail.co.uk - 5-29-11
It is the price we pay for an early summer. As temperatures start to soar, so do our chances of being bitten or stung.
'Some people are more sensitive to bites and stings than others. You can get three people walking through a cornfield and they might not all be affected in the same way,' explains Dr Andrew Wright, a consultant dermatologist with Bradford Hospitals NHS Trust.
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Why some people are mosquito magnets
msnbc.msn.com - 5-29-11
Some folks seem to be magnets for mosquitoes, while others rarely get bitten. What makes the little buggers single you out and not the guy or gal you're standing next to at the Memorial Day backyard barbecue?
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Your allergy meds could be making you fat
msnbc.msn.com - 5-29-11
Allergy season is upon us, and the record pollen levels we're experiencing this year may have you heading to the allergy relief aisle at your local drugstore. But what you take to alleviate your symptoms could have unpleasant side effects on your waistline. Researchers have suggested that allergies and weight gain go hand in hand, and that could have to do with the drugs you take or more subtle underlying problems.
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USDA to replace food pyramid with plate icon, source says
cnn.com - 5-29-11
The U.S. Department of Agriculture is planning to swap in a plate icon for the food pyramid this week, an individual familiar with the new guidelines told CNN Saturday.
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Folic acid during pregnancy may reduce baby's cancer risk
naturalnews.com - 5-29-11
The importance of maintaining high intake levels of folic acid during pregnancy has been established by numerous scientific studies, all of which verify that the vitamin directly affects the intelligence and physical health of the child later in life. And now a new study adds to this body of evidence, showing a 64 percent reduction in colon cancer rates among children whose mothers supplemented with folic acid during pregnancy.
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Does being exposed to too much estrogen lead to high blood pressure?
naturalnews.com - 5-29-11
Contrary to widely-held belief, sustained high levels of estrogen in women via hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is not necessarily a good thing, as the hormone can create excess amounts of superoxide compound in the brain. According to new research out of Michigan State University (MSU), buildup of superoxide leads to blockages in the areas of the brain that regulate blood pressure, which has led researchers to conclude that estrogen may be directly responsible for high blood pressure and resultant heart disease.
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Doctors needlessly prescribe one million antibiotics a year to children with asthma
naturalnews.com - 5-29-11
Standard protocol for many conventional doctors seems to be something along the lines of, when in doubt, just prescribe an antibiotic. A new study published in the journal Pediatrics has found that US doctors are literally handing out antibiotics like candy by needlessly prescribing about one million antibiotics a year to children with asthma, even though their conditions may not have anything to do with a bacterial infection.
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Take Steps to Prevent Pulmonary Embolisms
healthday.com - 5-29-11
In the wake of tennis star Serena Williams' potentially fatal pulmonary embolism after surgery this spring, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons has a reminder: it's sometimes possible to prevent the condition.
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Iron-Ferrying Protein May Be 'Universal Achilles Heel' for Parasitic Worms
sciencedaily.com - 5-29-11
Researchers have discovered a tiny protein without which the soil and lab-dwelling worm C. elegans can't deliver iron-rich heme taken in from their diets to the rest of their bodies or to their developing embryos. The finding reported in the May 27th issue of the journal Cell, offers important insight into the transport of the essential ingredient in worms and other animals, including humans.
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Common Test Could Help Predict Early Death in Diabetes, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 5-29-11
New findings out of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center reveal that a common test may be useful in predicting early death in individuals with diabetes. The study appears in the May issue of Diabetes Care.
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Dangerous Side Effect of Common Drug Combination -- Paxil and Pravachol -- Discovered by Data Mining
sciencedaily.com - 5-29-11
A widely used combination of two common medications may cause unexpected increases in blood glucose levels, according to a study conducted at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University and Harvard Medical School. Researchers were surprised at the finding because neither of the two drugs -- one, an antidepressant marketed as Paxil, and the other, a cholesterol-lowering medication called Pravachol -- has a similar effect alone.
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All in Your Head? Substantial Recovery Rate With Placebo Effect in Headache Treatment, Analysis Finds
sciencedaily.com - 5-29-11
Headache is a very common complaint, with over 90% of all persons experiencing a headache at some time in their lives. Headaches commonly are tension-type (TTH) or migraine. They have high socioeconomic impact and can disturb most daily activities. Treatments range from pharmacologic to behavioral interventions. In a study published online in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, a group of Dutch researchers analyzed 119 randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) and determined the magnitude of placebo effect and no treatment effect on headache recovery rate.
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Trusting your baby to decide when how much to eat is best
telegraph.co.uk - 5-29-11
Mothers who indulge their babies' demands for food whenever they want it are not spoiling them and are in fact setting them on the right track to a healthy lifestyle, new research suggests.
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For Those With Diabetes, Older Drugs Are Often Best
nytimes.com - 5-29-11
WHEN it comes to prescription drugs, newer is not necessarily better. And that's especially true when treating diabetes.
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Smoking-pill suicides overlooked in missing reports
msnbc.msn.com - 5-29-11
Hundreds of reports of suicides, psychotic reactions and other serious problems tied to the popular stop-smoking drug Chantix were left out of a crucial government safety review because Pfizer Inc., the drug's manufacturer, submitted years of data through "improper channels."
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Groups push Obama administration to reschedule marijuana after nine years of needless delay
naturalnews.com - 5-29-11
The gap between many individual state laws regulating marijuana and the overarching federal intolerance of the plant is widening, and a coalition of marijuana advocacy groups has filed a lawsuit in the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to push the Obama administration to respond to a nine-year-old petition to have marijuana rescheduled under the Controlled Substance Act (CSA). According to the Coalition for Rescheduling Cannabis (CRC), the federal government has violated the Administrative Procedures Act by failing to respond to the petition within a reasonable amount of time.
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Big Pharma attempting to corner the market on medical marijuana
naturalnews.com - 5-29-11
As DEA raids and IRS harassment continue on state-approved medical marijuana, Big Pharma eyes the profitability of cannabis and prepares to muscle in, using its lobbyists and government connections to ensure a monopoly on legal sales of the drug.
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Don't Let Food Poisoning Spoil Your Picnic
healthday.com - 5-29-11
It's start of the summer season as Americans get ready for a slew of picnics and barbecues.
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Fukushima: How Many Chernobyls Is It?
veteranstoday.com - 5-29-11
The world's second big nuclear disaster occurred at Chernobyl Reactor No. 4 in the Ukraine on Apr 26, 1986. Simply tagged as "Chernobyl," it is what the next big and well known nuke disaster, after the American Three Mile Island, on March 28, 1979 came to be called. "Chernobyl" ejected 30% of one 192 ton, three month old reactor core. That's 57.6 radioactive tons thrown into the air by fire and explosions.
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Dutch government to ban tourists from cannabis shops
news.yahoo.com - 5-29-11
The Dutch government on Friday said it would start banning tourists from buying cannabis from "coffee shops" and impose restrictions on Dutch customers by the end of the year.
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Happiness comes with a 75th birthday card
telegraph.co.uk - 5-28-11
The findings challenge the stereotype of old age as a time of isolation and unhappiness.
The survey showed that feelings of social isolation were more common among the young.
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Flavor-boosting MSG linked to unexplained weight gain
msnbc.msn.com - 5-28-11
The flavor enhancer monosodium glutamate (MSG), most often associated with Chinese food and after-dinner headaches, may also be enhancing waistlines, a new study finds.
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Study: Tree bark compound helps reduce severe pain symptoms naturally
naturalnews.com - 5-28-11
A new study published in the journal Nature Chemistry provides new insight into the power of a rare type of tree bark to relieve serious pain. Scientists from the Scripps Research Institute (SRI) in Florida discovered that the bark of the Tabernaemontana divaricata plant, also known as crepe jasmine, contains a compound known as conolidine that appears to be just as effective at treating pain as morphine, but without all the harmful side effects.
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Scientists reverse stance on sun and cancer: Now they admit sunlight can prevent skin cancer
naturalnews.com - 5-28-11
Since the 1980s, physicians and cancer groups have regularly warned the public against the potential health dangers of direct sunlight on skin. As a result, many people have stayed out of the sunlight completely, covered their limbs even in warm weather or slathered themselves with UV protection products, all in the interest of lowering their risk of melanomas.
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Early Intervention Holds Hope for Those Who Stutter
healthday.com - 5-28-11
Stuttering may seem simple enough. People who stutter cannot get words out properly. They repeat or prolong sounds or syllables, sometimes appearing to physically struggle to speak.
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Violence Doesn't Make TV Shows More Enjoyable for Kids
healthday.com - 5-28-11
Contrary to the belief of some television producers, spiking cartoons with a dose of violence doesn't make kids enjoy them more, a new study reveals.
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Does Our Personality Affect Our Level of Attractiveness?
sciencedaily.com - 5-28-11
Part of what determines how much success you will have in the dating world is whether you have a good sense of whether people find you attractive. A new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, finds that certain personality traits contribute to being a good judge of whether someone else thinks you're worth meeting again.
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Super-Sticky 'Ultra-Bad' Cholesterol Revealed in People at High Risk of Heart Disease
sciencedaily.com - 5-28-11
Scientists from the University of Warwick have discovered why a newly found form of cholesterol seems to be 'ultra-bad', leading to increased risk of heart disease. The discovery could lead to new treatments to prevent heart disease particularly in people with type 2 diabetes and the elderly.
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Nanoengineers Invent New Biomaterial That More Closely Mimics Human Tissue
sciencedaily.com - 5-28-11
A new biomaterial designed for repairing damaged human tissue doesn't wrinkle up when it is stretched. The invention from nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego marks a significant breakthrough in tissue engineering because it more closely mimics the properties of native human tissue.
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Drug May Help Overwrite Bad Memories
sciencedaily.com - 5-28-11
Recalling painful memories while under the influence of the drug metyrapone reduces the brain's ability to re-record the negative emotions associated with them, according to University of Montreal researchers at the Centre for Studies on Human Stress of Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital. The team's study challenges the theory that memories cannot be modified once they are stored in the brain.
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New Procedure to Make Brain Surgery Safer
sciencedaily.com - 5-28-11
To increase patient safety in clinical practice and minimize risks and damage that may arise during surgery, computer support and digital medical imaging are key technologies. Before brain operations, neurosurgeons can now evaluate patient-specific surgical risks, achieve increased safety, and avoid unacceptable risks.
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Human brain's 'bat sight' found
bbc.co.uk - 5-27-11
The part of the brain used by people who can "see like a bat" has been identified by researchers in Canada.
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Skin cells 'turned into neurons' by US scientists
bbc.co.uk - 5-27-11
A Californian team say they have managed to convert human skin cells directly into functioning brain cells.
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Grapefruit molecule may lower bad cholesterol, treat diabetes
naturalnews.com - 5-27-11
Israeli scientists may have discovered an effective new way to treat high cholesterol and diabetes naturally. Dr. Yaakov Nahmias from the Benin School of Engineering and Computer Science at Hebrew University and his colleagues have discovered that naringenin, a molecule in grapefruits that gives the fruit its bitter taste, can help to treat arteriosclerosis, hyper-metabolism, and even diabetes.
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U.S. Southeast 'Stroke Belt' Also Shows Higher Rates of Cognitive Decline
healthday.com - 5-27-11
People living in an area of the southeastern United States known as the "Stroke Belt" are also at greater risk for cognitive decline, or reduced brain function, than those living in other areas, new research suggests.
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Babies May Perform 'Pure Reasoning,' Study Suggests
healthday.com - 5-27-11
Gibberish may come out of the mouths of babes, but their minds are able to form surprisingly sophisticated expectations about how events should unfold, a new study suggests.
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Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help Heart Patients With Stents
healthday.com - 5-27-11
Combining omega-3 fatty acids with blood-thinning drugs may reduce the risk of heart attacks in patients who've had stents placed in their coronary arteries, a new European study suggests.
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Protein Drinks After Exercise Help Older People Build Stronger Muscles Than Those Who Drink Carbohydrate Beverages, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-27-11
A new research report appearing online in the FASEB Journal shows that what someone drinks after exercise plays a critical role in maximizing the effects of exercise. Specifically, the report shows that protein drinks after aerobic activity increases the training effect after six weeks, when compared to carbohydrate drinks. Additionally, this study suggests that this effect can be seen using as little as 20 grams of protein.
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Substance in Tangerines Fights Obesity and Protects Against Heart Disease, Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-27-11
New research from The University of Western Ontario has discovered a substance in tangerines not only helps to prevent obesity, but also offers protection against type 2 diabetes, and even atherosclerosis, the underlying disease responsible for most heart attacks and strokes.
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Folic Acid Given to Mother Rats Protects Offspring from Colon Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 5-27-11
Folic acid supplements given to pregnant and breast-feeding rats reduced the rate of colon cancer in their offspring by 64 per cent, a new study has found.
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'Guide Vests': Robotic Navigation Aids for the Visually Impaired
sciencedaily.com - 5-27-11
For the visually impaired, navigating city streets or neighborhoods has constant challenges. And most such people still must rely on a very rudimentary technology -- a simple cane -- to help them make their way through a complex world.
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Scientists Detect Earth-Equivalent Amount of Water Within the Moon
sciencedaily.com - 5-27-11
There is water inside the moon -- so much, in fact, that in some places it rivals the amount of water found within Earth.
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Daily pill that could halve the risk of heart attacks and strokes
dailymail.co.uk - 5-26-11
A once-a-day pill could halve the risk of heart disease and strokes for millions, say scientists.
Researchers behind the first international trial of its kind say the combined Red Heart 'polypill' could also reduce deaths from bowel cancer and kidney failure.
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As Wealth and Literacy Rise in India, Report Says, So Do Sex-Selective Abortions
nytimes.com - 5-26-11
India's increasing wealth and improving literacy are apparently contributing to a national crisis of "missing girls," with the number of sex-selective abortions up sharply among more affluent, educated families during the past two decades, according to a new study.
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Nearly 1 in 5 younger adults has high blood pressure
msnbc.msn.com - 5-26-11
Almost one in five younger adults in the U.S. has high blood pressure, according to a new study.
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Brisk walks fight prostate cancer
bbc.co.uk - 5-26-11
Men who have been recently diagnosed with prostate cancer can help keep their disease at bay by taking brisk walks, claim researchers.
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Hospitals mislead patients about benefits of robotic surgery
naturalnews.com - 5-26-11
A majority of the estimated four in 10 hospital websites in the United States that publicize the use of robotic surgery, tout the superiority of robotic surgery over conventional surgery, despite a lack of scientific evidence to support that claim, a new Johns Hopkins study finds.
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93 percent of unborn babies contaminated with GMO toxins, study finds
naturalnews.com - 5-26-11
A landmark new study out of Canada exposes yet another lie propagated by the biotechnology industry, this time blowing a hole in the false claim that a certain genetic pesticide used in the cultivation of genetically-modified (GM) crops does not end up in the human body upon consumption. Researchers from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Sherbrooke Hospital Centre in Quebec, Can., have proven that Bt toxin, which is used in GM corn and other crops, definitively makes its way into the blood supply, contrary to what Big Bio claims -- and this toxin was found in the bloodstreams of 93 percent of pregnant women tested.
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The dangers of artificial food colors
naturalnews.com - 5-26-11
"Should the FDA be so permissive with chemicals in food, suspect or not, that amount to little more than marketing?" asks The Daily Green (http://www.thedailygreen.com/health...). This question is particularly pertinent considering that colorings have not always proven to be harmless.
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Study Finds Almost 1 in 5 Young Adults Has High Blood Pressure
healthday.com - 5-26-11
About 19 percent of U.S. adults aged 24 to 32 have high blood pressure, but many of them are unaware that they have the potentially life-threatening condition, new research reveals.
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Combo of Paxil, Pravachol May Raise Blood Sugar
healthday.com - 5-26-11
Taken in combination, two commonly prescribed drugs, the antidepressant Paxil and the cholesterol-lowering medication Pravachol, appear to significantly raise blood sugar levels, a new study finds.
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Violent Video Games Reduce Brain Response to Violence and Increase Aggressive Behavior, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-26-11
Scientists have known for years that playing violent video games causes players to become more aggressive. The findings of a new University of Missouri (MU) study provide one explanation for why this occurs: the brains of violent video game players become less responsive to violence, and this diminished brain response predicts an increase in aggression.
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Scientists Recreate Brain Cell Networks Providing View of Activity Behind Memory Formation
sciencedaily.com - 5-26-11
University of Pittsburgh researchers have reproduced the brain's complex electrical impulses onto models made of living brain cells that provide an unprecedented view of the neuron activity behind memory formation.
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Vitamin D Increases Speed of Sperm Cells, Researchers Discover
sciencedaily.com - 5-26-11
Vitamin D is important for optimal reproductive function in both animals and humans. It has long been known that serum vitamin D level is important for reproductive function in various animals, but now researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Copenhagen University Hospital have shown that this relationship can also be demonstrated in humans.
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UCB Raw Milk Sampling Data
nuc.berkeley.edu - 5-26-11
The following are results for milk samples obtained from a few Bay Area dairies specializing in "raw" milk -- that is, milk that is "straight from the cow." The advantage of these samples is that we know from the farmers exactly how much grass the cows have been consuming, and we have even obtained some grass samples from the same fields that the cows graze. For one dairy in Sonoma County, we have received several samples and so have created plots and a table of the data. We have single samples from two other dairies, displayed in a table at the bottom of the page.
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Long commutes 'bad for marriage': Swedish study
thelocal.se - 5-25-11
A long commute to work might further job prospects and put more money in the bank but it could also increase the risk for divorce by 40 percent, a new study from Umeå University in northern Sweden shows.
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Why four cups of coffee-a-day can hinder conception by up to 25 per cent
dailymail.co.uk - 5-25-11
Scientists may have discovered why drinking coffee makes it harder for women to conceive.
Caffeine, the stimulant in coffee, impairs the transport of eggs from the ovaries to the womb, a study has found.
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Computers are 'wrecking children's reading skills as they abandon library books'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-25-11
Computer games are harming children's reading, researchers warned last night.
They found that the reading ability of nine and ten-year-olds has slumped in countries where households have at least one computer.
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Video game and mobile phone risk for joint pain
telegraph.co.uk - 5-25-11
Researchers found that schoolchildren who spend several hours a day playing on Xbox consoles and iPhones reported "high levels" of joint pain afterwards.
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7 worst supermarket rip-offs
msnbc.msn.com - 5-25-11
Walking into your average supermarket is a lot like being a contestant on "Jeopardy!" If you think hard, choose wisely, and give all the right answers, you can go home with a carload of cash and prizes. But make a few mistakes and you'll leave with an empty wallet-not to mention a lot of empty calories.
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Having a baby makes mom's body turn on itself
msnbc.msn.com - 5-25-11
The act of giving birth apparently raises the chance that a woman's body will attack itself with autoimmune diseases, a new study finds.
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FDA approves two new drugs to treat hepatitis C
cnn.com - 5-25-11
By the end of this week, adult hepatitis C patients will have access to two new drugs, to add to their arsenal in battling the viral disease that causes inflammation of the liver that can lead to liver failure.
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Why your brain needs vacations
cnn.com - 5-25-11
Mary Kole loves her job, but she's been feeling like she's lost the line between "work" and "not work."
A literary agent for children's books in Brooklyn, New York, Kole works from home and checks in with clients electronically around the clock -- sometimes writers will even call her in the middle of the night with an idea. Stepping outside isn't exactly relaxing either. "In New York, it's just subway, office, people, talking, yelling, honking, all the time," she said.
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Are american children to be used in medical experiments to test anthrax vaccine?
naturalnews.com - 5-25-11
The highly controversial and potentially lethal anthrax vaccine may be tested on US children if the federal government gets its way. Although adverse event reports related to the vaccine among adult test subjects have included hospitalization, disability and even death, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is exploring the possibility of testing the vaccine on children.
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With Calcium, More May Not Be Better
healthday.com - 5-25-11
Getting enough calcium for bone health is essential, but getting more than that doesn't appear to confer any additional benefit, Swedish researchers have found.
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Cooked Right, Fish Can Help a Woman's Heart
healthday.com - 5-25-11
Long known as heart-healthy, fish that's baked or broiled also protects against developing heart failure, a new study suggests.
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Drug Marketing Often Targets Med Students: Analysis
healthday.com - 5-25-11
Drug company marketing to those attending medical school is common and can cloud students' ethical judgment, researchers warn.
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Closing Schools Seems to Prevent Flu's Spread
healthday.com - 5-25-11
When it comes to the flu, closing schools as well as other public places and canceling large gatherings are effective ways to guard against the spread of the disease, according to new research.
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Irregular Heartbeat Linked to Raised Death Risk in Women
healthday.com - 5-25-11
Women newly diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation have a significantly higher risk of death than women without this condition, suggests new research.
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MS in Blacks Linked to Low Vitamin D
healthday.com - 5-25-11
Black people with multiple sclerosis are more likely to have vitamin D deficiencies than blacks who don't have the disease, a new study shows.
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Population Genetics Reveals Shared Ancestries: DNA Links Modern Europeans, Middle Easterners to Sub-Saharan Africans
sciencedaily.com - 5-25-11
More than just a tool for predicting health, modern genetics is upending long-held assumptions about who we are. A new study by Harvard researchers casts new light on the intermingling and migration of European, Middle Eastern and African and populations since ancient times.
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Medical Marijuana Patients Sue Federal Government
sfweekly.com - 5-24-11
We all know that the wheels of government move slowly -- but nine years slowly? That pace is too lazy for Americans for Safe Access, which just wants answers. So it's going to court to force the federal government to get some response.
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Headaches send 3M people to emergency rooms
usatoday.com - 5-24-11
More than 3 million Americans show up at hospital emergency rooms each year seeking relief from headaches, a new government report says.
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How men can perk up their virility WITHOUT Viagra
dailymail.co.uk - 5-24-11
Last week, British researchers revealed impotence drugs such as Viagra might cause sudden hearing loss - which is worrying news for the estimated 2.3 million men in Britain who suffer from erectile dysfunction.
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Those extra pounds can hurt you at work, ladies
msnbc.msn.com - 5-24-11
Packing a few extra pounds can hurt a woman's salary and even her ability to get a job, mounting research shows. Yet while women tend to get penalized by the pound, men don't, and perhaps they even gain from girth.
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Artsy, museum-going men are happier, study says
msnbc.msn.com - 5-24-11
Men who enjoy taking in the ballet or browsing art museums are more likely to be happy with their lives and satisfied with their health than men who don't enjoy the finer things in life, a new study finds.
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Bacteria 'linked' to Parkinson's disease
bbc.co.uk - 5-24-11
The bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers have been linked to Parkinson's disease, according to researchers in the US.
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Global food inflation hits hemp seed, coconut oil and other superfoods: Here's why it's happening
naturalnews.com - 5-24-11
Food inflation is hitting the superfood industry right where it hurts -- in the wallet. Thanks to several factors you'll read about here, prices on hemp seeds, hemp oils, coconut oil and other superfoods are set to skyrocket beginning in just a few days. One of the largest superfood suppliers in the USA, Nutiva, has announced an 11% price increase coming May 27th, and that may be just the beginning of an accelerating trend in steady increases.
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Researchers Find Cousin of Hepatitis C Virus in Dogs
healthday.com - 5-24-11
Researchers report that they've discovered a virus similar to the human hepatitis C virus in dogs, a finding that might provide insight into how the germ evolved in people and perhaps lead to better treatments.
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Losing Baby Weight Cuts Odds of Pregnancy-Linked Diabetes
healthday.com - 5-24-11
Women who gained 18 or more pounds after their first baby was born are more than three times more likely to develop gestational diabetes during their second pregnancy, according to new research.
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CT Heart Scans No Benefit to Patients Without Symptoms
healthday.com - 5-24-11
For people who show no symptoms of heart disease, there is little short-term benefit to having their heart vessels scanned for plaque buildup, a new study suggests.
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Mushroom Compound Suppresses Prostate Tumors
sciencedaily.com - 5-24-11
A mushroom used in Asia for its medicinal benefits has been found to be 100 per cent effective in suppressing prostate tumour development in mice during early trials, new Queensland University of Technology (QUT) research shows.
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OCD: Compulsions Lead to Obsessions, Not the Other Way Around
sciencedaily.com - 5-24-11
New scientific evidence challenges a popular conception that behaviours such as repetitive hand-washing, characteristic of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), are carried out in response to disturbing obsessive fears.
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Natural Product Shows Pain-Killing Properties
sciencedaily.com - 5-24-11
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have for the first time accomplished a laboratory synthesis of a rare natural product isolated from the bark of a plant widely employed in traditional medicine. This advance may provide the scientific foundation to develop an effective alternative to commonly prescribed narcotic pain treatments.
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How most dieters blow all their efforts on a drink at dinner
dailymail.co.uk - 5-23-11
They may feel virtuous when they stick to salad and turn down dessert.
But many dieters are unwittingly undoing all their good work by accompanying their meal with a favourite drink.
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Modern life has made British children weaker in the last decade
telegraph.co.uk - 5-23-11
A shift away from traditional activities like climbing trees, ropes and wall bars has made modern 10-year-olds physically weaker than their counterparts a decade ago.
They can do fewer sit ups, are less able to hang from wall bars and are generally less muscular than those brought up in the 1990s.
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Need Therapy? A Good Man Is Hard to Find
nytimes.com - 5-23-11
Between unresolved family conflicts, relationship struggles and his mixed-race identity, James Puckett had enough on his mind in college that he sought professional help. But after bouncing from one therapist to another, he still felt stuck.
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USDA fines family four million dollars for selling bunny rabbits
naturalnews.com - 5-23-11
When the Dollarhite family of Nixa, Mo., first started raising and selling bunnies as part of a lesson to teach their teenage son about responsibility and hard work, they had no idea they would eventually meet the heavy hand of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). According to a recent article covered in Breitbart's Big Government, the USDA recently ordered the Dollarhite family to pay more than $90,000 in fines because they sold more than $500 worth of rabbits in a year -- and if they fail to pay the fine by Monday, May 23, the fine will multiply to nearly $4 million.
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Blood Pressure Drug Helps Those With Mild Heart Failure
healthday.com - 5-23-11
New Swedish research suggests that the drug Inspra reduces the threat of major cardiovascular complications among patients who have a mild form of heart failure.
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Epstein-Barr Virus Could Be Risk Factor for Multiple Sclerosis, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-23-11
At present, while there is no cause known for multiple sclerosis, patients with MS seem to have genetic vulnerability to certain environmental factors that could trigger this condition, such as the Epstein-Barr virus. Scientists at the University of Granada have found a link between the Epstein-Barr virus -- which belongs to the herpes viruses family -- and the development of this condition.
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Human Brain's Most Ubiquitous Cell Cultivated in Lab Dish
sciencedaily.com - 5-23-11
Pity the lowly astrocyte, the most common cell in the human nervous system. Long considered to be little more than putty in the brain and spinal cord, the star-shaped astrocyte has found new respect among neuroscientists who have begun to recognize its many functions in the brain, not to mention its role in a range of disorders of the central nervous system.
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How Retinas Develop: Scientists Make Strides in Vision Research
sciencedaily.com - 5-23-11
New research at UC Santa Barbara is contributing to the basic biological understanding of how retinas develop. The study is part of the campus's expanding vision research.
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Embryonic Cells: Predicting Fate of Personalized Cells May Be Next Step Toward New Therapies
sciencedaily.com - 5-23-11
Discovering the step-by-step details of the path embryonic cells take to develop into their final tissue type is the clinical goal of many stem cell biologists. To that end, Kenneth S. Zaret, PhD, professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and associate director of the Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and Cheng-Ran Xu, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher in the Zaret laboratory, looked at immature cells called progenitors and found a way to potentially predict their fate. They base this on how the protein spools around which DNA winds -- called histones -- are marked by other proteins.
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HORSE OWNERS JITTERY AS DEADLY NEW EQUINE VIRUS REACHES CALIFORNIA
eastcountymagazine.org - 5-23-11
Horses from across the West were exposed to a deadly new form of Equine Herpes Virus at a Utah horse show. There is no vaccine for Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM), which is caused by Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1). The disease, which results in neuorological symptoms, is highly contagious and often fatal.
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The Obama Justice Department Is Forcing Legal Medical Marijuana Patients Into the Illicit Market
huffingtonpost.com - 5-21-11
In February, Oakland City Attorney John Russo asked the Obama Justice Department whether his city's plan to regulate large-scale medical marijuana cultivation would get the approval of the federal government. As expected, U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag responded to Russo with a declarative "No!" Little did patient advocates realize, though, that Haag's letter would begin a trend resulting in similar U.S. Attorney letters sent to local and state officials in at least 9 different medical marijuana states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Montana, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington.
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How crossing your arms can confuse your brain and help lessen pain
dailymail.co.uk - 5-21-11
Crossing your arms after burning your hand or suffering an injury could lessen pain, research suggests.
Scientists found that crossing the arms across the body may confuse the brain about where pain is occurring.
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Playing computer games increases obesity risk in teens by making them hungry
dailymail.co.uk - 5-21-11
Computer games make teenagers hungry and more likely to become obese, scientists claim.
They stimulate youngsters' appetites encouraging them to raid the fridge and cupboards for snacks.
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Sex, Lies and Pharmaceuticals - how drug companies exploit female sexual dysfunction for profit
naturalnews.com - 5-21-11
In the last decade, many American women have begun to question their libidos. Even though just twenty years ago, women accepted the ebbs and flows of their sex drive, something has changed. Many now hope for something to help them keep up with their partners, in the bedroom. They see their desire as falling short of what it should be. Now, for some strange reason, there is a new standard that many women feel they are falling short of.
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Traditional Remedy Bitter Cumin Is a Great Source Antioxidant Plant Phenols, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-21-11
Bitter cumin is used extensively in traditional medicine to treat a range of diseases from vitiligo to hyperglycemia. It is considered to be antiparasitic and antimicrobial and science has backed up claims of its use to reduce fever or as a painkiller. New research published in BioMedCentral's open access journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine shows that this humble spice also contains high levels of antioxidants.
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Is Fear Deficit a Harbinger of Future Psychopaths?
sciencedaily.com - 5-21-11
Psychopaths are charming, but they often get themselves and others in big trouble; their willingness to break social norms and lack of remorse means they are often at risk for crimes and other irresponsible behaviors.
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Herbal Remedies Offer Hope as the New Antibiotics
sciencedaily.com - 5-21-11
Cancer treatments often have the side effect of impairing the patient's immune system. This can result in life-threatening secondary infections from bacteria and fungi, especially since bacteria, like Staphylococcus aureus, are becoming multi-drug resistant (MRSA). New research published by BioMed Central's open access journal Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials investigates the potency of Indian wild plants against bacterial and fungal infections in the mouths of oral cancer patients.
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Imaging Technology Reveals Intricate Details of 49-Million-Year-Old Spider
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-11
Scientists have used the latest computer-imaging technology to produce stunning three-dimensional pictures of a 49 million-year-old spider trapped inside an opaque piece of fossilized amber resin.
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Buying 'Legal Highs' from the Internet Is Risky Business
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-11
Many drugs sold as 'legal highs' on the internet do not contain the ingredients they claim. Some instead contain controlled substances and are illegal to sell over the internet. These are findings of Dr. Mark Baron, who bought a range of tablets from different websites to see what each contained.
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High Iron, Copper Levels Block Brain-Cell DNA Repair
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-11
No one knows the cause of most cases of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative disorders. But researchers have found that certain factors are consistently associated with these debilitating conditions. One is DNA damage by reactive oxygen species, highly destructive molecules usually formed as a byproduct of cellular respiration. Another is the presence of excessive levels of copper and iron in regions of the brain associated with the particular disorder.
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Wolbachia Bacteria Reduce Parasite Levels and Kill the Mosquito That Spreads Malaria
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-11
Wolbachia are bacteria that infect many insects, including mosquitoes. However, Wolbachia do not naturally infect Anopheles mosquitoes, which are the type that spreads malaria to humans.
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Dairy delights: Eating butter and cheese 'doesn't increase risk of heart attacks'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-20-11
It's great news for cheese and butter fans - scientists have found that eating dairy food doesn't increase your risk of a heart attack.
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Sunshine linked to fatherhood: Vitamin D boosts sperm quality
dailymail.co.uk - 5-20-11
Would-be fathers should make the most of the next sunny day by taking off their shirt and topping up their tan.
A study of 340 men found that vitamin D, produced by the body when exposed to the sun, boosts the quality of sperm.
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Organic food 'can help you lose weight and live longer': How natural fruit and vegetables are packed with more nutrients
dailymail.co.uk - 5-20-11
Switching to organic produce could help you live longer as well as keeping you healthier and slimmer, say academics.
Fruit and vegetables grown without artificial fertilisers have significantly more key nutrients, including vitamin C.
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Toxic pesticides from GM food crops found in unborn babies
telegraph.co.uk - 5-20-11
Toxic pesticides which are implanted into genetically modified food crops have lodged in the blood of pregnant women and their unborn babies, research shows.
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Hospital patients more likely to die on weekends
msnbc.msn.com - 5-20-11
People admitted to the hospital on the weekend are 10 percent more likely to die than those who checked in during the week, according to a new analysis of nearly 30 million people.
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The health benefits of phytochemicals
healthday.com - 5-20-11
Phytonutrients, the chemicals that help plants defend against environmental challenges, such as damage from pests or ultraviolet light, appear to provide humans with protection as well. Mounting research shows their effectiveness in preventing and treating a range of conditions including everything from cancer and heart disease to diabetes and high blood pressure. But current law dictates that if anyone advertises health benefits without FDA approval, it is automatically considered an illegal health claim, even for everyday foods, such as walnuts.
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Thyroid drug increases risk of bone fractures in women
healthday.com - 5-20-11
Hypothyroidism is a fairly common disorder, caused by low levels of thyroid hormones. With the availability of either natural hormones taken from animals, or synthetic hormones (levothyroxine), doctors now treat the disorder by replacing the missing thyroid hormones. A recent study for the British Medical Journal found that elderly people with high levels of the artificial hormone may have an increased risk of bone fracture.
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Study Suggests Supplement May Protect Against Preeclampsia
healthday.com - 5-20-11
Though a new study suggests that a dietary supplement could lower the likelihood that high-risk pregnant women will develop preeclampsia, the jury is still out over whether it actually works and a specialist recommends that women not try it yet.
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Straight or Gay? Vowels in Speech May Give it Away
healthday.com - 5-20-11
For the average listener, the vowel sounds in an unfamiliar voice quickly give away the speaker's sexual orientation, a new study finds.
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Infants' Cries May Predict Later Language Development
healthday.com - 5-20-11
The level of complexity of infants' cries may help to predict which babies are at risk for language delays, new research suggests.
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Home Births Jump 20 Percent in 4 Years: U.S. Report
healthday.com - 5-20-11
The number of home births in the United States has jumped 20 percent in recent years, a new government study shows.
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Robotic Surgery Oversold on Hospital Websites, Study Contends
healthday.com - 5-20-11
Many hospitals tout the benefits of robotic surgery on their websites without solid scientific evidence to back up those claims, Johns Hopkins researchers report.
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Texas politicians knew agency hid the amount of radiation in drinking water
khou.com - 5-20-11
Newly-released e-mails from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality show the agency's top commissioners directed staff to continue lowering radiation test results, in defiance of federal EPA rules.
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NHS budget squeeze to blame for longer waiting times, say doctors
guardian.co.uk - 5-20-11
Doctors are blaming financial pressures on the NHS for an increase in the number of patients who are not being treated within the 18 weeks that the government recommends.
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Doctors can treat skin precancer before it turns deadly
usatoday.com - 5-20-11
Bob Neuman grew up at the beach on Long Island, N.Y., playing in the sand and surf almost every day of the summer. Blond and fair-skinned, he remembers his mother covering him with suntan lotion.
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Seniors seeking drug, alcohol treatment doubles
usatoday.com - 5-20-11
They go around this room at the Hanley Center telling of their struggles with alcohol and drugs. They tell of low points and lapses, brushes with death and pain caused to families. And silently, through the simple fact that each is in their 60s or beyond, they share one more secret: Addiction knows no age.
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Viagra 'could make you deaf'
telegraph.co.uk - 5-20-11
Viagra and similar impotence drugs have been linked to hundreds of cases of sudden hearing loss around the world, including some in the UK.
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'Sticking plaster' can heal damaged hearts
telegraph.co.uk - 5-20-11
n a heart attack, some parts of the muscle can be left dead, which increases the risk of a second or subsequent attack.
The inch-long black patch, which is only as thick as a single human hair, is built of carbon and is intended to be stuck to the dead area and attract new cell growth to bring it back to life.
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Want to be happy? Stop trying
msnbc.msn.com - 5-20-11
While the pursuit of happiness may seem like a reasonable aim, new research shows that making happiness a personal goal will only stand in the way of your achieving it.
The researchers found that women who valued happiness more tended to report being less happy and more depressed than women who didn't place such a high premium on a lasting smile.
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Coffee 'cuts prostate cancer risk' US study suggests
bbc.co.uk - 5-20-11
Coffee has been linked to a reduced risk of dying from prostate cancer in a study of nearly 50,000 US men.
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Elderly care costs could treble says OECD
bbc.co.uk - 5-20-11
The cost of caring for the elderly could treble by 2050, according to a report by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.
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Prevent illness by increasing your intake of potassium
naturalnews.com - 5-20-11
High blood pressure, which afflicts roughly one-third of Americans, and heart disease, the leading cause of death in the US, are both often attributed to bad habits like excess sodium intake and poor overall diet. However, a new report released by the US Institute of Medicine suggests that potassium deficiency may also be a critical factor in these diseases, and that Americans would do well to consume more potassium-rich foods as part of their regular diets.
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Man cured of AIDS after receiving stem cell transplant
naturalnews.com - 5-20-11
In what many in the mainstream media and medical community have now dubbed their first known case of cured AIDS, Timothy Ray Brown's miraculous healing from the deadly syndrome is sending shock waves throughout the world. After receiving a bone marrow stem cell transplant back in 2007, Brown inherited a genetic immunity from those stem cells that cured him of not only AIDS, but also leukemia.
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Swimmer's Ear Costs Up to $500 Million a Year in U.S.
healthday.com - 5-20-11
Summer fun can take a nose dive if someone in the family gets swimmer's ear, a common infection that accounts for almost $500 million in U.S. health-care costs each year, according to a new government report.
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Kids of Deployed Parents May Face Mental Health Risks
healthday.com - 5-20-11
Children whose parents are deployed in Afghanistan or Iraq face a higher risk of psychiatric problems requiring hospitalization, a new study indicates.
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Spinal Stimulation Helps Paralyzed Man Regain Movement
healthday.com - 5-20-11
A patient completely paralyzed below the chest after an road accident has been able to stand up by himself, move his legs and feet and take some assisted steps on a treadmill, thanks to electrical stimulation of his lower spinal cord.
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Strobe Eyewear Training May Improve Visual Abilities
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-11
Strobe-like eyewear designed to train the vision of athletes may have positive effects in some cases, according to tests run by a team of Duke University psychologists who specialize in visual perception.
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Exercise Helps Women Fight Smoking Cravings, but Effect Is Short-Lived
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-11
For years researchers have found that exercise can curb nicotine cravings, but have struggled to show a practical benefit in trials. Newly published research suggests a reason: the effect is too ephemeral. The next step, funded by a 5-year grant, will be to see how frequently exercise might be needed to have a lasting therapeutic effect.
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Building a Better Mouse Model to Study Depression
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-11
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have developed a mouse model of major depressive disorder (MDD) that is based on a rare genetic mutation that appears to cause MDD in the majority of people who inherit it. The findings, which were published online May 19 in the American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics EarlyView, could help to clarify the brain events that lead to MDD, and contribute to the development of new and better means of treatment and prevention. This report also illustrates an advance in the design of recombinant mouse models that should be applicable to many human diseases.
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Extremely Obese Children Have Higher Prevalence of Psoriasis, Higher Heart Disease Risk
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-11
Children who are overweight or obese have a significantly higher prevalence of psoriasis, and teens with psoriasis, regardless of their body weight, have higher cholesterol levels, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published online in the Journal of Pediatrics. The study findings suggest that higher heart disease risk for patients with psoriasis starts in childhood in the form of higher cholesterol levels.
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Cell Phone Use May Reduce Male Fertility, Austrian-Canadian Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-11
Men who have been diagnosed with poor sperm quality and who are trying to have children should limit their cell phone use, a new study suggests. Researchers in Austria and Canada have found that while cell phone use appears to increase the level of testosterone circulating in the body, it may also lead to low sperm quality and a decrease in fertility.
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Meet the woman allergic to electricity
telegraph.co.uk - 5-19-11
A British woman cannot use an electric kettle, keeps her washing machine in a concrete outhouse and cannot have neighbours with wireless internet because she is allergic to electricity.
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Watermelons explode in China as farmers apply too many growth chemicals to their crops
naturalnews.com - 5-19-11
Beyond melamine in the powdered milk and plastic in the rice, Chinese farmers have managed to achieve a little more food history with a new chemical monstrosity: Exploding watermelons.
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Monsanto pesticide found to infect plants with AIDS-like disease
naturalnews.com - 5-19-11
When Dr. Don Huber, professor emeritus at Purdue University and internationally-recognized plant pathologist, wrote a letter back in January to US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack, warning him about a new mystery disease showing up primarily in genetically-modified (GM) crops, the notice fell on deaf ears.
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Many Women Can Have Cervical Cancer Test Every 3 Years: Study
healthday.com - 5-19-11
Women 30 and older who have good results from each of the two cervical cancer tests available today can safely wait three years for their next screening instead of just one year, according to new research.
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Study Finds Ovarian Screening Tests Don't Improve Survival
healthday.com - 5-19-11
New research finds that the only two tests available to screen for ovarian cancer don't reduce the average woman's risk of dying from this "silent killer."
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Carbon Black Nanoparticles Can Cause Cell Death, Inflammation in Lungs, Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 5-19-11
Researchers from the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine have found that inhaled carbon black nanoparticles create a double source of inflammation in the lungs.
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Half of Prostate Cancers Could Potentially Benefit from New Type of Cancer Drugs
sciencedaily.com - 5-19-11
About half of prostate cancers have a genetic anomaly that appears to make tumor cells responsive to a new class of cancer-fighting drugs, a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds.
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Dairy Consumption Does Not Elevate Heart-Attack Risk, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-19-11
Dairy products can be high in harmful saturated fat but not necessarily in risk to the heart. A newly published analysis of thousands of adults in Costa Rica found that their levels of dairy consumption had nothing to do statistically with their risk of a heart attack.
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Sun Protects Against Childhood Asthma
sciencedaily.com - 5-19-11
Vitamin D, which is primarily absorbed from the sun, plays a role in protection against childhood asthma. Now, a new study led by Valencian researchers has shown that children who live in colder, wetter cities are at greater risk of suffering from this respiratory problem, since there are fewer hours of sunlight in such places.
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Nuclear Magnetic Resonance With No Magnets
sciencedaily.com - 5-19-11
Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), a scientific technique associated with outsized, very low-temperature, superconducting magnets, is one of the principal tools in the chemist's arsenal, used to study everything from alcohols to proteins to such frontiers as quantum computing. In hospitals the machinery of NMR's cousin, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is as loud as it is big, but nevertheless a mainstay of diagnosis for a wide range of medical conditions.
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Chinese Herbal Medicines Helping Infertility
botanical.com - 5-19-11
Herbal medicines can offer a more gentle aid to fertility problems than other help you may seek. Chinese herbal physicians have developed medicines which throughout history have helped women improve their chances of reproducing. They do this by harmonising the endocrine system which regulates the menstrual cycle.
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FDA Accuses Supplement Manufacturers of Selling Drugs?
anh-usa.org - 5-19-11
Misleading claims vs. legitimate science-getting to the truth can be a minefield! Which is why the Free Speech about Science Act is so important.
The US Food and Drug Administration recently sent warning letters to manufacturers of a number of products-MedaVir, Herpaflor, Viruxo Anti-Viral Support, C-Cure, and Never an Outbreak-for making health claims about treating or preventing sexually transmitted diseases, including herpes.
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Infestations May Trigger 'Bedbug Psychosis'
abcnews.go.com - 5-18-11
He spent months fighting bedbugs with sprays and fumigation, but the bedbug infestation at Lucas da Silva's house only got worse. At the peak of its severity, da Silva could flip over his mattress in the middle of the day, and bedbugs would appear everywhere, crawling around as if they owned the joint.
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Scientists Discover Gene That Controls Obesity
abcnews.go.com - 5-18-11
British researchers have found a gene they say is linked to Type 2 diabetes and cholesterol levels and serves as the master switch that controls the behavior of other genes found within body fat. The discovery could lead to obesity-related treatments in the future.
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Study: 1 out of 3 hospital ERs have closed over the last two decades
usatoday.com - 5-18-11
Close to a third of emergency departments closed shop over the last two decades, a new study shows.
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Life-long obesity risk of 'eating for two' in pregnancy: Mothers won't lose extra weight, experts warn
dailymail.co.uk - 5-18-11
It is advice that many an expectant mother will have heard as she settles down to a meal.
But 'eating for two' during pregnancy could leave women saddled with the extra pounds for life, researchers have found.
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My broken leg healed in half the time... all because I meditated
dailymail.co.uk - 5-18-11
Meditation is often touted as a panacea for all manner of ailments, from chronic pain to anxiety, stress and even depression.
Like most sensible people, I'd always taken such sweeping claims with a large pinch of salt. However, five years ago I learned the power of meditation for myself after an accident left me critically injured and in constant pain.
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Body clock drug as good as standard anti-depressants
telegraph.co.uk - 5-18-11
A new drug that regulates the internal "body clock" is as effective at treating depression as standard treatments, researchers believe.
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Chemical Suspected in Cancer Is in Baby Products
nytimes.com - 5-18-11
More than 30 years after chemical flame retardants were removed from children's pajamas because they were suspected of being carcinogens, new research into flame retardants shows that one of the chemicals is prevalent in baby's products made with polyurethane foam, including nursing pillows, car seats and highchairs.
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'Steroids for school': College students get hooked on 'smart drugs'
msnbc.msn.com - 5-18-11
At colleges across America, students are becoming addicted to a popular prescription drug - not because they're trying to get high, but because they hope to get smarter. The drug, Adderall, is normally prescribed for kids with attention deficit disorder. But some college kids are taking the medication because it helps them focus and pull all-nighters.
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Coffee linked to lower risk of fatal prostate cancer
cnn.com - 5-18-11
Men who drink a lot of coffee might feel a bit jittery or high-strung, but those side effects may come with a hidden benefit: prostate health.
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Egyptian mummy 'first to have diseased heart'
bbc.co.uk - 5-18-11
An Egyptian princess who lived 3,500 years ago is thought to be the first known person to have developed heart disease, say researchers.
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What Protects the Heart May Also Ward Off Kidney Stones
healthday.com - 5-18-11
The same lifestyle factors that are linked to healthy hearts and bones can also keep painful kidney stones at bay, a series of new studies suggests.
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Pills, Surgery Both Effective for Chronic Reflux: Study
healthday.com - 5-18-11
Both surgery and popular medications such as Nexium, Prevacid or Prilosec can successfully treat the discomfort of chronic reflux, according to new research.
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CSI for Infection: Geographic Profiling, Used in Hunt for Serial Killers, Can Help Combat Infectious Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 5-18-11
Every 30 seconds, infectious diseases such as malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis kill as many people as Jack the Ripper did in his entire career. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal International Journal of Health Geographics demonstrates how the mathematical model of geographic profiling, used in the hunt for serial killers, can help combat infectious diseases.
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Too Posh to Push? The Increasing Trend for Cesarean Section
sciencedaily.com - 5-18-11
During the last thirty years there has been an increase in the number of babies born by Caesarean section. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Public Health shows that there has also been a change in the social and economic status of the mothers involved and that advantaged mothers are more likely to have their babies by Caesarean section than mothers living in more difficult circumstances.
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Roots of Memory Impairment Resulting from Sleep Deprivation Identified
sciencedaily.com - 5-18-11
From high-school students to surgeons, anyone who has pulled an all-nighter knows there is a price to be paid the next day: trouble focusing, a fuzzy memory and other cognitive impairments. Now, researchers at Penn have found the part of the brain and the neurochemical basis for sleep deprivation's effects on memory.
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LED bulbs hit 100 watts as federal ban looms
yahoo.com - 5-17-11
Two leading makers of lighting products are showcasing LED bulbs that are bright enough to replace energy-guzzling 100-watt light bulbs set to disappear from stores in January.
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One cup cuts blood pressure, two stave off dementia... and six reduce your skin cancer risk - the GOOD news about coffee!
dailymail.co.uk - 5-17-11
We are a nation of coffee addicts - last year alone we spent almost £1 billion on it. Our caffeine habit was vindicated last week when Swedish researchers revealed women who drink five or more cups a day could be protecting themselves against an aggressive form of breast cancer.
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Elderly people should take up T'ai Chi, say academics
telegraph.co.uk - 5-17-11
A new study has found that the ancient Chinese exercises, enjoyed by millions of people every morning, can help pensioners avoid falling injuries and boost their psychological well-being.
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In Women, Hernias May Be Hidden Agony
nytimes.com - 5-17-11
Laura Sweet was an active, upbeat 42-year-old saleswoman living in Santa Monica, Calif., when the agony first started - debilitating, flaring pains in her pelvis that lasted for days and recurred periodically. The discomfort resulted in many visits to the emergency room, referrals to various specialists, wrong diagnoses and a daily cocktail of painkillers.
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What makes an innie an innie? And more belly button mysteries
msnbc.msn.com - 5-17-11
Innies, outies, in-betweenies. We had such an overwhelming response to our recent post on a new study examining belly button bacteria (ew) that we decided we didn't know nearly enough about our navels, and must investigate further.
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Fukushima orders of magnitude worse than Chernobyl, says Dr. Caldicott
naturalnews.com - 5-17-11
A renowned nuclear activist has said the crisis at Japan's Fukushima nuclear complex brought on by a 9.0-magnitude earthquake and resultant tsunami March 11 is much worse than the atomic disaster at the Chernobyl plant in the former Soviet Union in 1986.
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Study: Tylenol, acetaminophen linked to causing blood cancer
naturalnews.com - 5-17-11
A new study out of the University of Washington (UW) provides even more evidence that taking over-the-counter painkillers can kill you. Published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, the study explains that taking acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, for extended periods of time can increase a person's risk of developing blood cancer.
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Research Shows Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease Sometimes Missed
healthday.com - 5-17-11
More than half of those who develop Alzheimer's disease before the age of 60 are initially misdiagnosed when the first signs of the disease are symptoms other than memory problems, a small study suggests.
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Tonsil Removal Might Cure Bedwetting in Some Kids With Sleep Apnea
healthday.com - 5-17-11
Half of children with sleep apnea who also wet the bed might stop their bedwetting if their tonsils or adenoids are removed, new research suggests.
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Binge Drinking Tied to Memory Loss in College Students: Study
healthday.com - 5-17-11
A new Spanish study links binge drinking in college students to a lowered ability to remember lists of words, although the research doesn't prove alcohol is at fault and the drinkers did fine on a separate memory test.
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GPs Lack Accuracy in Spotting Skin Cancers: Study
healthday.com - 5-17-11
When general doctors refer patients to a specialist to investigate a suspicious skin lesion, it's more often another lesion that turns out to be cancerous, a new study finds.
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Selenium Supplements Might Give Modest Benefit Against Cholesterol
healthday.com - 5-17-11
A daily dose of the antioxidant selenium doesn't appear to elevate "bad" cholesterol levels, and may in fact prompt a very modest boost in "good" cholesterol, a new British study reveals.
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Sporadic Mutations Identified in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders
sciencedaily.com - 5-17-11
Scientists at the University of Washington (UW) Department of Genome Sciences have identified several sporadic or "de novo" genetic mutations in children with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers applied leading edge molecular biology techniques and massively parallel sequencing to simultaneously examine all of the protein coding portions of the genome, collectively called the exome.
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Digital Imaging Software to Create a 'Google Earth' View of the Bladder
sciencedaily.com - 5-17-11
Bladder cancer is the fourth-most-common cancer in men and one of the most expensive cancers to treat from diagnosis to death. After initial diagnosis and surgery, patients must return to the urologist at least yearly for a costly, time-consuming and uncomfortable bladder scan. Tumors recur in more than half of patients.
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Smoke-Related Chemical Discovered in the Atmosphere Could Have Health Implications
sciencedaily.com - 5-17-11
Cigarette smoking, forest fires and woodburning can release a chemical that may be at least partly responsible for human health problems related to smoke exposure, according to a new study by NOAA researchers and their colleagues.
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Graduation Contamination Through Handshaking?
sciencedaily.com - 5-17-11
Graduations are a celebration of achievement and growth, but could all the pomp and circumstance increase your risk of exposure to harmful bacteria? A team of researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health examined the risk of acquiring pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) through shaking hands at graduation ceremonies across Maryland.
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UCB Food Chain Sampling Results
berkeley.edu - 5-17-11
Radionuclides, once deposited by rainwater or air onto the ground, will find their way through the ecosystem. We are already tracking its path from rainwater to creek runoff to tap water, but we would also like to monitor how much these isotopes that make their way into our food. For example, how much gets taken up by the grass and eventually winds up in our milk?
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Cell Phones Caused Mysterious Worldwide Bee Deaths, Study Finds
foxnews.com - 5-17-11
Cellphone transmissions may be responsible for a mysterious, worldwide die off in bees that has mystified scientists.
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Apparent Immunity Gene 'Cures' Bay Area Man Of AIDS
sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com - 5-17-11
A 45-year-old man now living in the Bay Area may be the first person ever cured of the deadly disease AIDS, the result of the discovery of an apparent HIV immunity gene.
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Junk food Britain costs the NHS more than cigarettes and alcohol
telegraph.co.uk - 5-16-11
Britain's unhealthy eating habits are costing the NHS more than the combined impact of cigarettes and alcohol, a new study has found.
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Dessert, Laid-Back and Legal
nytimes.com - 5-16-11
Remember melatonin? In the 1990s, this over-the-counter dietary supplement was all the rage among frequent fliers, promoted as the miracle cure for jet lag. Now it is back in vogue, this time as a prominent ingredient in at least a half-dozen baked goods that flagrantly mimic the soothing effects of hash brownies - and do so legally. At least for now.
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Self-compassion may matter more than self-esteem
msnbc.msn.com - 5-16-11
A charming animated baby, Kristin Neff's son Rowan retreated into himself as a toddler, losing his few words and becoming prone to inexplicable screaming fits.
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Malaria blocks 'super-infection'
bbc.co.uk - 5-16-11
The malaria parasite can ensure it keeps a host body all to itself by preventing further malarial infections, according to international researchers.
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Switzerland: Zurich votes to keep assisted suicide
bbc.co.uk - 5-16-11
Voters in Zurich, Switzerland, have rejected proposed bans on assisted suicide and "suicide tourism".
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Diabetics twice as likely to develop cancer, suggests new study
naturalnews.com - 5-16-11
A new study published in the journal Diabetes Care reveals that diabetics have a nearly doubled risk of developing certain types of cancer compared to those without the disease. Dr. Chaoyang Li from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Ga., and his colleagues found that 16 percent of diabetic men and 17 percent of diabetic women develop cancer, while only seven and ten percent of the general population, respectively, develop it.
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Discovery of Bt insecticide in human blood proves GMO toxin a threat to human health, study finds
naturalnews.com - 5-16-11
The biotechnology industry's house of cards appears to be crumbling, as a new study out of the University of Sherbrooke, Canada, recently found Bt toxin, a component of certain genetically-modified (GM) crops, in human blood samples for the first time. Set to be published in the peer-reviewed journal Reproductive Toxicology the new study shreds the false notion that Bt is broken down by the digestive system, and instead shows that the toxin definitively persists in the bloodstream.
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Researchers Identify DNA Region Linked to Depression
sciencedaily.com - 5-16-11
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and King's College London have independently identified DNA on chromosome 3 that appears to be related to depression.
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Hormone Precursor Inhibits Brain Inflammation: Molecule Moderates Condition Linked to Neurodegenerative Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 5-16-11
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a steroid hormone that inhibits inflammation in the brain. The findings, to be published in the May 13 issue of the journal Cell, have implications for understanding the exaggerated inflammatory responses that are characteristic features of numerous neurodegenerative diseases.
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Sound Safety: Novel Device With Rock 'N' Roll Roots May Protect Listeners from Potential Dangers of Personal Listening Devices and Hearing Aids
sciencedaily.com - 5-16-11
Engineers investigating "listener fatigue"-- the discomfort and pain some people experience while using in-ear headphones, hearing aids, and other devices that seal the ear canal from external sound -- have found not only what they believe is the cause, but also a potential solution.
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'Master Switch' Gene for Obesity and Diabetes Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 5-16-11
A team of researchers, led by King's College London and the University of Oxford, have found that a gene linked to type 2 diabetes and cholesterol levels is in fact a 'master regulator' gene, which controls the behaviour of other genes found within fat in the body.
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Alzheimer's Risk Gene Disrupts Brain's Wiring 50 Years Before Disease Hits
sciencedaily.com - 5-16-11
What if you were told you carried a gene that increases your risk for Alzheimer's disease? And what if you were told this gene starts to do its damage not when you're old but when you're young?
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The £400 test that tells you how long you'll live
independent.co.uk - 5-16-11
A blood test that can show how fast someone is ageing - and offers the tantalising possibility of estimating how long they have left to live - is to go on sale to the general public in Britain later this year.
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FDA considers new dose instructions for kids' pain relievers
usatoday.com - 5-15-11
Federal health officials are considering adding dosing instructions for children younger than 2 years old to Children's Tylenol and similar products, a change favored by drugmakers and many doctors.
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Caesarean risk: New research finds C-section babies are more likely to become obese in later life
dailymail.co.uk - 5-15-11
Babies born by caesarean section are at greater risk of becoming obese in later life than those delivered naturally, researchers have found.
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Doctors miss one in three cancer cases, report warns
telegraph.co.uk - 5-15-11
One third of cancer cases in Britain are initially missed by GPs, a major study has found.
More than 100,000 people diagnosed with cancer each year previously had symptoms of the disease dismissed by family doctors, according to the NHS audit.
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Rejection May Hurt More Than Feelings
nytimes.com - 5-15-11
NOBODY would deny that being ostracized on the playground, mocked in a sales meeting or broken up with over Twitter feels bad. But the sting of social rejection may be more like the ouch! of physical pain than previously understood.
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Swiss city of Zurich to vote on 'suicide tourism' laws
bbc.co.uk - 5-15-11
Voters in the Swiss city of Zurich are set to go to the polls to decide on two proposals related to assisted suicide.
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Agent Orange Linked to Kidney Cancer: Study
healthday.com - 5-15-11
There appears to be a link between Agent Orange and kidney cancer in U.S. veterans exposed to the herbicide in Vietnam, a new study suggests.
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Poor Sleep Tied to Incontinence, Impotence
healthday.com - 5-15-11
Sleep problems are associated with erectile dysfunction and urologic conditions such as incontinence, according to the results of two new studies.
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Bones: Experts rethink long-term use of drugs
usatoday.com - 5-14-11
Bone experts are rethinking the way they treat osteoporosis now that research has linked widely prescribed drugs to rare but serious leg fractures.
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Race a factor in whether young women tested for STDs
msnbc.msn.com - 5-14-11
When young women visit the emergency room complaining of symptoms that mirror those of a sexually transmitted disease, many aren't tested for a possible infection - unless the young woman happens to be African-American, that is, provocative new research shows.
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Hundreds of herbal remedies now outlawed across Europe
naturalnews.com - 5-14-11
Live in Europe? Get your herbs while they last. New rules put forth by the European Union (EU) will ban the sale of certain herbal remedies that have been used for centuries.
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Fat Cats, Dogs Developing Diabetes, Report Finds
healthday.com - 5-14-11
Like all good pet owners, Christine Wong didn't hesitate to go to a veterinary clinic near her home in Austin, Texas, when her cat, Kiki, wasn't feeling well.
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Older Caregivers at Greater Risk for Cognitive Decline
healthday.com - 5-14-11
Caring for a loved one who is ill is always stressful, but older people caring for a spouse who has dementia may face an increased risk for cognitive problem or dementia themselves, researchers report.
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Eat Less, Live Longer?
healthday.com - 5-14-11
People who cut their daily caloric intake by 25 percent or more may live longer than those who do not, a new study suggests.
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Bacterium Found to Kill Malaria in Mosquitoes
sciencedaily.com - 5-14-11
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have identified a bacterium in field-caught mosquitoes that, when present, stops the development of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria in humans. According to the study, the Enterobacter bacterium is part of the naturally occurring microbial flora of the mosquito's gut and kills the parasite by producing reactive oxygen species (or free radical molecules). The study is published in the May 13 edition of Science.
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Sense of Smell: Single Giant Interneuron in Locusts Controls Activity in 50,000 Neurons, Enabling Sparse Codes for Odours
sciencedaily.com - 5-14-11
The brain is a coding machine: it translates physical inputs from the world into visual, olfactory, auditory, tactile perceptions via the mysterious language of its nerve cells and the networks which they form. Neural codes could in principle take many forms, but in regions forming bottlenecks for information flow (e.g., the optic nerve) or in areas important for memory, sparse codes are highly desirable.
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Protein Responsible for the Detection of Extreme Heat and Pain Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 5-14-11
The protein responsible for the detection of extreme heat and pain resulting from infections has been identified by a team of K.U.Leuven researchers led by Professor Thomas Voets. The protein is a promising target for the development of new analgesic medications.
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New Pathway Affecting Lifespan Identified: Discovery Advances Study of Diet and Longevity
sciencedaily.com - 5-14-11
A team led by a scientist from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute has identified a new role for a biological pathway that not only signals the body's metabolic response to nutritional changes, but also affects lifespan.
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Increase in Internet Access Parallels Growth in Prescription Drug Abuse
sciencedaily.com - 5-14-11
Increasing access to rogue online pharmacies -- those which dispense medications without a doctor's prescription -- may be an important factor behind the rapid increase in the abuse of prescription drugs. In a report that was released May 12 online by the journal Health Affairs and will also appear in its June edition, investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the University of Southern California (USC) find that states with the greatest expansion in high-speed Internet access from 2000 to 2007 also had the largest increase in admissions for treatment of prescription drug abuse.
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Scientists find MRSA germ in supermarket meats
usatoday.com - 5-13-11
MRSA, a bacteria resistant to common antibiotics, has been discovered in supermarket meats, and the germ is apparently being introduced by human food handlers, a new study reports.
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Children 'risking heart disease' by not exercising
telegraph.co.uk - 5-13-11
Swedish researchers who looked at 223 children whose average age was just under 10, found that those who exercised the least had more body fat and a higher resting pulse rate than those who exercised the most.
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'Cuddle Hormone' Linked to Postpartum Depression Risk
health.com - 5-13-11
Women who have lower levels of the brain chemical oxytocin toward the end of their pregnancy may be more prone to develop postpartum depression than expecting moms with higher levels, a new study suggests.
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Anti-retroviral drugs 'help reduce' HIV transmission
bbc.co.uk - 5-13-11
An HIV-positive person who takes anti-retroviral drugs after diagnosis, rather than when their health declines, can cut the risk of spreading the virus to uninfected partners by 96%, according to a study.
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Study: Most people have no idea what's actually in the painkiller drugs they take
naturalnews.com - 5-13-11
If you asked the average person what active ingredients are found in their favorite over-the-counter (OTC) painkiller drugs, most would be unable to properly identify them -- even if they personally use them. A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine has found that roughly 69 percent of people surveyed were unaware that McNeil Consumer Healthcare's painkiller drug Tylenol contains acetaminophen, while an astounding 81 percent had no idea that Pfizer's Advil contains ibuprofen.
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Is cabbage the ultimate anti-cancer food?
naturalnews.com - 5-13-11
Men with early signs of developing prostate cancer were able to prevent tumor growth by eating broccoli four times a week, according to a British study covered on MSN (http://health.msn.com/health-topics...). But broccoli is not the only cruciferous vegetable with anti-cancer properties.
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Lactose Intolerance May Sometimes Be in the Head, Not the Gut
healthday.com - 5-13-11
Italian researchers report that some people who think they are lactose-intolerant may actually suffer from a psychological condition known as somatoform disorder.
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Ecstasy Use May Make Brain Less Efficient
healthday.com - 5-13-11
Use of the illegal drug ecstasy is associated with long-term changes in brain function, a new study finds.
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Keep MP3 Headphones 2 Centimeters or More From Pacemaker: Study
healthday.com - 5-13-11
When positioned properly, the headphones of MP3 players won't cause problems for patients with implantable cardiac devices, a new study shows.
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Early HIV Drug Therapy Protects Sex Partners From Virus
healthday.com - 5-13-11
People with HIV can reduce the risk of infecting their sex partners by more than 90 percent if they start treatment with antiretroviral drugs when their immune system is still relatively healthy, researchers announced Thursday.
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New Gene That Causes Intellectual Disability Identified
sciencedaily.com - 5-13-11
A new study involving Canada's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) has found a gene connected with a type of intellectual disability called Joubert syndrome. CAMH Senior Scientist Dr. John Vincent has identified this gene that, when defective, leads to Joubert syndrome. This research is published in the 13 May 2011 issue of Cell.
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Finger Length Clue to Motor Neuron Disease
sciencedaily.com - 5-13-11
People with the commonest form of motor neuron disease (MND) called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are more likely to have relatively long ring fingers, reveals research from the Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) at King's.
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Why Some Genes Are Silenced: Researchers Find Clue as to How Notes Are Played on the 'Genetic Piano'
sciencedaily.com - 5-13-11
Japanese and U.S. scientists in the young field of epigenetics have reported a rationale as to how specific genes are silenced and others are not. Because this effect can be reversed, it may be possible to devise therapies for cancer and other diseases using this information.
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Marriage Problems Predict Sleep Difficulties in Young Children
sciencedaily.com - 5-13-11
A new study of more than 350 families has found that instability in the parents' relationship when the children are 9 months old predicted difficulties falling asleep and staying asleep when they were 18 months old. The findings suggest that the effects of marital instability on children's sleep problems emerge earlier in development than has been demonstrated previously.
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Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Common Gastrointestinal Disorder Linked to Bacterial Overgrowth, Food Poisoning
sciencedaily.com - 5-13-11
Cedars-Sinai researchers have reported two advances in the understanding of irritable bowel syndrome, the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States, affecting an estimated 30 million people.
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U.S. states braced for invasion of cicadas as they hatch after 13 years underground
dailymail.co.uk - 5-13-11
Their haunting chirrup strikes fear into the heart of every gardener.
For thirteen years this cicada hoard has lain dormant in its underground lair, awaiting the right time to strike. And it appears that that time has come.
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A spoonful of sugar can help beat bugs: Antibiotics made more effective by glucose
dailymail.co.uk - 5-12-11
It seems a spoonful of sugar can do more than help the medicine go down - it can also help make it work.
Sugar can improve the effectiveness of antibiotics against infections, according to researchers.
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Children can 'recall early memories', Canadian study suggests
bbc.co.uk - 5-12-11
Children can remember memories from their earliest years, but forget most of them later, according to research.
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'Legal highs' created at an 'unprecedented pace'
bbc.co.uk - 5-12-11
A record number of new "legal highs" were reported across Europe in 2010, with four times as many found in the UK than any other country, figures show.
The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction said there were 41 new substances, of which 16 were first reported in the UK.
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Selenium 'does not prevent cancer'
bbc.co.uk - 5-12-11
Taking a daily supplement of selenium will not ward off cancer, say experts who have reviewed the available evidence.
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Soil microbes are the immune system that protects plants, crops from disease
naturalnews.com - 5-12-11
New research conducted by the US Department of Energy (USDE) provides even more proof that synthetic pesticides and herbicides are completely unnecessary when the right balance of natural microbes are present and flourishing in soil. Gary Anderson and his colleagues from both the USDE and Wageningen University in the Netherlands recently discovered that soil microbes act as a type of probiotic, or immune system, for soil, effectively preventing plant diseases from developing.
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California to mandate labeling for GMO salmon
naturalnews.com - 5-12-11
The miserable failure of both the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to stand up for the interests of the people and require proper labeling of AquaBounty's genetically-modified (GM) salmon, which is set to be approved soon, has led California legislators to take matters into their own hands. According to Red, Green & Blue, the California Assembly Health Committee recently approved a measure requiring the "Frankenfish" to be clearly labeled so consumers are aware of what they are purchasing.
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Fever During Pregnancy, Diabetes and Obesity May Raise Autism Risk
healthday.com - 5-12-11
Having the flu during pregnancy isn't associated with a heightened risk of autism or developmental delay in children, although having a fever during pregnancy might be.
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ADHD Drug Shortage Has Patients, Parents Scrambling
healthday.com - 5-12-11
Due to an ongoing shortage, some American adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or the parents of children with ADHD, are having to call multiple pharmacies before finding one that carries the prescription they need to manage the condition.
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Superbug Germ Detected in Bedbugs, Study Finds
foxnews.com - 5-12-11
Scientists in Canada have found MRSA in bedbugs from three hospital patients who live in a poverty-stricken Vancouver neighborhood.
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Fears that EU rules on herbal medicines may put patients in danger
walesonline.co.uk - 5-11-11
NEW rules on herbal medicines could compromise patient safety by forcing people to turn to the internet to buy their supplies.
Herbalists and nutritionists have spoken of their fears that the new European Union rules, which have been introduced under the banner of patient safety, will do more harm than good.
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Suicide Kits Under Fire as Oregon Proposes Ban of Sale
abcnews.go.com - 5-11-11
Oregon senators have unanimously voted in favor of passing a bill that would ban the sale or marketing of suicide kits.
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Hazy Recall as a Signal Foretelling Depression
nytimes.com - 5-11-11
The task given to participants in an Oxford University depression study sounds straightforward. After investigators read them a cue word, they have 30 seconds to recount a single specific memory, meaning an event that lasted less than one day.
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Vitamin D Deficiency in Pneumonia Patients Associated With Increased Mortality
sciencedaily.com - 5-11-11
A new study published in the journal Respirology reveals that adult patients admitted to the hospital with pneumonia are more likely to die if they have vitamin D deficiency.
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New Method to Diagnose Heart Arrhythmias: First Non-Invasive Technique to Directly Map Electrical Activation of the Heart
sciencedaily.com - 5-11-11
Abnormalities in cardiac conduction, the rate at which the heart conducts electrical impulses to contract and relax, are a major cause of death and disability around the world. Researchers at Columbia Engineering School have been developing a new method, Electromechanical Wave Imaging (EWI), that is the first non-invasive technique to map the electrical activation of the heart. Based on ultrasound imaging, EWI will enable doctors to treat arrhythmias more efficiently and more precisely.
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Genetic Information May Help Predict Likelihood of Survival Following Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 5-11-11
Development of a predictive test that included genomic signatures that indicated chemoresistance, chemosensitivity and endocrine sensitivity for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer identified patients with a high probability of survival following chemotherapy, according to a study in the May 11 issue of JAMA.
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Beneficial Bacteria Help Repair Intestinal Injury by Inducing Reactive Oxygen Species
sciencedaily.com - 5-11-11
The gut may need bacteria to provide a little bit of oxidative stress to stay healthy, new research suggests.
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Prolonged Breastfeeding May Be Linked to Fewer Behavior Problems
sciencedaily.com - 5-11-11
Breastfeeding for four months or more is associated with fewer behavioural problems in children at age 5, an Oxford University study suggests.
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Coffee Reduces Breast Cancer Risk, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-11-11
Recently published research shows that coffee drinkers enjoy not only the taste of their coffee but also a reduced risk of cancer with their cuppa. More detailed research published May 10 in BioMed Central's open access journal Breast Cancer Research shows that drinking coffee specifically reduces the risk of antiestrogen-resistant estrogen-receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer.
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The Tricky Chemistry of Attraction
wsj.com - 5-11-11
Much of the attraction between the sexes is chemistry. New studies suggest that when women use hormonal contraceptives, such as birth-control pills, it disrupts some of these chemical signals, affecting their attractiveness to men and women's own preferences for romantic partners.
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Nitric Oxide Impacts Source of Sickle Cell Pain Crisis, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-10-11
Nitric oxide gas appears to directly impact the source of the classic, disabling pain crises of sickle cell disease, Georgia Health Sciences University researchers report.
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From heartburn to headaches and asthma: Is the way you sleep making you ill?
dailymail.co.uk - 5-10-11
We spend a third of our lives asleep, yet while it's accepted that sleep is good for health, many people don't realise it's not just the quality and quantity of sleep that matters - it's also the position you adopt.
With around 95 per cent of the population sleeping in the same position every night, here the experts reveal the health pros and cons of your favourite posture.
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Fixated by Screens, but Seemingly Nothing Else
nytimes.com - 5-10-11
The mother had brought in a note from her son's elementary school teacher: Dear doctor, I think this child needs to be tested for attention deficit disorder.
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More docs prescribing yoga, meditation
msnbc.msn.com - 5-10-11
Doctors may be more accepting of certain complementary and alternative medicine therapies, such as yoga, meditation and deep breathing, than they have been in the past, a new study suggests.
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1 in 7 strokes happens during sleep
msnbc.msn.com - 5-10-11
Nearly 15 percent of people who have a stroke are not eligible for clot-busting treatment because the stroke happened while they slept, a new study reports.
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Herbal tooth powders heal teeth and gums
naturalnews.com - 5-10-11
The healing power of herbs is no secret. However, our knowledge about the multiplicity of ways they can be used to heal and restore the body is constantly expanding. For instance, we know that certain herbs can have a profound effect on the health of our teeth and gums. Herbal tooth powders (which can be bought or made at home) provide a potent combination of herbs that can restore your dental health.
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Swiss researcher proves that natural selective breeding works better than GMOs
naturalnews.com - 5-10-11
Twenty years of careful research and development on a new apple variety has produced an amazing fruit that New Zealand's Scoop news states is "sweet, tangy and delicious." And the most amazing aspect of Swiss orchardist and researcher Markus Kobelt's new RedLove apple variety is that it was designed to be resistant to disease, appealing to the palate, and easy to grow -- and all without the use of any sort of artificial genetic modification.
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Children's brains needlessly exposed to cancer-linked radiation
naturalnews.com - 5-10-11
Are you a parent? Here's a simple question to ask yourself: if your youngster receives a bump on the head, would you rather keep an eye on your child for 4 to 6 hours to make sure he or she suffered no serious trauma -- or would you prefer that doctors zap your child's brain with ionizing radiation from costly computed tomography (CT) scans just to make you feel better immediately?
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Study Questions Overuse of Colonoscopy in Medicare Patients
healthday.com - 5-10-11
Among Medicare patients, colonoscopies are often done more frequently than recommended, a new study finds.
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Ring Finger Length Linked to ALS, Study Suggests
healthday.com - 5-10-11
Having long ring fingers has been associated with a lethal nervous system disease known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), British researchers report.
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Parsley, Celery Carry Crucial Component for Fight Against Breast Cancer, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-10-11
Parsley is usually used as a decorative accent to a scrumptious meal, but don't set it aside just yet. In a new study, a University of Missouri researcher has found that a compound in parsley and other plant products, including fruits and nuts, can stop certain breast cancer tumor cells from multiplying and growing. The study was published recently in Cancer Prevention Research.
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Green Tea and Tai Chi Enhance Bone Health and Reduce Inflammation in Postmenopausal Women
sciencedaily.com - 5-10-11
C.S. Lewis, the famous author and Oxford academic, once proclaimed "You can't get a cup of tea big enough or a book long enough to suit me." We sip it with toast in the morning, enjoy it with sweets and biscuits in the afternoon, and relax with it at the end of the day. Tea has for generations been an integral infusion worldwide, carrying both epicurean and economic significance. But, does it impart honest-to-goodness health benefits? In other words, is its persistence in the human diet perhaps coincident with enhanced quality (or quantity) of life?
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Simple Exercise Improves Lung Function in Children With Cystic Fibrosis
sciencedaily.com - 5-9-11
A small Johns Hopkins Children's Center study of children and teens with cystic fibrosis (CF) shows that simple exercise, individually tailored to each patient's preference and lifestyle, can help improve lung function and overall fitness.
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Brain Region That Influences Gambling Decisions Pinpointed
sciencedaily.com - 5-9-11
When a group of gamblers gather around a roulette table, individual players are likely to have different reasons for betting on certain numbers. Some may play a "lucky" number that has given them positive results in the past -- a strategy called reinforcement learning. Others may check out the recent history of winning colors or numbers to try and decipher a pattern. Betting on the belief that a certain outcome is "due" based on past events is called the gambler's fallacy.
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Study: Few Americans accurately monitor calories
usatoday.com - 5-9-11
Calories may count, but most people aren't counting them.
Only 9% of people in the USA can accurately estimate the number of calories they should eat in a day, and 9% keep track of their calories every day.
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Meat Glue a "dirty little secret"
youtube.com - 5-9-11
An expose on the meat industry in Australia and their use of Transglutaminase "meat glue" to sell off-cuts as prime meat for a premium price. The original video is from Australian Channel 7's current affairs program "Today Tonight"
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Chemo Brain May Last 5 Years or More
nytimes.com - 5-9-11
"Chemo brain," the foggy thinking and forgetfulness that cancer patients often complain about after treatment, may last for five years or more for a sizable percentage of patients, new research shows.
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Research Uncovers Raised Rate of Autism
nytimes.com - 5-9-11
An ambitious six-year effort to gauge the rate of childhood autism in a middle-class South Korean city has yielded a figure that stunned experts and is likely to influence the way the disorder's prevalence is measured around the world, scientists reported on Monday.
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Allergies to keep getting worse. Learn to cope
msnbc.msn.com - 5-9-11
The 2011 spring allergy season is shaping up to be a miserable one, with pollen levels reaching record highs, thanks to heavy winter snows, early spring rains, and an early spring warm-up. Sound familiar? Just a year ago, the 2010 allergy season was the "worst on record" for many of the same reasons. So should we expect each spring allergy season to be worse than the last, in an eternal one-upmanship that sends us running for the tissue box or the asthma inhaler?
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Gay men 'report higher cancer rate than straight men'
bbc.co.uk - 5-9-11
Homosexual men are more likely to have had cancer than heterosexual men, as US study has suggested.
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Even a Little Exercise May Protect Against Colon Polyps
healthday.com - 5-9-11
Even a little exercise may ward off polyps in the colon, which are sometimes precursors to cancer.
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Study Gives Clues to How Obesity Spreads Socially
sciencedaily.com - 5-9-11
Obesity is socially contagious, according to research published in the past few years. How it is "caught" from others remains a murky area. But findings from Arizona State University researchers published online May 5 in the American Journal of Public Health shed light on the transmission of obesity among friends and family.
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Common Medicine Used to Combat Osteoporosis Can Cause Fractures, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 5-9-11
Bisphosphonates are a medication that has been administered since the 1990s, which reduces the overall risk of brittleness and incidence of osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates deactivate those cells used to break down bone and therefore prevent fractures caused by brittleness of the bone.
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New Federal Crackdown Confounds States That Allow Medical Marijuana
nytimes.com - 5-8-11
Marijuana remains illegal under federal law, but that has not stopped a fuzzy industry of marijuana farms and dispensaries from rising to serve the 15 states that allow the drug to be used for medical purposes. Under President Obama, the federal government had seemed to make a point of paying little attention - until now.
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Chemicals found in flame retardant baby products can have lasting effects
usatoday.com - 5-8-11
A curious baby isn't afraid to get down and dirty.
Little ones explore the world on all fours. When they finally reach the object of their desire - whether it's a rattle, dog toy or TV remote - they waste no time in popping it into their mouths for a good slurp.
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Poor Sleep Might Worsen Diabetes
healthday.com - 5-8-11
People with diabetes who sleep poorly have higher blood glucose levels and a more difficult time controlling their disease, a new study shows.
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Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis May Raise Risk of Abnormal Heart Rhythm
healthday.com - 5-8-11
People with two common inflammatory diseases stand a higher chance of developing a heart condition that is strongly associated with stroke, a new study suggests.
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Horsetail Plant Developed Successful Set of Tools for Extreme Environments -- For Millions of Years
sciencedaily.com - 5-8-11
Over 100 million years ago, the understory of late Mesozoic forests was dominated by a diverse group of plants of the class Equisetopsida. Today, only one genus from this group, Equisetum (also known as horsetail or scouring rush), exists -- and it is a prime candidate for being the oldest extant genus of land plant.
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Engineers Patch a Heart: Tissue-Engineering Platform Enables Heart Tissue to Repair Itself
sciencedaily.com - 5-8-11
Researchers at Columbia Engineering have established a new method to patch a damaged heart using a tissue-engineering platform that enables heart tissue to repair itself. This breakthrough, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is an important step forward in combating cardiovascular disease, one of the most serious health problems of our day.
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EPA, Army Corps draft new Clean Water Act guidelines that threaten to seize control of all water supplies
naturalnews.com - 5-7-11
On Wednesday, April 27, the Obama administration's US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and US Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) jointly released a new draft guidance for the federal Clean Water Act that aims to dramatically expand both the scope of what constitutes a "water source," as well as the legal power federal agencies can exert over those water sources.
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Latisse Eyelash Enhancing Solution Thickens Thinning Hair and Brows
abcnews.go.com - 5-7-11
With her wedding date set, Dana Gaiser wanted to look her best. Like many brides, she dieted, worked out and whitened her teeth. But there was one last tiny tweak she was desperate to make.
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Study finds blacks who have strokes call relatives before 911
usatoday.com - 5-7-11
Most blacks ring up a friend or relative, not 911, when they have stroke symptoms, a new study suggests.
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'Happiness gene' discovered
telegraph.co.uk - 5-7-11
A "happiness gene" which has a strong influence on how satisfied people are with their lives, has been discovered.
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Overcoming 7 Obstacles to Cat Ownership
webmd.com - 5-7-11
You'd like to have a cat or you wouldn't be reading this. But something's holding you back from making the commitment. Maybe you're afraid that cat allergies will have you wheezing and sneezing. Maybe you're worried that cat scratching will ruin your furniture. Maybe your spouse or roommate refuses to let a feline join your happy home.
Whatever the reason, there are solutions. We've gathered some of the most common obstacles to cat ownership, along with suggestions on how to tackle each.
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Many types of organic compost are really packaged human sewage
naturalnews.com - 5-7-11
Do you want everything that goes down your drain winding up on your backyard produce? Well that's what happens to those who use organic compost made with municipal sewage.
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New study: Nations requiring the most vaccines tend to have the worst infant mortality rates
naturalnews.com - 5-7-11
A new study, published in Human and Experimental Toxicology (http://het.sagepub.com/content/earl...), a peer-reviewed journal indexed by the National Library of Medicine, found that nations with higher (worse) infant mortality rates tend to give their infants more vaccine doses. For example, the United States requires infants to receive 26 vaccines -- the most in the world -- yet more than six U.S. infants die per every 1000 live births. In contrast, Sweden and Japan administer 12 vaccines to infants, the least amount, and report less than three deaths per 1000 live births.
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Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis May Raise Risk of Abnormal Heart Rhythm
healthday.com - 5-7-11
People with two common inflammatory diseases stand a higher chance of developing a heart condition that is strongly associated with stroke, a new study suggests.
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Poor Sleep Might Worsen Diabetes
healthday.com - 5-7-11
People with diabetes who sleep poorly have higher blood glucose levels and a more difficult time controlling their disease, a new study shows.
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Parental Exposure to BPA During Pregnancy Associated With Decreased Birth Weight in Offspring
sciencedaily.com - 5-7-11
Parental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy is associated with decreased birth weight of offspring, compared with offspring from families without parental BPA exposure in the workplace, according to Kaiser Permanente researchers.
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Malaria Mosquitoes Accurately Find Their Way to Smelly Feet
sciencedaily.com - 5-7-11
Malaria mosquitoes utilize CO2 from exhaled air to localize humans from afar. In the vicinity of their preferred host, they alter their course towards the human feet. Researcher Remco Suer discovered how female malaria mosquitoes use foot odors in the last meters to guide them to their favoured biting place. Suer, who is defending his doctoral thesis May 9 at Wageningen University, part of Wageningen UR, sees possibilities to disrupt the host seeking behaviour of the malaria mosquito.
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Sleep-deprived brain cells take tiny catnaps
msnbc.msn.com - 5-6-11
Scientists may have found an explanation for all those slip-ups we make when we haven't gotten enough sleep.
A new study shows that even when we feel wide awake, regions of our brains may be opting to go offline in a sort of rolling blackout similar to what the electric company does when demands for power spike.
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Sex and coffee 'trigger stroke'
bbc.co.uk - 5-6-11
Coffee, sex and blowing your nose could increase the risk of a type of stroke, say researchers in the Netherlands.
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Scientists say forget osteoporosis drugs - Natural approach builds strong bones safely
naturalnews.com - 5-6-11
For countless years, natural health advocates, who suggested caution at the near hysterical and highly advertised push to put women on anti-osteoporosis prescription drugs, were looked at as unscientific health "nuts". But now some mainstream scientists are in total agreement and are even sounding the alarm about those medications. Instead of popping side effect loaded pills, say University of Illinois (U of I) researchers, an effective first course of action to keep bones strong should be to simply increase calcium in your diet and vitamin D or take calcium and vitamin D supplements.
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EPA ends special monitoring for Fukushima radiation despite continued rise in nuclear fallout, increased threats to US
naturalnews.com - 5-6-11
The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced yesterday that it is ceasing its special monitoring protocols in the US for radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan, despite the fact that no real progress at the plant has been made, and threats to the US are persistent. At the same time as the EPA announcement, foreign reports also indicate that levels of radiation in Pacific waters near the Fukushima plant are now up to 1,000 times normal levels, with no real indication of where this radioactive water is flowing.
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Surgery May Beat Antibiotics for Appendicitis, Study Finds
healthday.com - 5-6-11
But the drugs should be tried first in uncomplicated cases, an expert says.
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Antibodies Help Protect Monkeys from HIV-Like Virus, Scientists Show
sciencedaily.com - 5-6-11
Using a monkey model of AIDS, scientists have identified a vaccine-generated immune-system response that correlates with protection against infection by the monkey version of HIV, called simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The researchers found that neutralizing antibodies generated by immunization were associated with protection against SIV infection.
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Mirror Neuron System in Autism: Broken or Just Slowly Developing?
sciencedaily.com - 5-6-11
Developmental abnormalities in the mirror neuron system may contribute to social deficits in autism.
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Using Solar Power to Sterilize Medical Instruments
sciencedaily.com - 5-6-11
Rice University senior engineering students are using the sun to power an autoclave that sterilizes medical instruments and help solve a long-standing health issue for developing countries.
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Forecast Calls for Nanoflowers to Help Return Eyesight: Physicist Leads Effort to Design Fractal Devices to Put in Eyes
sciencedaily.com - 5-6-11
University of Oregon researcher Richard Taylor is on a quest to grow flowers that will help people who've lost their sight, such as those suffering from macular degeneration, to see again.
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Universal Signaling Pathway Found to Regulate Sleep
sciencedaily.com - 5-6-11
Sleeping worms have much to teach people, a notion famously applied by the children's show "Sesame Street," in which Oscar the Grouch often reads bedtime stories to his pet worm Slimy. Based on research with their own worms, a team of neurobiologists at Brown University and several other institutions has now found that "Notch," a fundamental signaling pathway found in all animals, is directly involved in sleep in the nematode C. elegans.
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Three new breast cancer genes found and discovery could bring drugs lifesaver in five years
dailymail.co.uk - 5-5-11
Three key breast cancer genes have been pinpointed by British scientists in a breakthrough likened to finding gold in Trafalgar Square.
The discovery could save thousands of lives a year by providing researchers with the inspiration they need to come up with vital new treatments for the most common form of the disease.
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Nature's gastric bands: From cinnamon to seaweed, the foods that naturally curb your appetite and help you shed pounds
dailymail.co.uk - 5-5-11
Last week, researchers revealed spicing up meal-times with red chilli peppers could provide a natural appetite suppressant and help you lose weight. Here, LAURA STOTT explains why - and gives some other fascinating tips on how to curb your appetite the natural way. . .
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Once-a-day asthma pill 'is more effective than inhaler'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-5-11
A once-a-day pill may be better than an inhaler at combating asthma, according to researchers.
The tablet could revolutionise treatment for the condition, meaning patients are no longer reliant on inhalers, which many find difficult to use.
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Long-Term Use of Bipolar Drug Questioned
health.com - 5-5-11
The growing use of a popular drug in the long-term treatment of bipolar disorder is based largely on a single, flawed clinical trial that may be steering doctors and patients away from drugs with a more established track record, a new review published this week in the journal PLoS Medicine suggests.
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Call for thyroid screening in pregnancy
bbc.co.uk - 5-5-11
All pregnant women should be screened for hidden signs of thyroid disease, according to Czech researchers.
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Asthma Pills Work as Well as Inhaled Steroids: Study
healthday.com - 5-5-11
In a study that compared asthma pills against commonly prescribed inhaled steroids, British researchers found that the oral medications were as effective as the inhaled drugs.
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Women in Their 40s Want Mammograms: Poll
sciencedaily.com - 5-5-11
A U.S. health task force stunned much of the medical world and many women in November 2009 by recommending that most women didn't need to get their first mammogram until age 50.
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New Route to Map Brain Fat
sciencedaily.com - 5-5-11
Mapping the fat distribution of the healthy human brain is a key step in understanding neurological diseases, in general, and the neurodegeneration that accompanies Alzheimer's disease in particular. Antonio Veloso and colleagues, from the University of the Basque Country in Leioa, Spain, find a new technique to reveal the fat distribution of three different areas of the healthy human brain.
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Hitting Target in Cancer Fight Now Easier With New Nanoparticle Platform, Scientists Say
sciencedaily.com - 5-5-11
The ability to use nanoparticles to deliver payloads of cancer-fighting drugs to tumors in the body could herald a fundamental change in chemotherapy treatment. But scientists are still at a relatively early stage in the implementation of this technology.
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Protein Discovered That Could Help Prevent the Spread of Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 5-5-11
A protein capable of halting the spread of breast cancer cells could lead to a therapy for preventing or limiting the spread of the disease.
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Exercise Protects the Heart Via Nitric Oxide, Researchers Discover
sciencedaily.com - 5-5-11
Exercise both reduces the risk of a heart attack and protects the heart from injury if a heart attack does occur. For years, doctors have been trying to dissect how this second benefit of exercise works, with the aim of finding ways to protect the heart after a heart attack.
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New Challenge: Leprosy in America
gather.com - 5-4-11
With the increase of immigrants from Mexico and other third world nations, leprosy has now become a concern to health officials in the United States. Cases of the ancient disease, in its early stages, are often misdiagnosed by doctors as eczema or diabetes. Add to the problem that the medical profession has "very little experience in treating the disease."
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States reassess medical marijuana laws after warnings
usatoday.com - 5-4-11
Several U.S. states have started reassessing their medical marijuana laws after stern warnings from the federal government that everyone from licensed growers to regulators could be subjected to prosecution.
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HIV drug could prevent 'cervical cancer by killing off virus that causes disease'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-4-11
A simple treatment using a widely prescribed HIV drug could prevent cervical cancer, research suggests.
It raises new hope for victims as the number of cervical cancers caused by the sexual transmission of human papilloma virus (HPV) soar - while the number of new cases of HIV are falling across the globe.
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Happiness is looking at the world through rose-tinted glasses
telegraph.co.uk - 5-4-11
Researchers found that people with personality traits that allow them to be nostalgic about the past have higher life satisfaction than those who exaggerate or mull over their failures.
They found that extroverted people had the best ability to do this whereas those with neurotic tendencies were the worst.
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Being overweight 'linked to dementia'
bbc.co.uk - 5-4-11
Middle aged people who are overweight but not obese, are 71% more likely to develop dementia than those with a normal weight, according to research.
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Scientists turn 'bad fat' into 'good fat'
bbc.co.uk - 5-4-11
Scientists say they have found a way to turn body fat into a better type of fat that burns off calories and weight.
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Green gardening secrets: How to eliminate bugs and pests without using poison
naturalnews.com - 5-4-11
As people are turning away from chemical ingredients in everything from cleaning products to beauty products, they are also turning to chemical-free foods by growing food in their own backyards.
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Highly contagious mystery virus with AIDS-like symptoms quickly spreading throughout China
naturalnews.com - 5-4-11
A new mystery virus with symptoms similar to those of AIDS and HIV is turning up all over China, according to a recent report in The Epoch Times. Patients with the highly transmissible disease are experiencing dramatic weight loss, night sweats, numb limbs, severe body aches, joint problems, severe vomiting, and the obvious decrease in white blood cell count and subsequent deterioration of the immune system.
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FDA approved Big Pharma drugs without effectiveness data
naturalnews.com - 5-4-11
Consumers constantly are told how complicated it is to get a new drug on the market. After all, researchers have to jump through all sorts of hoops to assure safety before new therapies are approved for the public, right?
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Tumors Spotted Between Mammograms Often More Aggressive: Study
healthday.com - 5-4-11
Breast tumors that are detected in between regular screening mammograms tend to be more aggressive and fast-moving than those found during scheduled screenings, indicating that better screening methods are needed, researchers say.
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Study Challenges Link Between Salt and Heart Disease
healthday.com - 5-4-11
The prevailing wisdom that high salt intake raises cardiovascular risks is being challenged by a new European study that suggests the opposite.
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'Fatting In': Immigrant Groups Eat High-Calorie American Meals to Fit In, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 5-4-11
Immigrants to the United States and their U.S.-born children gain more than a new life and new citizenship. They gain weight. The wide availability of cheap, convenient, fatty American foods and large meal portions have been blamed for immigrants packing on pounds, approaching U.S. levels of obesity within 15 years of their move.
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Scientists Track Evolution and Spread of Deadly Fungus, One of the World's Major Killers
sciencedaily.com - 5-4-11
New research has shed light on the origins of a fungal infection which is one of the major causes of death from AIDS-related illnesses. The study, published in the journal PLoS Pathogens, funded by the Wellcome Trust and the BBSRC, shows how the more virulent forms of Cryptococcus neoformans evolved and spread out of Africa and into Asia.
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Brain Enlargement in Autism Due to Brain Changes Occurring Before Age 2
sciencedaily.com - 5-4-11
In 2005, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that 2-year-old children with autism have brains up to 10 percent larger than children of the same age without autism.
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'Apple a Day' Advice Rooted in Science
sciencedaily.com - 5-4-11
Everyone has heard the old adage, "an apple a day keeps the doctor away." We all know we should eat more fruit. But why apples? Do they contain specific benefits?
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Receptor for Ebola Virus Identified
sciencedaily.com - 5-4-11
A team of researchers has identified a cellular protein that acts as a receptor for Ebola virus and Marburg virus. Furthermore, the team showed that an antibody, which binds to the receptor protein, is able to block infection by both viruses.
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Women who control pain relief in labour give themselves less drugs - study
telegraph.co.uk - 5-3-11
A new study has found that women used 30 per cent less pain relief when they had the power over their drugs.
They were found to be as satisfied with their experience of labour as those who were given the standard pain relief.
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Cheer up! Depression could be good for you - sometimes it leaves you more resilient and creative
dailymail.co.uk - 5-3-11
Eleven years ago, Helen McNallen suffered an episode of depression so severe she attempted to take her own life.
So it may seem extraordinary that the 43-year-old former city trader now devotes most of her time to running a website she has started up called www.depressioncanbefun.com.
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Bad Bugs Slideshow: Identifying Bugs and Their Bites
webmd.com - 5-3-11
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Drastically decrease your exposure to BPA by eating less packaged food
naturalnews.com - 5-3-11
One of the best ways to avoid exposure to the toxic plastics chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) might simply be to cut packaged foods from your diet, says a new study published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. Plastic bags, containers, cups, wraps, and other types of food packaging often contain not only BPA, but other harmful plastics chemicals. But by eating only fresh, non-packaged foods, you can reduce your blood levels of these chemicals by up to 90 percent in just three days.
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Eating fish helps prevent preterm births, suggests new study
naturalnews.com - 5-3-11
A new study published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology seems to confirm the notion that fish-based omega-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in proper fetal development. Dr. Mark A. Klebanoff from the Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and his team found that pregnant women who eat two-to-three servings of fatty fish a week are about 40 percent less likely to deliver early than women who eat less than one serving of fatty fish a month.
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Cancer breath test coming soon: Your halitosis may actually be cancer tumor offgassing
naturalnews.com - 5-3-11
It is important to diagnose cancer as early as possible. Some kinds of cancer, however, are especially hard to spot, including cancer of the head and neck. This is why a study published in the Journal of Cancer Research seems to hold good news for cancer diagnosis. The study showed that a device called Nano Artificial Nose (or shortened to Na-Nose) is able to detect metabolic byproducts in the breath of patients with head and neck cancer. In other words, Na-Nose can "smell" the head and neck cancer.
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Breast-feeding May Influence Long-Term Health: Study
healthday.com - 5-3-11
Infants who aren't breast-fed may experience long-term health consequences, a new study suggests.
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Aspirin Reduces the Risk of Cancer Recurrence in Prostate Cancer Patients, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-3-11
Some studies have shown that blood-thinning medications, such as aspirin, can reduce biochemical failure--cancer recurrence that is detected by a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level--the risk of metastasis and even death in localized prostate cancer. These studies, although very telling, have all emphasized the need for more data. Now, with researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center having concluded the largest study on this topic, and there is substantial data suggesting that aspirin improves outcomes in prostate cancer patients who have received radiotherapy.
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Packing on the Pounds in Middle Age Linked to Dementia
sciencedaily.com - 5-3-11
According to a new study, being overweight or obese during middle age may increase the risk of certain dementias. The research is published in the May 3, 2011, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Scientists Have Identifed an Abnormal Disease Pathway in Dystonia
sciencedaily.com - 5-3-11
Scientists tried creating a laboratory model of idiopathic torsion dystonia, a neurological condition marked by uncontrolled movements, particularly twisting and abnormal postures. But the genetic defect that causes dystonia in humans didn't seem to work in the laboratory models that showed no symptoms whatsoever.
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A Little Belly Fat Can Double the Risk of Death in Coronary Artery Disease Patients
sciencedaily.com - 5-3-11
One of the largest studies of its kind has found that people with coronary artery disease who have even a modest beer belly or muffin top are at higher risk for death than people whose fat collects elsewhere. The effect was observed even in patients with a normal Body Mass Index (BMI). The findings of this Mayo Clinic analysis are published in the May 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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Itch Receptors Work Through Pain Receptors on Sensory Neurons
sciencedaily.com - 5-3-11
A new study of itch adds to growing evidence that the chemical signals that make us want to scratch are the same signals that make us wince in pain.
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Left handed people are more affected by fear
telegraph.co.uk - 5-2-11
Psychologists found that people who watched an eight minute clip from a scary movie suffered more symptoms associated with post traumatic stress if they were left handed than if they were right handed.
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The Claim: Ginger Can Help Reduce Morning Sickness
nytimes.com - 5-2-11
Ginger has a long history as a cure for upset stomachs. One of its active compounds, 6-gingerol, is known to help relax gastrointestinal muscles, and research has shown that ginger pills and fresh ginger root can ease seasickness and other forms of queasiness.
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Waist fat 'increases heart risk'
bbc.co.uk - 5-2-11
People with coronary artery disease have an increased risk of death if they have fat around the waist, according to researchers in the US.
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Hypocritical pediatricians push for stricter chemical laws at the same time they inject babies with toxic vaccines
naturalnews.com - 5-2-11
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently issued a policy paper condemning the current Toxic Substances Control Act (TSC Act) for failing to properly regulate the tens of thousands of toxic chemicals used in various consumer products, many of which are especially dangerous to pregnant women and young children. Though correct in its identification of chemical use as a toxic threat to society's most vulnerable individuals, the AAP hypocritically continues to support the intramuscular poisoning of children through vaccinations, which are loaded with toxic chemicals that are directly injected into children's bodies.
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Less-Than-Optimal Sleep May 'Age' the Brain
healthday.com - 5-2-11
For middle-aged adults, sleeping less than six or more than eight hours a night is associated with a decline in brain function, British researchers contend.
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Living With a Smoker May Raise Blood Pressure in Boys
sciencedaily.com - 5-2-11
Exposure to secondhand smoke, even at extremely low levels, is associated with increased blood pressure in boys, according to new research presented May 1, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Denver.
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Chemical in Plastic, BPA, Exposure May Be Associated With Wheezing in Children
sciencedaily.com - 5-2-11
Exposure to the chemical bisphenol A during early pregnancy may be associated with wheezing in children, according to a Penn State College of Medicine researcher.
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Grandma Was Right: Infants Do Wake Up Taller
sciencedaily.com - 5-2-11
Science is finally confirming what grandma knew all along: infants wake up taller right after they sleep.
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Interesting -   Is the Sun Emitting a Mystery Particle?
discovery.com - 5-1-11
When probing the deepest reaches of the Cosmos or magnifying our understanding of the quantum world, a whole host of mysteries present themselves. This is to be expected when pushing our knowledge of the Universe to the limit.
But what if a well-known -- and apparently constant -- characteristic of matter starts behaving mysteriously?
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Terrifying scientific discovery: Strange emissions by sun are suddenly mutating matter
projectworldawareness.com - 5-1-11
For months mounting fear has driven researchers to wring their hands over the approaching solar storms. Some have predicted devastating solar tsunamis that could wipe away our advanced technology, others voiced dire warnings that violent explosions on the surface of the sun could reach out to Earth, breach our magnetic field, and expose billions to high intensity X-rays and other deadly forms of cancer-causing radiation.
Now evidence has surfaced that something potentially more dangerous is happening...
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CDC: Injuries among older workers on the rise
usatoday.com - 5-1-11
More and more Americans over age 55 are working later in life, and this means work-related injuries in this group continue to climb, up from 12% in 2003 to 17% in the latest tally, federal health officials report.
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Why we crave sugary snacks... and not fruit and veg
dailymail.co.uk - 5-1-11
It is the question that has foxed dieters and scientists alike: Why do we crave sugary snacks or fat-laden junk foods and not more healthy options such as, say, an apple?
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US tobacco firms win Missouri hospitals case
bbc.co.uk - 5-1-11
Six major US tobacco companies have defeated a lawsuit by hospitals seeking compensation for treating patients with smoking-related illnesses.
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Location of Body Fat May Predict Arterial Stiffness: Study
healthday.com - 5-1-11
A new study finds that different patterns of fat distribution in black and white women may predict increased arterial stiffness, which is associated with cardiovascular disease.
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Aspirin's Clot-Prevention Ability Blunted by Dietary Fat: Study
healthday.com - 5-1-11
Aspirin's ability to prevent potentially deadly blood clots may be hindered by elevated levels of fatty acids in the bloodstream, a new study suggests.
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Young Kids' Prescriptions Not Always on the Mark
healthday.com - 5-1-11
After reviewing more than 50,000 prescriptions for narcotic-containing drugs given to kids up to age 3, researchers found that about 4 percent were given an overdose.
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Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Have Evolved a Unique Chemical Mechanism, New Discovery Reveals
sciencedaily.com - 5-1-11
For the first time, scientists have been able to paint a detailed chemical picture of how a particular strain of bacteria has evolved to become resistant to antibiotics. The research is a key step toward designing compounds to prevent infections by recently evolved, drug-resistant "superbugs" that often are found in hospitals, as well as in the general population.
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Plant Extract May Be New Therapy for Hay Fever, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-1-11
Fighting hay fever with a plant extract -- this works, as was shown in a clinical study conducted by researchers of the Center of Allergy & Environment (ZAUM) of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Technische Universität München. Allergic symptoms were alleviated significantly better than with the usual histamine receptor antagonists. In a paper published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology the scientists explained how this plant extract works and how effective it is.
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