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June, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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FFX Subsidized Housing Tenants Live Large On Your Dime
wmal.com - 6-30-11
Resort-style swimming pools with fountains and heated spas, billiards rooms, granite counter tops, ceramic tile, indoor basketball courts, stainless steel appliances -- many Fairfax County taxpayers cannot afford such luxuries. But they are paying for these amenities for use by low-income residents who live in subsidized housing in affluent neighborhoods.
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FDA Advises: Avastin No Good for Breast Cancer
abcnews.go.com - 6-30-11
A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory committee today unanimously recommended that Avastin should no longer be used to treat breast cancer, saying that the risks of the drug far outweighed any benefits.
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Living well: Older generation does it best, survey says
usatoday.com - 6-30-11
Whether you are a twentysomething, Gen Xer or Baby Boomer, the older crew has an edge on you, according to new research.
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Diabetes time-bomb: 300,000 under-50s at risk of amputations and kidney failure
dailymail.co.uk - 6-30-11
Hundreds of thousands of younger people with diabetes are facing severe complications and could require 'substantial' hospital care in the future, according to an NHS report.
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Finally, a cure for hay fever? Scientists discover pine tree powder could stop summer sneezes
dailymail.co.uk - 6-30-11
Hay fever sufferers plagued by itchy eyes and a runny nose this summer may find relief in a powder produced from pine trees.
The cellulose nasal spray forms a barrier over the membrane, lining the nose and filtering out allergens like tree and flower pollen.
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37 strawberries a day, keeps doctors away
upi.com - 6-30-11
Thirty-seven strawberries a day may help keep diabetes complications away, U.S. researchers say.
Researchers at the Salk Institute's Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory say fisetin, a naturally-occurring flavonoid found most abundantly in strawberries and to a lesser extent in other fruits and vegetables, lessens complications of diabetes.
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Religion benefits traumatic brain injury
upi.com - 6-30-11
If traumatic brain injury victims feel close to a higher power, it can help them rehabilitate, U.S. researchers found.
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Drug addiction usually starts before 18
cnn.com - 6-30-11
The top public health problem in the United States is not obesity, as many might guess, says one public policy organization. The National Center for Addiction and Substance Abuse, also known as CASA, leaves no question as to where it stands on the subject, titling its latest study "Adolescent Substance Use: America’s No. 1 Public Health Problem."
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Snacking clue to obesity epidemic
bbc.co.uk - 6-30-11
Snacking and super sizing are two of the dieter's worst enemies, research suggests.
The average daily calorie intake in the US has increased by almost a third in 30 years, reaching 2,374 kilocalories.
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Coconut sugar quickly replacing agave nectar as natural sweetener of choice
naturalnews.com - 6-30-11
Over the last two years, we've witnessed a mass exodus away from agave nectar and a search for more natural sweeteners that are both low on the glycemic index and high in nutrient density. Several candidates have emerged, but my all-out favorite has become coconut sugar, which is really more like a coconut caramel sap.
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Are you eating pesticides? Canola oil, soybean oil used as key ingredients in pesticide products
naturalnews.com - 6-30-11
n a shocking new video, Mike Adams (the Health Ranger) reveals that common cooking oils such as canola oil and soybean oil are used as key active ingredients in pesticide products because they work so effectively to kill bugs. The video shows how one pesticide product that kills insects is made with 96% canola oil and is so dangerous that the label says, "Hazards to humans and domestic animals."
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Organic Consumers Association boycott forces Silk soymilk to get honest with Non-GMO Project
naturalnews.com - 6-30-11
The Silk beverage company, which is owned by the nation's largest dairy conglomerate Dean Foods, shot itself in the foot in 2009 when it quietly switched its line of organic soymilk beverages to conventional without changing its products labels.
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More Evidence CT Scans Better at Detecting Lung Cancer
healthday.com - 6-30-11
Routinely screening longtime smokers and former heavy smokers for lung cancer using CT scans can cut the death rate by 20 percent compared to those screened by chest X-ray, according to a major U.S. government study.
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E-Prescribing Doesn't Slash Errors, Study Finds
healthday.com - 6-30-11
Outpatient electronic prescribing systems make the same common mistakes that occur in manual systems, a new study finds.
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Mechanism by Which Chronic Stress Causes Brain Disease Identified
sciencedaily.com - 6-30-11
Chronic stress has long been linked with neurodegeneration. Scientists at USC now think they may know why. The study, which has tremendous implications for understanding and treating Alzheimer's disease, was published in the June issue of The FASEB Journal (the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology).
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Ghrelin Likely Involved in Why We Choose 'Comfort Foods' When Stressed
sciencedaily.com - 6-30-11
We are one step closer to deciphering why some stressed people indulge in chocolate, mashed potatoes, ice cream and other high-calorie, high-fat comfort foods. UT Southwestern Medical Center-led findings, in a mouse study, suggest that ghrelin -- the so-called "hunger hormone" -- is involved in triggering this reaction to high stress situations.
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Dyslexia Linked to Difficulties in Perceiving Rhythmic Patterns in Music
sciencedaily.com - 6-30-11
Children with dyslexia often find it difficult to count the number of syllables in spoken words or to determine whether words rhyme. These subtle difficulties are seen across languages with different writing systems and they indicate that the dyslexic brain has trouble processing the way that sounds in spoken language are structured. In a new study published in the June issue of Elsevier's Cortex, researchers at Cambridge have shown, using a music task, that this is linked to a broader difficulty in perceiving rhythmic patterns, or metrical structure.
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BPA-Exposed Male Deer Mice Are Demasculinized and Undesirable to Females, New Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 6-30-11
While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration notes "some concern" with the controversial chemical BPA, and many other countries, such as Japan and Canada, have considered BPA product bans, disagreement exists amongst scientists in this field on the effects of BPA in animals and humans. The latest research from the University of Missouri shows that BPA causes male deer mice to become demasculinized and behave more like females in their spatial navigational abilities, leading scientists to conclude that exposure to BPA during human development could be damaging to behavioral and cognitive traits that are unique to each sex and important in reproduction.
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Mystery Ingredient in Coffee Boosts Protection Against Alzheimer's Disease, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 6-30-11
A yet unidentified component of coffee interacts with the beverage's caffeine, which could be a surprising reason why daily coffee intake protects against Alzheimer's disease. A new Alzheimer's mouse study by researchers at the University of South Florida found that this interaction boosts blood levels of a critical growth factor that seems to fight off the Alzheimer's disease process.
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Multiple Sclerosis-Like Disease Discovered in Monkeys
sciencedaily.com - 6-30-11
Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University have discovered a naturally occurring disease in monkeys that is very much like multiple sclerosis in humans -- a discovery that could have a major impact on efforts to understand the cause of multiple sclerosis.
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Why doughnuts can make you depressed...and the other surprising, everyday triggers that can cause depression
dailymail.co.uk - 6-29-11
Depression is a blight that leaves few families untouched.
Last year alone, 5.5 million Britons took antidepressants, according to research just published by scientists at the universities of Warwick and Stirling.
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Diet drink consumers 'put on more weight'
telegraph.co.uk - 6-29-11
Diet drinks may not help people lose weight, medics have suggested after a study showed that those who drink them tend to get fatter.
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Peroxide fog can sterilize hospitals
upi.com - 6-29-11
A new peroxide technology may be an effective way to disinfect hospitals to reduce patient contact with pathogens, a U.S. infection prevention firm says.
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Diet sodas don't help with dieting
msnbc.msn.com - 6-29-11
Two new studies have linked drinking diet soda to poorer health compared with those who don't drink the beverage.
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Mammograms can cut breast cancer deaths by a third
msnbc.msn.com - 6-29-11
The longest-running breast cancer screening study ever conducted has shown that regular mammograms prevent deaths from breast cancer, and the number of lives saved increases over time, an international research team said on Tuesday.
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Exposed documents reveal Napolitano, TSA lied about safety of cancer-causing naked body scanners
naturalnews.com - 6-29-11
Remember when Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano claimed back in 2010 that the US Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) naked body scanners had been proven safe by research conducted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request recently brought to light internal emails that were sent by NIST to DHS that basically decry Napolitano's false assertion that NIST had verified the safety of the naked body scanners.
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Trials of Type 1 Diabetes Vaccines Bring Mixed Results
healthday.com - 6-29-11
A vaccine developed to prevent the progression of type 1 diabetes shows some promise, while another designed to alter insulin production fails, according to the results of two new studies.
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Obesity a Major Cause of Early Death in Women: Study
healthday.com - 6-29-11
Obesity is a major risk factor for death among obese women who don't smoke, particularly low-income women, a new study finds.
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Does Grilling Kill E. Coli O157:H7?
sciencedaily.com - 6-29-11
Top sirloin steaks have been getting a grilling in U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) food safety studies. USDA microbiologist John B. Luchansky and his colleagues are conducting experiments to help make sure that neither the foodborne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 nor any of its pathogenic relatives will ruin the pleasure of eating this popular entrée.
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How Cavity-Causing Microbes Invade Heart
sciencedaily.com - 6-29-11
Scientists have discovered the tool that bacteria normally found in our mouths use to invade heart tissue, causing a dangerous and sometimes lethal infection of the heart known as endocarditis. The work raises the possibility of creating a screening tool -- perhaps a swab of the cheek, or a spit test -- to gauge a dental patient's vulnerability to the condition.
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It's Not an Apple a Day After All -- It's Strawberries: Flavonoids Could Represent Two-Fisted Assault On Diabetes and Nervous System Disorders
sciencedaily.com - 6-29-11
A recent study from scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies suggests that a strawberry a day (or more accurately, 37 of them) could keep not just one doctor away, but an entire fleet of them, including the neurologist, the endocrinologist, and maybe even the oncologist.
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Can Soda Tax Curb Obesity? Surprising Reason Why Soda Tax to Reduce Obesity Won't Work
sciencedaily.com - 6-29-11
To many, a tax on soda is a no-brainer in advancing the nation's war on obesity. Advocates point to a number of studies in recent years that conclude that sugary drinks have a lot to do with why Americans are getting fatter.
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An FDA Panel Is Deciding Life or Death For My Wife
foxnews.com - 6-29-11
December 16, 2010 will forever be the day that changed my life. I had just received a news flash across my monitor that the FDA had confirmed its advisory panel’s decision to ”de-label” the drug Avastin for breast cancer patients. The practical implication of this was that my wife Arlene was now at mortal risk.
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Cancer Surges In Body Scanner Operators; TSA Launches Cover-Up
infowars.com - 6-29-11
Fearful of provoking further public resistance to naked airport body scanners, the TSA has been caught covering up a surge in cases of TSA workers developing cancer as a result of their close proximity to radiation-firing devices, perhaps the most shocking revelation to emerge from the latest FOIA documents obtained by the Electronic Privacy Information Center.
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Frankenpot – Marijuana gone GMO!
farmwars.info - 6-28-11
Marijuana Growers: Hang onto your pot, here come the genetically modified genes!
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Women who often work at night may face higher odds of developing type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.
healthday.com - 6-28-11
Pregnancy is generally safe for women with multiple sclerosis, a new study says.
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Working Night Shifts May Raise Diabetes Risk for Women
healthday.com - 6-28-11
Women who often work at night may face higher odds of developing type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.
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Enjoying a beer outside 'makes you more attractive to mosquitoes'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-28-11
Anyone who wants to enjoy a cold beer during the heatwave might want to spray on insect repellent first, after a study found it makes you more attractive to mosquitoes.
The insects are 15 per cent more likely to fly towards humans after they have consumed a pint or two, according to a study.
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Pesticides could cause Parkinson's 'by stopping brain protein from cleaning up toxic molecules'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-28-11
Scientists have shed new light on a link between Parkinson's disease and two pesticides, which they hope will improve both prevention and treatment for the neurodegenerative disease.
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Busted! Big Pharma epilepsy study rigged to push drug gabapentin
naturalnews.com - 6-28-11
If you think being concerned over natural health issues means you automatically dismiss everything that mainstream medicine has to say - think again. Not only are many mainstream researchers coming up with evidence that nutrition and other natural therapies really are effective but now comes a report published in none other than Archives of Internal Medicine, a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), that blows the lid off an unethical Big Pharma practice.
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Monsanto trying to take over world seed supply, nation by nation
naturalnews.com - 6-28-11
He who controls the seed controls the food supply; and he who controls the food supply controls the world. There is no question that Monsanto is on a mission to monopolize the conventional seed market. In fact, they are steadfastly working towards the goal of creating a world where 100% of all commercial seeds are genetically modified and patented- basically a world where natural seeds are extinct.
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Natural amino acids preferable to antibiotics for treating infections, says study
naturalnews.com - 6-28-11
As most NaturalNews readers probably already know, there is a rapidly-growing resistance to antibiotics that has given way to antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" like Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP), and even the strongest antibiotic drugs available have all but lost their ability to treat even the most common infections that afflict people today.
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Lab-Grown Blood Vessels Seem to Help Dialysis Patients
healthday.com - 6-28-11
In early research, blood vessels originating from a donor's skin cells and grown in a laboratory have been successfully implanted in three dialysis patients.
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Vitamin D, Calcium Combo May Halve Melanoma Risk in Some Women
healthday.com - 6-28-11
Certain women at risk for developing melanoma, the most severe form of skin cancer, may cut the likelihood in half by taking vitamin D/calcium supplements, a new study suggests.
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Does Ovulation Boost a Woman's 'Gaydar'?
healthday.com - 6-28-11
Uncovering some science behind the type of intuition known as "gaydar," a team of American and Canadian researchers reports that a woman can tell whether a man is straight or gay by looking at his face when she is ovulating.
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Content, Timing of TV Can Take Toll on Kids' Sleep
healthday.com - 6-28-11
Sleep problems common to the toddler set are made worse both by violent media content and greater evening use of televisions, computers or video games, a new study suggests.
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Terahertz Light to Illuminate Cell Biology and Cancer Research
sciencedaily.com - 6-28-11
Unique research carried out at the Science and Technology Facilities Council's (STFC) Daresbury Laboratory in Cheshire is set to trigger a new era in research into cancer diagnosis and our understanding of how living things function.
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Premature Aging Caused by Some HIV Drugs, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 6-28-11
A class of anti-retroviral drugs commonly used to treat HIV, particularly in Africa and low income countries, can cause premature aging, according to research published June 26 in the journal Nature Genetics. The study shows that the drugs damage DNA in the patient's mitochondria -- the 'batteries' which power their cells.
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Master Switch for Adult Epilepsy Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 6-28-11
UC Irvine and French researchers have identified a central switch responsible for the transformation of healthy brain cells into epileptic ones, opening the way to both treat and prevent temporal lobe epilepsy.
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Researchers Learn How Lung Fibrosis Begins and Could Be Treated
sciencedaily.com - 6-28-11
An invasive cell that leads to fibrosis of the lungs may be stopped by cutting off its supply of sugar, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center.
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Early chemical exposures may affect breast health
usatoday.com - 6-27-11
Exposure to common chemicals during critical periods of breast development may affect breast growth, the ability to breast-feed and breast cancer risk, a new report contends.
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Boring jobs lead to burn-out
telegraph.co.uk - 6-27-11
They believe there is a distinct category of "underchallenged" employees who end up finding they simply cannot take any more of the "monotonous and unstimulating" tasks that they are expected to perform.
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Some pets go missing due to fireworks
upi.com - 6-27-11
Fourth of July fireworks can scare pets and the holiday leads to more cats and dogs going missing than any other day of the year, a pet recovery service says.
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Global diabetes epidemic balloons to 350 million
msnbc.msn.com - 6-27-11
The number of adults with diabetes worldwide has more than doubled since 1980 to 347 million, a far larger number than previously thought and one that suggests costs of treating the disease will also balloon.
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Texas declares light bulb sovereignty, incandescents to remain legal in Lone Star State
naturalnews.com - 6-27-11
Federal attempts to illegally control what types of light bulbs Americans are permitted to buy and use have been thwarted by the great state of Texas, thanks to the recent passage of HB 2510. The bill effectively exempts incandescent light bulbs made and sold within the state of Texas from having to comply with federal light bulb restrictions that are set to come into effect in 2012.
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Spice up your sex life with this simple curry spice
naturalnews.com - 6-27-11
A new study conducted by researchers from both Applied Science and Nutrition, an Australia-based scientific and consulting company, and the University of Queensland's medical school have found that the curry spice fenugreek livens up a lot more than just food. Based in their findings, men who consume fenugreek regularly can boost their sex drives by as much as 25 percent, which can eliminate the need to take dangerous pharmaceuticals.
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Calories, Not Protein or Carbs, Are Key to Weight Loss: Study
healthday.com - 6-27-11
Curbing calories is the key ingredient for diabetics seeking to lose weight, and low-fat diets that are either high in protein or high in carbs are equally effective, researchers say.
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HIV Drugs May Be Tied to Early Aging
healthday.com - 6-27-11
An older class of antiretroviral drugs used to treat HIV can cause premature aging, a new study suggests.
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In Search of the Memory Molecule, Researchers Discover Key Protein Complex
sciencedaily.com - 6-27-11
Have a tough time remembering where you put your keys, learning a new language or recalling names at a cocktail party? New research from the Lisman Laboratory at Brandeis University points to a molecule that is central to the process by which memories are stored in the brain.
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Space Research Gives Birth to New Ultrasound Tools for Health Care in Orbit, On Earth
sciencedaily.com - 6-27-11
The remoteness and resource limitations of spaceflight pose a serious challenge to astronaut health care. One solution is ultrasound.
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A Breath of Fresh Air for Detecting Vitamin B12 Deficiency
sciencedaily.com - 6-27-11
Researchers have developed a new test to detect the levels of vitamin B12 using your breath, allowing for a cheaper, faster, and simpler diagnosis that could help to avoid the potentially fatal symptoms of B12 deficiency.
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Scientists Discover How to Control Fate of Stem Cells
sciencedaily.com - 6-27-11
Scientists from the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS), an institute of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), in collaboration with the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI), have discovered how the body uses a single communication system to decide the fate of stem cells. The study, published in the scientific journal PLoS Genetics on 23rd June 2011, paves the way for the development of new methods of stem cell therapy with fewer side effects.
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US GM Crops - 86% Corn, 90% Soybeans, 93% Of Cotton
ers.usda.gov - 6-27-11
U.S. farmers have adopted genetically engineered (GE) crops widely since their introduction in 1996, notwithstanding uncertainty about consumer acceptance and economic and environmental impacts. Soybeans and cotton genetically engineered with herbicide-tolerant traits have been the most widely and rapidly adopted GE crops in the U.S., followed by insect-resistant cotton and corn.
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Yum, yum, eat up: Test-tube beefburger made from mince grown from stem cells is on the way
dailymail.co.uk - 6-27-11
The first test-tube beefburger made of mince grown from stem cells is only a year away, scientists claim.
They believe their creation could pave the way for humans being able to eat meat without animals being slaughtered.
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Conservationists discover more than 1,000 species in New Guinea
guardian.co.uk - 6-27-11
Treasure trove of unknown varieties of animal, bird, fish, insect and plant have been identified in the forests and wetlands of the Pacific island over a period of just 10 years
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Treatment up for prescription drug, alcohol abuse
usatoday.com - 6-26-11
More people are getting treatment for prescription drug abuse than a decade ago, and alcohol treament is on the rise after declining for several years, a new government analysis shows.
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Headache, cold sore or ulcers? Thyme to try a herbal remedy
dailymail.co.uk - 6-26-11
Many of us have a few herbs in our garden - or wilting in a pot on the kitchen windowsill - that we use to add flavour to a sauce or roast dinner, writes Jill Foster. But these inauspicious plants may have far more significant uses when it comes to pepping up our health.
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Shockwaves that can heal broken bones: New treatment avoids need for surgery on fractures that won't join up
dailymail.co.uk - 6-26-11
New ultrasound treatment avoids need for surgery on fractures that won't join up
Those suffering from stubborn bone fractures once faced a stark choice: have painful surgery, followed by months of rehabilitation, or face a possible lifetime of pain and immobility.
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Teen eating disorders persist in adulthood
upi.com - 6-26-11
Adolescents who diet and develop eating disorders carry these unhealthy practices into young adulthood and beyond, University of Minnesota researchers found.
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Diabetes rate 'doubles' - Imperial College and Harvard research suggests
bbc.co.uk - 6-26-11
The number of adults with diabetes in the world has more than doubled since 1980, according to a new study.
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Study: Homeopathic remedy helps treat migraine headaches naturally
naturalnews.com - 6-26-11
A new study published in the journal Headache has found that a homeopathic preparation of ginger and the medicinal herb feverfew is effective at treating migraine headaches. Based on their findings, researchers found that 63 percent of those who took the remedy at the first signs of a migraine experienced pain relief, while only 39 percent of those taking a placebo experienced any perceived relief.
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7 surprising things you're not supposed to know about sunscreen and sunlight exposure
naturalnews.com - 6-26-11
Ask somebody about sunscreen and you're likely to receive an earful of disinformation from a person who has been repeatedly misinformed by health authorities and the mainstream media. Almost nothing you hear about sunscreen from traditional media channels is accurate. So here's a quick guide to the 7 most important things you need to know about sunscreen, sunlight and vitamin D.
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Diabetes on Upswing Worldwide
healthday.com - 6-26-11
The last quarter century has seen a such an explosion in the incidence of diabetes that nearly 350 million people worldwide now struggle with the disease, a new British-American study reveals.
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Pollinators Make Critical Contribution to Healthy Diets
sciencedaily.com - 6-26-11
Fruits and vegetables that provide the highest levels of vitamins and minerals to the human diet globally depend heavily on bees and other pollinating animals, according to a new study published in the international online journal PLoS ONE.
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Cocaine Laced With Veterinary Drug Levamisole Eats Away at Flesh
abcnews.go.com - 6-25-11
Cocaine cut with the veterinary drug levamisole could be the culprit in a flurry of flesh-eating disease in New York and Los Angeles.
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E. coli outbreak caused by mix of 2 deadly strains
usatoday.com - 6-25-11
A mix of two dangerous E. coli strains caused the recent deadly food poisoning outbreak in Germany, according to a new study of the bacteria's DNA.
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Drug use involved in 25% of fatal crashes, study finds
usatoday.com - 6-25-11
Drivers who die in crashes test positive for drugs 25% of the time, a new study finds.
Researchers examined data on more than 44,000 drivers in single-vehicle crashes who died between 1999 and 2009. They found that 24.9% tested positive for drugs and 37% had blood-alcohol levels in excess of 0.08, the legal limit. Fifty-eight percent had no alcohol in their systems; 5% had less than 0.08. The data were from a government database on traffic fatalities.
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Diabetic woman has leg amputated after terrier chews off her infected toe
dailymail.co.uk - 6-25-11
A diabetic woman had to have her leg amputated after her Jack Russell terrier chewed off her infected toe while she was asleep.
She slept through the traumatic incident as she suffers from diabetic neuropathy, which meant her feet were numb.
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Man flu DOES exist: Women's immune system is much better at fighting off the common cold
dailymail.co.uk - 6-25-11
Men really are more susceptible to catching colds, scientists have discovered.
Research shows that women are far better at resisting the bugs which cause coughs and sniffles - and often leave their partners heading straight for bed.
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Stressful home ups lung damage in kids
upi.com - 6-25-11
Living in stressful homes increases the effects of outside air pollution in children, resulting in greater pollution-related lung damage, U.S. researchers say.
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Ferns best for removal of indoor chemicals
upi.com - 6-25-11
Five classes of plants were tested on removing formaldehyde inside buildings and ferns were found the most effective, U.S. and South Korean researchers say.
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Where stress hides in your body
msnbc.msn.com - 6-25-11
The best explanation of stress we've ever heard comes from Stanford neurobiologist Robert Sapolsky, Ph.D., the author of Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers.
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TEPCO: Stopping melt-through fuel from contaminating groundwater will cost too much, hurt company stock price
naturalnews.com - 6-25-11
The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), which owns the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility struck by the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, has made it abundantly clear that protecting people and the environment from the radioactive fallout of its three massive reactor "melt-throughs" is not a priority.
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'Sexting' Common for Those Who Cheat: Study
healthday.com - 6-25-11
A new study finds that the practice of "sexting" -- sending salacious texts or nude photos over the Internet -- is now a key tool for Americans bent on infidelity.
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Snacking Totals a Quarter of Daily Calories for Many
healthday.com - 6-25-11
Snacking accounts for 25 percent of the calories consumed by Americans each day and beverages account for half of those snacking calories, a new study indicates.
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FDA Urges Reduced Doses for Anemia Drugs
healthday.com - 6-25-11
Doctors should use the anemia drugs Procrit, Epogen and Aranesp more cautiously in patients with chronic kidney disease, U.S. health officials said Friday.
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Lifestyle Changes Might Alter Breast Cancer Rates
healthday.com - 6-25-11
Lifestyle changes such as losing weight, drinking less alcohol and getting more exercise could lead to a substantial reduction in breast cancer cases across an entire population, according to a new model that estimates the impact of these modifiable risk factors.
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More Autism Diagnoses in High-Tech Areas, Study Finds
healthday.com - 6-25-11
Autism experts have long noted that they meet a lot of engineers and computer programmers who have autistic children compared to, say, salespeople. A new study suggests there may be merit to those observations.
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Prejudice Linked to Women's Menstrual Cycle, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-25-11
Women's bias against male strangers increases when women are fertile, suggesting prejudice may be partly fueled by genetics, according to a study by Michigan State University psychology researchers.
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Pollinators Make Critical Contribution to Healthy Diets
sciencedaily.com - 6-25-11
Fruits and vegetables that provide the highest levels of vitamins and minerals to the human diet globally depend heavily on bees and other pollinating animals, according to a new study published in the international online journal PLoS ONE.
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Cut Down On 'Carbs' to Reduce Body Fat, Study Authors Say
sciencedaily.com - 6-25-11
A modest reduction in consumption of carbohydrate foods may promote loss of deep belly fat, even with little or no change in weight, a new study finds.
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Lithium Profoundly Prevents Brain Damage Associated With Parkinson's Disease, Mouse Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-25-11
Lithium profoundly prevents the aggregation of toxic proteins and cell loss associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) in a mouse model of the condition. Preclinical research is now underway at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging to determine correct dosages for a drug that continues to be the gold standard for the treatment of bipolar disorder. The Buck is currently working toward initiating a Phase IIa clinical studies of lithium in humans in conjunction with standard PD drug therapy.
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Patients With Bowel Disease Eager to Test 'Fecal' Therapy
sciencedaily.com - 6-25-11
The first study of the social and ethical issues associated with a provocative approach to treatment for ulcerative colitis has found that the majority of potential patients are eager for what is now called "fecal microbiota transplantation" to become available, although many have concerns about donor selection, screening, and methods of delivery.
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Livestock infection hits victims in Wash.
upi.com - 6-24-11
Health officials in Washington say five people have been diagnosed with what doctors suspect is a rare livestock-related bacterial infection called Q fever.
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Caring for husband may cut longevity
upi.com - 6-24-11
The longer men are retired, the worse they rate their health, but they report improved health when their wives retire, U.S. researchers say.
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Daily aspirin may protect against melanoma
msnbc.msn.com - 6-24-11
An aspirin a day may keep melanoma at bay, a new study suggests.
After scrutinizing the medical records of 1,000 people, an international team of researchers have determined that the risk of melanoma was cut by almost half when people took a daily dose of aspirin for at least five years.
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Generic drug makers not liable for failing to list side effects
msnbc.msn.com - 6-24-11
The Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that makers of generic drugs cannot be sued for failing to warn consumers of the possible side effects of their products if they copy the exact warnings on the medicines' brand-name equivalents.
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1 in 5 kids carry too much weight before kindergarten
cnn.com - 6-24-11
Childhood obesity prevention efforts should start early – like after birth, says the Institute of Medicine.
Almost 10% of infants and toddlers under the age of 2 carry extra weight. And one in five children between ages of 2 and 5 are overweight or obese.
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Does life online give you 'popcorn brain'?
cnn.com - 6-24-11
When Hilarie Cash arrives home from work in the evening, she has a choice: She can go outside and tend to her garden or she can hop on her laptop.
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Common medicines for elderly linked to death
bbc.co.uk - 6-24-11
Commonly used drugs - for conditions such as heart disease, depression and allergies - have been linked to a greater risk of death and declining brain function by UK researchers.
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Type 2 diabetes in newly diagnosed 'can be reversed'
bbc.co.uk - 6-24-11
An extreme eight-week diet of 600 calories a day can reverse Type 2 diabetes in people newly diagnosed with the disease, says a Diabetologia study.
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Four decades of drug war tyranny may come to an end with Ron Paul's new effort to legalize marijuana
naturalnews.com - 6-24-11
Four decades of the so-called "War on Drugs" has led only to the suffering of millions of innocents, the crowding of our prisons with non-violent citizens, the utter waste of billions of dollars on law enforcement and the (in)justice system, and the enriching of underground drug gangs who thrive on violence. The outlawing of marijuana in America has been a disastrous political policy and an insane medical policy. It has labeled biochemical addicts "criminals" and thrown them in prisons to be treated like dogs.
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Poor 'Fat-Tasters' May Tend to Be Heavier
healthday.com - 6-24-11
The creaminess of fat-rich foods such as ice cream and salad dressing appeal to many, but new evidence indicates that some people can actually "taste" the fat lurking in rich foods and that those who can't may end up eating more of those foods.
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Early Talk Therapy May Help Stroke Patients Bounce Back
healthday.com - 6-24-11
After suffering a stroke, patients who talk with a therapist about their hopes and fears about the future are less depressed and live longer than patients who don't, British researchers say.
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Speed of Brain Signals Clocked: New Studies Illuminate Brain's Complex Neurotransmission Machinery
sciencedaily.com - 6-24-11
Two studies featuring research from Weill Cornell Medical College have uncovered surprising details about the complex process that leads to the flow of neurotransmitters between brain neurons -- a dance of chemical messages so delicate that missteps often lead to neurological dysfunction.
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Obese Dieters' Brain Chemistry Works Against Their Weight-Loss Efforts
sciencedaily.com - 6-24-11
If you've been trying to lose weight and suspect your body's working against you, you may be right, according to a University of Illinois study published in Obesity.
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Physicist's Discovery Alters Conventional Understanding of Sight
sciencedaily.com - 6-24-11
A discovery by a team of researchers led by a Syracuse University physicist sheds new light on how the visual process is initiated. For almost 50 years, scientists have believed that light signals could not be initiated unless special light-receptor molecules in the retinal cells first changed their shape in a process called isomerization. However, the SU research team, which includes researchers from Columbia University, has demonstrated that visual signals can be initiated in the absence of isomerization.
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Effects of Stress Can Be Inherited, and Here's How
sciencedaily.com - 6-24-11
None of us are strangers to stress of various kinds. It turns out the effects of all those stresses can change the fate of future generation, influencing our very DNA without any change to the underlying sequence of As, Gs, Ts and Cs. Now, researchers reporting in the June 24 issue of Cell, a Cell Press publication, have new evidence that helps to explain just how these epigenetic changes really happen.
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Study: Mountaintop coal mining raises birth defect risks
usatoday.com - 6-23-11
Children born in mountaintop-mining counties across Appalachia may suffer elevated risks of birth defects, concludes a forthcoming study.
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More young adults are living with diabetes
usatoday.com - 6-23-11
Some people say aiming to look sleek in your swimsuit or wedding duds is the biggest motivator for losing weight. But Mike Durbin's incentive for dropping pounds beats all.
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Paralysed by a PORK CHOP: Father-of-two, 46, almost dies after eating undercooked meat
dailymail.co.uk - 6-23-11
A father-of-two today told how he almost died after eating an under-cooked pork chop.
Darren Ashall, a plant operator from Chorley, Lancashire, developed a potentially lethal brain bug that has left him in hospital for nearly five months.
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City dwellers suffer most stress
telegraph.co.uk - 6-23-11
People living in the countryside are less likely to suffer stress and anxiety than city dwellers because their brains are wired differently, a study has found.
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Hospital pillows riddled with infection
telegraph.co.uk - 6-23-11
Hospital patients are at risk of catching infections such as MRSA and C. difficile from "biohazard" pillows which are ridden with 30 different bugs, according to a new study.
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Marriage increases colon cancer survival
upi.com - 6-23-11
Both men and women have better odds of surviving colon cancer if they are married, U.S. researchers say.
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Pine bark, CoQ10 improves heart failure
upi.com - 6-23-11
Pycnogenol, or pine bark, and Coenzyme Q10 in combination helped treated heart failure patients be more physically energetic, researchers in Italy found.
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Frankincense may help treat arthritis
upi.com - 6-23-11
Researchers at Cardiff University in Wales say frankincense -- long used in traditional medicine -- may help alleviate symptoms of arthritis.
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Is your thyroid on the fritz?
msnbc.msn.com - 6-23-11
Kristin Angelov was 26 when the exhaustion hit. Getting up in the morning was a superhuman effort, a struggle compounded by her suddenly dismal mood.
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Why you should never go to the hospital in July
cnn.com - 6-23-11
Do not get sick in July. Why? You might die.
A recent study published by the Journal of General Internal Medicine reported a 10 percent spike in teaching hospital deaths during the month of July due to medical errors. We call this spike “The July Effect” and we attribute it to the influx of new interns and residents.
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Human eye protein senses Earth's magnetism
bbc.co.uk - 6-23-11
A light-sensitive protein in the human eye has been shown to act as a "compass" in a magnetic field, when it is present in flies' eyes.
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People over 65 should drink less, a report says
bbc.co.uk - 6-23-11
Recommended safe limits for drinking alcohol by older people should be drastically cut, according to a report.
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Environmental group sues 26 companies for false organic labeling of personal care products
naturalnews.com - 6-23-11
The center for Environmental Health based out of Oakland, California has sued the manufacturers of 26 personal care products that allegedly violate California's organic labelling law that requires a product to be made up of at least 70% organic ingredients. The center feels that while there are somewhat more intense regulations in place for food and food supplements, those regulations just don't exist for personal health care products.
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Biotech quick fix for superweeds could lead to 'super superweeds'
naturalnews.com - 6-23-11
Albert Einstein once defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. And that is exactly how the biotechnology industry and government agencies are trying to handle the escalating "superweed" epidemic.
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More farmers going organic to improve soil, save energy, and produce better food
naturalnews.com - 6-23-11
Conventional farming methods may gradually be going the way of the buffalo, at least for many smaller-scale farmers who are discovering the practical and financial benefits of switching to organic techniques. The Morning Call (TMC) reports that many dairy farmers are making the transition to organic because they are realizing it is better for their herds, better for the land, better for consumers, and ultimately better for business.
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New Drug Effectively Treats Hepatitis C
healthday.com - 6-23-11
The recently approved drug Incivek, combined with two standard drugs, is highly effective at treating hepatitis C, a notoriously difficult-to-manage liver disease, two new studies show.
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German E. Coli Strain Especially Lethal, Studies Find
healthday.com - 6-23-11
The strain of E. coli bacteria that this month killed dozens of people in Europe and sickened thousands more may be more deadly because of the way it has evolved, a new study suggests.
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FDA: Breast Implants Basically Safe, But Won't Last a Lifetime
healthday.com - 6-23-11
Silicone-gel breast implants don't last forever, with as many as half of women with the devices requiring removal within 10 years of the initial surgery, U.S. health officials said Wednesday.
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Chips, Fries, Soda Most to Blame for Long-Term Weight Gain
healthday.com - 6-23-11
The edict to eat less and exercise more is far from far-reaching, as a new analysis points to the increased consumption of potato chips, French fries, sugary sodas and red meat as a major cause of weight gain in people across the United States.
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Molecular Glue Sticks It to Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 6-23-11
Imagine dropping dish soap into a sink full of greasy water. What happens? As soon as the soap hits the water, the grease recoils -- and retreats to the edges of the sink.
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Source of Mystery Pain Uncovered
sciencedaily.com - 6-23-11
An estimated 20 million people in the United States suffer from peripheral neuropathy, marked by the degeneration of nerves and in some cases severe pain. There is no good treatment for the disorder and doctors can find no apparent cause in one of every three cases.
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Lyme Disease Tick Adapts to Life On the (Fragmented) Prairie
sciencedaily.com - 6-23-11
A new study offers a detailed look at the status of Lyme disease in Central Illinois and suggests that deer ticks and the Lyme disease bacteria they host are more adaptable to new habitats than previously appreciated.
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Seeking chemical happiness: Why one in 10 of us reaches for the anti-depressants in middle age
dailymail.co.uk - 6-22-11
It's a time of life when many adults reach the peak of their careers and are busy raising their children, but a new study reveals you are most likely to be depressed in your late 40s.
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Blood-poisoning cases double over last decade
msnbc.msn.com - 6-22-11
Hospitalizations for sepsis, or blood poisoning, more than doubled in the last decade, a new report shows.
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Man says he robbed bank to get health care
cnn.com - 6-22-11
A man walks into a bank and slips a note to the teller. The note reads: "This is a bank robbery. Please only give me one dollar." Then the man tells the bank employees, "I’ll be sitting right over there in the chair waiting for the police."
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Vitamin B-12 warning: Avoid cyanocobalamin, take only methylcobalamin
naturalnews.com - 6-22-11
One of the pitfalls of pursuing a healthy diet is that we are sometimes blind to nutrients we may be missing. And in the world of healthy eating, one of the most common nutrient deficiencies involves vitamin B-12, a crucial nutrient for nerve health and the construction of red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout your body.
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Formaldehyde now officially listed as cancer-causing chemical; here are the top sources of exposure
naturalnews.com - 6-22-11
Formaldehyde is present in relatively benign quantities in nature; however its presence in manufactured goods is a major health concern because according to a significant body of research, it is a known carcinogenic substance.
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Medication strips your body of vital nutrients, says pharmacist
naturalnews.com - 6-22-11
Often prescribed to alleviate symptoms of illness, pharmaceutical medications rarely attack the root cause and cure the illness and have the added downside of side-effects.
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High-Dose Statins May Increase Diabetes Risk
healthday.com - 6-22-11
High doses of the widely popular cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins may have a downside.
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Diabetic Kidney Disease Rising in the U.S.
healthday.com - 6-22-11
The frequency of diabetic kidney disease has increased in line with rising rates of diabetes in the United States over the past two decades, a new study finds.
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Smoking, Prostate Cancer a Deadly Mix
healthday.com - 6-22-11
Smokers diagnosed with prostate cancer are more likely to have the cancer recur after treatment and are more likely to die than non-smokers, a new study says.
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Blueberries Help Lab Rats Build Strong Bones
sciencedaily.com - 6-22-11
Compounds in blueberries might turn out to have a powerful effect on formation of strong, healthy bones, if results from studies with laboratory rats turn out to hold true for humans.
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Adulterated Cocaine Causing Serious Skin Reactions; With Up to 70 Percent Contaminated, Doctors Warn of Potential Public Health Epidemic
sciencedaily.com - 6-22-11
Doctors warned of a potential public health epidemic in a recent report on patients in Los Angeles and New York who developed serious skin reactions after smoking or snorting cocaine believed to be contaminated with a veterinary medication drug dealers are using to dilute, or "cut," up to 70% of the cocaine in the U.S.
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Can Humans Sense Earth's Magnetism? Human Retina Protein Can Function as Light-Sensitive Magnetic Sensor
sciencedaily.com - 6-22-11
For migratory birds and sea turtles, the ability to sense Earth's magnetic field is crucial to navigating the long-distance voyages these animals undertake during migration. Humans, however, are widely assumed not to have an innate magnetic sense. Research published in Nature Communications this week by faculty at the University of Massachusetts Medical School shows that a protein expressed in the human retina can sense magnetic fields when implanted into Drosophila, reopening an area of sensory biology in humans for further exploration.
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Smoking During Pregnancy Lowers Levels of 'Good' HDL Cholesterol in Children
sciencedaily.com - 6-22-11
Researchers in Australia have discovered that mothers who smoke during pregnancy are causing developmental changes to their unborn babies that lead to them having lower levels of the type of cholesterol that is known to protect against heart disease in later life -- high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.
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Exercise Associated With Longer Survival After Brain Cancer Diagnosis
sciencedaily.com - 6-22-11
Brain cancer patients who are able to exercise live significantly longer than sedentary patients, scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute report.
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FDA to Step Up Inspections of Imported Products
healthday.com - 6-21-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Monday a new strategy to help ensure the safety and quality of imported drugs and food products.
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CDC: Most High School Students Don’t Exercise Enough
health.com - 6-21-11
High school students aren’t doing much running—and when they do run, there’s a good chance it’s to a vending machine.
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Millions Don't Get Meds for Serious Artery Disease: Study
healthday.com - 6-21-11
Millions of Americans suffer from a condition known as peripheral artery disease but aren't receiving medical treatment, putting them at risk of potentially fatal heart problems, a new study finds.
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Need not apply: Get 20 minutes of sun a day (without lotion) 'to help beat brittle bones'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-21-11
Britons should spend up to 20 minutes in the sun every day to protect their bones, according to MPs.
There are fears that rising numbers of elderly people are suffering fractures because their bones have become weak due to a lack of vitamin D.
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Why one biscuit is never enough: Doctors reveal the science of hunger pangs - and what you can do about them
dailymail.co.uk - 6-21-11
Why do some people manage to say no to that extra slice of cake, yet others can’t resist? And what can you do to control your appetite?
Appetite is an incredibly complex system which even scientists are yet to fully understand. It is one of our most basic drives.
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Single Reading Can't Gauge Blood Pressure Control: Study
healthday.com - 6-21-11
Evaluating how well a person responds to medication meant to lower blood pressure requires multiple readings, new research suggests.
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IUDs Officially Recommended for Healthy Women, Teens
healthday.com - 6-21-11
A female contraceptive device whose reported side effects kept it off the frontline of birth control for years has been formally endorsed for all healthy adult women and adolescents by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
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Buzz Kills: No Amount of Alcohol Safe to Drive
sciencedaily.com - 6-21-11
In the United States, the blood-alcohol limit may be 0.08 percent, but no amount of alcohol seems to be safe for driving, according to a University of California, San Diego sociologist. A study led by David Phillips and published in the journal Addiction finds that blood-alcohol levels well below the U.S. legal limit are associated with incapacitating injury and death.
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Diagnosed Autism Is More Common in an IT-Rich Region, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 6-21-11
A new study from Cambridge University has for the first time found that autism diagnoses are more common in an information technology-rich region.
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'My Dishwasher Is Trying to Kill Me': New Research Finds Harmful Fungal Pathogens Living in Dishwasher Seals
sciencedaily.com - 6-21-11
A potentially pathogenic fungus has found a home living in extreme conditions in some of the most common household appliances, researchers have found. A new paper published in the British Mycological Society journal, Fungal Biology, published by Elsevier, shows that these sites make perfect habitats for extremotolerant fungi (which includes black yeasts). Some of these are potentially dangerous to human health.
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Artificial meat could slice emissions, say scientists
guardian.co.uk - 6-21-11
Meat grown artificially in labs will be a greener alternative for consumers who can't bear to go vegetarian but want to cut the environmental impact of their food, according to new research.
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5 Summer Health Myths -- Busted!
abcnews.go.com - 6-20-11
You probably already know that going for a swim within 30 minutes of chowing down on a sandwich isn't going to cause you to cramp up and sink helplessly to the bottom of the pool. But there's plenty more lame summertime advice that you might still believe. We set the record straight.
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U.S. soldier 're-grows leg' after pioneering injection of pig bladder hormone
dailymail.co.uk - 6-20-11
A U.S.soldier who had most of his leg muscle blown off in Afghanistan has become the first to see it grow back in a pioneering experimental operation.
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The prostate cancer vaccine that targets tumours with an '80 per cent success rate'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-20-11
A vaccine that destroys advanced prostate cancers while leaving healthy tissue untouched has been developed by scientists.
In laboratory tests, the gene therapy jab successfully wiped out 80 per cent of cancers without causing serious side effects.
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Heart disease beats breast cancer as the biggest killer
telegraph.co.uk - 6-20-11
Treatment for breast cancer is now so effective that the leading cause of death for older people with the condition is heart disease, a new study has found.
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21 million treated in non-profit clinics
upi.com - 6-20-11
June 19 (UPI) -- The U.S. safety net -- private, non-profit health centers and clinics -- for those with no health insurance is stretched treating 21 million, researchers say.
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Your gut controls your weight in more ways than you think
msnbc.msn.com - 6-20-11
Surgery for obesity began with a simple premise: if you make the stomach smaller, people will eat less, so they will lose weight.
But in recent years the results of obesity surgery have been so outstanding, researchers went back to the drawing boards to figure out what was going on.
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Fukushima: Strontium levels up to 240 times over legal limit near plant, uninhabitable land area now the size of 17 Manhattans
naturalnews.com - 6-20-11
Representing the first time the substance has been detected at the crippled plant, the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) reported on Sunday that seawater and groundwater samples taken near the ravaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility in Japan have tested positive for radioactive strontium. And according to a recent report in The Japan Times, levels of strontium detected were up to 240 times over the legal limit, indicating a serious environmental and health threat.
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Experimental Vaccine Seems to Cure Prostate Cancer in Mice
healthday.com - 6-20-11
Preliminary research shows that an experimental vaccine may cure prostate cancer in mice.
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Dads Can Light Their Grills Without Fear
consumer.healthday.com - 6-20-11
Dads don't have to forego their plans to fire up the grill this Father's Day, despite research that has linked red and processed meat consumption to colon cancer risk, experts say.
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Freedom More Important to Happiness Than Wealth, Study Finds
healthday.com - 6-20-11
Personal independence and freedom are more important to people's well-being than wealth, a new study concludes.
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Dads Can Light Their Grills Without Fear
healthday.com - 6-20-11
Dads don't have to forego their plans to fire up the grill this Father's Day, despite research that has linked red and processed meat consumption to colon cancer risk, experts say.
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Calorie-Burning Brown Fat Is a Potential Obesity Treatment, Researchers Say
sciencedaily.com - 6-20-11
A new study suggests that many adults have large amounts of brown fat, the "good" fat that burns calories to keep us warm, and that it may be possible to make even more of this tissue.
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Pigs could grow human organs in stem cell breakthrough
telegraph.co.uk - 6-20-11
Human organs could be grown inside pigs for use in transplant operations following research using stem cells.
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Poll: U.S. cellphone users won't change
upi.com - 6-19-11
Most U.S. consumers say they are not changing cellphone use after a study said extensive use may increase cancer risk, a survey indicates.
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Tree leaf compound may help prevent skin aging
naturalnews.com - 6-19-11
A new study published in the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry highlights a new beneficial use for poplar tree leaf buds. When extracted, the antioxidants and other substances found in the buds effectively fight against, and possibly even help reverse, the aging process in skin.
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Are Men Who Flaunt Flashy Cars Not the 'Marrying Kind'?
healthday.com - 6-19-11
Men who drive Porsches or flaunt other flashy possessions are usually not the "marrying kind," a new study suggests.
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Progress Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Reverse Blindness
sciencedaily.com - 6-19-11
Researchers have used cutting-edge stem cell technology to correct a genetic defect present in a rare blinding disorder, another step on a promising path that may one day lead to therapies to reverse blindness caused by common retinal diseases such as macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa which affect millions of individuals.
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How Many US Deaths Are Caused by Poverty and Other Social Factors? About the Same as Deaths from Heart Attacks and Stroke, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 6-19-11
How researchers classify and quantify causes of death across a population has evolved in recent decades. In addition to long-recognized physiological causes such as heart attack and cancer, the role of behavioral factors -- including smoking, dietary patterns and inactivity -- began to be quantified in the 1990s. More recent research has begun to look at the contribution of social factors to U.S. mortality. In the first comprehensive analysis of such studies, researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that poverty, low levels of education, poor social support and other social factors contribute about as many deaths in the U.S. as such familiar causes as heart attacks, strokes and lung cancer.
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Dawn of Agriculture Took Toll On Health
sciencedaily.com - 6-19-11
When populations around the globe started turning to agriculture around 10,000 years ago, regardless of their locations and type of crops, a similar trend occurred: The height and health of the people declined.
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More Evidence Vitamin D Boosts Immune Response
sciencedaily.com - 6-19-11
Laboratory-grown gingival cells treated with vitamin D boosted their production of an endogenous antibiotic, and killed more bacteria than untreated cells, according to a paper in the June 2011 issue of the journal Infection and Immunity. The research suggests that vitamin D can help protect the gums from bacterial infections that lead to gingivitis and periodontitis. Periodontitis affects up to 50 percent of the US population, is a major cause of tooth loss, and can also contribute to heart disease. Most Americans are deficient in vitamin D.
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CDC: 1 in 4 high schoolers drink soda every day
yourlife.usatoday.com - 6-18-11
A new study shows one in four high school students drink soda every day.
The national survey found that teens drink water, milk and fruit juices most often. But a quarter say they have at least one soda each day.
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Hospitals Performed Needless Double CT Scans, Records Show
nytimes.com - 6-18-11
Long after questions were first raised about the overuse of powerful CT scans, hundreds of hospitals across the country needlessly exposed patients to radiation by scanning their chests twice on the same day, according to federal records and interviews with researchers.
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Changing Tides: Research Center Under Fire for 'Adjusted' Sea-Level Data
foxnews.com - 6-18-11
Is climate change raising sea levels, as Al Gore has argued -- or are climate scientists doctoring the data?
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Japan Strains to Fix a Reactor Damaged Before Quake
nytimes.com - 6-18-11
Three hundred miles southwest of Fukushima, at a nuclear reactor perched on the slopes of this rustic peninsula, engineers are engaged in another precarious struggle.
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Why 45 is start of a golden age of health: Confronted with their own mortality many kick drinking and improve diet
dailymail.co.uk - 6-18-11
It is an age when our plans to exercise regularly have usually petered out and our waistlines are expanding.
But this doesn't mean people have given up wanting to be in good shape when they reach 45.
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Multiple sclerosis linked to shingles
msnbc.msn.com - 6-18-11
People who get shingles are more likely to also develop multiple sclerosis, according to a study in Taiwan.
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Watching 'Jersey Shore' might make you dumber, study suggests
msnbc.msn.com - 6-18-11
Take note, fans of mindless reality shows like "Jersey Shore": New research suggests watching something dumb might make you dumber. In other words, you are what you watch.
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Adding folic acid to Latin American foods can help reduce birth defects
thechart.blogs.cnn.com - 6-18-11
Alexandra Dixon was born with a hole in her lower back, exposing her spinal cord, a condition called spina bifida. Within 48 hours, she had two surgeries to begin correcting her birth defect: One to close the hole and another to insert a cerebral shunt - a tube moving excess fluid from her head to prevent excessive pressure on the brain. In her 29 years, Dixon has had 18 surgeries to correct this birth defect - a type of neural tube defect (NTD), which can kill many infants and put others in wheelchairs for life.
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Parents' behaviour 'can influence teen drinking'
bbc.co.uk - 6-18-11
Children who see their parents drunk are twice as likely to regularly get drunk themselves, a survey of young teenagers has suggested.
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Coconut Oil for Alzheimer's
naturalnews.com - 6-18-11
My world is full of coconuts, including coconut oil and coconut milk. That's not unusual because I live on Maui. But I'm happily seeing coconut oil all over the internet as the treatment for dozens of conditions and possibly hundreds of symptoms.
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Radiation is Already Killing Babies
naturalnews.com - 6-18-11
Newborn babies are the most vulnerable of all beings. Vulnerability says it all when it comes to a newborn infant. Children deserve the best medical treatment from the best form of medicine human intelligence can implement but what they get is governmental interference and neglect. Below we see the first information coming in that the radiation that the government is saying is safe and harmless and of very low concentration is already killing babies on the west coast of the United States where death rates are spiking.
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Health experts announce 5 ways to protect children from toxic chemicals
naturalnews.com - 6-18-11
Imagine parents who would put their children in danger, placing them in situations that could cause serious health problems and distress such as difficulty breathing or a disruption of their male and female hormones -- or even shorten their kids' lives. We must be talking about psychopaths, right? After all, most moms and dads would do anything to protect their offspring.
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Energy Drink-Vodka Combo Nearly Kills Teen
healthday.com - 6-18-11
The near death of a German teenager who consumed huge amounts of energy drinks mixed with vodka highlights the largely unrecognized danger of such beverage combinations, researchers report.
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Scientists Turn Memory On, Off in Rats With Flip of Switch
healthday.com - 6-18-11
Fixing faulty memories may one day be as easy as flipping a switch, according to scientists who restored brain function in rats even when they had been drugged to forget.
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Deaths Exceed Births in 24% of U.S. Communities: Report
healthday.com - 6-18-11
Last year, more people died than were born in nearly one-quarter of all U.S. counties, a new study shows.
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Docs Overprescribing Antibiotics for Home-Care Patients: Study
healthday.com - 6-18-11
Amid increased threats of drug-resistant infections, a new study reveals that doctors may overprescribe antibiotics to patients receiving ongoing medical care at home.
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Rise in Drug-Related Suicide Attempts by Young Men Alarms Experts
healthday.com - 6-18-11
U.S. emergency department visits for drug-related suicide attempts by young adult males rose 55 percent between 2005 and 2009, a government report says.
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Size Matters -- In Virulent Fungal Spores -- And Suggests Ways to Stop a Killer
sciencedaily.com - 6-18-11
Scientists at Duke University Medical Center have found that larger fungal spores can be more lethal. Their findings about two different spore sizes of the fungus Mucor circinelloides, a pathogen that kills half or more of its victims, could help to develop new treatments and fight other types of fungal infections.
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How the Immune System Fights Back Against Anthrax Infections
sciencedaily.com - 6-18-11
Scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences have uncovered how the body's immune system launches its survival response to the notorious and deadly bacterium anthrax. The findings, reported online June 16 and published in the June 22 issue of the journal Immunity, describe key emergency signals the body sends out when challenged by a life-threatening infection.
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Lyme Disease Bacteria Take Cover in Lymph Nodes
sciencedaily.com - 6-18-11
The bacteria that cause Lyme disease, one of the most important emerging diseases in the United States, appear to hide out in the lymph nodes, triggering a significant immune response, but one that is not strong enough to rout the infection, report researchers at the University of California, Davis.
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Tapeworm Drug Inhibits Colon Cancer Metastasis
sciencedaily.com - 6-18-11
A compound that for about 60 years has been used as a drug against tapeworm infection is also apparently effective against colon cancer metastasis, as studies using mice have now shown. The compound silences a gene that triggers the formation of metastases in colon cancer.
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Shorter Sleep Durations May Increase Genetic Risks for Obesity
sciencedaily.com - 6-18-11
Sleeping less at night may increase the expression of genetic risks for obesity, while getting plenty of sleep may suppress genetic influences on body weight, suggests an abstract being presented in Minneapolis, Minn., at SLEEP 2011, the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).
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Fukushima: It's much worse than you think
english.aljazeera.net - 6-17-11
"Fukushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind," Arnold Gundersen, a former nuclear industry senior vice president, told Al Jazeera.
Japan's 9.0 earthquake on March 11 caused a massive tsunami that crippled the cooling systems at the Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) nuclear plant in Fukushima, Japan. It also led to hydrogen explosions and reactor meltdowns that forced evacuations of those living within a 20km radius of the plant.
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Land of the Free? New York and California come out at the bottom of individual freedoms study
dailymail.co.uk - 6-17-11
It might be the 'Land of the Free', but some states certainly aren't living up to the words of America's national anthem.
New York, New Jersey and California are the least free in the U.S., based on an index of public policies affecting your individual freedoms.
The rankings are based economic, social and personal freedoms of Americans - and include measures such as taxes, government spending and regulations.
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Olive Oil Protects Against Stroke
abcnews.go.com - 6-17-11
Consuming copious amounts of olive oil may dramatically reduce stroke risk for older adults, according to a population-based study.
Heavy use in cooking and dressings was associated with a 41% lower stroke incidence compared with never using olive oil, Cécilia Samieri of the Université Bordeaux in France and colleagues found.
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Why women lose three weeks' sleep a YEAR to hubby's snoring (and how a third are driven to the spare room)
dailymail.co.uk - 6-17-11
Love may conquer many things but, as any long-suffering other half knows, snoring isn't among them.
And now researchers have found that one in three of us loses the equivalent of more than three weeks' sleep every year because of a partner's noisy nose.
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Drug Is Harder to Abuse, but Users Persevere
nytimes.com - 6-17-11
Michael Capece had been snorting OxyContin for five years when a new version of the drug, intended to deter such abuse, hit the market last summer. The reformulated pills are harder to crush, turning instead into a gummy substance that cannot be easily snorted, injected or chewed.
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Energy drinks linked to alcohol
upi.com - 6-17-11
Researchers, in a study involving musicians in Buffalo, N.Y., found the music-makers used energy drinks with binge drinking and prescription drug misuse.
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Are antidepressants glorified placebos?
cnn.com - 6-17-11
Which came first, the mental illness or the drug? While in other areas of medicine this is a no-brainer (no pun intended), some argue that certain psychiatric conditions are created and classified because of the effects particular drugs have on the body, and not the other way around.
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The growing culprit behind liver disease
cnn.com - 6-17-11
The first time Wilson Alvarado got lost on the way to a neighborhood park, he told his wife, Patricia, not to worry about it -- he was 62, he told her, and just getting a little forgetful.
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Congenital syphilis screening 'cuts baby deaths'
bbc.co.uk - 6-17-11
Hundreds of thousands of babies' lives could be saved each year if pregnant women were screened for syphilis, researchers say.
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Parents' behaviour 'can influence teen drinking'
bbc.co.uk - 6-17-11
Children who see their parents drunk are twice as likely to regularly get drunk themselves, a survey of young teenagers has suggested.
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In partial victory against GMOs, U.S. Congress bans FDA from approving GM salmon
naturalnews.com - 6-17-11
The U.S. House of Representatives passed a law today that would effectively bar the FDA from approving GM salmon. This is a direct result of the rising awareness of the dangers of GMOs among American consumers, along with steady coverage of the issue by the alternative media (including NaturalNews) and the efforts of Jeffrey Smith from ResponsibleTechnology.org
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True fact: A common ingredient in commercial breads is derived from human hair harvested in China
naturalnews.com - 6-17-11
If you read the ingredients label on a loaf of bread, you will usually find an ingredient listed there as L-cysteine. This is a non-essential amino acid added to many baked goods as a dough conditioner in order to speed industrial processing. It's usually not added directly to flour intended for home use, but you'll find it throughout commercial breads such as pizza dough, bread rolls and pastries.
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Japanese scientist creates edible meat alternative made from recycled human waste
naturalnews.com - 6-17-11
If you think meatless, genetically-modified (GM) soy food products are a poor alternative to real meat, wait until you see the latest in vegetarian meat replacement technology. According to a recent Inhabitat report, Japanese researcher Mitsuyuki Ikeda has developed a new kind of meatless burger made from soy, steak sauce essence, and -- brace yourself -- protein matter extracted from human excrement.
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New Memory Theory Focuses on Brain-Wave Levels
healthday.com - 6-17-11
Your ability to remember things may vary according to levels of certain brain waves at a given moment, a new study suggests.
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High School Kids Get Too Many Sugary Drinks, Too Little Exercise: CDC
healthday.com - 6-17-11
When it comes to the eating and exercise habits of America's teens, new data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention paints a decidedly pessimistic picture.
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Smoking-Cessation Drug Chantix Linked to Heart Problems
healthday.com - 6-17-11
The quit-smoking drug Chantix may lead to a small but increased risk of heart problems in people with cardiovascular disease, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Thursday.
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Bad Sleep Habits Are Associated With Lower Grades from High School Through College
sciencedaily.com - 6-17-11
Declines in sleep hygiene across the college years are associated with declines in grade-point average. Although students who are "evening types" initially experience the greatest decline in GPA from high school to college, their grades improve as they shift toward a morning chronotype, suggests a research abstract being presented in Minneapolis, Minn., at SLEEP 2011, the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).
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Low Testosterone Linked to Varicoceles
sciencedaily.com - 6-17-11
As many as 15 percent of men have varicoceles, masses of enlarged and dilated veins in the testicles. There is new evidence that varicoceles, long known to be a cause of male infertility, interfere with the production of testosterone -- a crucial hormone to maintaining men's health.
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Healing Times for Dental Implants Could Be Cut
sciencedaily.com - 6-17-11
The technology used to replace lost teeth with titanium dental implants could be improved. By studying the surface structure of dental implants not only at micro level but also at nano level, researchers at the University of Gothenburg; Sweden, have come up with a method that could shorten the healing time for patients.
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Weekend Sleep Fails to Improve Performance, but Women Handle Workweek Sleep Loss Better
sciencedaily.com - 6-17-11
Performance deteriorates when sleep is restricted to six hours per night for a week and does not improve after two nights of recovery sleep. However, women may be less affected than men by this workweek pattern of sleep loss, suggests a research abstract being presented in Minneapolis, Minn., at SLEEP 2011, the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).
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Understanding Alcohol's Damaging Effects on the Brain
sciencedaily.com - 6-17-11
While alcohol has a wide range of pharmacological effects on the body, the brain is a primary target. However, the molecular mechanisms by which alcohol alters neuronal activity in the brain are poorly understood. Participants in a symposium at the June 2010 annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism in San Antonio, Texas addressed recent findings concerning the interactions of alcohol with prototype brain proteins thought to underlie alcohol actions in the brain.
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Effects of Premature Birth Can Reach Into Adulthood
sciencedaily.com - 6-17-11
In the longest running U.S. study of premature infants who are now 23 years old, University of Rhode Island Professor of Nursing Mary C. Sullivan has found that premature infants are less healthy, have more social and school struggles and face a greater risk of heart-health problems in adulthood.
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A Knockout Resource for Mouse Genetics: Mouse Gene Knockout Resource Will Empower Mammalian Gene Studies for a Generation
sciencedaily.com - 6-17-11
An international consortium of researchers report June 15 in Nature that they have knocked out almost 40 per cent of the genes in the mouse genome. The completed resource will power studies of gene activity in models of human disease.
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Canadians drinking, smoking pot more
upi.com - 6-16-11
More Canadians are drinking daily, though fewer are binge drinkers, and more are smoking marijuana, while fewer are puffing cigarettes, a survey indicates.
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College students sleep longer, drink more
upi.com - 6-16-11
Some sleep advocates call for later class schedules for college students, but U.S. researchers say some students would just drink and sleep more.
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More physicians leaving private practices
upi.com - 6-16-11
A survey by Accenture indicates more U.S. physicians are selling their private practices to work at larger healthcare systems.
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Woman who suffered three miscarriages becomes a mother of two after using reflexology
dailymail.co.uk - 6-16-11
After suffering three miscarriages, Gabby Lamplugh and her husband feared they would never have the baby they longed for.
But an email from a friend who recommended the couple try reflexology classes has changed their lives forever.
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'Magic mushrooms' could help treat addiction
msnbc.msn.com - 6-16-11
The hallucinogen found in "magic mushrooms" could help treat a variety of psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety and even addiction, researchers say.
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Real-Time Video: First Look at a Brain Losing Consciousness Under Anesthesia
healthland.time.com - 6-16-11
What happens to your brain as it slips into unconsciousness? A new technique allows researchers to view real-time 3-D images of a patient undergoing anesthesia using the drug propofol, and the findings show that consciousness isn't suddenly switched off, but rather fades as though a dimmer is being dialed down.
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Vaccination: The pet controversy
naturalnews.com - 6-16-11
In the history of human vaccines, the numbers clearly show that in every case, the disease itself was already on the decline when the vaccine was introduced. Most vaccines were scarcely a blip on the radar, not affecting the natural decline of the disease at all. In a few unfortunate cases such as polio, the disease actually increased after vaccinations began.
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New report: Regulators knew Roundup caused birth defects
naturalnews.com - 6-16-11
Regulators have known since 1980 that Roundup, the herbicide manufactured by U.S. company Monsanto, causes birth defects, and have done nothing to make the information public, according to a new report released June 7 (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/...).
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Impotence Linked to Restless Legs Syndrome
healthday.com - 6-16-11
Men who struggle with restless legs syndrome face a higher risk of impotence, a new study suggests.
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U.S. Found to Be Losing Ground in Life Expectancy
healthday.com - 6-16-11
A full 80 percent of U.S. counties lag behind other leading nations in terms of life expectancy, and the gap is getting bigger, according to a new county-by-county report.
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More Olive Oil in Diet Could Cut Stroke Risk: Study
healthday.com - 6-16-11
Adding olive oil to your diet may reduce your risk of stroke, a new study suggests.
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Earth facing a mini-Ice Age 'within ten years' due to rare drop in sunspot activity
dailymail.co.uk - 6-16-11
The sun is heading into an unusual and extended period of hibernation that could trigger a mini-Ice Age on Earth, scientists claim.
A decrease in global warming might result in the years after 2020, the approximate time when sunspots are expected to disappear for years, maybe even decades.
While the effects of a calmer sun are mostly good - there'd be fewer disruptions of satellites and power systems - it could see a sharp turnaround in global warming.
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'SpongeBob' Mushroom Discovered in the Forests of Borneo
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-11
Sing it with us: What lives in the rainforest, under a tree? Spongiforma squarepantsii, a new species of mushroom almost as strange as its cartoon namesake.
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Clever Tool Use in Parrots and Crows
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-11
The kea, a New Zealand parrot, and the New Caledonian crow are members of the two most intelligent avian families. Researchers from the Department of Cognitive Biology of the University of Vienna investigated their problem solving abilities as well as their innovative capacities.
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Fear Boosts Activation of Immature Brain Cells: Adult Neural Stem Cells Play Role in Creating Emotional Context of Memory
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-11
Fear burns memories into our brain, and new research by University of California, Berkeley, neuroscientists explains how.
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How Spiders Breathe Under Water: Spider's Diving Bell Performs Like Gill Extracting Oxygen from Water
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-11
Water spiders spend their entire lives under water, only venturing to the surface to replenish their diving bell air supply. Yet no one knew how long the spiders could remain submerged until Roger Seymour and Stefan Hetz measured the bubble's oxygen level. They found that the diving bell behaves like a gill sucking oxygen from the water and the spiders only need to dash to the surface once a day to supplement their air supply.
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Why Hair Turns Gray: Communication Between Hair Follicles and Melanocyte Stem Cells Key to Mystery
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-11
A new study by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center has shown that, for the first time, Wnt signaling, already known to control many biological processes, between hair follicles and melanocyte stem cells can dictate hair pigmentation.
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The Good Life: Good Sleepers Have Better Quality of Life and Less Depression
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-11
Getting six to nine hours of sleep per night is associated with higher ratings for quality of life and lower ratings for depression, suggests a research abstract that will be presented on June 14, in Minneapolis, Minn., at Sleep 2011, the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).
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Prolonged TV Viewing Linked to Increased Risk of Type Two Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-11
Watching television is the most common daily activity apart from work and sleep in many parts of the world, but it is time for people to change their viewing habits. According to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers, prolonged TV viewing was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and premature death.
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Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Helps Curb Impulsivity
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-11
Inhibitory control can be boosted with a mild form of brain stimulation, according to a study published in the June 2011 issue of Neuroimage. The study's findings indicate that non-invasive intervention can greatly improve patients' inhibitory control. Conducted by a research team led by Dr Chi-Hung Juan of the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, National Central University in Taiwan, the research was sponsored by the National Science Council in Taiwan, the UK Medical Research Council, the Royal Society Wolfson Merit Award, and a Fulbright Award.
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Low-Carbohydrate, High-Protein Diets May Reduce Both Tumor Growth Rates and Cancer Risk
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-11
Eating a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet may reduce the risk of cancer and slow the growth of tumors already present, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
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Evidence of a Natural Origin for Banned Drug That Plumps Up Livestock
sciencedaily.com - 6-16-11
There may be a natural solution to the mystery of how small amounts of a banned drug that disrupts thyroid function and plumps up livestock gets into their bodies -- and the bodies of humans, scientists are reporting. Their study, which appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, reports the first evidence that the substance can form naturally in feed and food.
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Could Sleeping on Left Side Help Prevent Stillbirth?
healthday.com - 6-15-11
For pregnant women, reducing the risk for stillbirth may be as simple as sleeping on their left side, New Zealand researchers suggest.
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Scotts Miracle-Gro exploring role in medical marijuana market
eastvalleytribune.com - 6-15-11
The company that promises it will help you grow bigger tomatoes is showing some interest in helping you grow more potent pot.
“I want to target the pot market,” Jim Hagedorn, chief executive of Scotts Miracle-Gro company told the Wall Street Journal. “There’s no good reason we haven’t.”
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What Ritalin is doing to our children's heads
telegraph.co.uk - 6-15-11
Are we experiencing an explosion of mental illness among young children in Britain? That is what you’d reasonably conclude, looking at the rise in the number of prescriptions issued for psychiatric medicines for them.
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Oxi is more toxic than crack and a fraction of the price: will it catch on in Britain?
telegraph.co.uk - 6-15-11
Have you heard of oxi? It’s the deadly new drug that’s threatening to engulf the Amazon region of Brazil. The Guardian gasps: “More potent than crack and a fifth of the price” — which makes it sound slightly as though they’re selling the stuff. Oxi, “rust” or oxidado is a crude and cheaply produced version of crack and it’s used in the same way – you smoke it as “rocks” in a makeshift pipe. The red, white, yellow or blue-coloured rocks are said to contain petrol, quicklime and a bit of cement and sulphuric acid in some cases. There are an estimated 8,000 users in the drug-dens or bocadas of the Acre region of western Brazil.
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Number of people with brain cancer could soar 20-fold in 20 years because of mobile phones, experts warn
dailymail.co.uk - 6-15-11
Two weeks ago, the World Health Organisation warned for the first time that mobile phones may cause cancer - urging users to limit their use.
The warning followed Interphone's research from 13 countries that found that the even just using a phone for 15 minutes a day could substatially increase the risk of a brain tumour.
But it could come to late for many mobile addicts, as it takes 15 to 20 years for primary cancers to develop - meaning the 'timebombs' could have already done their damage.
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US government spends millions administering street drugs to monkeys in the name of research
naturalnews.com - 6-15-11
Government abuse and waste of taxpayer dollars takes many forms. Perhaps one of the most outrageous is the countless millions that are spent in the form of grants that fund "scientific research."
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Secret GM wheat experiments begin in Australia
naturalnews.com - 6-15-11
Australia's first trial of genetically modified wheat and barley is under way near Narrabri, New South Wales in the south-eastern area of the country. The goal of the GM wheat is said to be more nutritious bread (http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/gm-wheat-...).
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Too Much TV Raises Risk of Diabetes, Heart Disease and Death
healthday.com - 6-15-11
Couch potatoes beware: All those hours in front of the TV may be making you sick, or even killing you.
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Good Sleep Could Boost Undergrads' Learning Capacity
healthday.com - 6-15-11
Sufficient sleep improves college students' ability to learn, a new study finds.
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Hormone Linked to Death Risk in Those With Early Kidney Disease
healthday.com - 6-15-11
Patients with early-stage chronic kidney disease are more likely to die if they have elevated levels of a certain hormone, a new study says.
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Too Little Sleep in Preschool Years May Predict ADHD
healthday.com - 6-15-11
Preschoolers who don't get enough sleep are more likely than other children to be hyperactive and inattentive by the time they reach kindergarten, according to a new study.
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Sleep-Deprived Teens May Crave Carbohydrates
healthday.com - 6-15-11
Daytime sleepiness is associated with an increased craving for carbohydrates among teens, according to new research.
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Why Hair Turns Gray: Communication Between Hair Follicles and Melanocyte Stem Cells Key to Mystery
sciencedaily.com - 6-15-11
A new study by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center has shown that, for the first time, Wnt signaling, already known to control many biological processes, between hair follicles and melanocyte stem cells can dictate hair pigmentation.
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Poplar Tree Leaf Bud Extract Could Fight Skin Aging
sciencedaily.com - 6-15-11
Antioxidants are popular anti-aging ingredients in skin creams, and now scientists are reporting a new source of these healthful substances -- leaf buds of poplar trees. Their study appears in the ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
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Poorer Families Have More Sedentary Children, Spanish Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-15-11
It is not strange to expect that families with better living conditions enjoy better health and a longer life expectancy. Now, a new study has also confirmed the relationship between a family's socioeconomic situation and certain sedentary behaviours, such as watching television and playing video games, during the first years of life.
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Ancestry Plays Vital Role in Nutrition and Disease, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 6-15-11
Over the past decade, much progress has been made regarding the understanding and promise of personalized medicine. Scientists are just beginning to consider the impact of gene-diet interactions in different populations in regards to disease prevention and treatment.
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Nanotubes Could Pose Health Risk to Production Line Staff, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-15-11
Tiny fibres used to strengthen items such as bike frames and hockey sticks could pose risks to workers who make them. Certain types of carbon nanotubes -- cylindrical molecules about one-thousandth of the width of a human hair -- could cause cancer in the lining of the lung, University of Edinburgh research shows.
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Brain Structure Adapts to Environmental Change
sciencedaily.com - 6-15-11
Scientists have known for years that neurogenesis takes place throughout adulthood in the hippocampus of the mammalian brain. Now Columbia researchers have found that under stressful conditions, neural stem cells in the adult hippocampus can produce not only neurons, but also new stem cells. The brain stockpiles the neural stem cells, which later may produce neurons when conditions become favorable. This response to environmental conditions represents a novel form of brain plasticity.
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'Fukushima media cover-up - PR success, public health disaster'
youtube.com - 6-14-11
Residents of the Fukushima district, and those who lived near-by have not only faced radiation exposure but also social exclusion... That's according to Dr. Robert Jacobs, Professor of nuclear history, at the Hiroshima Peace Institute.
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The revolutionary plaster that can prevent surgery scars
dailymail.co.uk - 6-14-11
A revolutionary type of wound dressing could reduce scars caused by surgery.
The dressing, made from a form of silicone, is stretched over the wound and left in place for up to eight weeks. It works by reducing the tension on the skin that leads to scarring.
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Cracked lips, wrinkles, droopy eyelids... The illnesses staring you in the face
dailymail.co.uk - 6-14-11
We tend to see narcissism as an unattractive characteristic, best left for reality TV stars.
However, studies show that taking more than a passing glance at ourselves in the mirror could be a good thing.
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Women are BORN to be moody
dailymail.co.uk - 6-14-11
Are women born to be grumpy? This sounds like the sexist moan of a disgruntled husband, torn off a strip for failing to put the rubbish out. Again.
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A better kind of prostate test
telegraph.co.uk - 6-14-11
It’s the most common cancer in men, a quarter of a million of whom live with the disease in Britain alone. So the news this week that the use of MRI scans to detect prostate cancer could save many of them from unnecessary rectal biopsies could lead to a real revolution in diagnosing this deadly disease.
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Disparities: Health Risks Seen for Single Mothers
nytimes.com - 6-14-11
Middle-aged women who were single when they had their first child are in worse health than similar women who were married when first giving birth, suggesting that the stress of being a single parent has long-term health consequences, a new study has found.
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Patterns: Prenatal Vitamins May Ward Off Autism
nytimes.com - 6-14-11
Scientists have identified an unexpected factor that may play a significant role in the development of autism: prenatal vitamins.
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A General in the Drug War
nytimes.com - 6-14-11
From heroin and cocaine to sex and lies, Tetris and the ponies, the spectrum of human addictions is vast. But for Dr. Nora D. Volkow, the neuroscientist in charge of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, they all boil down to pretty much the same thing.
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Girl survives rabies without vaccination
msnbc.msn.com - 6-14-11
An 8-year-old girl who contracted rabies — likely from a feral cat — is a rare survivor of the infection without having received the life-saving vaccine, hospital officials said Sunday.
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Mysterious, severe arthritis plagues doc
msnbc.msn.com - 6-14-11
Dr. Sue Zieman can almost set her watch by her disease: Twice a day, she gets a fever and the already arthritic joints in her arms and hands, legs and feet abruptly, painfully swell even more. During the evening flare, even the tendons in her feet puff up, rope-like worms just under her skin.
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Living with pets may protect infants from allergies
cnn.com - 6-14-11
Children who live with dogs and cats are less likely to develop allergies to those animals later in life, but only if the pet is under the same roof while the child is still an infant, a new study suggests.
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Doctor indicted for falsely diagnosing patients with HIV and defrauding Medicare
naturalnews.com - 6-14-11
At a cost of up to $15,000 a year, the antiretroviral drugs used for treating HIV and AIDS are a big money-maker for drug companies. But apparently they are also a good choice for corrupt doctors who are illegally trying to make a quick buck off the US Medicare system. A federal investigation has revealed that Dr. Suresh Hemrajani of Manhattan, NY, falsely diagnosed about 150 patients with HIV, and billed Medicare for $700,000 worth of phony prescribed treatments.
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Breast-feeding May Shield Against Sudden Infant Death Syndrome
healthday.com - 6-14-11
Breast-feeding appears to reduce the risk of SIDS by up to 73 percent, especially when babies are exclusively breast-fed, a new study suggests.
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When Wives Can't Sleep, Marriage May Suffer
healthday.com - 6-14-11
When wives can't fall asleep, that tends to trigger marital tensions the next day, a new study suggests, whereas the sleep issues of husbands barely impact spousal relationships.
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Could a Diet Help Prevent Alzheimer's?
healthday.com - 6-14-11
The low-fat, low-glycemic diet often promoted for general health and well-being may lower the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease if adopted early in life, researchers say.
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Diabetics May Be at Greater Risk for Second Stroke
healthday.com - 6-14-11
After suffering a first stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), people with diabetes are at greater risk of having another stroke or a heart attack, a new study confirms.
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Heart Attack Death Rates Linked to Ambulance Diversion
sciencedaily.com - 6-14-11
Heart attack patients die at a higher rate when their nearest emergency room is so overtaxed that the ambulance transporting them is dispatched to another hospital, according to a new study led by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco.
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We Are All Mutants: First Direct Whole-Genome Measure of Human Mutation Predicts 60 New Mutations in Each of Us
sciencedaily.com - 6-14-11
Each one of us receives approximately 60 new mutations in our genome from our parents. This striking value is reported in the first-ever direct measure of new mutations coming from mother and father in whole human genomes.
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Simple Analysis of Breathing Sounds While Awake Can Detect Obstructive Sleep Apnea
sciencedaily.com - 6-14-11
The analysis of breathing sounds while awake may be a fast, simple and accurate screening tool for obstructive sleep apnea, suggests a research abstract being presented in Minneapolis, Minn., at SLEEP 2011, the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).
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Preteens Surrounded by Smokers Get Hooked on Nicotine, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-14-11
Exposure to secondhand smoke can create symptoms of nicotine dependence in non-smoking preteens, according to a new study from Concordia University and the University of Montreal.
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One in Five Heart-Attack Deaths Could Be Prevented With New Drug, Findings Show
sciencedaily.com - 6-14-11
Robert Storey, Professor of Cardiology at the University of Sheffield's Department of Cardiovascular Science, has presented findings that show that one in five deaths in the year following a heart attack could be prevented if a new drug, ticagrelor, was used instead of the standard treatment, clopidogrel.
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Cooling the Brain During Sleep May Be a Natural and Effective Treatment for Insomnia
sciencedaily.com - 6-14-11
People with primary insomnia may be able to find relief by wearing a cap that cools the brain during sleep, suggests a research abstract presented June 13, in Minneapolis, Minn., at Sleep 2011, the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).
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Scientists probe DNA of E. coli for outbreak clues
guardian.co.uk - 6-13-11
Scientists are quickly combing the DNA of the killer bacteria behind the world's worst E. coli outbreak to find clues about how to treat patients and prevent future epidemics.
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E.coli patients may need kidney transplants
thelocal.de - 6-13-11
"Around 100 patients have suffered such terrible kidney damage that they will require a transplant or have to undergo dialysis for the rest of their lives," he told the Bild am Sonntag newspaper.
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Age alone may not cause testosterone to fall
usatoday.com - 6-13-11
Testosterone levels don't necessarily drop with age, but it's more likely among older men with declining general health, a new study suggests.
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Growing number of adults developing hayfever
telegraph.co.uk - 6-13-11
More than half a million more middle-aged people will develop hay fever over the next decade, as a surge in late-onset allergies baffles scientists.
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Scientists Identify Genes Linked to Migraines
healthday.com - 6-13-11
Researchers have identified three genes linked to migraine headache and found that people who inherit any one of these genes have a 10 to 15 percent greater risk for the condition.
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Weight-Loss Surgery May Not Lower Death Risk: Study
healthday.com - 6-13-11
Weight-loss surgery doesn't decrease the risk of death among severely obese middle-aged adults, a new study says.
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Non-Alcoholic Wheat Beer Boosts Athletes' Health, Sport Doctors Say
sciencedaily.com - 6-13-11
Many amateur athletes have long suspected what research scientists for the Department of Preventative and Rehabilitative Sports Medicine of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen at Klinikum rechts der Isar have now made official: Documented proof, gathered during the world's largest study of marathons, "Be-MaGIC" (beer, marathons, genetics, inflammation and the cardiovascular system), that the consumption of non-alcoholic weissbier, or wheat beer, has a positive effect on athletes' health. Under the direction of Dr. Johannes Scherr, physicians examined 277 test subjects three weeks before and two weeks after the 2009 Munich Marathon.
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Cancer-Seeking 'Smart Bombs' Target Kidney Cancer Cells
sciencedaily.com - 6-13-11
Researchers are halting kidney cancer with a novel form of radioimmunotherapy that zeroes in on antigens associated with renal cell carcinoma. Patients with progressive kidney cancer receiving up to three doses of the therapy show dramatic slowing of cancer growth and stabilization of their disease.
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Groundbreaking Male Infertility Test Could 'Bring Hope to Millions'
sciencedaily.com - 6-13-11
A groundbreaking new test for male infertility, which will save time, money and heartache for couples around the world, has been developed at Queen's University Belfast.
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Childhood Trauma Linked to Higher Rates of Mental Health Problems
sciencedaily.com - 6-13-11
New research has shown that children's risk for learning and behavior problems and obesity rises in correlation to their level of trauma exposure, says the psychiatrist at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital who oversaw the study. The findings could encourage physicians to consider diagnosing post-traumatic stress disorder rather than attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, which has similar symptoms to PTSD but very different treatment.
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Is the Dramatic Increase in Baby Deaths in the US a Result of Fukushima Fallout?
counterpunch.org - 6-12-11
U.S. babies are dying at an increased rate. While the United States spends billions on medical care, as of 2006, the US ranked 28th in the world in infant mortality, more than twice that of the lowest ranked countries. (DHHS, CDC, National Center for Health Statistics. Health United States 2010, Table 20, p. 131, February 2011.)
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UCB Food Chain Sampling Results
nuc.berkeley.edu - 6-12-11
Radionuclides, once deposited by rainwater or air onto the ground, will find their way through the ecosystem. We are already tracking its path from rainwater to creek runoff to tap water, but we would also like to monitor how much these isotopes that make their way into our food. For example, how much gets taken up by the grass and eventually winds up in our milk?
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Are we aliens on our own planet? Meteorite suggests life's building blocks evolved in space
dailymail.co.uk - 6-12-11
A meteorite that exploded above Canada 11 years ago has provided strong evidence that life's building blocks came from space.
Fragments of the rock that landed on Tagish Lake, British Columbia, yielded a mix of organic compounds.
They included amino acids and monocarboxylic acids, both essential to the evolution of the first simple life forms on Earth.
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Floating Fungus: Trouble in the Air?
abcnews.go.com - 6-12-11
Under the light of a high autumnal sun, I stand before a grove of Douglas firs, enjoying the vertigo brought on by gazing skyward at the giants. From a few hundred feet away, a breeze whispers off the Strait of Georgia. It's another spectacular day in Rathtrevor Beach Provincial Park, one of the most popular camping spots in British Columbia. Bewitched by the beauty, I can almost forget the danger.
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Skin cancer super drug has added years to my life says one of the first patients to receive it
dailymail.co.uk - 6-12-11
The news last week of a breakthrough in the treatment of malignant melanoma, involving not one but two new drugs, came as little surprise to a British woman who was diagnosed with the advanced stage of the disease in 2005.
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Cat lovers given new drug hope of 'beating their allergy to their pets'
telegraph.co.uk - 6-12-11
Cat lovers allergic to their pets have been given hope of a cure after scientists developed a drug that stops reactions rather than just treat symptons.
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‘You Look Great’ and Other Lies
nytimes.com - 6-12-11
MY friend sat down and ordered a stiff drink. I didn’t think of her as the stiff-drink kind. An hour later, after our spouses drifted off into conversation, she leaned over the table. "I need your help," she said. "My sister has a brain tumor. I don’t know what to do."
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Fukushima already ten times worse than Chernobyl in ocean waters, suggests data
naturalnews.com - 6-12-11
Recent readings taken roughly 19 miles out to sea from the Fukushima nuclear power facility in Japan have revealed radioisotope levels ten times higher than those measured in the Baltic and Black Seas after the massive Chernobyl disaster. Because Fukushima is much closer to water than the Chernobyl plant is, the ongoing fallout there is shaping up to be far worse than Chernobyl, at least as far as the world's oceans are concerned, and time will tell just how devastating this massive disaster will be on the entire world as radiation continues to circulate around the globe.
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Want to prevent diabetes? Take more omega-3, says new research
naturalnews.com - 6-12-11
Consuming omega-3 fatty acids may help lower your risk of diabetes, according to two recent studies. The studies, one based in the US, the other in Singapore, found adults with higher levels of omega-3 fats were less likely to develop diabetes.
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Marijuana and Radiation Protection
naturalnews.com - 6-12-11
Marijuana offers strong protective qualities against radiation exposure. Since fewer and fewer people have the financial resources to continually purchase all the helpful things they will need perhaps growing weed in our backyard will offer the public one of the best anti-radiation solutions in the long run. Instead of it being just relaxing it might become very necessary to intake marijuana to increase ones defenses against radiation exposure. Might as well get your brownies ready but one has to be careful about radiation getting into everything, even your marijuana plants, which will actually thrive nicely in radioactive environments.
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Insect Stings Hold Deadly Risk for Some
healthday.com - 6-12-11
For most people, insect stings are a painful annoyance, but they can be deadly for those who are allergic to them, researchers warn.
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Eight Substances Added to U.S. Report on Carcinogens, Including Formaldehyde, May Increase Cancer Risk
sciencedaily.com - 6-12-11
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has added eight substances to its Report on Carcinogens, a science-based document that identifies chemicals and biological agents that may put people at increased risk for cancer.
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Molecular Imaging for Alzheimer's Disease May Be Available in Hospitals Within a Year, Studies Suggest
sciencedaily.com - 6-12-11
Researchers the world over are advancing positron emission tomography (PET) as an effective method of early detection for Alzheimer's disease, a currently incurable and deadly neurological disorder. Three studies presented at SNM's 58th Annual Meeting are providing new insights into the development of Alzheimer's disease while opening the door to future clinical screening and treatments.
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Gender Differences in Risk Pathways for Adolescent Substance Abuse and Early Adult Alcoholism
sciencedaily.com - 6-12-11
Clinically ascertained reports suggest that boys and girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may differ from each other in their vulnerability to substance use problems, say the researchers of the University of Helsinki and University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
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Scientists warn of deadly shellfish in part of Alaska
ca.news.yahoo.com - 6-11-11
Public health officials warned Alaskans to avoid eating shellfish they harvest from the southeastern tip of the state after high concentrations of a poison than can kill humans was found.
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Dope-Smoking, Menstruating Monkey Study Got $3.6 Million in Tax Dollars
cnsnews.com - 6-11-11
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a division of the federal government’s National Institutes of Health (NIH), has spent $3,634,807 over the past decade funding research that involves getting monkeys to smoke and drink drugs such as PCP, methamphetamine (METH), heroin, and cocaine and then studying their behavior, including during different phases of the female monkeys’ menstrual cycles.
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Salmonella outbreak tied to chicks, ducklings
usatoday.com - 6-11-11
Health officials say 39 people have been sickened from a salmonella outbreak spread through handling baby chicks or ducklings.
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Dried fruit 'just as healthy as fresh' and can help combat cancer and heart problems
dailymail.co.uk - 6-11-11
Dried fruit is as healthy as its fresh equivalent and can help combat cancer, metabolic disease and heart problems, researchers have found.
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German tests link bean sprouts to deadly E. coli
bbc.co.uk - 6-11-11
New data released in Germany strongly suggests that locally produced bean sprouts were, as suspected, the source of the deadly E. coli outbreak.
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Is lithium the next fluoride? Medication may be added to the water supply
naturalnews.com - 6-11-11
Lithium, the psychiatric drug prescribed for depression, mania and bipolar disorder, is now being viewed as the new fluoride by some experts. These experts are calling for the addition of lithium to the water supply as a cure-all for social problems, including suicide, violent crime and drug use.
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Organic Trade Association "Modified" By GMO Interests
naturalnews.com - 6-11-11
Organic Spies made news by releasing information on the financial interests and campaign contributions of the companies that are represented on the OTA board, but the underlying story of Food Inc.'s efforts to co-opt and water down organic, while protecting their interest in industrial agriculture's GMOs and factory farms, goes back to very start of the National Organic Program.
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Heavy Cell Phone Use Might Raise Risk of Brain Tumors
healthday.com - 6-11-11
The debate over whether or not cell phones might cause brain tumors continues, as a new international study finds a small risk among people who are heavy cell phone users or who have used them for a long time.
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Chemical Found in Foam Cups a Possible Carcinogen
healthday.com - 6-11-11
The chemical styrene, ubiquitous in foam coffee cups and take-out containers, has been added to the list of chemicals considered possible human carcinogens, according to a new U.S. government report.
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Self-Confidence, Empathy May Make for Better Sex
healthday.com - 6-11-11
Could a healthy psychological outlook be tied to better sex?
That's the finding from a new study comparing the psychological profiles of young adults against their reports of satisfaction in the bedroom.
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ER Docs Frustrated, Burned Out by Repeat Patients: Survey
healthday.com - 6-11-11
Americans who routinely turn to hospital emergency departments for non-urgent primary care are a big source of frustration and stress for the doctors who run those facilities, a new national survey reveals.
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Discovery May Pave Way to Quitting Smoking Without Gaining Weight
sciencedaily.com - 6-11-11
Smokers tend to die young, but they tend to die thinner than non-smokers. A team of scientists led by Yale School of Medicine has discovered exactly how nicotine suppresses appetite -- findings that suggest that it might be possible to develop a drug that would help smokers, and non-smokers, stay thin.
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Simple Test Could Hold Key to Early Diagnosis of Cancers
sciencedaily.com - 6-11-11
Cancers of the gut, stomach and pancreas could be detected much sooner with a simple urine test, research suggests. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have identified key proteins in the urine of patients with advanced cancers.
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Seniors Abused During Childhood Face Increased Risk of Sleep Troubles, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-11-11
Suffering from parental abuse as a child increases a person's chances of having poor sleep quality in old age, according to a research article in the current issue of the Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological and Social Sciences (Volume 66B, Number 3).
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B Vitamins in Mother's Diet Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk in Offspring, Animal Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-11-11
Mice born to mothers who are fed a diet supplemented with B vitamins are less likely to develop intestinal tumors, report scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University.
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Mortality from All Causes Higher Among Hepatitis C-Infected, Analysis Finds
sciencedaily.com - 6-11-11
Although liver-related mortality among those infected with hepatitis C is well documented, little is known about deaths in these patients that are not related to liver problems. A new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and now available online sought to determine mortality from all causes, including liver- and non-liver-related deaths among hepatitis C patients in the general U.S. population. The analysis found mortality from all causes to be higher in these patients.
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Brain Imaging Study of Preschoolers With ADHD Detects Brain Differences Linked to Symptoms
sciencedaily.com - 6-11-11
In a study published June 9 in the Clinical Neuropsychologist, researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute found differences in the brain development of preschool children with symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Results showed the region of the brain important for cognitive and motor control was smaller in these children than in typically developing children. Novel for its use of neuroimaging in very young, preschool age children with early symptoms of ADHD, this study's examination of brain differences may offer new insights into potential early interventions for the disorder.
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Japan recalls Shizuoka tea over radiation fears
telegraph.co.uk - 6-10-11
A tea dealer has started a recall of the dried tea after measuring about 679 becquerels of caesium per kilogramme in leaves at a tea factory in the city of Shizuoka, prefectural officials said. The legal limit is 500 Bq/kg.
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Germany: Sprouts are cause of E. coli outbreak
apnews.myway.com - 6-10-11
Investigators have determined that German-grown vegetable sprouts are the cause of the E. coli outbreak that has killed 29 people and sickened nearly 3,000, the head of Germany's national disease control center said Friday.
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Many of us won't be able to retire until our 80s
marketwatch.com - 6-10-11
We all think it's a panacea. If you don’t have enough money saved for retirement, you’ve got a few ways to close the gap between what you have and what you need in your nest egg: Save more, invest more aggressively, and/or work longer.
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Japan mulls closure of N-reactors by April
omantribune.com - 6-10-11
All 54 of Japan’s nuclear reactors may be shut by next April, adding more than $30 billion a year to the country’s energy costs, if communities object to plant operating plans due to safety concerns, trade ministry officials said on Wednesday.
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HealthWatch: Sitting Vs. Smoking
sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com - 6-10-11
Smoking cigarettes is the cause of so much preventable, deadly disease. But now new research shows sitting for long stretches of time may be just as dangerous.
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Special Dogs Track Allergens to Keep Kids Safe
abcnews.go.com - 6-10-11
Boo and Riley are more than affectionate, protective family pets. To their owners, the specially trained dogs are a furry layer of security to sniff out peanut products and other life-threatening allergens.
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1 in 3 develop AIDS within a year of HIV diagnosis
usatoday.com - 6-10-11
Experts at the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC) have long estimated that 20% of people infected with HIV don't know it. One-third are diagnosed so late in the course of their infection that they develop AIDS within one year. The new analysis found that the states with the biggest epidemics and the greatest number of late diagnoses are Florida, New York, Texas, Georgia and New Jersey.
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UK cancer survival rates 'the worst in the Western world'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-10-11
Cancer survival rates in the UK rank amongst the lowest in the Western world and show little sign of catching up, a damning report warns.
Late diagnosis and a lack of life-saving treatments are blamed for patients being more likely to die here than elsewhere in Europe, Canada or Australia, Norway and Sweden.
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Meningitis vaccine could save thousands of lives
telegraph.co.uk - 6-10-11
Thousands of children's lives could be saved by a new meningitis vaccine that could be available by the end of the year, it has emerged.
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Loading up on fruits and veggies makes you live longer
msnbc.msn.com - 6-10-11
To the likely delight of nagging parents, a new study shows that people who eat more fruit and veggies tend to live longer.
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FDA Restricts Use of High Doses of Cholesterol-Lowering Drug Zocor
healthland.time.com - 6-10-11
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Wednesday restricted the use of high doses of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin, which is sold in generic forms and under the brand names Zocor and Vytorin, because of concerns over muscle problems associated with the drug.
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Researchers' hope of 20 new vaccines in next decade
bbc.co.uk - 6-10-11
Researchers writing in The Lancet say there is the potential to develop 20 new or improved vaccines in the next decade.
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Study: Conventional cosmetic products linked to damaging side effects
naturalnews.com - 6-10-11
A new report published by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH) highlights some of the worst cosmetic products that cause harmful side effects. Among the most damaging are permanent hair dyes, facial and body moisturizers, cleansers, and even sunscreens, all of which are used by a significant portion of the overall population. And cases of severe reactions from such everyday-use products are widespread, say researchers.
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Startling findings - ovarian cancer screening doesn't save lives and not all ovarian cancers kill or need treatment
naturalnews.com - 6-10-11
There's no denying ovarian cancer is usually a terrible disease. A stealthy malignancy, it's often misdiagnosed as indigestion and by the time ovarian cancer is actually discovered by a doctor, the disease may have spread extensively. According to the National Institutes of Health, ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women and causes more deaths than any other type of female reproductive cancer.
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World entering era of permanent food crisis, with prices to double over next 20 years
naturalnews.com - 6-10-11
The average price of staple foods will more than double in the next 20 years, Oxfam warns. The world is entering an era of permanent food crisis, which is likely to be accompanied by political unrest, and the situation will lead to an unprecedented reversal in human development, it said.
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To this day, Coca-Cola still imports coca leaves which are used to manufacture cocaine in the United States
naturalnews.com - 6-10-11
Coca leaves have been chewed and consumed as tea for thousands of years in the high Andes. They are rich in many essential nutrients; they ease respiratory and digestive distress and are a natural stimulant and painkiller. Indigenous tradition and scientific studies have both confirmed that in their natural form, the leaves are completely safe and non-addictive -- it takes intensive processing and toxic chemical ingredients to produce cocaine. That's why more and more coca-containing products have started to hit the market in Andean countries in the past few years.
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Drugs for Enlarged Prostate May Raise Risk of Aggressive Cancer
healthday.com - 6-10-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is calling for new warning labels on a class of drugs used primarily to treat enlarged prostates, because the medications may raise the risk of developing an aggressive form of prostate cancer.
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Experts Say Hormone Replacement Generally Safe in Short-Term
healthday.com - 6-10-11
Treatment with hormone replacement therapy (HRT), if tailored to an individual woman's needs, appears to be safe during menopause, according to a report scheduled for release Friday at the World Congress on Menopause in Rome, Italy.
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Preschool's Benefits Linger Into Adulthood, Study Finds
healthday.com - 6-10-11
Children enrolled in a full-time preschool program that sees them through elementary school have a better life 25 years later than children who were not in preschool do, University of Minnesota researchers report.
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Young Adults Sometimes See Debt as a Positive
healthday.com - 6-10-11
Debt may actually give some young adults a self-esteem boost, a new study suggests.
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Tainted Soil May Put Kids at Risk for Vision Loss
healthday.com - 6-10-11
Children are among those most likely to be affected by a parasitic disease called ocular toxocariasis (OT), which can lead to permanent vision loss, according to a national survey of American ophthalmologists.
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Mothers Play Important Role in Recovery From Mental Illness
healthday.com - 6-10-11
Negative family attitudes can have an adverse effect on recovery from mental illness, according to a new study.
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Chemo for Late-Stage Cancer Patients May Be Unjustified
healthday.com - 6-10-11
Some patients with advanced cancer receive drugs that won't help them but could cause them harm, a U.S. study suggests.
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Why Animals Don't Have Infrared Vision: Source of the Visual System's 'False Alarms' Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 6-10-11
On rare occasion, the light-sensing photoreceptor cells in the eye misfire and signal to the brain as if they have captured photons, when in reality they haven't. For years this phenomenon remained a mystery. Reporting in the June 10 issue of Science, neuroscientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that a light-capturing pigment molecule in photoreceptors can be triggered by heat, as well, giving rise to these false alarms.
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Huntington's Disease Breakthrough: New Research Offers Promise of Medical Intervention
sciencedaily.com - 6-10-11
Medical researchers may have uncovered a novel approach to treat an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease that affects hundreds of thousands of people.
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Study Confirms Safety, Cancer-Targeting Ability of Nutrient in Broccoli, Other Vegetables, Researchers Say
sciencedaily.com - 6-10-11
Sulforaphane, one of the primary phytochemicals in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables that helps them prevent cancer, has been shown for the first time to selectively target and kill cancer cells while leaving normal prostate cells healthy and unaffected.
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Eating a High-Fat Diet May Rapidly Injure Brain Cells That Control Body Weight
sciencedaily.com - 6-10-11
Obesity among people who eat a high-fat diet may involve injury to neurons, or nerve cells, in a key part of the brain that controls body weight, according to the authors of a new animal study.
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Nicotine Triggered Appetite Suppression Site Identified in Brain
sciencedaily.com - 6-10-11
A new study uncovers a brain mechanism that could be targeted for new medications designed to help people quit smoking without gaining weight. This research shows that a specific subclass of brain nicotinic receptor is involved in nicotine's ability to reduce food intake in rodents. Prior research shows that the average weight gain after smoking is less than 10 pounds, but fear of weight gain can discourage some people who would like to quit.
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Genetic Link Between Emphysema, Lung Cancer Uncovered
sciencedaily.com - 6-10-11
A gene linked to emphysema also can be a factor for developing lung cancer unrelated to cigarette smoking, UT Southwestern Medical Center research indicates. Smoking was the only known risk factor previously associated with both diseases.
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Roundup Birth Defects: Regulators Knew World's Best-Selling Herbicide Causes Problems, New Report Finds
huffingtonpost.com - 6-9-11
Industry regulators have known for years that Roundup, the world's best-selling herbicide produced by U.S. company Monsanto, causes birth defects, according to a new report released Tuesday.
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Nuclear fuel has melted through base of Fukushima plant
telegraph.co.uk - 6-9-11
The nuclear fuel in three of the reactors at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant has melted through the base of the pressure vessels and is pooling in the outer containment vessels, according to a report by the Japanese government.
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Green Buildings Hazardous to Health? Report Cites Risks of Weatherization
foxnews.com - 6-9-11
The buildings commonly referred to as "green" could actually be hazardous to your health, according to a new report.
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China Genetically Modifying Cows To Produce Human Breast Milk
myfoxny.com - 6-9-11
Chinese scientists have genetically modified dairy cows to produce human breast milk, and hope to be selling it in supermarkets within three years.
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DNA Can be influenced and reprogrammed by words and frequencies
quantumpranx.wordpress.com - 6-9-11
THE HUMAN DNA IS A BIOLOGICAL INTERNET and superior in many aspects to the artificial one. The latest Russian scientific research directly or indirectly explains phenomena such as clairvoyance, intuition, spontaneous and remote acts of healing, self healing, affirmation techniques, unusual light/auras around people (namely spiritual masters), mind’s influence on weather patterns and much more. In addition, there is evidence for a whole new type of medicine in which DNA can be influenced and reprogrammed by words and frequencies WITHOUT cutting out and replacing single genes.
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Simvastatin can damage muscles in high doses
usatoday.com - 6-9-11
The cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin can cause severe muscle damage and should not be prescribed in high doses to patients who have taken it for less than a year or in any dose to people taking certain drugs, health officials said Tuesday.
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New Questions Rise in Cause and Trajectory of Germany E. Coli Outbreak
nytimes.com - 6-9-11
As Germany's tally of deaths increased in what has become one of the world's most lethal infections of E. coli, new elements of confusion surfaced Wednesday with conflicting signals about whether the outbreak is abating and what caused it.
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Drug makes hearts repair themselves
bbc.co.uk - 6-9-11
A drug that makes hearts repair themselves has been used in research on mice.
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US keeping secret stash of smallpox viruses at lab in Georgia to use for future bioweapons
naturalnews.com - 6-9-11
You may have heard that smallpox has long been eradicated but what you may not know is that the United States and Russia still maintain stocks of the disease, and the U.S. is still in the business of researching and developing it. The question is, why?
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25 Amazing Facts About Food revealed in free downloadable report
naturalnews.com - 6-9-11
Did you know that a common ingredient in commercial breads and pizza dough is made from human hair? Or that Chicken McNuggets are made with an ingredient that's also an industrial chemical?
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FDA Places New Warning Label on Zocor
healthday.com - 6-9-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday called for a label warning on the popular statin Zocor because of an increased risk of muscle damage when taken in the highest doses.
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It's Safe to Get IUD Right After Abortion, Miscarriage: Study
healthday.com - 6-9-11
Women offered an intrauterine device (IUD) for birth control at the same time they're having a uterine aspiration due to miscarriage or abortion are much more likely to get one compared to women offered one later on, new research suggests.
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Arsenic-Containing Poultry Drug Suspended From Market
healthday.com - 6-9-11
A drug maker has agreed to suspend the sale of its animal drug 3-Nitro from the market because it contains organic arsenic that can be transformed into inorganic arsenic, a known carcinogen, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said Wednesday.
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Girls May Be More Resistant to Autism Than Boys: Study
healthday.com - 6-9-11
Girls may be more resistant to the spontaneous genetic mishaps that explain some cases of autism in families with no history of the disorder, two new studies suggest.
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Dieters More Likely to Trust Food Packaging
healthday.com - 6-9-11
Dieters are more likely than non-dieters to be misled by food names, a new study says.
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Exercise May Protect the Brain From 'Silent Strokes'
healthday.com - 6-9-11
Jogging, swimming, biking or other moderate to intense physical activity may protect the brain from "silent strokes," or small brain lesions that can lead to mental decline and increase the chances of a future stroke, a new study suggests.
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Impaired Heart Function Seen in Teens With Type 2 Diabetes
healthday.com - 6-9-11
Some teens with type 2 diabetes already show signs of impaired heart function, researchers report.
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Historic First Images of Rod Photoreceptors in the Living Human Eye
sciencedaily.com - 6-9-11
Scientists have just reported that the tiny light-sensing cells known as rods have been clearly and directly imaged in the living eye for the first time. Using adaptive optics (AO), the same technology astronomers use to study distant stars and galaxies, scientists can see through the murky distortion of the outer eye, revealing the eye's cellular structure with unprecedented detail. This innovation, described in two papers in the Optical Society's (OSA) open access journal Biomedical Optics Express, will help doctors diagnose degenerative eye disorders sooner, leading to quicker intervention and more effective treatments.
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Barefoot Running: To Ditch the Shoes or Not?
sciencedaily.com - 6-9-11
A hot issue among runners is whether running in bare feet reduces or increases the risk of injury. Stuart Warden, associate professor and director of research in the Department of Physical Therapy at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, says for some runners it could do both.
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An Alternative to Antibiotics
sciencedaily.com - 6-9-11
Antibiotics are among the greatest achievements of medical science. But lately the former multi-purpose weapon fails in the battle against infectious diseases. Bacteria are increasingly developing resistance to antibiotics. Researchers have now found a therapeutic equivalent which could replace penicillin and related phamaceuticals.
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Shingles May Be Related to Elevated Risk of Multiple Sclerosis
sciencedaily.com - 6-9-11
Taiwanese investigators have found that there can be a significantly higher risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) occurring in the year following a shingles, or herpes zoster, attack. The findings, which support a long-held view on how MS may develop, are published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases and now available online.
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Size, Strength of Heart's Right Side Differs by Age, Gender, Race/Ethnicity
sciencedaily.com - 6-9-11
The size and pumping ability of the right side of the heart differs by age, gender and race/ethnicity, according to the first large imaging study of the right ventricle.
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Smoking, Even for a Short Time, Significantly Increases a Woman's Risk for Peripheral Artery Disease, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 6-9-11
A prospective study of initially healthy women aged 45 and over found that smoking is a potent risk factor for symptomatic peripheral artery disease, or PAD. PAD is a serious, often debilitating disorder, caused by narrowing of the arteries in the lower extremities. Symptoms of PAD include pain in the legs with normal activity and a feeling of tiredness in the leg muscles.
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How Low Doses Of Radiation Can Cause Heart Disease And Stroke
sciencedaily.com - 6-8-11
A mathematical model constructed by researchers at Imperial College London predicts the risk of cardiovascular disease (heart attacks, stroke) associated with low background levels of radiation. The model shows that the risk would vary almost in proportion with dose.
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EPA poised to ban rodent poisons
msnbc.msn.com - 6-8-11
The government is moving to ban the sale of some popular rat and mouse poisons such as D-Con and Hot Shot in an effort to protect children and pets.
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Green tea exports banned from Japan after testing high for radioactive cesium
naturalnews.com - 6-8-11
The Japanese government has banned exports of green tea from four agricultural regions of Japan after leaves there tested positive for high levels of radioactive cesium. According to reports from the UK's Telegraph, green tea leaves from parts of Tochigi, Chiba, and Kanagawa, as well as from the entire region of Ibaraki, have exceeded legal limits following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, prompting the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare to recall already-shipped stocks of tainted tea, and cease all future shipments.
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In U.S., Salmonella Is on the Rise While E. Coli Retreats
healthday.com - 6-8-11
As a deadly new strain of E. coli in Europe makes headlines, U.S. health officials announced Tuesday that salmonella, not E. coli, remains the biggest foodborne health threat to Americans.
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Chronic Pot Smoking Affects Brain Chemistry, Scans Show
healthday.com - 6-8-11
Imaging scans show that chronic daily use of marijuana can have a detrimental effect on the brain, according to a new report.
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Chronic Pot Smoking Affects Brain Chemistry, Scans Show
healthday.com - 6-8-11
Imaging scans show that chronic daily use of marijuana can have a detrimental effect on the brain, according to a new report.
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Age Alone May Not Cause Testosterone to Fall
healthday.com - 6-8-11
Testosterone levels don't necessarily drop with age, but it's more likely among older men with declining general health, a new study suggests.
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Using Magnets to Help Prevent Heart Attacks: Magnetic Field Can Reduce Blood Viscosity, Physicist Discovers
sciencedaily.com - 6-8-11
If a person's blood becomes too thick it can damage blood vessels and increase the risk of heart attacks. But a Temple University physicist has discovered that he can thin the human blood by subjecting it to a magnetic field.
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Apple Ingredient Keeps Muscles Strong: Component of Apple Peels Found to Help Prevent Muscle Weakening in Mice
sciencedaily.com - 6-8-11
n search of a way to prevent the muscle wasting that comes with illness and aging, researchers have landed a natural compound that might just do the trick. The findings reported in the June issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication, identify a component of apple peels as a promising new drug candidate for the widespread and debilitating condition that affects nearly everyone at one time or another.
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Squeeze an Arm, Protect the Heart: New Technique for Heart Protection Analyzed
sciencedaily.com - 6-8-11
Scientists at the University of Leicester are investigating a novel technique that promises to protect heart muscle from life-threatening damage following a heart attack -- simply by squeezing an arm. Heart attacks are the major cause of premature death in England, with massive implications for survival and costs of long-term health care.
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Research Creates Nanoparticles Perfectly Formed to Tackle Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 6-8-11
Researchers from the University of Hull have discovered a way to load up nanoparticles with large numbers of light-sensitive molecules to create a more effective form of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treating cancer.
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Insulin Action on Brain's Reward Circuitry Linked to Obesity
sciencedaily.com - 6-8-11
Researchers reporting in the June issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication, have what they say is some of the first solid proof that insulin has direct effects on the reward circuitry of the brain. Mice whose reward centers can no longer respond to insulin eat more and become obese, they show.
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U.S. cancer drugs shortage has doctors scrambling
reuters.com - 6-8-11
Cancer medicines desperately needed by sick children and adults are in short supply, undermining the ability of U.S. doctors to administer treatments, top oncologists warned this week.
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Germany backtracks on sprouts as E. coli source
finance.yahoo.com - 6-7-11
First they pointed a finger at Spanish cucumbers. Then they cast suspicion on sprouts from Germany. Now German officials appear dumbfounded as to the source of the deadliest E. coli outbreak in modern history, and one U.S. expert has called the investigation a "disaster."
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Firms to cut health plans as reform starts: survey 30% of companies say they'll stop offering coverage
marketwatch.com - 6-7-11
Once provisions of the Affordable Care Act start to kick in during 2014, at least three of every 10 employers will probably stop offering health coverage, a survey released Monday shows.
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The green killer: Scores of protected golden eagles dying after colliding with wind turbines
dailymail.co.uk - 6-7-11
California's attempts to switch to green energy have inadvertently put the survival of the state's golden eagles at risk.
Scores of the protected birds have been dying each year after colliding with the blades of about 5,000 wind turbines.
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How your medicine could be draining vital nutrients from your body
dailymail.co.uk - 6-7-11
Medication can do much to alleviate the symptoms that make your life miserable. But in most cases they don't actually tackle the cause. There is also the risk of side-effects.
And as a new book suggests, they might be adding to your health woes by 'stealing nutrients from your system or preventing their absorption'. As a result, you could end up feeling worse, or even being diagnosed with another condition.
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Brain Calisthenics for Abstract Ideas
nytimes.com - 6-7-11
Like any other high school junior, Wynn Haimer has a few holes in his academic game. Graphs and equations, for instance: He gets the idea, fine - one is a linear representation of the other - but making those conversions is often a headache.
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Does third grade lead to brain changes?
thechart.blogs.cnn.com - 6-7-11
New research from Stanford University, published in the journal NeuroImage, suggests that problem-solving ability improves from second to third grade in ways that are associated with changes in the brain. The researchers believe these brain changes are the result of skills that the children are acquiring in school, although the study did not show cause and effect.
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Children are dissociated from the natural world due to focus on internet, Xbox and TV
naturalnews.com - 6-7-11
The tossing aside of age old childhood pastimes, such as tree climbing, in favor of staring at the illuminated screens of televisions and computers is making the protection of biodiversity more difficult.
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Prevent age-related diseases by consuming high levels of vitamins and minerals
naturalnews.com - 6-7-11
Most people who live in developed nations like the United States assume they get plenty of the necessary vitamins and minerals as part of their normal diets, and that they do not need to take vitamin supplements. But a new study published online in the FASEB Journal suggests otherwise, explaining that even moderate nutrient deficiencies, which afflict many unwitting individuals, are responsible for causing age-related diseases including cancer and heart disease.
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Food wars: How European health authorities are using the e.coli scare to wage economic warfare against vegetable farmers
naturalnews.com - 6-7-11
Even as hospitals in Germany are now filling up with people sickened by a super-powerful drug-resistant "superbug" strain of e.coli that looks like it was bioengineered (http://www.naturalnews.com/032622_e...), European health authorities are leaping at the opportunity to spread fear about organic foods while ignoring the obvious true cause of the contamination in the first place -- the widespread abuse of antibiotics in animal farming operations.
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Jury Still Out on Radiation for Early Prostate Cancer
healthday.com - 6-7-11
There's too little evidence to say definitively whether treating early, localized prostate cancer with radiation is a better option than "watchful waiting," new research finds.
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Heart-Healthy DASH Diet May Help Teen Girls Stay Slim
healthday.com - 6-7-11
An eating plan originally touted to reduce high blood pressure in adults has been found to keep adolescent girls trimmer between the ages of 9 and 19.
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Weight Loss May Help Sleep Apnea Symptoms
healthday.com - 6-7-11
Many people who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea could eliminate the condition by losing a significant amount of weight, a new study suggests.
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Parkinson's Disease May Boost Melanoma Risk: Study
healthday.com - 6-7-11
People with Parkinson's disease may have twice the risk of developing the deadly skin cancer melanoma, a new report confirms.
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New Direction in Alzheimer's Research
sciencedaily.com - 6-7-11
In what they are calling a new direction in the study of Alzheimer's disease, UC Santa Barbara scientists have made an important finding about what happens to brain cells that are destroyed in Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.
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Scientists Identify How Major Biological Sensor in the Body Works
sciencedaily.com - 6-7-11
A biological sensor is a critical part of a human cell's control system that is able to trigger a number of cell activities. A type of sensor known as the "gating ring" can open a channel that allows a flow of potassium ions through the cell's wall or membrane -- similar to the way a subway turnstile allows people into a station. This flow of ions, in turn, is involved in the regulation of crucial bodily activities like blood pressure, insulin secretion and brain signaling.
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Brain Scans Appear to Show Changes Associated With Violent Behavior
sciencedaily.com - 6-7-11
A brain imaging study suggests that men with a history of violent behavior may have greater gray matter volume in certain brain areas, whereas men with a history of substance use disorders may have reduced gray matter volume in other brain areas, according to a report published online by the Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
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Bisphenol A (BPA) Accumulates More Rapidly Within the Body Than Previously Thought
sciencedaily.com - 6-7-11
A new University of Missouri study shows that the exposure to the controversial chemical Bisphenol A (BPA) through diet has been underestimated by previous lab tests. In the study, researchers compared BPA concentrations in mice that were given a steady diet supplemented with BPA throughout the day, compared to the more common lab method of single exposure, and found an increased absorption and accumulation of BPA in the blood of mice.
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Study Suggests Link Between Childhood Bullying and Adult Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration
sciencedaily.com - 6-7-11
Men who report having bullied peers in childhood appear to have an increased risk of perpetrating violence against an intimate partner in adulthood, according to a report posted online by the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
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Yo-Yo Dieting Vs. Obesity? Dieters May Be Healthier, Live Longer, Mouse Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-7-11
Yo-yo dieters may be healthier and live longer than those who stay obese, a new Ohio University study in mice suggests.
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A Scary Side Effect of Eating GMO Foods
stopagingnow.com - 6-7-11
While the long term health consequences of consuming genetically modified foods are not yet know, scientists do know one thing. Consuming genetically modifying plant DNA leads to the development of "GMO" microorganisms, which reproduce continuously inside the human body. And as the Alliance for Natural Health reports, the implications could be deadly. It's time to tell the USDA we won't stand for more GMOs!
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Alarm on Gene GM Crops: A Previously Unrecognised Effect on GM Plant Development
globalresearch.ca - 6-7-11
Indian scientists have discovered that the genetic modification of plants with a gene already used in crops worldwide may severely damage the plants, a surprising finding that may stir a debate on current crop biotechnology science.
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Cancer costs put treatments out of reach for many
reuters.com - 6-7-11
The skyrocketing cost of new cancer treatments is putting advances in fighting the deadly disease out of reach for a growing number of Americans.
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Stressed at the office? Break out the pomegranate juice - it will make you more enthusiastic about your job
dailymail.co.uk - 6-6-11
Pomegranate juice could help beat stress at the office, research claims.
It has been shown to lower workers' heart rates and make them feel more enthusiastic about their jobs.
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Drinking age 'should be raised to 24' to cut alcoholism
telegraph.co.uk - 6-6-11
People should avoid beer, wine and spirits until their mid-20s amid claims "modest teenage binge drinking" is linked to poorer performance in IQ tests in later life.
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Veggie sprouts likely cause of E. coli outbreak
msnbc.msn.com - 6-6-11
The terrifying E. coli outbreak in Europe appears to have been caused by vegetable sprouts grown in Germany, an agriculture official Sunday as the toll climbed to at least 22 dead and more than 2,200 sickened.
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Signs that E. coli cases are stabilising, say doctors
bbc.co.uk - 6-6-11
European health officials say there are signs that the outbreak of a deadly strain of E. coli is stabilising.
They said that despite nearly 200 new cases in Germany - the centre of the outbreak - in the first two days of June, infection rates were dropping.
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America spends billions on pharma drugs only to destroy them at additional cost
naturalnews.com - 6-6-11
In the last year, American drug disposal programs have claimed more than 309 tons of prescription and other drugs as people turn in their unused medications. While health officials congratulate themselves on a job well done, others consider what these numbers have to say about the state of American health care - how consumerism has leaked into the pharmaceutical industry and is now running rampant.
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Forensic evidence emerges that European e.coli superbug was bioengineered to produce human fatalities
naturalnews.com - 6-6-11
Even as the veggie blame game is now under way across the EU, where a super resistant strain of e.coli is sickening patients and filling hospitals in Germany, virtually no one is talking about how e.coli could have magically become resistant to eight different classes of antibiotic drugs and then suddenly appeared in the food supply.
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Two Drugs Shown to Prolong Survival in Advanced Melanoma Cases
healthday.com - 6-6-11
Two new drugs prolong the lives of patients with advanced melanoma, one of the deadliest forms of skin cancer and one that is notoriously difficult to treat, let alone cure.
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Epilepsy Drugs' Risk of Birth Defects May Be Dose-Dependent
healthday.com - 6-6-11
Four of the most frequently prescribed epilepsy drugs appear to increase the risk of serious birth defects when taken early in pregnancy, a new study finds.
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Precision-Tinted Lenses Offer Real Migraine Relief, Reveals New Study
sciencedaily.com - 6-6-11
Precision tinted lenses have been used widely to reduce visual perceptual distortions in poor readers, and are increasingly used for migraine sufferers, but until now the science behind these effects has been unclear. Now research published in the journal Cephalalgia, uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the first time to suggest a neurological basis for these visual remedies.
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Neuroscientists Map a New Target to Wipe Pain Away
sciencedaily.com - 6-6-11
Researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine have discovered a peptide that short circuits a pathway for chronic pain. Unlike current treatments this peptide does not exhibit deleterious side effects such as reduced motor coordination, memory loss, or depression, according to an article in Nature Medicine posted online June 5, 2011.
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Could a Birth Control Pill for Men Be on the Horizon? Retinoic Acid Receptor Antagonist Interferes With Sperm Production
sciencedaily.com - 6-6-11
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center are honing in on the development of what may be the first non-steroidal, oral contraceptive for men. Tests of low doses of a compound that interferes with retinoic acid receptors (RARs), whose ligands are metabolites of dietary vitamin A, showed that it caused sterility in male mice.
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Stem Cell Treatment May Offer Option for Broken Bones That Don't Heal
sciencedaily.com - 6-6-11
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have shown in an animal study that transplantation of adult stem cells enriched with a bone-regenerating hormone can help mend bone fractures that are not healing properly.
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Hormone Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer May Raise Diabetes Risk
sciencedaily.com - 6-6-11
Men with prostate cancer are at higher risk of developing diabetes or diabetes risk factors if they receive androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to block the production or action of male hormones that can fuel the growth of this cancer.
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Blood stem cell bank to provide biological insurance for adults
telegraph.co.uk - 6-5-11
Wealthy Britons can now pay to freeze and store their stem cells as an "insurance policy" that could be used to treat diseases they develop in the future or even grow new organs.
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Side Effects? These Drugs Have a Few
nytimes.com - 6-5-11
Dr. Jon Duke of Indiana University was trying to figure out why his patient's blood platelets were abnormal. Could it be a side effect of one of the dozen drugs the man was taking, a number that is not uncommon among elderly people?
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Dripping in sweat? Maybe it's hyperhidrosis
msnbc.msn.com - 6-5-11
Imagine what your life would be like if your hands were always dripping in sweat: You'd make up excuses after giving a clammy handshake. You'd worry about your touch devices slipping out of your hands.
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'Werewolf' gene may explain excess hair disorder
msnbc.msn.com - 6-5-11
Scientists have discovered a genetic mutation responsible for a disorder that causes people to sprout thick hair on their faces and bodies.
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Drug that treats breast cancer found to prevent it, too
cnn.com - 6-5-11
Doctors and patients have a new tool to prevent breast cancer: A drug that is already approved for the treatment of the disease.
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New strain of MRSA superbug found in cows
bbc.co.uk - 6-5-11
A new strain of the MRSA "superbug" has been found in British cows and is believed to be infecting humans.
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You've been eating cloned bananas
naturalnews.com - 6-5-11
Have you ever noticed that while there are a plethora of varieties of nearly all common fruits such as apples, oranges and peaches, each banana seems identical to every other? When someone says "banana," you probably think of a large fruit with yellow skin and a soft, pale middle.
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800 tons of farm fish found dead in mass die-off
naturalnews.com - 6-5-11
More mysterious animal deaths have surfaced, this time in a volcanic lake in the Philippines. Reports say that 800 tons, or 1.6 million pounds, of fish have turned up dead in a lake near the Taal volcano, which is located south of the capital city of Manila. Oficials say the deaths may have been a result of sudden temperature change in the water.
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UK food board suddenly reverses position, approves cloned food without labels despite lack of safety studies
naturalnews.com - 6-5-11
In a shocking reversal of its previous position on the matter, the UK Food Standards Agency (FSA), which is supposed to be a consumer watchdog group that works on behalf of citizen interests, has arbitrarily decided that cloned animal food is safe, and that it can be sold without proper labeling. Just days before making this complete about-face, FSA had purported that there was not enough evidence that cloned food was safe to support its approval.
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Right cultivation of the blood is the foundation of health and longevity
naturalnews.com - 6-5-11
Dracula had it right. The blood IS the key to longevity. In this age of global contamination and health care meltdown, the practice of blood cultivation must be rightly understood by anyone interested in health self sufficiency and longevity.
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Cancer Drug Avastin Makes Inroads Against Ovarian Tumors
healthday.com - 6-5-11
Two new studies indicate that a common cancer drug, Avastin, may benefit both early stage ovarian cancer patients and women whose cancer has recurred.
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After Colon Cancer Surgery, Early Chemo May Pay Off
healthday.com - 6-5-11
For patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer, a new study suggests that the sooner chemotherapy starts following the operation, the better the prognosis.
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Could a Woman's Wrinkles Predict Risk of Fractures?
healthday.com - 6-5-11
As if facial wrinkles didn't have a bad enough rap, a new study suggests that the worse a woman's wrinkles are in early menopause, the lower her bone density.
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Excess Pounds May Lower Odds of Surviving Breast Cancer
healthday.com - 6-5-11
Breast cancer patients who were overweight or obese before and after the diagnosis have a lower chance of surviving, a new study suggests.
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New Drug Target for Squamous Cell Carcinoma
sciencedaily.com - 6-5-11
Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have discovered a new drug target for squamous cell carcinoma -- the second most common form of skin cancer. Scientists in the laboratory of Valeri Vasioukhin, Ph.D., have found that a protein called alpha-catenin acts as a tumor suppressor and they also have unlocked the mechanism by which this protein controls cell proliferation.
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Similarities Cause Protein Misfolding
sciencedaily.com - 6-5-11
A large number of illnesses stem from misfolded proteins, molecules composed of amino acids. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now studied protein misfolding using a special spectroscopic technique. Misfolding, as they report in Nature, is more frequent if the sequence of the amino acids in the neighboring protein domains is very similar.
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Could a Birth Control Pill for Men Be on the Horizon? Retinoic Acid Receptor Antagonist Interferes With Sperm Production
sciencedaily.com - 6-5-11
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center are honing in on the development of what may be the first non-steroidal, oral contraceptive for men. Tests of low doses of a compound that interferes with retinoic acid receptors (RARs), whose ligands are metabolites of dietary vitamin A, showed that it caused sterility in male mice.
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Farmers Markets: The time is ripe for produce shopping
usatoday.com - 6-4-11
When Holly Hollingsworth recites the list of fresh fruits filling the tables and bins at Green Market farmers market in Atlanta's Piedmont Park, she pauses to think - and names another fruit.
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Eating a high-fat diet during pregnancy 'increases the risk of stillbirth'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-4-11
Pregnant women who tuck into fatty foods are at greater risk of having a stillbirth, a study reveals.
Researchers found an unhealthy diet decreased the blood flow from mother to baby via the placenta - the temporary organ that nourishes the foetus.
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Lack of sleep 'kills a man's sex drive', study concludes
telegraph.co.uk - 6-4-11
For many women married to workaholic husbands, a lack of interest in the bedroom can be a problem. But researchers may have come up with the answer to a lack of sex - a good night's sleep.
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E.coli outbreak spreads to 12 countries as Britons treated
telegraph.co.uk - 6-4-11
The deadly new strain of E.coli that is capable of spreading from person to person in Britain has now been detected in 12 countries, the World Health Organisation said.
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Patterns: More People Praying About Health, Analysis Finds
nytimes.com - 6-4-11
More Americans are praying about their health, researchers have concluded.
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Addicts putting pharmacies under siege
cnn.com - 6-4-11
Less than two hours after picking out a man in a police lineup who held up his drugstore, pharmacist Mike Donohue was being robbed.
Again.
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New strain of MRSA superbug found in cows
bbc.co.uk - 6-4-11
A new strain of the MRSA "superbug" has been found in British cows and is believed to be infecting humans.
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Scientists push to implement edible RFID tracking chips in food
naturalnews.com - 6-4-11
It will monitor your calorie intake, show from where your food was sourced, and even let you know when the food in your fridge is about to go bad -- these are some of the enticing claims made by the developers of a new system that embeds edible radio frequency identification (RFID) chips directly into food. Its creators insist the technology will revolutionize the way humans eat for the better, but critical-thinking onlookers will recognize the ploy as just another way to track and control human behavior.
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How doctors are bought off by medical device makers
naturalnews.com - 6-4-11
When it comes to advertising, are doctors really immune? Every year, millions of dollars are spent by pharmaceutical companies and medical device manufacturers in attempts to win over physicians. All-expense-paid trips to Hawaii, season tickets to sporting events, lavish dinners, expensive wine, T-shirts, hats, key chains and pens. All of this, of course, endorsed by Company X. No wonder doctors are drinking the Kool-Aid.
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Scientists issue urgent warning about danger of common drug combination taken by millions
naturalnews.com - 6-4-11
Check out Big Pharma's ads or the inserts that come with pill packages and you'll find (in almost impossible-to-read tiny print) the side effects and risks of the meds in question listed -- at least the adverse effects that are supposedly known. But where is the info about taking more than one of the prescription medications together?
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Magnesium Offers Strong Radiation Protection
naturalnews.com - 6-4-11
One would not normally think that magnesium deficiency can increase the risk of cancer yet we will find that just as severe dehydration or asphyxiation can cause death, magnesium deficiency can lead directly to cancer. It is known that carcinogenesis induces magnesium distribution disturbances, causing magnesium mobilization through blood cells and magnesium depletion in non-neoplastic tissues. Magnesium deficiency is carcinogenic, and in the case of solid tumors, a high level of supplemented magnesium inhibits carcinogenesis.
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Mental Illness Linked to Greater Risk of Death After Heart Attack
healthday.com - 6-4-11
People with mental illness are more likely to die following a heart attack or serious cardiac event, a new study finds.
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Meditation May Help Women Cope With Hot Flashes
healthday.com - 6-4-11
An easy-to-learn meditation technique can help ease the hot flashes, night sweats and insomnia of menopause, a new study says.
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Bone Drug Reduces Odds for Breast Cancer's Return: Study
healthday.com - 6-4-11
Early stage breast cancer patients can see their chances of the cancer's return drop by 32 percent when the osteoporosis drug Zometa is added to regular hormone therapy for three years after surgery, Austrian researchers report.
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30 Years Into the Epidemic, a Generation With HIV Comes of Age
healthday.com - 6-4-11
In 1991, the life of a 6-year-old girl in Texas named Danielle began to unravel.
First, her father learned that he was infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Her mother went in for screening soon after and received the same grim result.
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Officials: U.S. Not Affected by European E. Coli Outbreak
healthday.com - 6-4-11
U.S. health officials sought Friday to reassure Americans that there is little chance the deadly new strain of E. coli bacteria affecting Germany and other European countries will have any significant impact here.
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New Sound Synchronization Technology Holds the Key to Earlier Diagnosis of Heart Disease
sciencedaily.com - 6-4-11
Innovative UK technology is contributing to the development of a revolutionary digital stethoscope that could make it easier for GPs to spot the first signs of heart disease.
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Eating Dirt Can Be Good for the Belly, Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 6-4-11
Most of us never considered eating the mud pies we made as kids, but for many people all over the world, dining on dirt is nothing out of the ordinary. Now an extensive meta-analysis forthcoming in the June issue of The Quarterly Review of Biology helps explain why.
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Scientists Reactivate Immune Cells Exhausted by Chronic HIV
sciencedaily.com - 6-4-11
Scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, have demonstrated why certain immune cells chronically exposed to HIV shut down, and how they can be reactivated.
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Inability to Combat Oxidative Stress May Trigger Development of Asthma
sciencedaily.com - 6-4-11
An impaired ability to handle oxidative stress that arises from exposure to secondhand smoke and other environmental triggers may contribute to the development of asthma, according to results obtained from the Shanghai Women's Health Asthma and Allergy Study. The results of the study suggest regulating the body's antioxidant defense system may play an important role in asthma prevention.
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Many Cancer Survivors Can't Shake Pain, Fatigue, Insomnia, Foggy Brain, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 6-4-11
When people finish treatment for cancer, they want to bounce back to their former vital selves as quickly as possible. But a new Northwestern Medicine study -- one of the largest survivor studies ever conducted -- shows many survivors still suffer moderate to severe problems with pain, fatigue, sleep, memory and concentration three to five years after treatment has ended.
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Japan: green tea exports banned due to high radiation levels
telegraph.co.uk - 6-4-11
The Japanese government has banned shipments of green tea leaves in four regions after high levels of radioactive caesium were found.
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More Than 1 Million Americans Now Living With HIV: CDC
healthday.com - 6-3-11
Although HIV/AIDS continues to be an epidemic with no cure, thanks to powerful medications more HIV-infected Americans are living longer and healthier lives, federal health officials said Thursday.
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2 Studies Examine Syndrome of Fatigue
nytimes.com - 6-3-11
In a blow to patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, two new studies published on Tuesday raised serious doubts about earlier reports that the disabling disease is linked to infection with XMRV, a poorly understood retrovirus.
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Why 'diet' food is so unsatisfying
msnbc.msn.com - 6-3-11
When you think you're eating something indulgent, you feel satisfied sooner than when you consume a food that's supposedly better for you, reveals a new study.
Yale University researchers wanted to find out if your frame of mind -- your beliefs and expectations -- while eating a food could influence your body's physiology more than its actual nutritional value. So, they measured levels of ghrelin, a hormone released in the stomach in response to hunger.
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Fact: The most expensive coffee in the world is brewed from beans partially digested and defecated by the Asian palm civet
naturalnews.com - 6-3-11
Here's something you probably didn't know about coffee: The world's most expensive coffee, kopi luwak (literally, "civet coffee") is brewed from coffee beans that have been eaten and partially digested by the Asian palm civet, a catlike wild animal. The beans are harvested from the droppings of the civet and washed, and can be brewed into an aromatic coffee renowned for its low bitterness and excellent flavor.
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Herbal therapies that stop aging and fight disease
naturalnews.com - 6-3-11
Tell a mainstream medical doctor you are taking a herb, especially if it is for some condition Big Pharma has no treatment for, and odds are you'll be faced with warnings that herbs are unproven quackery at worst. And if you claim a traditional herbal cure is actually working, don't be surprised if you are told it is probably the placebo effect, i.e. all "in your head".
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Traditional Indian plant medicine may halt breast cancer metastasis
naturalnews.com - 6-3-11
The reason breast cancer can be a killer isn't because of the lump it forms in a breast -- the danger comes from metastasis, the spread of cancer cells to additional areas of the body, including the bones, brain and other organs. Despite mainstream medicine's treatments with radiation and chemotherapy, metastasis remains a serious, common and virtually untreatable condition. But there's finally some good news from an unexpected -- and ancient -- source.
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Popular Blood Pressure Meds Not Linked to Cancer, FDA Says
healthday.com - 6-3-11
A class of drugs widely used to treat high blood pressure doesn't boost the risk of cancer, as a recent analysis suggested, U.S. health authorities announced Thursday.
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Deadly E. Coli Strain in Europe Should Serve as Warning, Experts Say
healthday.com - 6-3-11
The emergence of an unusually dangerous strain of E. coli bacteria in Europe should serve as a red flag for U.S. health officials, experts say.
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U.S. Serves Up New Nutrition Guidelines on 'MyPlate'
healthday.com - 6-3-11
In its latest effort to get Americans to eat healthier meals and fight the obesity epidemic, the federal government has introduced a new nutrition icon called MyPlate.
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Mechanism Discovered for Health Benefit of Green Tea, New Approach to Autoimmune Disease
sciencedaily.com - 6-3-11
One of the beneficial compounds found in green tea has a powerful ability to increase the number of "regulatory T cells" that play a key role in immune function and suppression of autoimmune disease, according to new research in the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University.
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High-Fat Diet During Pregnancy Programs Child for Future Diabetes, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-3-11
A high-fat diet during pregnancy may program a woman's baby for future diabetes, even if she herself is not obese or diabetic, says a new University of Illinois study published in the Journal of Physiology.
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People With Depression Get Stuck on Bad Thoughts, Unable to Turn Their Attention Away, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 6-3-11
We all have our ups and downs -- a fight with a friend, a divorce, the loss of a parent. But most of us get over it. Only some go on to develop major depression. Now, a new study, which will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggests part of the reason may be that people with depression get stuck on bad thoughts because they're unable to turn their attention away.
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Scientists find new MRSA superbug in cows, humans
ca.news.yahoo.com - 6-3-11
British scientists have found a new strain of the "superbug" MRSA in milk from cows and in swab samples from humans and say it cannot be detected with standard tests.
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Killer germ very antibiotic resistant: German researchers
sg.finance.yahoo.com - 6-3-11
A German hospital treating patients felled by a mysterious killer bacteria said Thursday that it appears to be particularly resistant to antibiotics after its researchers sequenced the strain's genome.
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Killer germ: First outbreak of 'rare' microbe: - WHO
univision.com - 6-3-11
The strain of a lethal bacteria that has killed 18 people in Europe is "very rare" and had never been seen in an outbreak form before, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Thursday.
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Significant Rise in HPV-Related Throat Cancer in Men
abcnews.go.com - 6-2-11
Philip and Joanne Keane, of Newtown, Conn., never thought twice about having their daughters immunized against strains of the human papillomavirus that could cause cervical cancer.
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Too many kids getting antibiotics for asthma
usatoday.com - 6-2-11
Although guidelines don't recommend antibiotics for asthma, almost 1 million children with the respiratory condition are prescribed the medications each year in the United States, a new study finds.
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Divorce 'permanently harms learning and affects their ability to make friends'
dailymail.co.uk - 6-2-11
Children struggle with maths and making friends when their parents divorce, a study has found.
They often fall behind classmates whose parents stay married, suffering from anxiety, loneliness and feeling sad - and may never catch up academically.
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Girls' lack of iodine 'could harm babies' (and it's due to a lack of milk)
dailymail.co.uk - 6-2-11
Schoolgirls have dangerously low levels of iodine, which could put the health of future generations at risk, claim British researchers.
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U.S. Orders Review of Risks of Some Birth Control Pills
nytimes.com - 6-2-11
Bayer's birth control pills will be reviewed by regulators after some studies suggested they may cause more blood clots than competing medicines.
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Why it's so hard to win war against US oxycodone epidemic
msnbc.msn.com - 6-2-11
In the "war on drugs," Phil Price has battled crack, methamphetamine, heroin, and pot. But the newest drug epidemic - abuse of prescription opioid painkillers- has the narcotics agent reassessing his role in policing America's hunger for illicit highs.
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Dad's smoking linked to daughter's menopause
msnbc.msn.com - 6-2-11
When men smoke while their partners are pregnant, their daughters may end up hitting menopause about a year earlier, suggests a new study.
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Little people, lots of pills: Experts debate medicating kids
cnn.com - 6-2-11
Americans have been led to believe -- by their doctors, by advertisers and by the pharmaceutical industry -- that there is a pill to cure just about anything that ails them. This week, the networks of CNN go deep into the politics and the pills.
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Mushroom compound heals cancer stem cells and prevents tumors
naturalnews.com - 6-2-11
Incredible new research out of Australia has shown that a compound called polysaccharopeptide (PSP), which comes from a type of mushroom called "Turkey Tail," is 100 percent effective at targeting prostate cancer stem cells and suppressing tumor formation. The research, which has been published in the online journal PLoS ONE, represents the first to show that a natural substance is totally and completely effective in every single trial.
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Australia shuns GM canola in response to consumer demand for non-GMO products
naturalnews.com - 6-2-11
The biotechnology industry and its lackeys in the US government may be getting away with pulling a fast one on the American people, but citizens across Europe and in Australia continue to resist the onslaught of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) in their food supply. A recent report from Gene Ethics Media (GEM) explains that two of Australia's largest grain traders are refusing to deal with any GM canola this year, citing intense and increasing consumer opposition to GM grains.
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Psych drug doctors now pushing to add lithium to drinking water
naturalnews.com - 6-2-11
Chlorine, fluoride, and the various other chemical poisons already added to the nation's drinking water supplies are apparently not enough for the self-appointed experts whose insatiable lust to force-medicate the world is never satisfied. A recent report in The Daily offers credence to the insane notion that adding lithium, a drug currently used to treat mental disorders, to drinking water will be beneficial in helping to reduce suicide and violent crime rates.
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Maybe you aren't doomed to cancer or other diseases because of your genes; scientists find risk research is inaccurate
naturalnews.com - 6-2-11
Countless people have had regular expensive testings and even organs removed because, based on genetic testing, they've been told they are sure to get cancer. Think about women having breasts amputated to avoid breast cancer in the future, for example. Others live a life of worry and a feeling of impending doom if they believe test results of "biomarkers" for specific diseases show sooner or later they will probably get heart disease, dementia or some other potential killer.
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Melanoma Vaccine Shows Promise in Trial
healthday.com - 6-2-11
For patients with advanced melanoma, the most dangerous type of skin cancer, a vaccine combined with an immune-boosting drug is showing promise in a large clinical trial.
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High-Risk Surgeries Getting Safer: Study
healthday.com - 6-2-11
Undergoing an operation can be scary, but University of Michigan researchers offer some reassuring news: Deaths among those having high-risk surgery have fallen substantially in recent years.
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Fear of Dying During Heart Attack May Make Matters Worse
healthday.com - 6-2-11
People who become very afraid of dying in the moments during and days after a heart attack also seem to have more inflammation, an indicator that they may, in the long run, do worse than patients who are less fearful, a small British study suggests.
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Deadly Bacteria May Mimic Human Proteins to Evolve Antibiotic Resistance
sciencedaily.com - 6-2-11
Deadly bacteria may be evolving antibiotic resistance by mimicking human proteins, according to a new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).
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Source of Key Brain Function Located: How to Comprehend a Scene in Less Than a Second
sciencedaily.com - 6-2-11
Scientists at the University of Southern California have pinned down the region of the brain responsible for a key survival trait: our ability to comprehend a scene -- even one never previously encountered -- in a fraction of a second.
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What Odors Throw Off Mosquitoes? New Findings Hold Big Promise for Fight Against Mosquito-Borne Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 6-2-11
Female mosquitoes are efficient carriers of deadly diseases such as malaria, dengue and yellow fever, resulting each year in several million deaths and hundreds of millions of cases.
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What Odors Throw Off Mosquitoes? New Findings Hold Big Promise for Fight Against Mosquito-Borne Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 6-2-11
Female mosquitoes are efficient carriers of deadly diseases such as malaria, dengue and yellow fever, resulting each year in several million deaths and hundreds of millions of cases.
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Mother's Body Size and Placental Size Predict Heart Disease in Men
sciencedaily.com - 6-2-11
Researchers investigating the fetal origins of chronic disease have discovered that combinations of a mother's body size and the shape and size of her baby's placenta can predict heart disease in men in later life. The research is published online June 1 in the European Heart Journal.
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Toxin from GM crops found in human blood: Study
indiatoday.intoday.in - 6-2-11
Fresh doubts have arisen about the safety of genetically modified crops, with a new study reporting presence of Bt toxin, used widely in GM crops, in human blood for the first time.
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Cannabis use 'damages the brain in early teens', frightening new study reveals
dailymail.co.uk - 6-1-11
Children who smoke cannabis before their 15th birthday perform much worse in mental tests than those who start at a later age, warn researchers.
A study of chronic cannabis users found those who started in their early teens struggled with a range of neuropsychological tasks.
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Are you taking too many meds?
cnn.com - 6-1-11
For Alesandra Rain, it all started with sleeplessness. In 1993 she was having marital troubles and her business wasn't doing well. Anxiety kept her up at night, so her general practitioner prescribed sleeping pills.
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Cause for alarm: Antipsychotic drugs for nursing home patients
cnn.com - 6-1-11
When a loved one moves into a nursing home, the support of family and friends is particularly important. This is especially true when the nursing home patient has dementia and can't adequately advocate on his or her own behalf.
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Fraudulent organics from China spell safety hazards for U.S. consumers
naturalnews.com - 6-1-11
Three years ago, Chinese baby formula tainted with Melamine caused the death of six infants and over 300,000 serious injuries. After initially suppressing the information, the Chinese government made a grand gesture of eradicating the problem. The company was shut down. Some executives were even put to death. The epidemic, however, was not.
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A Link Between Bat Deaths and Pesticides?
naturalnews.com - 6-1-11
The US Fish and Wildlife Service published a plan in May of 2011 to prevent the spread of white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats. The fast-spreading disease has killed more than one million bats in the US and Canada since it detection in 2006. The new plan is meant to coordinate multiple governmental and research groups in a "swift national effort to avoid irreversible losses to bat populations".
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Studies Refute Virus' Link to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
healthday.com - 6-1-11
A virus identified two years ago as a possible cause of chronic fatigue syndrome now turns out not to be the culprit, new research says.
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Link Between Environment and Genetics in Triggering Multiple Sclerosis: Discovery Points to Personalized Treatments
sciencedaily.com - 6-1-11
Environmental and inherited risk factors associated with multiple sclerosis -- previously poorly understood and not known to be connected -- converge to alter a critical cellular function linked to the chronic neurologic disease, researchers with the UC Irvine Multiple Sclerosis Research Center have discovered.
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How the Brain Processes Faces: Neural System Responsible for Face Recognition Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 6-1-11
Each time you see a person that you know, your brain rapidly and seemingly effortlessly recognizes that person by his or her face.
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How Vitamins and Minerals May Prevent Age-Related Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 6-1-11
Severe deficiency of the vitamins and minerals required for life is relatively uncommon in developed nations, but modest deficiency is very common and often not taken seriously. A new research published online in the FASEB Journal, however, may change this thinking as it examines moderate selenium and vitamin K deficiency to show how damage accumulates over time as a result of vitamin and mineral loss, leading to age-related diseases.
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WHO: Cell phone use can increase possible cancer risk
cnn.com - 6-1-11
Radiation from cell phones can possibly cause cancer, according to the World Health Organization. The agency now lists mobile phone use in the same "carcinogenic hazard" category as lead, engine exhaust and chloroform.
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