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May, 2012 - Herbal and Health News

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Diagnoses of increasingly antibiotic resistant gonorrhoea infections rise by 'unprecedented' 25 per cent
independent.co.uk - 5-31-12
The number of diagnoses of the sexual transmitted infection gonorrhoea has increased by an “unprecedented” 25 per cent in the past year, the Health Protection Agency has revealed.
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High levels of naphthalene can hurt genes
upi.com - 5-31-12
Children exposed to high levels of naphthalene -- moth balls, cigarettes, exhaust -- are at increased risk for chromosomal aberrations, U.S. researchers say.
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FDA warns of fake Adderall sold online
upi.com - 5-31-12
Officials of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warn a counterfeit version of Adderall 30 milligram tablets is being sold on the Internet.
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Marriage helps in old age
upi.com - 5-31-12
Marriage doesn't make people happier than when they were single, but it may protect them against normal declines in adult happiness, U.S. researchers say.
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Obama's pot reform goes up in smoke
chicagotribune.com - 5-31-12
I would shrug and say "So what?" to the latest details from President Barack Obama's pot-smoking past, except for one thing: He stirred so much hope as a candidate for sensible marijuana policy reforms but, as president, has delivered so little change.
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Bald men are 'more at risk of developing prostate cancer'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-31-12
Researchers think there is connection to higher levels of testosterone, which can trigger the development of cancerous cells but also inhibit hair growth.
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The 'new AIDS of the Americas': Experts warn of deadly insect-borne disease that can cause victims' hearts to explode
dailymail.co.uk - 5-31-12
A little-known life-threatening illness caused by blood sucking insects has been labelled the ‘new AIDS of the Americas’ by experts. The parasitic illness called Chagas Disease has similarities to the early spread of HIV, according to a new study. Similar to AIDS, Chagas is difficult to detect and it can take years for symptoms to emerge, according to experts writing in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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Eating a Mediterranean diet 'improves mental well-being as well as physical health'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-31-12
Eating a Mediterranean diet is good for the mind as well as the body and improves a person's quality of life, according to researchers. The study found that the consumption of oil-rich Mediterranean foods, such as fish and seafood, helps to improve overall well-being. For years the region's diet has been associated with superior physical health.
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Blood test to replace repeat biopsies
telegraph.co.uk - 5-31-12
Simply by analysing a patient's blood, doctors have shown they can identify faulty DNA which indicates how fast a tumour is growing and whether or not their treatment is proving effective.
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Can achy joints really predict the weather?
msnbc.msn.com - 5-31-12
Before the thunder rolls in or the first drop of rain falls, some people predict showers even without consulting the forecast -- they know it will rain because their joints ache.
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Cellular Particles Fuse With Organs Establishing An Environment Ripe For The Spread Of Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-31-12
Cancer researchers have known for well over a century that different tumor types spread only to specific, preferred organs. But no one has been able to determine the mechanisms of organ specific metastasis, the so-called "soil and seed" theory of 1889. New details that could help shed light on this hypothesis have been provided by a team of researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and their collaborators, proposing a new mechanism controlling cancer metastasis that offers fresh diagnostic and treatment potential.
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Existing Diabetes Medication May Ease Damage Caused By Traumatic Brain Injury
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-31-12
Although the death toll is relatively low for people who suffer from traumatic brain injury (TBI), it can have severe, life-long consequences for brain function. TBI can impair a patient's mental abilities, impact memory and behavior, and lead to dramatic personality changes. And long-term medical treatment carries a high economic cost.
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Marijuana Compound Treats Schizophrenia with Few Side Effects: Clinical Trial
time.com - 5-31-12
A compound found in marijuana can treat schizophrenia as effectively as antipsychotic medications, with far fewer side effects, according to a preliminary clinical trial.
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Five-year-olds treated for depression and anxiety
bbc.co.uk - 5-31-12
Children as young as five are being referred for treatment for depression and anxiety, the BBC has found.
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Infant 'Smarts' Similar With Different Types of Formula: Study
healthday.com - 5-31-12
Babies who are fed soy formula do as well as babies drinking cow's milk formula on tests of mental ability in the first year of life, a new study finds. But breast-fed babies score slightly higher than infants on either type of formula, the researchers say.
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FDA Warns of Fake Version of ADHD Drug Adderall
healthday.com - 5-31-12
A counterfeit version of the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug Adderall, sold online, contains the wrong active ingredients, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
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Exercise and a Healthy Diet of Fruits and Vegetables Extends Life Expectancy in Women in Their 70s
sciencedaily.com - 5-31-12
Women in their seventies who exercise and eat healthy amounts of fruits and vegetables have a longer life expectancy, according to research published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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Ketamine Improved Bipolar Depression Within Minutes, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-31-12
Bipolar disorder is a serious and debilitating condition where individuals experience severe swings in mood between mania and depression. The episodes of low or elevated mood can last days or months, and the risk of suicide is high.
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Supplement may help children with autism
upi.com - 5-31-12
The antioxidant N-Acetylcysteine, an antioxidant supplement, might be an effective therapy for some symptoms of autism, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Vitamin D lack restricts senior mobility
upi.com - 5-31-12
A lack of vitamin D may be put seniors at increased risk of developing mobility limitations and disability, U.S. researchers found.
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Menopause Hormone Therapy Benefits Hit in Govt Report
abcnews.go.com - 5-30-12
Hormone replacement therapy may provide relief from the hot flashes, night sweats and other oppressive symptoms of menopause, but when it comes to preventing chronic health problems, a panel of experts for the federal government said HRT isn’t helpful and may be harmful.
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Cannabis 'does not slow progress of multiple sclerosis', scientists claim in blow to hopes drug could provide long-term benefits to sufferers
dailymail.co.uk - 5-30-12
Cannabis does not slow the progression of multiple sclerosis, a large-scale study has concluded. The study at the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry at Plymouth University is a blow to hopes that the drug could provide long-term benefits for patients with the debilitating nerve disease.
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Strong Emotions Synchronize People's Brain Activity
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-30-12
An article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) reports that researchers from Aalto University and Turku PET Centre have revealed how experiencing strong emotions synchronizes brain activity across individuals.
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Personality Traits May Determine How Long A Person Lives
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-30-12
Personality traits may play a role in how long an individual lives, say researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology of Yeshiva University.
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Sanofi, Novo, Lilly shape up for big insulin fight
reuters.com - 5-30-12
Competition is ramping up in the multibillion-dollar market for long-lasting insulins, with Novo Nordisk and Eli Lilly lining up new products that could trump Sanofi's top-seller Lantus.
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Nasa team find 'new way' to spot osteoporosis
bbc.co.uk - 5-30-12
Nasa scientists believe they have found a way to spot osteoporosis bone loss at the earliest disease stages.
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Aspirin 'may prevent skin cancer'
bbc.co.uk - 5-30-12
An aspirin a day may protect against skin cancer, some experts believe.
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Fever During Pregnancy May Raise Odds for Autism in Offspring
healthday.com - 5-30-12
Women who develop fevers while pregnant may be more than twice as likely to have a child with autism spectrum disorder or another developmental delay, a new study suggests.
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Optimism, Laughter May Bring Long Life
healthday.com - 5-30-12
If you want to live a long life, accent the positive and keep laughing, say researchers who have found that centenarians are often extroverts who embrace the world from an optimistic and carefree perspective.
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Surly People Tend to Like Fierce Dogs, Study Shows
healthday.com - 5-30-12
In a study that supports the belief that dogs match the personality of their owners, British researchers say they found that disagreeable people prefer to own aggressive dogs.
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New Effective Treatment for Tinnitus?
sciencedaily.com - 5-30-12
A team of researchers from Maastricht, Leuven, Bristol and Cambridge demonstrated the effectiveness of a new tinnitus treatment approach in the journal The Lancet. Tinnitus is the perception of a noxious disabling internal sound without an external source. Roughly fifteen percent of the population suffers from this disorder in varying degrees along with the associated concentration problems, sleep disturbances, anxiety, depression and extreme fatigue.
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Older Adults May Need More Vitamin D to Prevent Mobility Difficulties, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-30-12
Older adults who don't get enough vitamin D -- either from diet, supplements or sun exposure -- may be at increased risk of developing mobility limitations and disability, according to new research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.
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Children Exposed to the Common Pollutant Naphthalene Show Signs of Chromosomal Damage
sciencedaily.com - 5-30-12
According to a new study, children exposed to high levels of the common air pollutant naphthalene are at increased risk for chromosomal aberrations (CAs), which have been previously associated with cancer. These include chromosomal translocations, a potentially more harmful and long-lasting subtype of CAs.
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Fukushima radiation seen in tuna off California
reuters.com - 5-29-12
Low levels of nuclear radiation from the tsunami-damaged Fukushima power plant have turned up in bluefin tuna off the California coast, suggesting that these fish carried radioactive compounds across the Pacific Ocean faster than wind or water can.
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Organ black market booming
upi.com - 5-29-12
An estimated 10,000 black market operations involving purchased human organs take place annually, World Health Organisation experts in Switzerland said.
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Doctors disagree on when to stop PSA screening
chicagotribune.com - 5-29-12
Doctors vary when it comes to deciding when an older man can stop routine PSA screening for prostate cancer, a new study finds. In the U.S., many men now have their cancer diagnosed at an early stage through screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood tests.
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How Fukushima May Show Up in Your Sushi
abcnews.go.com - 5-29-12
Those looking for evidence of the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan may need search no further than their next plate of sushi, Stanford University researchers report. The researchers tested 15 Pacific bluefin tuna that had migrated from Japan to the California coast and found that the levels of radioactive cesium in these fish were 10 times higher than those found in bluefin tuna from the years before the disaster.
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Gardeners warned to wash their hands after using compost as rare strain of Legionnaire's disease infects six in Scotland
dailymail.co.uk - 5-29-12
Gardeners have today been warned to wash their hands after using compost due to a rare strain of Legionnaire's disease, previously unseen in Britain, that has infected six people in Scotland. One man has died after contracting 'Legionella longbeachae', which authorities believe comes from compost.
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Cheer up... you might live until you're 100! Those with the most positive outlook live longest, says study
dailymail.co.uk - 5-29-12
For all those pessimists among you, there’s some even worse news. Optimists appear to live longer. According to research, those who make 100-plus tend to have a sunny disposition.
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Stroke Survivors Benefit From Clot Buster
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-29-12
Results of an international trial show that stroke survivors make a better recovery if they are given the clot-busting drug rt-PA in the first six hours following a stroke.
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Coveting May Be Hardwired In Brain
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-29-12
Coveting, or wanting what others have, may be hardwired in the brain, according to new research from France. We see it in children at play, the toy the other child is enjoying is more desirable. We do it with fashion items, accessories, cars, "keeping up with the Joneses", where the value assigned to an object increases when it is desired by others.
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GSK melanoma drugs may steal market from Roche
reuters.com - 5-29-12
Two experimental skin cancer drugs from GlaxoSmithKline - each designed to block different pathways used by tumour cells - look set to steal a march on Roche's pioneering melanoma treatment Zelboraf, according to Citigroup.
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Anger can rob a person of happiness
upi.com - 5-29-12
The first step to happiness is getting angry -- but unless people master anger others steal energy and power robbing them of happiness, a U.S. author suggests.
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Hypertension need not be due to aging
upi.com - 5-29-12
Hunter-gatherers who live off the land have lower age-related increases in blood pressure and less risks of atherosclerosis, U.S. researchers say.
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Progestin may reduce pregnancy chances
upi.com - 5-29-12
Progestin, a hormone used to treat infertility due to polycystic ovary syndrome, may reduce the odds of conception and giving birth, U.S. researchers say.
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Physical Education Is Good for Kids' Grades, Study Finds
healthday.com - 5-29-12
Boosting students' levels of physical education improves their grades, a new, small study says.
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HRT Update: Therapy May Reduce Fractures, Boost Some Risks
healthday.com - 5-29-12
Updated evidence on hormone replacement therapy for menopausal women presents good news for those at risk of osteoporosis, but a mixed bag of results regarding breast cancer and other chronic diseases.
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New Species Of Ticks Spreading Disease Across Southeast
charlotte.cbslocal.com - 5-29-12
In the trees and grasses of the South, there are a growing number of unwanted visitors that at best are an itchy nuisance and at worst can carry debilitating diseases: Ticks.
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Nearly 1 in 4 U.S. Teens Facing Diabetes
health.com - 5-28-12
The proportion of U.S. adolescents with diabetes or borderline diabetes has jumped dramatically since the late 1990s, raising the possibility that this generation of young people may face high rates of heart disease and other complications as adults.
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The Truth About Sunscreen: Are Labels Lying?
abcnews.go.com - 5-28-12
As summer approaches and Americans head to the beaches for Memorial Day Weekend, people are stocking up on sunscreen to protect their skin. But finding a good sunscreen can be difficult. Walk down the aisle looking to buy sunscreen and you're bombarded with claims such as waterproof, sweat-proof, and protects against skin cancer. The problem, many of those claims are false.
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The Nasa 'space drink' that can rub out sun spots: Fruit juice developed to protect astronauts reduces wrinkles and reverses the telltale signs of ageing in four months
dailymail.co.uk - 5-28-12
These startling images may prove that a fruit drink developed by Nasa to protect astronauts from radiation can rejuvenate the skin. A groundbreaking study has shown that the concoction, known as AS10, dramatically reduces wrinkles, blemishes and sun damage after four months.
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Seaweed pill could help beat arthritis thanks to potent anti-inflammatory effect
dailymail.co.uk - 5-28-12
A pill made from seaweed could one day help treat the painful joint disorder arthritis. Scientists found a 'nuisance' seaweed that has been destroying coral reefs in Hawaii produces a chemical with powerful anti-inflammatory properties. It could be used in future medicines to treat other chronic diseases from cancer to heart trouble.
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Enoy the sun (and eat fish) to reduce stroke risk
telegraph.co.uk - 5-28-12
Getting out in the sun and eating foods rich in vitamin D could reduce the chance of having a stroke, according to research.
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Kidney stone rate doubles in last 16 years
msnbc.msn.com - 5-28-12
Kidney stones are nearly twice as common now as they were in the early 1990s, according to a new study.
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Diabetes Deaths Drop Substantially, US
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-28-12
In the decade leading up to 2006, the US saw a substantial drop in deaths for people with diabetes, especially in connection with heart disease and stroke, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
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Why People Can Develop Life-Threatening Allergies After Receiving Treatment For Conditions Such As Epilepsy And AIDS Discovered
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-28-12
The finding could lead to the development of a diagnostic test to determine drug hypersensitivity.
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Physical Education Is Good for Kids' Grades, Study Finds
healthday.com - 5-28-12
Boosting students' levels of physical education improves their grades, a new, small study says.
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Garlic Constituent Blocks Biofilm Formation, Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients and Others
sciencedaily.com - 5-28-12
E Pluribus Unum, the de facto motto of the United States, could just as well apply to biofilm-forming bacteria. Bacterial biofilms are far more resistant than individual bacteria to the armories of antibiotics we have devised to combat them. Now Tim Holm Jakobsen and Michael Givskov of the University of Copenhagen, and their many collaborators have pinpointed a constituent of garlic that attacks a key step in the development of biofilms, in an effort they hope may offer help in particular for patients with cystic fibrosis.
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Spent Fuel Rods Drive Growing Fear Over Plant in Japan
nytimes.com - 5-28-12
What passes for normal at the Fukushima Daiichi plant today would have caused shudders among even the most sanguine of experts before an earthquake and tsunami set off the world’s second most serious nuclear crisis after Chernobyl.
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African monkey meat that could be behind the next HIV
independent.co.uk - 5-28-12
Deep in Cameroon's rainforests, poachers are killing primates for food. Evan Williams reports from Yokadouma on a practice that could create a pandemic.
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Why you should smile at strangers
msnbc.msn.com - 5-27-12
Next time you're out walking about, you may want to give passers-by a smile, or at least a nod. Recent research reveals that these tiny gestures can make people feel more connected.
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Diabetes Treatment - Potential New Target
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-27-12
The online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reports that Cincinnati University (UC) researchers have discovered that apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV), a naturally produced protein that has the ability to reduce blood sugar levels and enhance insulin secretion, could be a potential target for a new diabetes treatment.
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Marital Disagreements Reveal Climate Of The Marriage
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-27-12
According to a study by a Baylor University researcher entitled 'The Communication of Emotion During Conflict in Married Couples', married couples are usually very good at recognizing each other's emotions during conflicts. The study, published in the American Psychological Association's Journal of Family Psychology also reveals that if one partner is angry, it may reveal more about the overall climate of their marriage than about what the other partner is feeling at the time of the dispute.
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What Is The Best Way To Obtain Vitamin D?
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-27-12
This summer, individuals in the UK should go outside for a few minutes each day in order to top up their vitamin D levels, according to the fifth Sunlight Campaign from the National Osteoporosis Society.
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Irritable Bowel Linked To Gut Bacteria, Definitively
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-27-12
A new study of Greek patients shows that overgrowth of bacteria in the gut is definitively linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
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Music: It's in your head, changing your brain
cnn.com - 5-27-12
Michael Jackson was on to something when he sang that "A-B-C" is "simple as "Do Re Mi." Music helps kids remember basic facts such as the order of letters in the alphabet, partly because songs tap into fundamental systems in our brains that are sensitive to melody and beat. That's not all: when you play music, you are exercising your brain in a unique way.
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Lack of vitamin D ups stroke risk in some
upi.com - 5-27-12
Japanese-American men who did not eat foods rich in vitamin D had an increased risk of stroke later in life, U.S. researchers found.
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100 deadliest days for teen drivers
upi.com - 5-27-12
Memorial Day is the beginning of the 100 deadliest days of the year for U.S. teen drivers, the president of AT&T in New England said.
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Male pill: gene discovery may lead to contraceptive
bbc.co.uk - 5-27-12
It may be possible to develop a new male contraceptive pill after researchers in Edinburgh identified a gene critical for the production of healthy sperm.
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Flea-Borne Typhus Warning in Santa Ana
ktla.com - 5-27-12
A warning to residents in Santa Ana after a man contracted typhus from a flea earlier this week.
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Chemicals in PVC Flooring Can Be Absorbed Into Children's Bodies: Study
healthday.com - 5-26-12
Phthalates in PVC flooring materials can be absorbed by children's bodies, a new study shows.
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People Who Lived Near World Trade Center Report More Lung Disease
healthday.com - 5-26-12
People in lower Manhattan whose homes were damaged in the 9/11 terrorist attacks are more likely to have symptoms of respiratory diseases than those whose homes were not damaged, a new study indicates.
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Hazelnuts may provide better baby formula
upi.com - 5-26-12
University of Georgia researchers say human breast milk is the best source of food for infants, but a new second best-formula may be made from hazelnut oil.
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Vaporizers prove effective in treating medical marijuana patients
washingtontimes.com - 5-26-12
As medical marijuana patients seek improved treatment options, many are discovering the benefits of vaporizers, which effectively eliminate the toxins normally produced by smoke. The patient inhales only the active ingredients needed for treatment, and these smokeless delivery systems are often portable and easy to use.
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Many Livers 'Too Fat' For Transplant
abcnews.go.com - 5-26-12
Increases in factors associated with fatty liver disease may be leading clinicians to discard more donated organs, researcher found.
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Head Lice, Getting Drug-Resistant, Shut Down Idaho School
abcnews.go.com - 5-26-12
Maggie Sarner admits she is "grossed out" by head lice, those nasty little creatures that lay their eggs in the scalp and get passed from child to child at school.
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4 Mushroom Poisonings In 2 Weeks - Doctors Test Milk Thistle As Treatment
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-26-12
Over the course of two weeks, four people visited the MGUH for medical treatment due to mushroom (amantin) poisoning. One Virginia man arrived at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital (MGUH) in the early stages of liver failure after having mistakenly eaten poisonous mushrooms he handpicked from his yard.
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Rheumatoid Arthritis Battle - New Target Identified
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-26-12
Over one million adults in the U.S. suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, a systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease that can be incapacitating. Researchers have now discovered the mechanism by which a cell signaling pathway contributes to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study, published ahead of the print version of Nature Immunology shows evidence that drugs that are being developed for diseases like cancer, could potentially be used to treat RA.
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Most U.S. stroke risk is in the southeast
upi.com - 5-26-12
Older adults, blacks, American Indians, those with fewer years of education and those living in the southeast, have elevated stroke risk, U.S. officials say.
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Thinking of death makes some compassionate
upi.com - 5-26-12
Some people try to avoid all thoughts of death but U.S. researchers advise thinking about death can bring out the good in people.
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Health Canada warns of foreign products
upi.com - 5-26-12
Health Canada officials advise against buying any foreign health products because they may pose a health risk.
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Male pill: gene discovery may lead to contraceptive
bbc.co.uk - 5-26-12
It may be possible to develop a new male contraceptive pill after researchers in Edinburgh identified a gene critical for the production of healthy sperm.
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More Mental Health Care Urged for Kids Who Self-Harm
healthday.com - 5-26-12
Doctors have long known that some kids suffering severe emotional turmoil find relief in physical pain -- cutting or burning or sticking themselves with pins to achieve a form of release.
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As Obesity Rates Rise, Cases of Kidney Stones Double: Study
healthday.com - 5-26-12
The number of Americans suffering from kidney stones has almost doubled since 1994, researchers report, and the obesity epidemic is the most likely reason why.
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Amazon Tribe Gives Clues to Heart-Healthy Lifestyles
healthday.com - 5-26-12
Investigating indigenous Amazonian or African peoples who still follow a hunter-gatherer or forager-horticulturist lifestyle is giving new insights into how diet and lifestyle affect the heart as humans age.
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Combo Therapy May Help Ease 'Ringing in the Ears'
healthday.com - 5-26-12
One in five people suffers from tinnitus, the annoying and sometimes severely debilitating condition often referred to as "ringing in the ears," and new research may offer some hope for relief for these patients.
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Like Curry? New Biological Role Identified for Compound Used in Ancient Medicine
sciencedaily.com - 5-26-12
Oregon State University scientists just identified a new reason why some curry dishes, made with spices humans have used for thousands of years, might be good for you.
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Device May Inject a Variety of Drugs Without Using Needles
sciencedaily.com - 5-26-12
MIT researchers have engineered a device that delivers a tiny, high-pressure jet of medicine through the skin without the use of a hypodermic needle. The device can be programmed to deliver a range of doses to various depths -- an improvement over similar jet-injection systems that are now commercially available.
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Are Obesity And Heart Disease And Death Risk Always Linked? No
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-25-12
Obese people are not always at greater risk of cardiovascular disease or early death, researchers from Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, reported in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. If the obese individual is metabolically healthy, their risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality is not usually that different for other people's, the authors added.
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Is A Non-Hormonal Male Contraceptive Feasible? Probably
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-25-12
Researchers in the UK have identified a vital gene essential for sperm development that could pave the way for a new type of male contraceptive. The study is published in the journal PLoS Genetics.
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Recovery From Multiple Sclerosis By Growth Factor In Stem Cells
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-25-12
The online edition of Nature Neuroscience reports that researchers from the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered that a substance within growth promoting human mesenchymal stem cells seems to spur restoration of nerves and their function in mice models with multiple sclerosis (MS).
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Medical Marijuana Dispensaries Keep On Truckin' Despite IRS
forbes.com - 5-25-12
If you live in a state with legal medical marijuana dispensaries you probably know that the feds do what they can to stamp them out. It’s that old federal versus state law tension. In the case of pot dispensaries, the tension is palpable.
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Poll shows strong support for legal marijuana: Is it inevitable?
csmonitor.com - 5-25-12
A national Rasmussen Reports poll found that 56 percent of Americans back legal marijuana regulated like tobacco or alcohol. Trends show support on the upswing.
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Medical Marijuana 101: You Can't Smoke That On Campus
npr.org - 5-25-12
Medical marijuana is legal in 16 states, and that number is expected to grow. But these state laws put colleges in a bind. That's because under federal law, marijuana is still illegal. So colleges that let students make use of their pot prescription on campus risk losing their federal funding.
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'Goldilocks Effect': Babies Learn When Things Aren't Too Complex, Too Simple
abcnews.go.com - 5-25-12
Not too simple and not too complicated: Babies focus their attention on situations that are "just right," according to a new study published in the journal PLoS ONE.
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Why women trying to have babies need to think about their body clock as well as their biological clock
dailymail.co.uk - 5-25-12
Women trying to have babies need to think about their body clock as well as their biological clock, according to new research. Previous studies have shown female shift workers - such as nurses, and female flight attendants who work on long-distance routes - have fertility and menstrual issues. They are habitually out of sync with the external light cycle.
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Diabetic Foot Infections Can Be Reduced With Proper Treatment
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-25-12
Diabetics often suffer from foot infections, yet appropriate care can save limbs, and ultimately lives, according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America's new guidelines.
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Obesity not always tied to higher heart risk: study
reuters.com - 5-25-12
An obese person isn't inevitably at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death, a new U.K. study finds.
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New recommendations to control gout
upi.com - 5-25-12
New recommendations highlight lifestyle changes as a key to managing acute gout symptoms, U.S. rheumatologists said.
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Calcium pills pose 'heart risk'
bbc.co.uk - 5-25-12
People who take calcium supplements could be increasing their risk of having a heart attack, according to researchers in Germany.
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States Use Only Fraction of Tobacco Revenues to Fight Smoking, Study Finds
healthday.com - 5-25-12
Only a small percentage of the billions of dollars states take in from tobacco revenues goes to anti-smoking efforts, a new federal report finds.
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Autism Often Not Diagnosed Until Age 5 or Older: U.S. Report
healthday.com - 5-25-12
Even though autism symptoms typically emerge before age 3, most children with autism are diagnosed when they're 5 or older, a new snapshot of autism in America shows.
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Nuisance Seaweed Found to Produce Compounds With Biomedical Potential
sciencedaily.com - 5-25-12
A seaweed considered a threat to the healthy growth of coral reefs in Hawaii may possess the ability to produce substances that could one day treat human diseases, a new study led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has revealed.
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Persistent Sensory Experience Is Good for Aging Brain
sciencedaily.com - 5-25-12
Despite a long-held scientific belief that much of the wiring of the brain is fixed by the time of adolescence, a new study shows that changes in sensory experience can cause massive rewiring of the brain, even as one ages. In addition, the study found that this rewiring involves fibers that supply the primary input to the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain that is responsible for sensory perception, motor control and cognition. These findings promise to open new avenues of research on brain remodeling and aging.
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Epilepsy: ‘Miracle Diet’ Prevents Seizures; Scientists May Know Why
abcnews.go.com - 5-24-12
While neurologists have known that a high-fat and very low-carb diet, known as a ketogenic diet, reduces seizures in epileptic patients who are resistant to medical therapy, the “why” to it all has always been a mystery.
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Feeling hormonal? How serious cycling could be playing havoc with male reproductive health
dailymail.co.uk - 5-24-12
Male cycling enthusiasts may have more to worry about than saddle sores and road safety, after a study found the sport can play havoc with their fertility. Researchers at UCLA School of Nursing found serious cyclists - rather than the recreational rider - could experience hormonal imbalances that could affect their reproductive health. They found keen bikers had more than double the amount of estradiol in their blood compared to triathletes and other sport enthusiasts.
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One in 12 babies pick up dangerous new infections in hospital
dailymail.co.uk - 5-24-12
One in 12 babies and toddlers picked up an infection while they were treated in hospital last autumn, according to the latest figures from the Health Protection Agency.
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Fashion victims: Skinny jeans can cause nerve damage, doctor warns
dailymail.co.uk - 5-24-12
From Kate Moss to Russell Brand, skinny jeans are a integral part of any hipster's wardrobe. But those who are fans of the tight-hugging denim should be warned - they can cause serious nerve damage. A U.S doctor said she had seen a number of patients who were suffering from 'meralgia paresthetica' as a result of their trendy clothing choices. The disorder causes symptoms of tingling, numbness and pain in the upper legs.
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Cheating men more likely to have heart attacks
telegraph.co.uk - 5-24-12
A study has shown “sudden coital death” to be more common when a man was meeting his mistress outside his family home than when he was with his wife.
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Gossip guys: Men and women dish dirt differently
msnbc.msn.com - 5-24-12
Would anyone watch a TV spinoff on the CW called "Gossip Guy"? No, the network isn't considering it -- but a new study suggests that it would definitely have different story lines and dialogue than the original hit show.
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Mental Distraction Provides Pain Relief
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-24-12
A new study reveals that mental distractions can reduce the amount of pain an individual experiences.
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Healthy Brain Connections Keep Us Smart In Old Age
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-24-12
Maintaining healthy nerve connections among distant brain areas may help keep us smart in old age, according to new research published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry this week.
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Celldex breast cancer drug shrinks some tumors: study
reuters.com - 5-24-12
Interim results from a mid-stage trial of Celldex Therapeutics Inc's experimental drug showed trends toward reducing tumors in patients with advanced breast cancer, with rates improving for those patients with high levels of a key protein.
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Workplace break room handles full of germs
upi.com - 5-24-12
Many U.S. workers are aware of germs in the workplace lavatory but they may not be aware of the high level of germs where they make coffee, researchers say.
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Vitamin C helps babies of smoking moms
upi.com - 5-24-12
Pulmonary function of babies born to women who smoked during pregnancy was significantly improved if the women took vitamin C, U.S. researchers say.
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Skin cells turned into healthy heart muscle cells
bbc.co.uk - 5-24-12
Scientist say they have managed to turn patients' own skin cells into healthy heart muscle in the lab.
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Overweight Moms More Apt to Have Large Babies, Study Says
healthday.com - 5-24-12
Being overweight or obese before and during pregnancy is the most reliable predictor of a woman's risk of giving birth to a large baby, which can increase the chances of cesarean section and other complications during delivery, a new study says.
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Aspirin May Prevent Recurrence of Deep Vein Blood Clots
healthday.com - 5-24-12
After suffering a type of blood clot called a venous thromboembolism, patients usually take a blood-thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin). But aspirin may do just as well after a period of time, according to a new Italian study.
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IUDs, Implants Best for Long-Term Birth Control: Study
healthday.com - 5-24-12
New research suggests that long-term birth control options, such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) and under-the-skin implants, are 20 times more effective for preventing pregnancy than short-term contraceptives, such as birth control pills, patches and rings.
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C-Section May Hike Risk for Toddlers' Obesity, Study Suggests
healthday.com - 5-24-12
Babies born by Caesarean section are twice as likely to be obese by age 3 as infants delivered vaginally, a new study suggests.
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Hormone Plays Surprise Role in Fighting Skin Infections
sciencedaily.com - 5-24-12
Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules produced in the skin to fend off infection-causing microbes. Vitamin D has been credited with a role in their production and in the body's overall immune response, but scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say a hormone previously associated only with maintaining calcium homeostasis and bone health is also critical, boosting AMP expression when dietary vitamin D levels are inadequate.
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Children's Body Fat Linked to Vitamin D Insufficiency in Mothers
sciencedaily.com - 5-24-12
Children are more likely to have more body fat during childhood if their mother has low levels of Vitamin D during pregnancy, according to scientists at the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit (MRC LEU), University of Southampton.
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Common Acne Medication Doubles Risk of Eye Infection, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-24-12
Millions of teenagers suffer from acne, and they deal with the embarrassing skin blemishes by taking popular prescription medications such as Accutane or Roaccutane. Now, however, research from Tel Aviv University shows that these pills can also cause eye infections such as conjunctivitis (pink eye) or sties.
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Hazelnuts: New Source of Key Fat for Infant Formula That's More Like Mother's Milk
sciencedaily.com - 5-24-12
Scientists are reporting development of a healthy "designer fat" that, when added to infant formula, provides a key nutrient that premature babies need in high quantities, but isn't available in large enough amounts in their mothers' milk. The new nutrient, based on hazelnut oil, also could boost nutrition for babies who are bottle-fed for other reasons. The report appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
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Fever During Pregnancy More Than Doubles the Risk of Autism or Developmental Delay
sciencedaily.com - 5-24-12
A team of UC Davis researchers has found that mothers who had fevers during their pregnancies were more than twice as likely to have a child with autism or developmental delay than were mothers of typically developing children, and that taking medication to treat fever countered its effect.
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Fukushima's Radiation Effects: World Experts to Assess Impacts from Japanese Power Plant
sciencedaily.com - 5-24-12
Pre-eminent world experts on the effects of atomic radiation agree today to start an assessment of the radiological impact of the events at the TEPCO (Fukushima-Daiichi) nuclear power plant following the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami.
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Rapid DNA Sequencing May Soon Be Routine Part of Each Patient's Medical Record
sciencedaily.com - 5-23-12
Rapid DNA sequencing may soon become a routine part of each individual's medical record, providing enormous information previously sequestered in the human genome's 3 billion nucleotide bases.
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Sick U.S. adults unhappy with healthcare
upi.com - 5-23-12
Polls have shown majorities are happy overall with their healthcare coverage, but a U.S. survey indicated 75 percent of those who had been sick were unhappy.
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Baby 'head lag' may indicate autism risk
upi.com - 5-23-12
Weak head and neck control at 6 months of age may be a sign of autism spectrum disorder and developmental delays, U.S. researchers say.
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Youth diabetes, pre-diabetes rates soar
usatoday.com - 5-23-12
Diabetes and pre-diabetes have skyrocketed among the nation's young people, jumping from 9% of the adolescent population in 2000 to 23% in 2008, a study reports today.
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Barefoot running causes spate of injuries as enthusiasts are 'too quick' to ditch the trainers
dailymail.co.uk - 5-23-12
The recent craze for barefoot running has led to a spike in leg and foot injuries among enthusiastic amateurs, U.S doctors have warned. Many converts have been inspired by Christopher McDougall's best-seller 'Born To Run,' which focuses on an Indian tribe in Mexico whose members run long distances without pain in little more than sandals.
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Why do we twitch as we're falling asleep?
msnbc.msn.com - 5-23-12
You're drifting off to sleep, when suddenly you feel like you're plunging off a cliff -- and you jerk awake. The jolt is disorienting, and you must try again to fall asleep.
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Nearly 1,000 dogs now sick from jerky treats, FDA reports say
msnbc.msn.com - 5-23-12
Nearly 1,000 dogs reportedly have been sickened by chicken jerky pet treats from China, according to a new tally of complaints from worried owners and veterinarians submitted to federal health officials.
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Increasing Incidence Of Clostridium difficile Infection
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-23-12
A study presented by Mayo Clinic researchers during Digestive Disease Week 2012 provides clear evidence that the number of people contracting the hard-to-control and treat bacterial infection Clostridium difficile (C. difficile or C. diff) is increasing, and that the infection is commonly contracted outside of the hospital.
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How One Strain Of MRSA Becomes Resistant To Last-Line Antibiotic
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-23-12
Researchers have uncovered what makes one particular strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) so proficient at picking up resistance genes, such as the one that makes it resistant to vancomycin, the last line of defense for hospital-acquired infections. They report their findings in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, on Tuesday May 22.
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Lung Cancer CT Screening Guidelines Revised
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-23-12
Older, current and former heavy smokers should receive annual, low-dose CT screening, according to revised guidelines published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Sunday. The revised guidelines follow, and in the JAMA paper are accompanied by, a systematic review of evidence on the role of CT screening for individuals at higher risk of lung cancer.
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Task force: PSA tests do more harm than good
cnn.com - 5-23-12
The United States Preventive Services Task Force issued their final recommendation on the PSA prostate cancer-screening test Monday, recommending against routine PSA exams for men of any age. The task force says the PSA exam and additional treatments that may follow, like radiation and surgery, result in far more harm than benefit.
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Folic acid tied to lower child cancer risks
reuters.com - 5-23-12
Rates of two rare childhood cancers declined after the U.S. began requiring grain products to be fortified with the B vitamin folic acid, a new study finds.
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Toxins should not stop breastfeeding
upi.com - 5-23-12
A U.S. expert says despite toxins in breast milk, it is still best for babies for its numerous protective benefits.
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Do Bald Men Face Higher Risk of Prostate Cancer?
healthday.com - 5-23-12
Got hair? If you don't, you might have a higher risk of prostate cancer, a preliminary study suggests.
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New TB Test Promises to Be Cheap and Fast
sciencedaily.com - 5-23-12
Biomedical engineers at UC Davis have developed a microfluidic chip to test for latent tuberculosis. They hope the test will be cheaper, faster and more reliable than current testing for the disease.
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Monsanto’s Mass ‘Super Weeds’ Force Sustainable Farming
naturalsociety.com - 5-23-12
What happens when Monsanto’s modified creations get out of hand and threaten the biosphere with mutated ‘super weeds’ that continue to suffocate farmland across the entire planet? Experts call upon farmers and government officials to return to traditional sustainable farming practices — the kind without Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide. It was recently reported by the media (despite them always being quite, and NaturalSociety and others reporting on this extensively back in 2011) that a “fast-spreading plague” of the super weeds is spreading and they will not be stopped easily.
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Third of malaria drugs 'are fake'
bbc.co.uk - 5-22-12
A third of malaria drugs used around the world to stem the spread of the disease are counterfeit, data suggests.
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Childhood 'screen time': Warning over TV and computers
bbc.co.uk - 5-22-12
Parents need to do more to stop children spending too much time watching television or playing computer games, according to a psychologist.
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New Musical Pacifier Helps Premature Babies Get Healthy
sciencedaily.com - 5-22-12
Florida State University has announced the availability of a new medical device that uses musical lullabies to help premature babies overcome one of their greatest growth hurdles.
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Seventy-Two Percent of Teenagers Experienced Reduced Hearing Ability After Attending Concert
sciencedaily.com - 5-22-12
Seventy-two percent of teenagers participating in a study experienced reduced hearing ability following exposure to a pop rock performance by a popular female singer.
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6% of Ore. 8th-graders play 'choking game'
upi.com - 5-22-12
About 6 percent of Oregon eighth-grade teens said they have engaged in the "choking game," researchers found.
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Middle-age men at risk of skin cancer
upi.com - 5-22-12
Dermatologists warn U.S. men age 50 and older have an increased risk of developing melanoma -- the deadliest form of skin cancer.
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'Mansome' Explores Metrosexual Revolution
abcnews.go.com - 5-22-12
Is the age of the metrosexual man ebbing or was it never really such a big deal? These days, some so-called man's men are pushing back. So much so, that there are songs written to boycott the man-icures, facials, waxing, and man tans.
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Dementia denial: Two out of three older people are worried… but most don’t want to know more
dailymail.co.uk - 5-22-12
Dementia holds a real fear for two out of every three older people, but the majority don’t want to learn more about the disease, a survey has found. It reveals that 66 per cent of people aged 55 and over have worries about brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s. It is this age group that has the biggest fears, as they are of an age where it becomes a very real threat.
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Simple scope exam cuts colon cancer deaths
msnbc.msn.com - 5-22-12
Screening for colon cancer using a flexible tube -- which is less invasive and more convenient than colonoscopy -- may also help prevent new cases and deaths from the disease, a large federal study finds.
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Tempting but toxic mushrooms? Drug promises new cure
msnbc.msn.com - 5-22-12
When unusually rainy weather near Washington, D.C., produced a bumper crop of mushrooms last fall, it also sparked a scary surge in mushroom poisonings.
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"Nordic Walking" Benefits Heart Failure Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-22-12
Research presented at a conference this week suggests heart failure patients can benefit from "Nordic walking", where people walk with the help of poles as in cross-country skiing. This type of walking, which engages the upper as well as the lower body, is becoming increasingly popular in Europe: it is safe for older patients, especially those over 65, and after a short introductory course, can be practised outdoors without having to go to the gym.
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Binge Drinking Reduced With Herbal Extract
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-22-12
Researchers at McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School have discovered that an extract of the Chinese herb Kudzu may help to curb binge drinking. The team found that components in the kudzu root can significantly reduce alcohol consumption, without adverse effects. The study is published in the current issue of Drug and Alcohol Dependence.
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Inexpensive Paper-Based Diabetes Test Developed
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-22-12
Scientists have developed a new, inexpensive and easy-to-use urine test for people with type 2 diabetes in areas of extreme poverty, such as rural India, China and other locations in the world. The paper-based device is described in the journal Analytical Chemistry, and could also be adapted to diagnose and monitor other conditions and the environment.
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"Pre-diabetes," diabetes rising among U.S. teens
reuters.com - 5-22-12
The percentage of U.S. teenagers with "pre-diabetes" or full-blown type 2 diabetes has more than doubled in recent years -- though obesity and other heart risk factors have held steady, government researchers reported Monday.
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Cheap amoebic dysentery drug 'promising'
bbc.co.uk - 5-22-12
A cheap drug, which is already prescribed for arthritis, could fight amoebic dysentery, according to researchers in the US.
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Could Compound in Artificial Sweeteners Worsen Crohn's Disease?
healthday.com - 5-22-12
The food additive maltodextrin, commonly used in some artificial sweeteners, may worsen Crohn's disease by encouraging the growth of E. coli bacteria in the small intestine, a new study suggests.
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Birth Control Pills, HRT Tied to Digestive Ills
healthday.com - 5-22-12
The use of oral contraceptives by younger women or hormone therapy by older women may be linked with inflammatory bowel disease, new research indicates.
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Teens' Love of Loud Music Tied to Drinking, Drug Abuse
healthday.com - 5-22-12
In a new study, teens who loved listening to music blasting at high decibels on their MP3 players were also more likely than others to smoke marijuana, while those who listened to loud music at concerts and clubs were more likely to drink heavily and have sex without a condom.
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Study Supports Value of Sigmoidoscopy, an Alternative to Colonoscopy
healthday.com - 5-22-12
New research confirms that sigmoidoscopies -- less-invasive alternatives to colonoscopies that don't require sedation -- are effective in lowering the risk of colon cancer.
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Acid in the Brain: New Way to Look at Brain Function
sciencedaily.com - 5-22-12
University of Iowa neuroscientist John Wemmie, M.D., Ph.D., is interested in the effect of acid in the brain. His studies suggest that increased acidity or low pH, in the brain is linked to panic disorders, anxiety, and depression. But his work also suggests that changes in acidity are important for normal brain activity too.
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Don't Like Blood Tests? New Microscope Uses Rainbow of Light to Image the Flow of Individual Blood Cells
sciencedaily.com - 5-22-12
Blood tests convey vital medical information, but the sight of a needle often causes anxiety and results take time. A new device developed by a team of researchers in Israel, however, can reveal much the same information as traditional blood test in real-time, simply by shining a light through the skin. This optical instrument, no bigger than a breadbox, is able to provide high-resolution images of blood coursing through our veins without the need for harsh and short-lived fluorescent dyes.
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Antibiotic Residues, Some More Than FDA Limits, in Seafood Purchased at US Grocery Stores, Experts Say
sciencedaily.com - 5-22-12
After testing farm-raised shrimp samples of international origin researchers at Texas Tech University found evidence of antibiotics -- one a suspected human carcinogen -- in seafood imported into the United States and purchased from grocery store shelves.
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Obese Adolescents Have Heart Damage
sciencedaily.com - 5-22-12
Obese adolescents with no symptoms of heart disease already have heart damage, according to new research.
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Prompt action must follow stroke signs
upi.com - 5-22-12
Getting treatment quickly can make all the difference after a stroke, so it is important to be able to recognize the signs of stroke, a U.S. physician says.
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Half in U.S. snack at least twice a day
upi.com - 5-22-12
Nearly half of the U.S. population snacks at least twice a day, researchers said.
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Real life Inception: Two 'mad scientists' create sleep mask that lets people CONTROL their dreams
dailymail.co.uk - 5-22-12
In a twist straight out of the movie Inception, a duo of developers from Brooklyn, New York, have built a sleeping mask designed to allow people to have lucid dreams that they can control.
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Government tyranny: Illinois Department of Agriculture secretly destroys beekeeper's bees and 15 years of research proving Monsanto's Roundup kills bees
naturalnews.com - 5-22-12
An Illinois beekeeper with more than a decade's worth of expertise about how to successfully raise organic, chemical-free bees is the latest victim of flagrant government tyranny. According to the Prairie Advocate, Terrence "Terry" Ingram of Apple River, Ill., owner of Apple Creek Apiaries, recently had his bees and beehives stolen from him by the Illinois Department of Agriculture (IDofA), as well as more than 15 years' worth of research proving Monsanto's Roundup to be the cause of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) destroyed.
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10% of U.S. prisoners sexually victimized
upi.com - 5-21-12
An estimated 10 percent of adult former state U.S. prisoners reported being sexually victimized during their most recent confinement, officials said.
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World Health Organisation to declare global polio emergency
telegraph.co.uk - 5-21-12
The World Health Organisation is expected this week to declare polio a global health emergency as it battles complacency in an attempt to eradicate the deadly virus forever.
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Depressed people spend more time chatting online
msnbc.msn.com - 5-21-12
What if your smartphone were to tell you, “I think you need to see a mental health professional?” It may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but researchers now say that someday soon our laptops -- and our phones -- might be able to diagnose depression based simply on how we surf the net.
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Some "Good" Cholesterol May Be Bad For Heart
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-21-12
It appears that in some cases, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the so-called "good" cholesterol, does not protect against heart disease, and may even be harmful. A new study suggests a subclass of HDL that carries a particular protein is bad for the heart.
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Improving Understanding Of Psychiatric Disorders With The Help Of Zebrafish
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-21-12
Scientists at Queen Mary, University of London have shown that zebrafish could be used to study the underlying causes of psychiatric disorders.
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Snoring may be linked to cancer death
upi.com - 5-21-12
Snoring, one of the main symptoms of sleep disordered breathing, may be linked to cancer death, U.S. researchers say.
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Fitness may reduce hypertension risk
upi.com - 5-21-12
People who have a parent with high blood pressure can reduce their risk of hypertension with moderate exercise, U.S. researchers say.
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Cheap amoebic dysentery drug 'promising'
bbc.co.uk - 5-21-12
A cheap drug, which is already prescribed for arthritis, could fight amoebic dysentery, according to researchers in the US.
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Study Ties Secondhand Smoke to Bladder Irritation in Kids
healthday.com - 5-21-12
Parents who smoke may put their children at greater risk for bladder irritation, according to a small new study.
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Sleep Apnea Linked to Higher Cancer Death Risk
healthday.com - 5-21-12
Sleep apnea has already been linked to a host of adverse health problems, such as high blood pressure and heart disease. Now, new research suggests that in people who already have cancer, the sleep disorder may raise their risk of dying from cancer.
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Oxytocin Improves Brain Function in Children With Autism
sciencedaily.com - 5-21-12
Preliminary results from an ongoing, large-scale study by Yale School of Medicine researchers shows that oxytocin -- a naturally occurring substance produced in the brain and throughout the body -- increased brain function in regions that are known to process social information in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).
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Drug Found for Parasite That Is Major Cause of Death Worldwide
sciencedaily.com - 5-21-12
Research by a collaborative group of scientists from UC San Diego School of Medicine, UC San Francisco and Wake Forest School of Medicine has led to identification of an existing drug that is effective against Entamoeba histolytica. This parasite causes amebic dysentery and liver abscesses and results in the death of more than 70,000 people worldwide each year.
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Fukushima Reactor 4 poses massive global risk
ctv.ca - 5-21-12
More than a year after a devastating earthquake and tsunami triggered a massive nuclear disaster, experts are warning that Japan isn't out of the woods yet and the worst nuclear storm the world has ever seen could be just one earthquake away from reality.
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upi.com - 5-20-12

upi.com - 5-20-12
Americans say they feel more confident about their health when taking a vitamin or supplement, a U.S. survey found.
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Most want doctor to prescribe vacation
upi.com - 5-20-12
More than half of U.S. workers say doctors should be able to prescribe vacations as a curative option for stress-related maladies, a survey indicates.
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'Superbug' malaria mosquitoes becoming resistant to insecticides
naturalnews.com - 5-20-12
The government's solution to almost every environmental, pest, and agricultural problem is to simply throw more chemicals at it. But this misguided -- and upon further review, sinister -- approach always fails to actually solve the underlying issue, as is once again being evidenced by the rapid rise of malaria-carrying, "superbug" mosquitoes that have developed resistance to the insecticide chemicals that were supposedly designed to eradicate them.
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Are raspberry ketones a 'miracle' fat burner? Dr. Oz weighs in
latimes.com - 5-20-12
Until recently, very few people had ever heard of raspberry ketones, the aromatic compounds that give the berries their distinctive smell. Today, health food stores have trouble keeping the capsules or drops of the stuff on their shelves. Almost overnight, an obscure plant compound became the next big thing in weight loss — and all it took was a few words from Dr. Oz.
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French autistic kids mostly get psychotherapy
usatoday.com - 5-20-12
In most developed countries, children with autism are usually sent to school where they get special education classes. But in France, they are more often sent to a psychiatrist where they get talk therapy meant for people with psychological or emotional problems.
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Worried about lead poisoning in your home? What to do
usatoday.com - 5-20-12
As more children are considered at risk for lead poisoning, many parents may wonder how to prevent the problem, especially if they have an older home with lead-based paint.
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Why are doctors will not warning about the 'new Thalidomide'? Mother tells how taking an anti-epileptic drug while pregnant devastated the heath of two of her children
dailymail.co.uk - 5-20-12
In 2008, Emma Murphy phoned her partner Joe at work. ‘I know what’s wrong with the children,’ she said. For four years the couple had been perplexed by the health problems that affected their daughters Chloe and Lauren and their son Luke – and their GP had consistently dismissed their concerns.In 2008, Emma Murphy phoned her partner Joe at work. ‘I know what’s wrong with the children,’ she said. For four years the couple had been perplexed by the health problems that affected their daughters Chloe and Lauren and their son Luke – and their GP had consistently dismissed their concerns.
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Professional women 'drink twice as much'
telegraph.co.uk - 5-20-12
Professional women drink twice as much than those in manual jobs, reflectig a 'Sex and the City' culture, it has been warned.
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It's Not Just What You Eat, When You Eat Matters Too
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-20-12
When it comes to weight gain, when you eat might be at least as important as what you eat. That's the conclusion of a study reported in the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism published early online.
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Hormone-Depleting Drug Shows Promise Against Localized High-Risk Prostate Tumors
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-20-12
A hormone-depleting drug approved last year for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer can help eliminate or nearly eliminate tumors in many patients with aggressive cancers that have yet to spread beyond the prostate, according to a clinical study to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), June 1-5, in Chicago.
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Autism, Obesity And Schizophrenia Gene Isolated
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-20-12
The size of a baby's head is often related to neurological disorders, such as autism - which affects 1 in 88 children. Now, researchers at Duke University Medical Center have identified genes responsible for head size at birth by inserting human genes into zebrafish. The study is published online in the journal Nature.
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Some doctors unaware of long-term side effects of cancer care
cnn.com - 5-20-12
Doctors need to be better educated about the significant long-term side effects of chemotherapy that may affect their cancer survivor patients, according to new research published Wednesday in advance of the 47th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).
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Trash best way to dispose of unused drugs
upi.com - 5-20-12
Discarding unused medications in the trash is a better way to limit the risk of poisoning and reduce air and water pollution, U.S. researchers suggest.
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N.Y. doctor detects rare tick, saves child
upi.com - 5-20-12
A quick-thinking physician in Albany, N.Y., detected a tick that caused a 2-year-old girl to become partially paralyzed, hospital officials said.
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Keeping Your Family Safe From Dog Bites
healthday.com - 5-20-12
More than 4.7 million Americans are bitten by dogs each year, and more than half of those victims are younger than age 14, experts say.
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New Method Detects Traces of Veterinary Drugs in Baby Food
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-12
The quantities are very small, but in milk powder and in meat-based baby food, residues of drugs given to livestock were found. Researchers from the University of Almeria (Spain) have developed a system to analyse these substances quickly and precisely.
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'Rare' Genetic Variants Are Surprisingly Common, Life Scientists Report
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-12
A large survey of human genetic variation, just published in the online version of the journal Science, shows that rare genetic variants are not so rare after all and offers insights into human diseases.
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Coffee Drinkers Have Lower Risk of Death, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-20-12
Older adults who drank coffee -- caffeinated or decaffeinated -- had a lower risk of death overall than others who did not drink coffee, according a study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and AARP.
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A Very Sugary Diet Makes You Stupid
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-19-12
As we near the final year exams for schools and universities, students should be wary of powering up on buckets of soda and pocketfuls of candy bars. A UCLA study on rats suggests that fructose slows down the brain and memory functions. Too much sweetness can also prevent learning. The findings are published in Journal of Physiology and also show omega-3 fatty acids helping to negate the effect.
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Anxiety Disorders And Cellular Metabolism Linked
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-19-12
Researchers at the University of Chicago have found an association between anxiety disorders and the gene that encodes Glyoxylase 1 (GLO1). However, the mechanism underlying this association is unclear.
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California teens eat fewer calories in school
reuters.com - 5-19-12
High school kids in California, a state that limits the junk food sold in vending machines, eat fewer calories in school than kids in states without such regulations, according to a new study.
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Antibiotics prevent UTIs better than probiotics
reuters.com - 5-19-12
Antibiotics are still better than probiotics at preventing urinary tract infections, but at least "good bacteria" don't add to a person's antibiotic resistance, a new study concludes.
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Food fat tax would have to be 20 percent
upi.com - 5-19-12
Taxes on unhealthy food might improve health, but the tax would need to be at least 20 percent to have a significant effect, British researchers said.
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Weight management 'benefits' for mother and baby
bbc.co.uk - 5-19-12
Dieting in pregnancy is safe for women and does not carry risks for the baby, a review of research has suggested.
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One-Third of U.S. Homeless Population Is Obese: Study
healthday.com - 5-19-12
One-third of homeless people in the United States are obese, about the same rate as the general population, a new study finds.
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Test Baby Boomers for Hepatitis C, Says CDC
healthday.com - 5-19-12
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants all Americans born between 1945 and 1965 -- the baby boom generation -- tested for hepatitis C.
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'Bad' Fat May Hurt Brain Function Over Time
healthday.com - 5-19-12
Women who eat a lot of "bad" saturated fat may hurt their overall brain function and memory over time, Harvard University researchers report.
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Underage Drinkers Can Easily Order Alcohol From the Internet
healthday.com - 5-19-12
Young people can easily buy alcohol on the Internet, where they're also exposed to a wide range of advertising and marketing efforts from the alcohol industry, two new journal articles warn.
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Phase I Clinical Trial Shows Drug Shrinks Melanoma Brain Metastases
sciencedaily.com - 5-19-12
An experimental drug targeting a common mutation in melanoma successfully shrank tumors that spread to the brain in nine out of 10 patients in part of an international phase I clinical trial report in the May 18 issue of The Lancet.
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Slew of Rare DNA Changes Following Population Explosion May Hold Clues to Common Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 5-19-12
One-letter switches in the DNA code occur much more frequently in human genomes than anticipated, but are often only found in one or a few individuals.
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How Exercise Affects the Brain: Age and Genetics Play a Role
sciencedaily.com - 5-19-12
Exercise clears the mind. It gets the blood pumping and more oxygen is delivered to the brain. This is familiar territory, but Dartmouth's David Bucci thinks there is much more going on.
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Men equate steak with masculinity
upi.com - 5-18-12
Men connect eating meat -- especially muscle meat like steak -- with masculinity, but vegetables were not considered masculine, U.S. scientists found.
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People can make split-second gay judgement
upi.com - 5-18-12
A U.S. study in which subjects made split-second judgments of pictures suggests many unconsciously distinguish between gay and straight people, researchers say.
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Diagnosis of Alzheimer's isn't always accurate
usatoday.com - 5-18-12
Martin Rosenfeld's loved ones dreaded what might be next: a diagnosis of Alzheimer's. He had called too many times, confused and frustrated, from a parking lot outside his synagogue, after driving there in the middle of the night for services that wouldn't begin for hours.
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Antipsychotic medication relieves chemo-related nausea
usatoday.com - 5-18-12
New research presented Wednesday highlights drugs to make cancer therapy easier but also underscores the difficulties that patients may encounter after treatment.
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Third of diabetic patients are victims of medication errors that can cause dangerous blood glucose levels
dailymail.co.uk - 5-18-12
Almost one in three diabetic hospital patients are victims of medication errors that can cause dangerous blood glucose levels, a report has found. Hospitals in England and Wales made at least one mistake per inpatient in the treatment of 3,700 diabetes sufferers in one week, data showed.
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When you can't stop pick, pick, picking at your skin
msnbc.msn.com - 5-18-12
From time to time, everyone picks their skin, whether it's squeezing a pimple or removing peeling skin. But for people with compulsive skin picking, "We just take it to a whole new level," says Dana Marie Flores, who has struggled with this disorder for 30 years.
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Young men who take erection pills for fun often feel down
msnbc.msn.com - 5-18-12
Young men who take erectile dysfunction drugs for fun may damage their sex lives, a new study suggests.
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Brushing Teeth - Which Way Is The Right Way?
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-18-12
Twenty five percent of teenagers in Sweden do not brush their teeth regularly and only 10% of Swedes know how to use toothpaste effectively, according to researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
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Should Children Be Made To Have Vaccines?
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-18-12
Two experts discuss in the journal BMJ whether childhood vaccination should be mandatory in the UK. According to Paul Offit, Chief of Infectious diseases at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, mandatory vaccination is essential to protect those who are vulnerable from infection.
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Controlling Blood Pressure - Team Based Care Vital
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-18-12
High blood pressure was listed as a primary or contributing cause of death for approximately 336,000 Americans in 2007. If all patients with high blood pressure were treated to goal as outlined in current clinical guidelines, it is estimated that 46,000 deaths might be averted each year. Total annual costs associated with hypertension are $156 billion, including medical costs of $131 billion and lost productivity costs of $25 billion.
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USDA: Healthy food isn't really more expensive
cnn.com - 5-18-12
We have many excuses for not eating healthy: I’m too busy. I don’t live near a grocery store. I can’t afford healthy food. I don’t know how to cook.
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Group argues weed is safer than booze
cnn.com - 5-18-12
A Colorado advocacy group is spending thousands of dollars to convince people that smoking pot is safer than drinking alcohol.
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Breastfed babies may gain less weight
reuters.com - 5-18-12
Babies who are fed milk from their mothers' breasts gain less weight over their first year compared to babies fed milk -- breast or formula -- from a bottle, suggests a new study.
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New York judge with cancer makes case for marijuana
reuters.com - 5-18-12
A cancer-stricken judge in New York has become an unlikely voice in support of legalizing the use of medical marijuana with the admission that he smokes pot to ease the side-effects of his treatments.
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Reducing arthritis exercise barriers
upi.com - 5-18-12
Officials of the Arthritis Foundation said they have developed a resource for making physical activity convenient and accessible for adults with arthritis.
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Lockerbie bomber prostate drug available
upi.com - 5-18-12
The drug many thought kept the Lockerbie bomber alive for years will be made available to men with advanced prostate cancer in Britain, officials say.
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NHS 'should consider giving statins to healthy people'
bbc.co.uk - 5-18-12
Thousands of heart attacks and strokes could be prevented if the cholesterol-lowering drugs, statins, were more widely prescribed, research suggests.
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Drowning Is Leading Cause of Kids' Accidental Death: CDC
healthday.com - 5-18-12
Drowning kills more American children 1 to 4 years old than any cause except birth defects, according to a new federal report.
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Being Obese May Make Job Search Tougher
healthday.com - 5-18-12
It was the small square photo clipped to an applicant's resume that most influenced whether a woman would be hired. But there was a hidden catch: The pictures showed the same six women both before and after weight-loss surgery.
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Early Study Hints at Link Between Certain Sunscreens, Endometriosis
healthday.com - 5-18-12
A preliminary study links chemicals found in certain sunscreens to a higher risk of endometriosis, but it's too soon to say whether there's any reason for women to change their habits.
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Diabetes Can Take a Toll on Your Emotions
healthday.com - 5-18-12
Many people know diabetes -- both type 1 and type 2 -- can take a serious toll on physical health. But these blood-sugar disorders also can affect your emotions and, in turn, your emotions can wreak havoc on your diabetes control.
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Pain Relief Through Distraction: It's Not All in Your Head
sciencedaily.com - 5-18-12
Mental distractions make pain easier to take, and those pain-relieving effects aren't just in your head, according to a report published online on May 17 in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication.
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Suspicion Resides in Two Regions of the Brain: Our Baseline Level of Distrust Is Distinct and Separable from Our Inborn Lie Detector
sciencedaily.com - 5-18-12
Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on my parahippocampal gyrus. Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have found that suspicion resides in two distinct regions of the brain: the amygdala, which plays a central role in processing fear and emotional memories, and the parahippocampal gyrus, which is associated with declarative memory and the recognition of scenes.
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Slew of Rare DNA Changes Following Population Explosion May Hold Clues to Common Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 5-18-12
One-letter switches in the DNA code occur much more frequently in human genomes than anticipated, but are often only found in one or a few individuals.
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Whites Account for Under Half of Births in U.S.
nytimes.com - 5-18-12
After years of speculation, estimates and projections, the Census Bureau has made it official: White births are no longer a majority in the United States.
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Rising Infertility And Cancer Rates Possibly Linked To Pharmaceuticals And Household Chemicals
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-17-12
According to the European Environment Agency (EEA), household products, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and food all contain endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) which may be causing significant increases in diabetes, obesity, cancers and increasing infertility.
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Biologists Produce Potential Malarial Vaccine from Algae
sciencedaily.com - 5-17-12
Biologists at the University of California, San Diego have succeeded in engineering algae to produce potential candidates for a vaccine that would prevent transmission of the parasite that causes malaria, an achievement that could pave the way for the development of an inexpensive way to protect billions of people from one of the world's most prevalent and debilitating diseases. Initial proof-of-principle experiments suggest that such a vaccine could prevent malaria transmission.
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You Are What You Eat: Why Do Male Consumers Avoid Vegetarian Options?
sciencedaily.com - 5-17-12
Why are men generally more reluctant to try vegetarian products? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are influenced by a strong association of meat with masculinity.
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Want to Avoid Erectile Dysfunction Following Prostate Cancer Surgery? Find an Experienced, Gentle Surgeon
sciencedaily.com - 5-17-12
Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer in the U.S., and radical prostatectomy, the surgical removal of the prostate gland, remains the most popular therapeutic option, accounting for half of treatments.
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GOP probe uncovers deal between Obama and drug cos
washingtonexaminer.com - 5-17-12
Three years ago, President Obama cut a secret deal with pharmaceutical company lobbyists to secure the industry’s support for his national health care law.
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Lead poisoning guidelines revised; more considered at risk
usatoday.com - 5-17-12
Lead poisoning guidelines revised; more considered at risk Up to 365,000 more children across the USA will be considered at risk of lead poisoning under new guidelines released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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One in eight deaths before retirement is caused by alcohol, study finds
dailymail.co.uk - 5-17-12
One in eight deaths of UK adults under the age of 64 is caused by alcohol, an international conference on tackling problem drinking has heard. The social cost of alcohol abuse has been estimated to be £240 a year for each European, with the annual bill for the NHS alone being £2.7 billion. A major conference of addiction specialists from across the world is meeting at Newcastle University and organisers have called for England to follow Scotland and set a minimum price per unit.
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Who hates cilantro? Study aims to find out
msnbc.msn.com - 5-17-12
To a very vocal online contingent, cilantro is the very worst.
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Happy colonoscopy! Laxative-free test may be as effective
msnbc.msn.com - 5-17-12
Colonoscopies could be made a bit more comfortable for people if they involved lying in a CT scanner, rather than being probed with an endoscope, and at the same time didn't require drinking upward of a gallon of laxative fluid beforehand — current requirements that most consider unpleasant.
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Child Mortality Rate Decreased After Prenatal Micronutrient, Food Supplementation Internvention
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-17-12
A study in the May 16 edition of JAMA reveals that survival rates of newborns in poor Bangladeshi communities were significantly improved if their mothers received multiple micronutritions, including iron and folic acid combined with early food supplementation during pregnancy, in comparison with women receiving the usual food supplementation.
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Avoiding Repeat Biopsies In Prostate Cancer - MDxHealth Launches ConfirmMDx
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-17-12
Each year, in the United States, more than 650,000 men receive a negative prostate biopsy result, with around 25-35% of these results being false negative. However, a new prostate cancer test has been launched by MdxHealth. The test - ConfirmMDx™ for Prostate Cancer - will help physicians identify which men have a true-negative prostate biopsy from those who may have occult cancer.
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New data on the health of these United States
cnn.com - 5-17-12
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released their annual health report for 2011 on Wednesday. The report contains more than 150 data tables on the U.S. population's well-being, with a special focus on socioeconomic status.
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Avoid sunscreens with potentially harmful ingredients, group warns
cnn.com - 5-17-12
Twenty-five percent of 800 tested sunscreens are effective at protecting your skin without the use of potentially harmful ingredients, according to the 2012 Sunscreen Guide released Wednesday by the Environmental Working Group.
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Those with dementia apt to die at home
upi.com - 5-17-12
People with dementia are more likely to live in their family's home than in a nursing home, U.S. researchers said.
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Sexy women's bodies in ads seen as objects
upi.com - 5-17-12
Both men and women see images of sexy women's bodies in advertisements as objects, but they see sexy-looking men as people, Belgian researchers found.
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Experimental Drug Helps Fight Some Childhood Cancers, Study Finds
healthday.com - 5-17-12
A new targeted drug therapy may help treat certain advanced cancers in children, a new preliminary study indicates.
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Advanced Prostate Cancer Drug May Help at Earlier Stage
healthday.com - 5-17-12
A drug approved to treat advanced prostate cancer appears to help men who have localized high-risk prostate cancer if given before surgery.
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Many Primary Care Docs Don't Know Long-Term Effects of Chemo: Survey
healthday.com - 5-17-12
Many primary care doctors don't know the long-term side effects of the chemotherapy treatments that cancer survivors under their care may have been given, a new survey found.
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Daily Coffee May Help Keep Grim Reaper Away
healthday.com - 5-17-12
Older adults who consume three cups of coffee or more daily might lower their risk of dying from common causes by 10 percent, compared with those who drink no coffee, a large U.S. National Cancer Institute study suggests.
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Chronic Child Abuse Strong Indicator of Negative Adult Experiences
sciencedaily.com - 5-17-12
Child abuse or neglect are strong predictors of major health and emotional problems, but little is known about how the chronicity of the maltreatment may increase future harm apart from other risk factors in a child's life.
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Drugs from Gila Monster Lizard Saliva Reduces Cravings for Chocolate and Ordinary Food
sciencedaily.com - 5-17-12
A drug made from the saliva of the Gila monster lizard is effective in reducing the craving for food. Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, have tested the drug on rats, who after treatment ceased their cravings for ordinary food and also chocolate.
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'Superbugs' created by U.S. cheap meat
upi.com - 5-16-12
Mothers, healthcare providers, farmers and chefs gathered in Washington for a conference on the link between cheap meat and so-called superbugs in humans.
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Rise of the 'smartphone face': Is technology to blame for sagging complexions?
dailymail.co.uk - 5-16-12
Technology addicts may be at risk of sagging jowls, according to aesthetic experts.
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Sugar can make you dumb, US scientists warn
ca.news.yahoo.com - 5-16-12
Eating too much sugar can eat away at your brainpower, according to US scientists who published a study Tuesday showing how a steady diet of high-fructose corn syrup sapped lab rats' memories.
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Learning to do new things helps aging
upi.com - 5-16-12
Aging adults are often advised to work crosswords or other puzzles to keep their brain sharp but U.S. researchers found learning new things was most beneficial.
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Flaxseed, walnut oils highest in omega-3
upi.com - 5-16-12
Nut, fruit and seed oils have some of the highest amounts of omega-3s, an essential fatty acid believed to be good for heart health, a U.S. food expert says.
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Fukushima Radiation Release is Worse than You Have Been Told – What You Can Do to Protect Yourself
farmwars.info - 5-16-12
People have been misinformed about the tragedy at Fukushima and its consequences. There is a continuing cover up, the reactors have not been stabilized, and radiation continues to be released. The Japanese College of Intravenous Therapy (JCIT) has recently released a video for people wishing to learn more about how to protect themselves from contamination by taking large doses of vitamin C.
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Moggie lovers beware! One bite from a cat can put you on the critical list
dailymail.co.uk - 5-16-12
A few weeks ago I was at my friend Helena’s house playing with her cat, Mr Fluff, when he suddenly lashed out. Mr Fluff is a cutie, but he’s a very aggressive moggie — and has been confirmed as semi-feral by a cat behaviouralist.
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Feeling depressed? How a walk in the park could lift your mood
dailymail.co.uk - 5-16-12
Dealing with depression could literally be a walk in the park, according to a new study. Scientists claim strolling through nature could have psychological benefits.
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Woman, 93, is world's oldest yoga teacher
telegraph.co.uk - 5-16-12
She's 93 years old, but that isn't keeping Tao Porchon-Lynch from striking a perfect pose. The yoga instructor and dance competitor is vibrant as ever and proves that age really is just a number.
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Awakened: Immune cells revive woman in coma
msnbc.msn.com - 5-16-12
Researchers from the University of Munich recently reported that they were able to awaken an 82-year-old woman who’d been in a persistent vegetative state by using injections of her own immune cells.
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Talking with your hands is innate, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 5-16-12
Good news for those of you who are so self-conscious about gesturing when speaking you issue that “I use my hands when I talk” line: You can stop apologizing.
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Cervical Cancer Patients Avoid Hysterectomies With Help Of 3-D Imaging Techniques
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-16-12
A study presented by Dr. Renaud Mazeron at the World Congress of Brachytherapy reveals that many cases of hysterectomy, as well as recurrence and spreading of cancer of the cervix can be controlled effectively by delivering radiotherapy directly to the cancer with 3-D imaging techniques.
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Non-oral Contraceptives Have Higher Venous Thromboembolism Risk Than Oral Ones
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-16-12
Some non-oral hormonal contraceptives, such as vaginal rings, implants and skin patches carry a higher risk of venous thromboembolism - blood clots - when compared to oral contraceptive pills, researchers from the University of Copenhagen revealed in the BMJ (British Medical Journal). The authors wrote that some patients should change over to oral, hormonal contraceptives to reduce their risk of developing clots.
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US sets 2025 goal to tame Alzheimer's
bbc.co.uk - 5-16-12
The US says it will seek an effective treatment for Alzheimer's by 2025, as it faces an ageing population and spiralling health costs.
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Plavix's New Generic Status Could Be Boon for Patients
healthday.com - 5-16-12
The blockbuster drug Plavix (clopidogrel), used to prevent clotting in some heart patients, will go off patent in the United States on Thursday, making it considerably more affordable.
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Two-Drug Combo Helps Teens With Migraines
healthday.com - 5-16-12
A two-drug combination that relieves migraines in adults also works well in adolescents, new research indicates.
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Looks Matter More Than Reputation When It Comes to Trusting People With Our Money
sciencedaily.com - 5-16-12
Our decisions to trust people with our money are based more on how they look then how they behave, according to new research from the University of Warwick.
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Cross-Reactivity Between Peanuts and Other Legumes Can Lead to Serious Allergic Reactions
sciencedaily.com - 5-16-12
Food allergies pose a serious and growing problem in the West. Many foods can lead to allergic reactions and this situation is further complicated by so-called cross-reactions, whereby an allergy to one particular food can trigger allergic reactions to another food. There are no treatments available for food allergies, but the establishment of two mouse models can be used to develop and test new forms of treatment, for example vaccines.
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How to Minimize Damage from Strokes, According to Experts
sciencedaily.com - 5-16-12
Following a stroke, factors as varied as blood sugar, body temperature and position in bed can affect patient outcomes, Loyola University Medical Center researchers report.
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Brain Circuitry Is Different for Women With Anorexia and Obesity
sciencedaily.com - 5-16-12
Why does one person become anorexic and another obese? A study recently published by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher shows that reward circuits in the brain are sensitized in anorexic women and desensitized in obese women. The findings also suggest that eating behavior is related to brain dopamine pathways involved in addictions.
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ER Visits Tied to Xanax, Similar Drugs Soar in NYC
nbcnewyork.com - 5-16-12
A rise in prescription drug abuse involving Xanax and similar anti-anxiety pills in recent years has prompted some doctors in the U.S. to rethink the frequency with which they dole out the prescription.
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Mild head injury can change brain function
upi.com - 5-15-12
Even mild head injuries can cause significant abnormalities in brain function that last for several days, U.S. researchers found.
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Never Get Drunk Again? Yale Researchers Developing ‘Stay-Sober’ Pill
connecticut.cbslocal.com - 5-15-12
An experimental drug could stop people from getting drunk off alcohol and thus helping heavy drinkers wean off alcohol.
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Why having an overweight mother could lead to you being obese as an adult
dailymail.co.uk - 5-15-12
Overweight mothers-to-be could be condemning their unborn children to decades of ill-health. Research has shown that men and women whose mothers were carrying extra pounds when pregnant are more likely to be fat and unhealthy themselves – even when in their 30s.
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How salt-blasting surgery cured my disfiguring condition called 'drinker's red nose'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-15-12
It is often called ‘a drinker’s nose’. In fact, those who suffer the disfiguring condition known properly as rhinophyma tend to drink less than the rest of the population, according to research. It is a severe type of rosacea, the incurable skin disease that affects one in ten Britons, typically resulting in facial flushing and acne. In rhinophyma, the skin – particularly on the nose – thickens, leading to the characteristic ruddy, bulbous and lumpy appearance.
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You are what you read, study suggests
msnbc.msn.com - 5-15-12
Novels may have a lot more power than we think. When you identify with a literary character, like Katniss Everdeen of the "Hunger Games" books, there’s a good chance you’ll become more like her, new study shows.
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Waist Less Than Half Of Height Helps You Live Longer
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-15-12
A new study reveals that waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) is a significantly better predictor of cardiometabolic risk than waist circumference (WC) and body-mass index (BMI). In addition WHtR takes account of differing heights, therefore making it the best proxy to use across all countries.
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Infant Testosterone Levels Impacted More By Environmental Factors Than Genetics
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-15-12
According to a study published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, researchers at the University of Montreal have found that environmental factors determine testosterone levels in infancy and not genetics.
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Kids' ER Visits Due To Batteries Double
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-15-12
A new study in the US has found that the number of ER visits by children under the age of 18 to deal with battery-related emergencies has doubled in the last two decades. This figure includes, but is not limited to, incidences of swallowing of button batteries, which have also doubled over the period.
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Memory gene may fuel PTSD
cnn.com - 5-15-12
A vivid memory can be an asset if you're studying for an exam or trying to recall the details of a conversation, but that aptitude may backfire when it comes to forming long-term responses to emotional trauma.
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Analysis: Beleaguered beef purveyors carve out "pink slime" stain
reuters.com - 5-15-12
Piece by piece, the men use knives to cut meat and fat off beef carcasses, and grind them into mounds of hamburger. "We're seeing customers in here that we haven't seen in ages," said store manager Joe Lane. "Everyone's asking the same question: Do you use pink slime?"
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Asthma triggered by more than pollen
upi.com - 5-15-12
People with asthma have to watch out for more than pollen -- fruit, campfires, weather changes or insect bites can all trigger attacks, U.S. allergists warn.
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Babies benefit from music lessons
upi.com - 5-15-12
One-year-old babies exposed to music lessons demonstrated better communication and more sophisticated brain responses to music, Canadian researchers say.
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Only one in five eats five a day, poll suggests
bbc.co.uk - 5-15-12
Just one in five Britons eats the recommended five portions of fruit and vegetables a day, a poll for World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) suggests.
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Sleepwalking in Adults More Common Than Thought
healthday.com - 5-15-12
Sleepwalkers on TV and in movies are often played for drama or laughs, but the phenomenon is surprisingly common in American households, a large, new study suggests.
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Secondhand Smoke May Harm Heart Function
healthday.com - 5-15-12
For nonsmokers, exposure to low levels of secondhand smoke for just 30 minutes can cause significant damage to the lining of their blood vessels, the results of a new study indicate.
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Acupuncture May Help Ease Symptoms of COPD
healthday.com - 5-15-12
For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acupuncture may help relieve shortness of breath during activity, Japanese researchers suggest.
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'Thermal Tasters' Can Experience Taste from Heating or Cooling Tongue Without Any Food
sciencedaily.com - 5-15-12
Can the temperature of the food we eat affect the intensity of its taste? It depends on the taste, according to a new study by Dr. Gary Pickering and colleagues from Brock University in Canada. Their work shows that changes in the temperature of foods and drinks have an effect on the intensity of sour, bitter and astringent (e.g. cranberry juice) tastes but not sweetness.
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To Avoid Pain During an Injection, Look Away
sciencedaily.com - 5-15-12
Health professionals commonly say, "Don't look and it won't hurt" before administering an injection, but is there any scientific basis for the advice? A group of German investigators has found that, in fact, your past experience with needle pricks, along with information you receive before an injection, shape your pain experience.
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Sundown Syndrome-Like Symptoms in Fruit Flies May Be Due to High Dopamine Levels
sciencedaily.com - 5-15-12
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania researchers have discovered a mechanism involving the neurotransmitter dopamine that switches fruit fly behavior from being active during the day (diurnal) to nocturnal. This change parallels a human disorder in which increased agitation occurs in the evening hours near sunset and may also be due to higher than normal dopamine levels in the brain. Sundown syndrome occurs in older people with dementia or cognitive impairment.
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Smoked Cannabis Reduces Some Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis
sciencedaily.com - 5-15-12
A clinical study of 30 adult patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has shown that smoked cannabis may be an effective treatment for spasticity -- a common and disabling symptom of this neurological disease.
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Begin Early: Water With Meals May Encourage Wiser Choices
sciencedaily.com - 5-15-12
Water could change the way we eat. That's the conclusion of new research by T. Bettina Cornwell of the University of Oregon and Anna R. McAlister of Michigan State University. Their findings appear online this week ahead of regular publication by the journal Appetite.
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Breastfeeding Benefits: Human Breast Milk Ingredient Adjusts to Optimize for Beneficial Gut Bacteria Over Time
sciencedaily.com - 5-15-12
A new University of Illinois study shows that human milk oligosaccharides, or HMO, produce short-chain fatty acids that feed a beneficial microbial population in the infant gut. Not only that, the bacterial composition adjusts as the baby grows older and its needs change.
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Why Women Chose Bad Boys: Ovulating Women Perceive Sexy Cads as Good Dads
sciencedaily.com - 5-15-12
Nice guys do finish last at least when it comes to procreation according to a study from The University of Texas at San Antonio that answers the question of why women choose bad boys.
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Fat reaches waist just three hours after a big meal
telegraph.co.uk - 5-15-12
Anyone who has had to loosen their belt after enjoying a big meal may be reassured to know their weight gain was not in their imagination, as scientists find fat reaches the waistline as little as three hours after a big meal.
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FDA reviews first rapid, take-home test for HIV
usatoday.com - 5-14-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is considering approval of the first over-the-counter HIV test that would allow consumers to quickly test themselves for the virus at home, without medical supervision.
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Chemicals in household items are 'causing huge increase in cancer, obesity and falling fertility'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-14-12
Chemicals found in household products may be causing significant increases in cancers, diabetes, obesity and falling fertility, the European Environment Agency has warned.
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18% Of Deaths Among Under 5s Caused By Pneumonia Globally
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-14-12
Of the 7.6 million deaths worldwide among children under 5 years of age in 2010, 18% were caused by pneumonia, while 14% were the result of a complication of a preterm birth, researchers from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and an international team of experts reported in The Lancet. The authors added that diarrhea is the third leading cause of deaths among very young children.
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Waist To Height Ratio Better Than BMI
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-14-12
Waist to height ratio is a better predictor of heart disease and diabetes risk than BMI, according to new research presented at a scientific meeting recently.
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How To Overcome Poor Response To Radiotherapy Caused By Low Haemoglobin Levels
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-14-12
Patients with head and neck cancer and a low haemoglobin (Hb) level do not respond well to radiotherapy and therefore both control of their tumour and disease-free survival are compromised. Now researchers from The Netherlands have found that the problems caused by low Hb in these patients can be overcome by the use of a treatment known as ARCON therapy, in which accelerated radiotherapy is combined with carbogen (a mixture of carbon dioxide and oxygen) and the water-soluble vitamin nicotinamide [1].
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Canada mulls wider prescription authority
upi.com - 5-14-12
The Canadian government wants more prescription authority for midwives, nurse practitioners and podiatrists, the health minister announced Sunday.
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Heart failure takes bigger toll on men
upi.com - 5-14-12
Men with heart failure report more depression and poorer quality of life than women or men without heart failure, U.S. researchers said.
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In Rat Study, Eye Device Shows Promise for Restoring Sight
healthday.com - 5-14-12
A new type of artificial eye system could one day restore sight to people who have lost their vision due to degenerative eye diseases such as macular degeneration, according to the results of research with rats.
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The most dangerous drug in the world: 'Devil's Breath' chemical from Colombia can block free will, wipe memory and even kill
dailymail.co.uk - 5-14-12
A hazardous drug that eliminates free will and can wipe the memory of its victims is currently being dealt on the streets of Colombia. The drug is called scopolamine, but is colloquially known as ‘The Devil’s Breath,' and is derived from a particular type of tree common to South America. Stories surrounding the drug are the stuff of urban legends, with some telling horror stories of how people were raped, forced to empty their bank accounts, and even coerced into giving up an organ.
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Herbal supplement may prevent dangerous blood clots
foxnews.com - 5-13-12
An apple a day may actually keep the doctor away – or even better, keep you from getting a life-threatening blood clot. So might an orange or onion, it turns out. All of these fruits and veggies are high in a flavanoid known as rutin, a natural anti-clotting agent, according to a study published Tuesday.
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$500,000 Medical Marijuana Loan Up In Smoke$500,000 Medical Marijuana Loan Up In Smoke
abcnews.go.com - 5-13-12
Sometimes even the best-laid plans go up in smoke. And sometimes these plans end up costing a lot of money. That's what happened to Mark Haile and Michele Hammer, two Arizona businesspeople who in August, 2010, each loaned $250,000 to Today's Health Care II (THC), a Colorado-based medical marijuana dispensary. The agreements specifically stated that THC was using the loan proceeds for "a retail medical marijuana sales and grow center," but neither Haile nor Hammer thought that would ever be a problem.
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Egg breakfast 'could help you lose weight'
telegraph.co.uk - 5-13-12
'Go to work on an egg', went the no-nonsense 1950s advertising campaign. But now obesity experts have found out that not only does an egg keep you going longer, it could also help keep you slim.
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16 now sick from salmonella in dry dog food; recall expands
msnbc.msn.com - 5-13-12
Two more people have become ill after being exposed to salmonella-tainted dry dog food, bringing the total to 16, federal health officials reported Friday
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FDA delays new rules for sunscreen
msnbc.msn.com - 5-13-12
Sunscreen confusion won't be over before summer after all. The government is bowing to industry requests for more time to make clear how much protection their brands really offer against skin cancer.
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Music Lessons Good For Babies' Brains
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-13-12
An article published recently in the scientific journals Developmental Science and Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences reveals that McMaster University researchers have discovered in a first study of its kind that very early musical training benefits children before they are able to walk or talk.
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Hazardous To Health - Social Jet Lag
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-13-12
Social jetlag - a syndrome related to the mismatch between the body's internal clock and the realities of our daily schedules - does more than make us sleepy. It is also contributing to the growing tide of obesity, according to a large-scale epidemiological study reported online in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication.
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Scientists do away with body mass index
upi.com - 5-13-12
British researchers say people concerned about heart disease and diabetes should watch their height-to-waist ratio rather than the body mass index.
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HIV prevention pill Truvada backed by US experts
bbc.co.uk - 5-13-12
A panel of US health experts has for the first time backed a drug to prevent HIV infection in healthy people.
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Does Your Child Have Seasonal Allergies or a Cold?
healthday.com - 5-13-12
It can be difficult during the spring months for parents to determine whether their children have a cold or seasonal allergies, but an expert outlines how to tell the difference.
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Sooner Is Better for Controlling Obese Kids' Weight: Study
healthday.com - 5-13-12
A type of therapy that helps people change their behavior seems to benefit severely obese children but not severely obese teens, new research suggests.
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CDC: U.S. influenza rates fall further
upi.com - 5-12-12
U.S. influenza rates fell further last week in most of the country, but Alabama and Hawaii reported influenza-like illness, health officials said.
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Tool cuts down on ER CT scan exposure
upi.com - 5-12-12
A new electronic medical record tool cuts down on unnecessary CT scans in U.S. hospital emergency patients with abdominal pain, researchers say.
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Vitamin K2 may help treat Parkinson's
upi.com - 5-12-12
Vitamin K2 may help treat Parkinson's disease, researchers in Belgium said.
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U.S. adults worry less, enjoy life more
upi.com - 5-12-12
U.S. adults are worrying less and enjoying life more, and are less stressed since the recession began in 2008, a survey indicates.
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45.9M in U.S. had mental illness in 2011
upi.com - 5-12-12
Almost 46 million Americans suffered some form of a mental illness in 2011, Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius said Friday.
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Doomsday scenarios spread about No. 4 reactor at Fukushima plant
asahi.com - 5-12-12
When Ron Wyden, a Democratic senator from the U.S. state of Oregon, visited the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant on April 6, he spent about an hour looking at a building constructed under strict anti-quake standards and observed the facility that processes water contaminated by radiation.
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Unintended Consequence for Dialysis Patients as Drug Rule Changes
nytimes.com - 5-12-12
A shift last year by the federal government in how it pays for drugs to treat dialysis patients may have had an unintended and potentially dire consequence, according to new research: a significant jump in blood transfusions for patients who now may not be getting enough of the medications.
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New Cautions About Long-Term Use of Bone Drugs
nytimes.com - 5-12-12
In an unusual move that may prompt millions of women to rethink their use of popular bone-building drugs, the Food and Drug Administration published an analysis that suggested caution about long-term use of the drugs, but fell short of issuing specific recommendations.
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The 3 Most Important Words on a Bag of Dog Food
rodale.com - 5-12-12
Time, yet again, to reassess your dog's diet. A growing number of dry dog foods are being recalled in the wake of a discovery of Salmonella contamination at a Diamond Pet Food facility in South Carolina.
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FDA Issues Warning About Experimental MS Therapy
abcnews.go.com - 5-12-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning about the potential risks of an experimental therapy used to treat a condition -- chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, or CCSVI -- often linked to multiple sclerosis.
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A cure for tinnitus? Hope for millions tormented by ringing in ears as scientists edge closer to developing first drug treatments
dailymail.co.uk - 5-12-12
The first drug treatments to prevent the onset of tinnitus could soon be developed after doctors discovered how to tone down overactive neurons in the brain.
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UK addicted to sleeping pills: Stress-related insomnia on rise since start of the economic crunch
dailymail.co.uk - 5-12-12
Britain has become a nation of sleeping pill addicts since the start of the economic downturn, figures revealed yesterday. Stress-related insomnia has been blamed for a sharp increase in the number of people prescribed powerful drugs to help them sleep. The annual cost to the NHS of handing out the pills has risen by a sixth in the past three years to nearly £50million.
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Two in five new mothers struggle to cope with the demands of parenting and 'need more help', says charity
dailymail.co.uk - 5-12-12
Two in five new mothers have struggled to cope with the demands of parenting during the first few weeks after birth, with a similar amount admitting getting 'angry' with their baby, according to a poll.
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Common household chemicals 'causing cancer and reduced fertility'
telegraph.co.uk - 5-12-12
Common chemicals found in household products may be causing a range of medical problems such as cancer, reduced fertility and obesity, Europe's environmental watchdog has warned.
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HIV Prevention Pill Receives FDA Panel Support
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-12-12
On Thursday, a panel of outside experts that advises the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) voted to support approval of the daily pill Truvada to prevent HIV in healthy people.
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Insight: America's hatred of fat hurts obesity fight
reuters.com - 5-12-12
One night when Lynn McAfee was 5 years old, her psychologically troubled mother left her at the side of a road as punishment for a now forgotten infraction.
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Study: Income inequality increases deaths
upi.com - 5-12-12
Higher levels of U.S. income inequality lead to more deaths in the country long-term, an Ohio State University sociologist suggests.
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Swapping whole fruit for juice beneficial
upi.com - 5-12-12
Substituting whole fruit for fruit juice in children's diets would cut calorie intake, while increasing fiber consumption, U.S. and British researchers found.
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Study: Rating depression severity
upi.com - 5-12-12
People are more likely to seek help for depression and anxiety if they think their suffering ranks less than that of others, researchers in Britain said.
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Vitamin K2: New Hope for Parkinson's Patients?
sciencedaily.com - 5-12-12
Neuroscientist Patrik Verstreken, associated with VIB and KU Leuven, succeeded in undoing the effect of one of the genetic defects that leads to Parkinson's using vitamin K2. His discovery gives hope to Parkinson's patients.
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Gene Therapy for Hearing Loss: Potential and Limitations
sciencedaily.com - 5-12-12
Regenerating sensory hair cells, which produce electrical signals in response to vibrations within the inner ear, could form the basis for treating age- or trauma-related hearing loss. One way to do this could be with gene therapy that drives new sensory hair cells to grow.
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FDA reviews first rapid, take-home test for HIV
kansascity.com - 5-12-12
The Food and Drug Administration is considering approval of the first over-the-counter HIV test that would allow consumers to quickly test themselves for the virus at home, without medical supervision.
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Less contraception knowledge, less use
upi.com - 5-11-12
More than 50 percent of U.S. young men and 25 percent of young women showed serious gaps in knowledge of common contraceptive methods, researchers say.
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Half of young U.S. adults sunburned
upi.com - 5-11-12
Half of U.S. young adults age 30 and under report being sunburned in the past year and indoor tanning rates are highest among white women, researchers say.
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Poll: 44-60 is middle aged, 60-plus is old
upi.com - 5-11-12
Women and men agree the start and end of middle age occurs earlier for women than for men, U.S. researchers found.
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Americans consume EIGHTY percent of the world's pain pills as prescription drug abuse epidemic explodes
dailymail.co.uk - 5-11-12
Americans consume 80 percent of the world's supply of painkillers -- more than 110 tons of pure, addictive opiates every year -- as the country's prescription drug abuse epidemic explodes.
That's enough drugs to give every single American 64 Percocets or Vicodin. And pain pill prescriptions continue to surge, up 600 percent in ten year, thanks to doctors who are more and more willing to hand out drugs to patients who are suffering.
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Medical Marijuana Raids To Continue After House Defeats Defunding Bill
huffingtonpost.com - 5-11-12
A bipartisan measure that would have eliminated funding for federal raids on medical marijuana dispensaries in states where they're legal failed Wednesday in the House of Representatives. The legislation, introduced by Reps. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.), Sam Farr (D-Calif.), Maurice Hinchey (D-N.Y.), and Tom McClintock (R-Calif.), was part of the appropriations bill to fund the Department of Justice for fiscal 2013. It failed 262-163.
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Simple blood test could show which women are at risk of postnatal depression
dailymail.co.uk - 5-11-12
One in seven women will experience postnatal depression after the birth of their baby - now scientists think they could spot those most at risk with a simple, accurate blood test.
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'The ultimate wonder food': Potatoes have more nutrients, vitamins and minerals than traditional 'superfoods'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-11-12
Ignored by dieters because they are 'fattening', few would class the potato as a 'wonder food' packed full of vitamins, minerals and nutrients. But the spud is actually better for the body than traditional superfoods - such as bananas, broccoli, beetroot, nuts and avocado, a study has found. The researchers said people are wrong to shun it in favour of modern and more expensive alternatives.
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Hot sauce ingredient reduces 'beer belly' fat and could play key role in future weight-loss surgery
dailymail.co.uk - 5-11-12
The ingredient that gives hot sauce its heat could play a role in the future of weight loss, say scientists. Unfortunately it's not as simple as simply eating more chillies at dinner. Instead the ingredient capsaicin - which gives peppers their burning sensation - has been used to improve a slimming surgery technique.
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Half of all British men will be obese by 2040, claim experts
telegraph.co.uk - 5-11-12
Nearly half of all men and more than a third of all women will be obese within the next 30 years, experts have warned.
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Women ditching gym for great outdoors
telegraph.co.uk - 5-11-12
Women are increasingly ditching the gym in favour of fresh air exercise, according to a survey.
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What Are The Top 10 Healthy Foods?
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-11-12
Imagine a selection of foods that were delicious, nutritious and good for you - i.e. they reduced your risk of developing diseases. According to a several different surveys and sources in North America and Western Europe, the following ten foods are generally considered as the most healthy.
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Facebook Addiction - New Psychological Scale
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-11-12
Researchers in Norway have published a new psychological scale to measure Facebook addiction, the first of its kind worldwide. They write about their work in the April 2012 issue of the journal Psychological Reports. They hope that researchers will find the new psychometric tool useful in investigating problem behavior linked to Facebook use.
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Psychiatrists say diagnosis manual needs overhaul
reuters.com - 5-11-12
Many psychiatrists believe a new edition of a manual designed to help diagnose mental illness should be shelved for at least a year for further revisions, despite some modifications which eliminated two controversial diagnoses.
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Fish tied to lower colon cancer risk: study
reuters.com - 5-11-12
People who eat plenty of fish may have a lower risk of colon and rectal cancers, a new report suggests.
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Norovirus outbreak traced to shopping bag
upi.com - 5-11-12
Oregon public health investigators said they traced a norovirus outbreak to a reusable open grocery bag in a hotel bathroom, where a person had been ill.
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Lower five basic risks to save mothers around the world
upi.com - 5-11-12
While working in remote Papua New Guinea last year with Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres my team and I heard about a woman who'd recently died giving birth to twins. So we immediately left to check up on the newborn children. While there, we came upon another woman who was also in labor and carrying twins. After learning that she'd already had one stillbirth, we transferred her to our hospital.
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Argentina Senate passes 'dignified death' law
bbc.co.uk - 5-11-12
The Argentine Senate has approved a "dignified death" law to give the terminally ill and their families more say in end-of-life decisions.
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Induced Labor Late in Pregnancy Has Pros, Cons
healthday.com - 5-11-12
Inducing labor after a woman has been pregnant for more than 37 weeks can reduce an infant's risk of death before, during or shortly after birth without increasing the need for cesarean delivery, a new study says.
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Smell Tests Don't Predict Alzheimer's, Study Finds
healthday.com - 5-11-12
Smell tests should not be used to predict Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, according to a new study.
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Only Half of Meds Taken by Kids Have 'Adequate' Safety Info: Study
healthday.com - 5-11-12
About half of medications used in children have little or no label information about drug effectiveness, safety or dosing in children, new research finds.
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Blood Clot Risk Linked to Some Non-Pill Contraceptives
healthday.com - 5-11-12
Some women using hormonal contraceptives other than birth control pills may have an increased risk for serious blood clots, Danish researchers report.
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FDA Panel Gives Blessing to New Weight-Loss Drug
healthday.com - 5-11-12
An advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday recommended approval of the weight-loss medication lorcaserin, even though concerns remain about cardiovascular side effects.
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Gut-Throat Competition: Native Bacteria Fend Off Invaders, Suggesting New Way to Stop Dangerous Forms of E. Coli
sciencedaily.com - 5-11-12
From tiny villages in developing nations to suburban kitchens in the United States, dangerous strains of E. coli bacteria sicken millions of people each year -- and kill untold numbers of children.
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Neurodegeneration 'Switched Off' in Mice
sciencedaily.com - 5-11-12
Researchers at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Toxicology Unit at the University of Leicester have identified a major pathway leading to brain cell death in mice with neurodegenerative disease. The team was able to block the pathway, preventing brain cell death and increasing survival in the mice.
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Evolution's Gift May Also Be at the Root of a Form of Autism
sciencedaily.com - 5-11-12
A recently evolved pattern of gene activity in the language and decision-making centers of the human brain is missing in a disorder associated with autism and learning disabilities, a new study by Yale University researchers shows.
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Washington state health officials declare whooping cough epidemic, seek CDC help as cases soar
washingtonpost.com - 5-11-12
Washington state’s worst outbreak of whooping cough in decades has prompted health officials to declare an epidemic, seek help from federal experts and urge residents to get vaccinated amid worry that cases of the highly contagious disease could spike much higher.
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Calif. students rank 47th in science
ocregister.com - 5-11-12
About 22 percent of California's eighth-graders tested on a national science test passed, ranking the Golden State among the worst in the nation, according to figures released Thursday.
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Viagra helps children with heart defects
upi.com - 5-10-12
Viagra, or sildenafil may give a boost to underdeveloped hearts in children and young adults with congenital heart defects, U.S. researchers say.
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HPV causing rise in male throat cancer
usatoday.com - 5-10-12
In the past decade, oncologists have noted an increase in cancers at the back of the tongue, in the tonsils and into the throat, especially in healthy, nonsmoking men.
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Coil 'could be a more effective form of emergency contraception than the Morning-after pill'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-10-12
Girls as young as 11 should be fitted with coils to reduce teenage pregnancies, claim researchers. They say that handing out supplies of the morning-after pill does nothing to reduce rates of prevent abortions or unwanted babies.
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Eating yoghurt could make men more virile (finds a study on 'swaggering' mice)
dailymail.co.uk - 5-10-12
Eating probiotic yoghurt is known to calm troubled tummies - now scientists have found it could boost virility as well.
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End of anti-depressants? Magnetic pulse therapy eases depression in third of patients
dailymail.co.uk - 5-10-12
Depression affects one in four of us at some point of our lives, but controversy still reigns over how to best treat the debilitating condition. Now scientists have found that a type of 'magnetic therapy' - which involves no brain-altering drugs or invasive procedures - could be a potent new treatment.
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Obese women more likely to become pregnant if they lose weight: research
telegraph.co.uk - 5-10-12
Obese women who are trying to conceive should try dieting before immediately turning to IVF treatment as women who lost weight were three times more likely to fall pregnant, a study has found.
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FDA aims to limit kids' radiation exposure
msnbc.msn.com - 5-10-12
The government is taking steps to help ensure that children who need CT scans and other X-ray-based tests don't get an adult-sized dose of radiation.
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Chest pain doesn't always merit stress test
msnbc.msn.com - 5-10-12
People who come to the emergency department complaining of chest pain often get a test that isn't helping them very much, according to a new study.
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What Is The Best And Worst Place To Be A Mother Worldwide?
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-10-12
According to Save the Children's 13th State of the World's Mothers report, Norway is the best place to be a mother in the entire world, and Niger is the worst, overtaking Afghanistan, which for the last two years was classified as the worst place to be a mother. The U.S, as of now, is ranked number 25.
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Sleeping With Parents May Help Sleep Quality Which Reduces Obesity Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-10-12
There is a little good news for mothers in the United States. The U.S. has moved up six places -- from 31st to 25th -- in the annual Save The Children State of the World's Mothers report.
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Consumption Of Probiotics Associated With Reduced Risk Of Diarrhea From Antibiotic Use
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-10-12
Consuming probiotics reduces the risk of diarrhea caused by antibiotic usage, researchers from RAND Health, Santa Monica, California reported in Jama (Journal of the American Medical Association). Probiotics are microbes that protect their host and prevent diseases. The most common probiotic is Lactobacillus acidophilus, which is common in yogurt and acidophilus milk.
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Report offers a bit of good news for American moms
cnn.com - 5-10-12
There is a little good news for mothers in the United States. The U.S. has moved up six places -- from 31st to 25th -- in the annual Save The Children State of the World's Mothers report.
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Anti-obesity program doesn't help teen girls: study
reuters.com - 5-10-12
An intensive obesity-prevention program for Australian girls didn't lead to any improvements in their diet, physical activity or body weight a year later, according to a new report.
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Violence linked to risky sexual behavior
upi.com - 5-10-12
U.S. women who either witness neighborhood crimes or are subject to abuse themselves are more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior, researchers say.
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Stem cell shield 'could protect cancer patients'
bbc.co.uk - 5-10-12
It may be possible to use "stem cell shielding" to protect the body from the damaging effects of chemotherapy, early results from a US trial suggest.
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'One in six cancers worldwide are caused by infection'
bbc.co.uk - 5-10-12
One in six cancers - two million a year globally - are caused by largely treatable or preventable infections, new estimates suggest.
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New Drug Shows Promise for Myeloma Patients
healthday.com - 5-10-12
Three new studies confirm that the drug lenalidomide can significantly lengthen the time that people with multiple myeloma experience no worsening of their disease, either after having a stem cell transplant or getting chemotherapy.
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Scientists Map Melanoma's Genome
healthday.com - 5-10-12
Researchers have completed the first genome sequencing of melanoma, an aggressive and frequently fatal form of skin cancer.
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FDA Seeks Less Radiation for Kids Getting X-Rays, CT Scans
healthday.com - 5-10-12
In an effort to make sure children are not exposed to any more radiation than necessary when they get X-rays or CT scans, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has asked the makers of these devices to factor in the safety of pediatric patients when using existing machines and designing new ones.
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Soybeans Soaked in Warm Water Naturally Release Key Cancer-Fighting Substance
sciencedaily.com - 5-10-12
Soybeans soaking in warm water could become a new "green" source for production of a cancer-fighting substance now manufactured in a complicated and time-consuming industrial process, scientists are reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
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New Under the Sun: Recurrent Genetic Mutations in Melanoma
sciencedaily.com - 5-10-12
Melanoma -- the deadliest and most aggressive form of skin cancer -- has long been linked to time spent in the sun. Now a team led by scientists from the Broad Institute and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has sequenced the whole genomes of 25 metastatic melanoma tumors, confirming the role of chronic sun exposure and revealing new genetic changes important in tumor formation.
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Indian Government Acknowledges Cell Phone Risks United States Doesn’t
theintelhub.com - 5-10-12
It is widely know amongst well researched individuals that cell phones emit radiation. However, the FCC and the US Government continue to do everything in their power to not let this issue come to light by claiming tests are flawed (therefore we don’t know the truth).
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Prepregnancy obesity may affect kid scores
upi.com - 5-9-12
Women who are obese before pregnancy have an elevated risk of bearing children who get relatively low grades in school, U.S. researchers say.
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Women take longer to overcome concussions
upi.com - 5-9-12
Younger athletes and female athletes take longer to recover from concussions, researchers at Michigan State University say.
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FDA review favors first drug for HIV prevention
ap.org - 5-9-12
A pill that has long been used to treat HIV has moved one step closer to becoming the first drug approved to prevent healthy people from becoming infected with the virus that causes AIDS.
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Beep! Beep! That creeping commute is hurting your health
msnbc.msn.com - 5-9-12
Sure, speed kills. But new science suggests your sluggish slog from home to work (and back again) is slowly sucking the life out of you -- exit by excruciating exit.
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Why We All Love The Sound Of Our Own Voice
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-9-12
Research shows that people dedicate some 30-40% of their speech to communicating their subjective experiences to others. The old saying to teach is to learn might have been taken a little to the extreme, but none the less, psychologists believe that communicating thoughts and experiences to others stimulates cognitive and neural mechanisms associated with reward. Put simply, we feel better when we share thoughts, experiences and ideas with those around us.
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Bipolar symptoms may begin in teen years
reuters.com - 5-9-12
The number of teenagers who have experienced mania -- a hallmark of bipolar disorder -- is close to the number of adults estimated to have the mood disorder, suggesting that for many the condition begins during adolescence, according to a new study.
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Irregular Heartbeat Poses Greater Stroke Risk for Women Than Men
healthday.com - 5-9-12
Older women with the irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation face a 14 percent greater risk of stroke than men with the same condition, Canadian researchers report.
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Exercise May Boost Survival in Breast, Colon Cancer Patients
healthday.com - 5-9-12
Being physically active might lengthen the lives of people with breast and colon cancer, a new study suggests.
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Gestures Fulfill a Big Role in Language
sciencedaily.com - 5-9-12
People of all ages and cultures gesture while speaking, some much more noticeably than others. But is gesturing uniquely tied to speech, or is it, rather, processed by the brain like any other manual action?
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'Blindness’ May Rapidly Enhance Other Senses
sciencedaily.com - 5-9-12
Can blindness or other forms of visual deprivation really enhance our other senses such as hearing or touch? While this theory is widely regarded as being true, there are still many questions about the science behind it.
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Medical Marijuana: Obama's War On Pot Ramps Up In Colorado, Key Swing State
huffingtonpost.com - 5-9-12
In its official party platform, the Colorado Democratic Party endorses the legalization of marijuana.
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Amped, New Synthetic Drug Used to Get High
abcnews.go.com - 5-9-12
Amped, a new type of synthetic drug that falls into the street category of “bath salts,” is being used by people in Virginia to get high, and likely in other parts of the country as well.
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Diagnosed via Facebook: Baby boy's serious condition that could have left him brain-damaged is discovered by stranger online
dailymail.co.uk - 5-9-12
A young mother was told her baby son had a condition that could potentially leave him brain damaged from a stranger on the internet. Charlotte Dent discovered six-month-old George had the rare condition trigonocephaly because a woman whose son has the same thing spotted the tell-tale signs on a Facebook profile picture. The woman spotted the ridge running down George's forehead - a sign that he has the condition. It is so serious that without an operation the one-year-old could be left permanently brain damaged.
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Why there's always room for dessert: Pleasure eating triggers body's reward system
dailymail.co.uk - 5-9-12
Why is it that after a huge meal you can always find a corner for a delicious dessert... even though you know you shouldn't? It's because this type of eating is motivated by pleasure rather than by hunger, scientists say.
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Women more likely to be addicted to Facebook, researchers claim
telegraph.co.uk - 5-9-12
Women are more likely to become addicted to Facebook, according to researchers who designed a chart of symptoms signalling whether someone has an unhealthy devotion to social networking.
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Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration Responds Equally To Avastin And Lucentis
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-9-12
The one year results from a study into whether two drug treatments (Lucentis and Avastin), are equally effective in treating neovascular or wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD), have been reported at an international research meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.* The findings will also appear online in the leading journal Ophthalmology.
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Middle Aged And Elderly With Depression Have Higher Risk Of Dementia
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-9-12
A report in the May issue of Archives of General Psychiatry draws a link between people in mid-life and late-life, suffering from depression and the possibility of them developing dementia.
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Obesity fight must shift from personal blame-U.S. pane
reuters.com - 5-9-12
America's obesity epidemic is so deeply rooted that it will take dramatic and systemic measures - from overhauling farm policies and zoning laws to, possibly, introducing a soda tax - to fix it, the influential Institute of Medicine said on Tuesday.
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Prebiotic may reduce colitis, colon risk
upi.com - 5-9-12
A prebiotic -- a fiber supplement that serves as food for bacteria living in the gut -- greatly decrease the risk of colon cancer, U.S. researchers say.
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Canada renews ungutted fish warning
upi.com - 5-9-12
Canada's federal health agencies renewed warnings Tuesday against eating salted fish that haven't been gutted, weeks after illnesses were reported in Toronto.
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U.S. ranked 25th best country to be a mom
upi.com - 5-9-12
Pregnancy and motherhood can bring joy and or apprehension, medical complications and even death, depending on where one lives in the world.
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US drug company to pay $1.6bn over Depakote mis-selling
bbc.co.uk - 5-9-12
A US drug company has agreed to pay out $1.6bn (£1bn) after improperly marketing a mood-stabilising drug in a settlement thought to be the largest of its kind involving a single drug.
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That Long Commute May Be Harming Your Health
healthday.com - 5-9-12
New research has found that the longer your driving time between home and office, the less likely you are to exercise, the more your waistline widens and the worse your overall heart health becomes.
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Eye Color May Help Predict Vitiligo Risk
healthday.com - 5-9-12
Eye color may help predict risk for vitiligo, an autoimmune disease in which the skin loses its pigment, a new study finds.
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How Cannabis Use During Adolescence Affects Brain Regions Associated With Schizophrenia
sciencedaily.com - 5-9-12
New research from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) published in Nature's Neuropsychopharmacology has shown physical changes to exist in specific brain areas implicated in schizophrenia following the use of cannabis during adolescence. The research has shown how cannabis use during adolescence can interact with a gene, called the COMT gene, to cause physical changes in the brain.
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Fewer Suicides After Antidepressive Treatment for Schizophrenia
sciencedaily.com - 5-9-12
Antidepressive drugs reduce the mortality rate of schizophrenic patients, while treatment with bensodiazepines greatly increases it, especially as regards suicide. Giving several antipsychotics simultaneously, however, seems to have no effect at all. This according to a new study examining different drug combinations administered to patients with schizophrenia.
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Marijuana supply piles up in California as growers take a hit
miamiherald.com - 5-8-12
The pot market is crashing in California's legendary Emerald Triangle. The closure of hundreds of marijuana dispensaries across California and a federal crackdown on licensing programs for medical pot cultivation are leaving growers in the North Coast redwoods with harvested stashes many can't sell.
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Chinese-Made Infant Flesh Capsules Seized in S. Korea
abcnews.go.com - 5-8-12
The dried flesh of dead infants appears to be the not-so-secret ingredient in a health supplement that is reportedly being smuggled out of China.
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Yogurt Makes Mice Slimmer, Sexier
abcnews.go.com - 5-8-12
Scientists studying the power of probiotics to fight obesity got more than they bargained for: Not only does yogurt make mice slimmer; it also makes them sexier.
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Chemical cosh drugs 'given to children aged three' as prescriptions to treat hyperactivity soar
dailymail.co.uk - 5-8-12
Prescriptions for ‘chemical cosh’ drugs to treat hyperactivity have soared four-fold in a decade amid evidence that children as young as three are taking the medication.
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Stormy summer could spark huge rise in deadly 'thunderstorm asthma' cases
telegraph.co.uk - 5-8-12
A stormy summer will spark a huge rise in the number of life-threatening asthma cases, a leading healthcare expert has warned.
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Oversharing on Facebook as satisfying as sex?
msnbc.msn.com - 5-8-12
From bad breakups to bathroom updates to the amount of bacon your best friend can eat in a single sitting, we've all grown used to oversharers spilling their guts both online and off.
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Oral Zinc Found To Reduce Common Cold Symptoms In Adults More Than Kids
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-8-12
People who take oral zinc may experience shorter common cold symptoms than those who do not, researchers from The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), Toronto, and McMaster University reported in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).The authors added that adverse effects, especially when higher doses are taken, are common.
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Age-Related Macular Degeneration - How To Tackle Increasing Rates
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-8-12
With aging populations, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is set to increase. AMD, which causes progressive blindness, may already be present in the early stages in 20% of 60 year-olds and those who are older in some countries. Whilst 10 years ago there were hardly any treatments for AMD, the age of targeted drugs like vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) suppressants has changed the way in which AMD is controlled.
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What Is Vitiligo? What Causes Vitiligo
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-8-12
Vitiligo is a continual and long term skin problem that produces white depigmentation patches that develop and enlarge only in certain sections of the skin. These white patches appear because the patient has very little or no skin cells - called melanocytes - which are the cells in charge of producing the skin pigmentation, called melanin, which gives the color of the skin and protects it from the sun´s UV rays.
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42% of nation to be obese by 2030, study predicts
cnn.com - 5-8-12
After years of rising obesity rates in the United States, recent statistics show the rates may have steadied. But that may not be enough, according to a new report released on Monday - it estimates about 42% of the U.S. population will be obese by 2030.
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Study finds psychopaths have distinct brain structure
reuters.com - 5-8-12
Scientists who scanned the brains of men convicted of murder, rape and violent assaults have found the strongest evidence yet that psychopaths have structural abnormalities in their brains.
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Black pepper fights formation of fat cells
upi.com - 5-8-12
Researchers in South Korea say they are unlocking the secret to why black pepper fights fat.
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Curry's ability to fight cancer put to the test
bbc.co.uk - 5-8-12
A chemical found in curry is to be tested for its ability to kill bowel cancer tumours in patients.
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Depression in Mid-Life Linked to Higher Odds for Later Dementia
healthday.com - 5-8-12
People who suffer depression when they're middle-aged or elderly may also have an higher risk of dementia later, a new study suggests.
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In Mom's Eyes, Overweight Toddler May Not Be
healthday.com - 5-8-12
A new study suggests that many mothers of overweight toddlers misjudge their child's weight and that could lead to overfeeding, researchers say.
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People Love Talking About Themselves, Brain Scans Show
healthday.com - 5-8-12
Got something to report about yourself? An opinion, perhaps, or a status update? Nobody may care except you, but new brain research suggests you can make yourself feel good simply by sharing.
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Having a 'Purpose in Life' May Help Shield You From Dementia
healthday.com - 5-8-12
If you're looking for a way to keep dementia at bay, a new study suggests you can do so by developing a firm purpose in life.
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Lots of TV May Harm Kids' Diet
healthday.com - 5-8-12
Kids who spend lots of time in front of the TV have poorer diets overall, a new study of U.S. middle school students finds.
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U.S. Obesity Rate Set to Soar, Costing Billions: CDC
healthday.com - 5-8-12
Even if the skyrocketing rates of obesity level off, 42 percent of Americans will be obese and 11 percent will be severely obese by the year 2030, a new report predicts.
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Kids Most Likely to Start Abusing Painkillers at 16: Study
healthday.com - 5-8-12
Among U.S. adolescents, misuse of prescription painkillers peaks at age 16, earlier than thought, a new large survey analysis reveals.
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Screening for Breast Cancer Without X-Rays: Lasers and Sound Merge in Promising Diagnostic Technique
sciencedaily.com - 5-8-12
X-ray mammography is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer, but it has certain drawbacks that limit its effectiveness. For example, it can give in false positive and negative results; it also exposes women to low doses of ionizing radiation, which -- while accepted as safe -- still carry some risk.
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Heart Attack Survivors Living Close to Highways Face Higher 10-Year Death Risk
sciencedaily.com - 5-8-12
Living close to a major highway poses a significant risk to heart attack survivors, reinforcing the need to isolate housing developments from heavy traffic areas, a Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center study concludes.
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Thousands of pills filled with powdered human baby flesh discovered by customs officials in South Korea
dailymail.co.uk - 5-8-12
Thousands of pills filled with powdered human flesh have been discovered by customs officials in South Korea, it was revealed today. The capsules are in demand because they are viewed as being a medicinal 'cure-all'. The grim trade is being run from China where corrupt medical staff are said to be tipping off medical companies when babies are aborted or delivered still-born.
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Many U.S. teens fatalistic about pregnancy
upi.com - 5-7-12
Four-in-10 U.S. teens say using birth control doesn't matter because "when it's your time to get pregnant, it will happen," a survey indicates.
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IVF treatment used by 23,000 women in turmoil as shock report reveals that birth abnormalities have DOUBLED
dailymail.co.uk - 5-7-12
Fertility clinics are facing demands to restrict the most popular form of IVF after a shocking new report linked it to an increased risk of birth defects. The study created a major alert after revealing the ICSI treatment, used by 23,000 women in the UK every year, creates a ‘sky high’ chance of having a baby with serious abnormalities.
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Venom from the death stalker scorpion and the black widow spider are being used to create new treatments for cancer and Alzheimer's Disease.
dailymail.co.uk - 5-7-12
A jab to protect against deadly meningitis B is being developed by scientists. Early trials have shown it could prevent the illness in more than 80 per cent of youngsters.
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The deadly venom being used as medicine
telegraph.co.uk - 5-7-12
Venom from the death stalker scorpion and the black widow spider are being used to create new treatments for cancer and Alzheimer's Disease.
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US Health Care Spending Linked To Higher Prices And Greater Use Of Medical Technology, Not More Doctor Visits Or Hospital Stays
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-7-12
The United States spends more on health care than 12 other industrialized countries yet does not provide "notably superior" care, according to a new study from The Commonwealth Fund. The U.S. spent nearly $8,000 per person in 2009 on health care services, while other countries in the study spent between one-third (Japan and New Zealand) and two-thirds (Norway and Switzerland) as much. While the U.S. performs well on breast and colorectal cancer survival rates, it has among the highest rates of potentially preventable deaths from asthma and amputations due to diabetes, and rates that are no better than average for in-hospital deaths from heart attack and stroke.
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Choline Consumption During Pregnancy May 'Program' Healthier Babies
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-7-12
Pregnant women may have added incentive to bulk up on broccoli and eggs now that a Cornell University study has found increased maternal intake of the nutrient choline could decrease their children's chances of developing hypertension and diabetes later in life.
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Troubled Romantic Relationships May Stem From Childhood Emotional Maltreatment
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-7-12
People who experience Childhood Emotional Maltreatment (CEM) are more likely to have troubled romantic relationships in adult years, according to Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers.
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Alcohol Consumption Decreased In Heavy-Drinking Smokers By Anti-Smoking Drug Varenicline
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-7-12
The smoking cessation drug varenicline significantly reduced alcohol consumption in a group of heavy-drinking smokers, in a study carried out by researchers at the Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center at the University of California, San Francisco.
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Drug-resistant Bacteria - Designing Nanoparticles For High Antibiotic Doses
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-7-12
Highly-targeted nanoparticles that deliver huge doses of existing antibiotics could be used to overload the defenses of drug-resistant bacteria, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and MIT reported in the journal ACS Nano.
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Most in U.S. would prefer sleep over sex
upi.com - 5-7-12
Sixty-one percent of U.S. adults -- 79 percent of women -- would rather get a good night's sleep than have sex, a U.S. survey indicates.
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Range of brain diseases could be treated by single drug
bbc.co.uk - 5-7-12
The tantalising prospect of treating a range of brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, all with the same drug, has been raised by UK researchers.
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Research May Point to New Obesity Treatments
healthday.com - 5-7-12
Scientists who found a way to make white fat behave more like brown fat say their discovery could lead to new obesity treatments.
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Birth Defect Rates Vary Depending on Fertility Treatment: Study
healthday.com - 5-7-12
Birth defects are more common after certain infertility treatments, but whether the cause is the assisted reproduction techniques themselves or the underlying biology preventing conception isn't clear, Australian researchers say.
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Losing Weight When Obese Can Prevent or Cure Diabetes, Whatever the Initial BMI, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-7-12
Lowering your BMI by five units can dramatically reduce your risk of diabetes, whatever your initial weight, says new research presented at the International Congress of Endocrinology/European Congress of Endocrinology in Florence, Italy. The findings show that even severely obese patients with diabetes can potentially rid themselves of the disease.
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Asian students 'are at greater risk of eye strain as they study too hard’
dailymail.co.uk - 5-6-12
Staying indoors, poring over books and 'intense' levels of education have been blamed for an epidemic of short-sightedness sweeping across eastern Asia. Myopia, or short-sightedness, now affects between 80 per cent and 90 per cent of school leavers in the major cities of countries such as China, Japan and South Korea, say experts.
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Black Pepper's Secrets As A Fat Fighter Revealed
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-6-12
A new study provides a long-sought explanation for the beneficial fat-fighting effects of black pepper. The research, published in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, pinpoints piperine - the pungent-tasting substance that gives black pepper its characteristic taste, concluding that piperine also can block the formation of new fat cells.
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Cancer-Causing Food Additives A Major Concern For Consumers
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-6-12
As with many concerned consumers, a team of University of Oklahoma researchers wondered if the green color sometimes seen in bacon is, in fact, harmful to human health. Recently, these OU scientists took an important first step in answering this question by determining the structure of the green pigment responsible for this 'nitrite burn.'
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Salmonella linked to dog food, sickens at least 14 people
reuters.com - 5-6-12
An outbreak of a rare strain of salmonella poisoning linked to dog food has infected at least 14 people in nine states, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention said.
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Parents not so unhappy, research shows
upi.com - 5-6-12
People who have children are not less happy than people without kids, international research suggests.
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Brain scans decipher the thoughts of dogs
upi.com - 5-6-12
A U.S. researcher who looked into what dogs think said he was inspired to do the research when he saw a Navy dog was on the team that killed Osama bin Laden.
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Men's Breast Cancer Often More Deadly, Study Suggests
healthday.com - 5-6-12
Breast cancer in men is much less common than it is in women, but it may be more deadly, new research suggests.
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Mammograms Beat Thermography for Breast Cancer Detection: Study
healthday.com - 5-6-12
Thermography -- a breast cancer detection method touted by some as a substitute for mammography -- is an unreliable cancer screen, according to new research.
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Higher Risk of Birth Defects from Assisted Reproduction, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 5-6-12
A University of Adelaide study has identified the risk of major birth defects associated with different types of assisted reproductive technology.
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Pfizer's Lyrica falls short in two pain studies
reuters.com - 5-5-12
Pfizer Inc's big-selling Lyrica drug failed to help HIV patients and diabetics relieve forms of nerve pain, according to separate clinical trial results released by the drugmaker on Friday.
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Fewer jobs means more spending on U.S. Medicaid
reuters.com - 5-5-12
Millions of people turned to the Medicaid health insurance program for the poor during the 2007-2009 recession as families coped with job losses and drastic drops in income, pushing Medicaid spending up by an average of 6.6 percent per year, according to a study released on Friday.
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Amish farm kids remarkably immune to allergies: study
reuters.com - 5-5-12
Amish children raised on rural farms in northern Indiana suffer from asthma and allergies less often even than Swiss farm kids, a group known to be relatively free from allergies, according to a new study.
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Hunger threatens 1 in 7 U.S. seniors
upi.com - 5-5-12
More than 8 million U.S. seniors faced the threat of hunger in 2010 -- a 78 percent increase since 2001, The Meals On Wheels Research Foundation says.
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What works in weight loss
upi.com - 5-5-12
U.S. researchers analyzed data to find what works in weight loss and confirmed quick fixes, fad diets, diet foods and supplements do little good.
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U.S. spends $7,960 a person on healthcare
upi.com - 5-5-12
The United States spends the most -- $7,960 per person -- on healthcare annually than any other nation in the world, a non-profit group said.
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N.Y. soldier died of rabies from dog bite
upi.com - 5-5-12
A recently returned U.S. Army soldier died of rabies in New York state last August, eight months after he was bitten by a dog in Afghanistan, officials say.
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Bird flu can spread in mammals, study finds
latimes.com - 5-5-12
The results, showing an engineered flu strain can spread easily between ferrets, derive from a controversial study that stirred debate over fears of a bioterrorism threat.
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Research Questions Impact of Pacifiers on Breast-Feeding
health.com - 5-5-12
Pacifiers can soothe agitated infants, but some experts—including those at the World Health Organization (WHO)—discourage pacifier use in the first six months of life because of concerns that it may interfere with breast-feeding, widely seen as the best way to feed a newborn.
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Got the Munchies? A New Pot Eatery Opens in Ore.
abcnews.go.com - 5-5-12
After scraping together a mound of zucchini, broccoli, beef, pineapple and noodles on a big round Mongolian grill, Kevin Wallace measured out a shot of grapeseed oil infused with hashish and poured it over the steaming food, setting off a sizzle.
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Why low testosterone may increase your risk of diabetes
dailymail.co.uk - 5-5-12
Men with low levels of testosterone could be at greater risk of developing diabetes, a study has suggested.
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Eat fish twice a week to protect the heart: new guidelines
telegraph.co.uk - 5-5-12
Eating fish is probably better for health than taking fish oil supplements because it contains other nutrients not present in the capsules, a conference was told.
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Kids Born After 42 Weeks Have Higher Behavioral Problems Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-5-12
According to a study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, children born after 42 weeks of pregnancy (post-term birth) are more likely to have behavioral and emotional problems, especially Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) problems, in early childhood.
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USA Spends Much More On Health Than Other Rich Nations - Is It Worth The Extra Money?
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-5-12
A new study from The Commonwealth Fund reveals that although health care expenditures are greater in the United States than in 12 other developed countries, the care provided is not "notably superior."
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Nanotechnology In Medicine: Huge Potential, But What Are The Risks?
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-5-12
Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter at the atomic and molecular scale to create materials with remarkably varied and new properties, is a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential in many sectors, ranging from healthcare to construction and electronics. In medicine, it promises to revolutionize drug delivery, gene therapy, diagnostics, and many areas of research, development and clinical application.
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Stroke patients not getting diagnosed
upi.com - 5-5-12
A study of 40,777 stroke patients found 42 percent underwent brain imaging within the recommended 25 minutes of hospital arrival, researchers say.
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More U.S. female teens abstaining from sex
upi.com - 5-5-12
U.S. teen birth rates are still higher than those of other developed countries despite a decline of 44 percent since 1990, federal health officials say.
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Massive rise in Asian eye damage
bbc.co.uk - 5-5-12
Up to 90% of school leavers in major Asian cities are suffering from myopia - short-sightedness - a study suggests.
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Germs Behind Urinary Tract Infections Becoming More Resistant to Drugs
healthday.com - 5-5-12
E. coli bacteria's resistance to ciprofloxacin (Cipro), the most widely prescribed antimicrobial for urinary tract infections in the United States, increased five-fold between 2000 and 2010, according to a new study.
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Rising Obesity Rates Might Mean More Rheumatoid Arthritis
healthday.com - 5-5-12
A new study suggests that severe weight gain might raise the risk for rheumatoid arthritis -- a painful, chronic ailment -- especially among obese women.
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Men's Breast Cancer Often More Deadly, Study Suggests
healthday.com - 5-5-12
Breast cancer in men is much less common than it is in women, but it may be more deadly, new research suggests.
More...


Mammograms Beat Thermography for Breast Cancer Detection: Study
healthday.com - 5-5-12
Thermography -- a breast cancer detection method touted by some as a substitute for mammography -- is an unreliable cancer screen, according to new research.
More...


Environmental Toxicants Causing Ovarian Disease Across Generations
sciencedaily.com - 5-5-12
Washington State University researchers have found that ovarian disease can result from exposures to a wide range of environmental chemicals and be inherited by future generations.
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Beehive Extract Shows Potential as Prostate Cancer Treatment
sciencedaily.com - 5-5-12
An over-the-counter natural remedy derived from honeybee hives arrests the growth of prostate cancer cells and tumors in mice, according to a new paper from researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine.
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California medical pot crackdown hits upscale Santa Barbara
reuters.com - 5-4-12
A crackdown on California's medical marijuana supply chain by federal authorities targeting the state's illegal drug trade arrived this week in the affluent, coastal county of Santa Barbara.
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People with diabetes moodier, depressed
upi.com - 5-4-12
People with diabetes are more likely to suffer depression, anxiety and anger if blood sugar levels are poorly controlled, U.S. researchers say.
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Bees Drink Human Sweat, Tears
abcnews.go.com - 5-4-12
What’s tastier than meat and cheese? Sweat and tears, for bees anyway. Though they’re not as popular as their honeybee cousins, sweat sucking and tear drinking bees are making a buzz in cities across the country.
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Overdue babies 'twice as likely to develop ADHD in early childhood'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-4-12
Babies who spend too long in the womb are twice as likely to suffer behavioural problems in early childhood, researchers have warned. The added risk is similar to that of being born prematurely, which is known to cause health and emotional problems.
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Eating fish may reduce risk of Alzheimer's by lowering levels of protein linked to the disease
dailymail.co.uk - 5-4-12
Eating fish and other foods containing omega-3 fatty acids may lower the risk of Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. The oily compounds, which combat inflammation, appear to lower blood levels of a protein linked to Alzheimer's, scientists have found. Researchers in the US studied 1,219 people over the age of 65 who were free of dementia.
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Should we call it quits? A new kind of couples counseling
msnbc.msn.com - 5-4-12
Many unhappily married couples turn to marriage counselors to help them improve their relationship. Now a new type of couples therapy helps them figure out whether the best solution is to call it quits.
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PE: The 'other' male sexual problem
cnn.com - 5-4-12
Given the ease with which the average person can rattle off brand names like “Viagra” and “Cialis,” or joke about “four hour erections,” it would seem that erectile-dysfunction drugs are just about as common as ibuprofen.
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U.S. to partner with Big Pharma for drug discovery
reuters.com - 5-4-12
The U.S. government will help drug companies find treatments for a host of diseases through a new collaboration in which researchers will test experimental drugs provided by manufacturers.
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Reducing calories may preserve memory
upi.com - 5-4-12
Cutting back on calories is a good idea to protect the heart, and U.S. researchers say eating less also may reduce a person's risk of memory loss.
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Sports/energy drinks bathe teeth in acid
upi.com - 5-4-12
Consumption of sports and energy drinks, especially among adolescents, is causing irreversible damage to teeth, U.S. researchers found.
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Lack of sleep hurts handling of unexpected
upi.com - 5-4-12
Surgeons who are sleep-deprived can perform a learned task or learn a new task, but have trouble dealing with the unexpected, U.S. researchers say.
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Two blind British men have electronic retinas fitted
bbc.co.uk - 5-4-12
Two British men who have been totally blind for many years have had part of their vision restored after surgery to fit pioneering eye implants.
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More Teen Girls Using Contraceptives: CDC
healthday.com - 5-4-12
More teenage girls are using contraceptives, which may explain part of the dramatic drop in the U.S. teen pregnancy rate, federal health officials reported Thursday.
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Why You Overeat Even When You're Full
healthday.com - 5-4-12
A group of Italian researchers has uncovered evidence that regardless of how "full" a person may feel, the body is hard-wired to chemically reward itself by overeating when tempted by yummy foods.
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Migraines More Likely for People With Celiac Disease, Study Says
healthday.com - 5-4-12
Migraine headaches are more likely to plague people with celiac disease than those without it, according to new research.
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Kids on cow farms may have fewer allergies
reuters.com - 5-3-12
Kids who grow up on farms and have contact with cows and cow milk are less likely to have allergies and asthma than kids raised nearby but not on a farm, according to a new study from Europe.
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One in seven thinks end of world is coming: poll
reuters.com - 5-3-12
Nearly 15 percent of people worldwide believe the world will end during their lifetime and 10 percent think the Mayan calendar could signify it will happen in 2012, according to a new poll.
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Fish body oil may help dialysis patients
upi.com - 5-3-12
Fish body oil -- omega 3 -- appears to help kidney patients undergoing hemodialysis, researchers in London said.
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How garlic can prevent a dicky tummy: Ingredient '100 times more powerful at fighting food poisoning than antibiotics'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-3-12
A key ingredient in garlic is 100 times more powerful than two popular antibiotics at fighting a leading cause of food poisoning, scientists have found.
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Seen At 11: Rare Mental Condition Gives Actress Henner Super-Human Memory
newyork.cbslocal.com - 5-3-12
Most people are able to recall big moments in their lives, but a select few are able to recall minute details of almost every day.
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Sleep 9 hours a night to lose weight
upi.com - 5-3-12
Sleeping too much does not make one fat -- in fact, sleeping more than 9 hours a night may suppress genetic influences on body weight, U.S. researchers say.
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Report: Frequent marijuana smoking up 80 percent among teens
cbsnews.com - 5-3-12
Pot use is becoming a big problem for U.S. teens, a new survey suggests. The Partnership at Drugfree.org released a new survey Wednesday that found nearly 1 in 10 teens said they smoke marijuana at least 20 or more times a month.
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Pork and Genes: How Pork Smells Genetically Determined, Says Study
abcnews.go.com - 5-3-12
If you find the smell of pork revolting, it could be because that's how you're genetically programmed to perceive it, according to a new study.
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Energy drinks start to destroy teenagers' teeth after only five days
dailymail.co.uk - 5-3-12
Teenagers' love of energy drinks is taking a terrible toll on their teeth, scientists have warned.
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Never forget a name again: tips from a memory expert
msnbc.msn.com - 5-3-12
Tired of finding yourself in that awkward situation where you recognize someone's face, yet you can't recall their name? New research in Psychological Science sheds some light on the phenomenon.
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Are USDA assurances on mad cow case 'gross oversimplification'?
msnbc.msn.com - 5-3-12
The mad cow discovered in California last week was not really a mad cow. It suffered from a closely related disease. There is no cause for alarm at this point, but several top scientists say the public health implications may not be as clear the U.S. Department of Agriculture would have us believe.
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Spotting Breast Cancer Risk Years Before It Occurs
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-3-12
Scientists from Imperial College London say that women with very high levels of methylation in an area of a gene, known as ATM, had double the risk of going on to develop breast cancer, compared to those without the faulty gene.
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Maternal Opiate Usage Grows Considerably
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-3-12
A study published online in JAMA reveals that the rate of mothers abusing opiates during pregnancy has increased by almost five times between 2000 and 2009 in the United States. In addition, the researchers found that the number of newborns with drug withdrawal symptoms (neonatal abstinence syndrome [NAS]) has increased by almost three times and has significantly increasing hospital costs.
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Eat more and weigh less with Volumetrics
cnn.com - 5-3-12
You're no diet dummy -- your "unrealistic" detector is on high alert. Cut out carbs? Fast on herbal juice blends? Please.
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Boomers at elevated risk of asthma death
upi.com - 5-3-12
The U.S. death rate attributed to asthma for those age 65 and older is 14 times higher than in younger patients, researchers say.
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More than one in ten babies worldwide born prematurely
bbc.co.uk - 5-3-12
Fifteen million babies, one in ten births, are born prematurely every year, a global project suggests.
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Who's the Dad? First-Trimester Blood Test May Tell
healthday.com - 5-3-12
Finding out who the father is in paternity cases may become easier with the emergence of a simple blood test for women that can be given in the first trimester of pregnancy.
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Eating More Foods Rich in Omega-3s May Lower Alzheimer's Risk: Study
healthday.com - 5-3-12
Consuming foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids may guard against Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests.
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Lower-Dose Radioiodine Effective Against Thyroid Cancer
healthday.com - 5-3-12
People with thyroid cancer are often given a radioactive iodine treatment to wipe out stray cancer cells, a treatment that comes with its own health risks.
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Iceman Mummy: 5,000-Year-Old Red Blood Cells Discovered -- Oldest Blood Known to Modern Science
sciencedaily.com - 5-3-12
His DNA has been decoded; samples from his stomach and intestines have allowed us to reconstruct his very last meal. The circumstances of his violent death appear to have been explained. However, what had, at least thus far, eluded the scientists, was identifying any traces of blood in Ötzi, the 5,000-year-old glacier mummy. Examination of his aorta had yielded no results. Yet recently, a team of scientists from Italy and Germany, using nanotechnology, succeeded in locating red blood cells in Ötzi's wounds, thereby discovering the oldest traces of blood to have been found anywhere in the world.
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Unmasking Black Pepper's Secrets as a Fat Fighter
sciencedaily.com - 5-3-12
A new study provides a long-sought explanation for the beneficial fat-fighting effects of black pepper. The research, published in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, pinpoints piperine -- the pungent-tasting substance that gives black pepper its characteristic taste, concluding that piperine also can block the formation of new fat cells.
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Blood test may detect breast cancer
upi.com - 5-2-12
A blood test might be able to detect breast cancer years before it develops, researchers in Britain said.
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Poll: Most say 61 is middle-aged, not old
upi.com - 5-2-12
Age 61 seems old or middle-aged to those age 45 and younger, while those older than 61 tend to see it young, a U.S. survey indicated.
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Brachytherapy: Targeted Breast Cancer Treatment Comes With Risks
abcnews.go.com - 5-2-12
An increasing number of women are treating their breast cancer with brachytherapy, a type of radiation therapy that delivers a smaller, more targeted dose of radiation.
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The real reason why the elderly have to get up in the middle of the night: Protein in the body tricks brain into thinking bladder is full
dailymail.co.uk - 5-2-12
As people age they often find it more difficult to get to sleep. Yet a few hours after they have drifted off they find they are awoken by the need for the toilet. Now scientists have pinpointed a protein that could explain why the elderly have to urinate more frequently.
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Engagement angst: How long is too long?
msnbc.msn.com - 5-2-12
The Five-Year Engagement, starring Jason Segel and Emily Blunt, might have been something of a box-office dud this weekend, but real women everywhere can certainly relate to the phenomenon of the Little Commitment That Couldn't. When it comes to the "journey between popping the question and tying the knot" (as the movie poster says), how long is too long after he puts a ring on it for you to start worrying you're never going to get to your first dance?
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Plenty Of Sleep Helps Keep You Slim
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-2-12
The more we sleep the less our genes determine how much we weigh, while the less we sleep the more our genes impact - in other words, less sleep can contribute to people putting on the pounds, while plenty of sleep can help us stay slim, researchers from University of Washington Medicine Sleep Center in Seattle reported in the journal Sleep.
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Minimally Invasive Procedure For Oesophageal Cancer Shows Promise
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-2-12
Patients with oesophageal cancer could gain substantial benefit from minimally invasive procedure.
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Study: Common pesticide affects developing brain
cnn.com - 5-2-12
Chlorpyrifos, a common pesticide, may be subtly influencing brain development in children, according to a new study. The brain abnormalities, found among a very small population of school-aged children, may have occurred while they developed in utero.
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Study: To eat better, buy a fruit bowl
upi.com - 5-2-12
People who want to eat healthier might do well to use a fruit bowl, as it seems to promote consumption of some fresh fruits, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Macular degeneration drugs compared
upi.com - 5-2-12
Two drugs used for age-related macular degeneration were "highly effective" but Avastin was more frequently used in a head-to-head test, U.S. researchers said.
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To lose beer belly, first quit beer
upi.com - 5-2-12
A U.S. sports medicine doctor says people who want to lose a beer belly before summer arrives should first stop drinking beer.
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Exercise Plus Computer Time May Boost Seniors' Brains
healthday.com - 5-2-12
A combination of moderate exercise and mental stimulation through computer use may help reduce the risk of age-related memory loss more than computer use or exercise alone, according to new research.
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Women More Likely to Survive Melanoma Than Men: Study
healthday.com - 5-2-12
When it comes to surviving the skin cancer known as melanoma, nature appears to have dealt women a better hand than men, new research suggests.
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How That Glass of Red Wine Might Help You Live Longer
healthday.com - 5-2-12
Researchers have found new evidence showing that resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, may play a role in preventing cell aging.
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Simple Way to Remove Mud from Drinking Water
sciencedaily.com - 5-2-12
Nearly 80 percent of disease in developing countries is linked to bad water and sanitation. Now a scientist at Michigan Technological University has developed a simple, cheap way to make water safe to drink, even if it's muddy.
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Garlic Compound Fights Source of Food-Borne Illness Better Than Antibiotics
sciencedaily.com - 5-2-12
Researchers at Washington State University have found that a compound in garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting the Campylobacter bacterium, one of the most common causes of intestinal illness.
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FDA may let patients buy drugs without prescriptions
washingtontimes.com - 5-2-12
In a move that could help the government trim its burgeoning health care costs, the Food and Drug Administration may soon permit Americans to obtain some drugs used to treat conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes without obtaining a prescription.
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Some Teens May Be Pre-Wired for Addiction: Study
abcnews.go.com - 5-1-12
Babies instinctively clutch on fingers and seek out their mother’s voice. For many, it takes little effort to understand the difference between laughter and anger.
But how instinctive is a teen’s desire to snort a line of coke?
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Women who smoke during pregnancy 'may be more likely to have a child with Asperger's syndrome'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-1-12
Women who smoke during pregnancy could be more likely to have a child with high-functioning autism, say researchers. 'It has long been known that autism is an umbrella term for a wide range of disorders that impair social and communication skills,' said lead author Professor Amy Kalkbrenner from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
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Thousands of men suffer needlessly as prostate cancer surgery is often 'a waste of time'
dailymail.co.uk - 5-1-12
Thousands of men are undergoing debilitating surgery for prostate cancer which may be needless, claim scientists. They say that in many cases the tumours are growing so slowly they do not need to be treated. A major study has shown that survival rates of men who had surgery were hardly any higher than patients whose doctors essentially did nothing.
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Blood test 'could detect breast cancer years in advance'
telegraph.co.uk - 5-1-12
A blood test that can detect breast cancer decades before the disease develops could be available in five years, scientists have announced.
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Teenager stripped and rode naked through town on bike after eating hallucogenic Devil's Snare
telegraph.co.uk - 5-1-12
Police and health experts warned today that a "Harry Potter" plant which gives an instant high but which can also kill is gaining a foothold on the British countryside.
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Top 5 things that cause brain bloopers
msnbc.msn.com - 5-1-12
Our brains balk at the thought of four-dimensional hypercubes, quantum mechanics or an infinite universe, and understandably so. But our gray matter is generally adept at processing sensory data from the mundane objects and experiences of daily life. However, there are a few glaring exceptions.
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Why you get the dizzies when standing up too fast
msnbc.msn.com - 5-1-12
If you're seeing stars when you get out of bed in the morning, it's probably not because you slept with Halle Berry last night. There's actually a name for that dizziness you sometimes get when you go from laying down or sitting to standing up: orthostatic hypotension (OH).
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Study: Obesity adds $190 billion in health costs
msnbc.msn.com - 5-1-12
U.S. hospitals are ripping out wall-mounted toilets and replacing them with floor models to better support obese patients. The Federal Transit Administration wants buses to be tested for the impact of heavier riders on steering and braking. Cars are burning nearly a billion gallons of gasoline more a year than if passengers weighed what they did in 1960.
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Altering Attitude To An Ailment May Result In Less Day-To-Day Pain
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-1-12
Evidence of a study published in the journal Pain reveals that people with chronic pain who learn to divert the focus away from their ailments may sleep better and experience less day-to-day pain.
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Schoolchildren On Free School Meals More Likely To Abuse Alcohol Or Drugs
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-1-12
Although the short and long-term health risks of alcohol, tobacco and illegal drug use is well known, they still remain a public health concern in the UK amongst young people, with risks ranging from accidental injuries, to violence, sexual ill-health and elevated rates of chronic conditions as well as premature death.
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Metformin And Rosiglitazone Combo Best For Kids With Diabetes Type 2
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-1-12
Controlling blood sugar in children and teenagers with diabetes type two is best achieved with a metformin plus rosiglitazone combo, compared to just metformin or metformin plus lifestyle changes, researchers reported in NEJM (New England Journal of Medicine). Blood-sugar control is also known as glycemic control, or blood glucose control.
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Arthritis - Anxiety Twice As Common As Depression
medicalnewstoday.com - 5-1-12
Approximately one third of adults with arthritis in the USA aged 45+ years suffer from anxiety or depression, researchers from the CDC reported in the journal Arthritis Care & Research. The authors added that the prevalence of anxiety in adults with arthritis is almost twice as high as depression, in spite of more studies focusing on the arthritis-depression link.
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New ED drug may work in 15 minutes
cnn.com - 5-1-12
Look out Viagra - there's a new erectile dysfunction drug in town. It's called Stendra (aka Avanafil) and it's newly approved by the Food and Drug Administration, making it the first ED drug to come out in almost 10 years. Although Stendra has not been tested against what is known as the "Little Blue Pill," drug makers say that - for some men - it may work faster.
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Obese less likely to wear seatbelts
upi.com - 5-1-12
Normal weight drivers are 67 percent more likely to wear a seatbelt than morbidly obese drivers, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York found.
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Ending anti-clotting drug ups stroke risk
upi.com - 5-1-12
Some heart patients with irregular heartbeats taken off anti-clotting medication face a greater risk of stroke or blood clotting, U.S. researchers say.
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Autism disorder may have link to smoking
upi.com - 5-1-12
Children of women who smoked during pregnancy were more likely to have high-functioning autism, such as Asperger's Disorder, U.S. researchers say.
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'Brake gene' turned off in pancreatic cancer
bbc.co.uk - 5-1-12
Aggressive pancreatic tumours may be treatable with a new class of drugs, according to Cancer Research UK.
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U.S. Sees Tripling of Babies Born Addicted to Painkillers
healthday.com - 5-1-12
About one baby an hour is born addicted to powerful painkillers called opiates in the United States, a new study shows.
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Here Are the Women Who Need Mammograms in Their 40s: Study
healthday.com - 5-1-12
A new analysis that may help women in their 40s interpret mammogram guidelines says those with a family history of breast cancer or extremely dense breast tissue should start getting regular screenings.
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Less-Invasive Surgery for Esophageal Cancer Might Be Safer
healthday.com - 5-1-12
Besides being easier on the patient, minimally invasive surgery to remove the esophagus of patients with esophageal cancer can also greatly reduce the risk of lung infection compared to traditional open surgery, a new study finds.
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Exercise Twice a Day Vital for Your Dog's Health, Expert Says
healthday.com - 5-1-12
Just like people, dogs need to get daily exercise to stay healthy, a veterinarian says.
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Insecticide Linked to Brain Abnormalities in Kids
healthday.com - 5-1-12
A new, small study links maternal exposure to a commonly used insecticide to unusual changes in the brain structures of young children, although the research doesn't definitely prove that the pesticide is at fault.
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Formaldehyde Exposure May Affect Fertility in Men
sciencedaily.com - 5-1-12
Occupational exposure to formaldehyde in Chinese men may be linked to reduced fertility, reports a paper in the May Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).
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