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Home of the electronic version of "A Modern Herbal" by Maud Grieve.

 

 

July, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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Five deaths from Joplin tornado linked to fungal infection
reuters.com - 7-31-11
In all, 13 people contracted the mucormycetes-born illness, the CDC said in a report released Friday. The CDC said it has seen multiple fungal infections of that type after other natural disasters such as hurricanes but never after a tornado.
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Tamoxifen wards off breast cancer's return for more than a decade
usatoday.com - 7-31-11
Women who took the cancer-suppressing drug tamoxifen for five years after a breast cancer diagnosis were nearly 40 percent less likely to have the cancer return, and that protection lasted for more than a decade after they stopped taking the drug, a new study finds.
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Insomnia: treating a disease not a symptom
usatoday.com - 7-31-11
There has never been a better time to have a sleep disorder.
Awareness of clinical sleep disorders and clinical sleep medicine expertise is growing. We can see this in the increasing efforts to develop new treatments, and the expanding specialty training programs. We can also sense the growing importance of sleep because of intensified advertising on TV which encourages viewers to seek attention for sleep dissatisfaction – often for the first time. Americans today are both sleep-deprived and sleep-disordered.
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Actress Gena Lee Nolin tells how her diagnosis took ten years: I battled thyroid illness in a Baywatch bathing suit
dailymail.co.uk - 7-31-11
With an audience of more than a billion fans in 110 countries, it was one of the most touching and supposedly true-to-life scenes in television history.
Just 12 weeks after giving birth to her first child, a little boy called Spencer, Baywatch star Gena Lee Nolin agreed to appear with him in an episode in which she played a happy, healthy, curvaceous new mother.
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Popeye ate spinach for his, but apricots make a better choice: How to manage your muscles
dailymail.co.uk - 7-31-11
Mention muscles and bodybuilders displaying their overdeveloped physiques come to mind – but building muscle strength is something we should all be conscious of.
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Beat loneliness - to avoid a stroke: Why isolation is as bad for you as smoking
dailymail.co.uk - 7-31-11
Loneliness is as bad for your health as smoking.
It seems astonishing, I know, but scientific research suggests that social isolation, in the long term, is as damaging as a 15-a-day cigarette habit or being an alcoholic.
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Hundreds of preteen children treated for eating disorders
telegraph.co.uk - 7-31-11
Almost 600 children below the age of 13 have been treated in hospital for eating disorders in the past three years, new figures have revealed.
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Low blood pressure ups dialysis clot risk
upi.com - 7-31-11
Kidney patients undergoing dialysis have an increased risk of blood clots when blood pressure drops, U.S. researchers say.
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The brain is like Jell-O
upi.com - 7-31-11
Young girls may be at a higher risk than boys when it comes to concussions, a U.S. neurological surgeon advises.
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Grapes may protect against sun radiation
upi.com - 7-31-11
Substances in grapes can reduce the amount of cell damage caused in skin exposed to the sun's ultraviolet radiation, researchers in Spain say.
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Menopause puts women's bones at risk
upi.com - 7-31-11
Estrogen replacement therapy is not the treatment of choice for osteoporosis and women should check with their physician first, U.S. experts say.
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Daughters Seem to Influence Mothers' Fashion Sense
healthday.com - 7-31-11
Daughters have a strong influence on the shopping behaviors of their mothers, but there is no similar effect the other way, a new study suggests.
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Smartphones Really Are Habit-Forming: Study
healthday.com - 7-31-11
A new study seems to confirm the widely held belief that many smartphone users obsessively check their devices for e-mails, social media and news.
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Incompetence Sets A Precedent- GE Alfalfa
morphcity.com - 7-30-11
The USDA, FDA and EPA favor corporations over human health and the environment, especially when it comes to genetically engineered (GE) organisms.
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Hepatitis rates soar among IV drug users, study finds
usatoday.com - 7-30-11
About 10 million injection drug users worldwide have hepatitis C, and 1.3 million have hepatitis B, a new study reports.
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For some, hypnosis eases pain, recovery of surgery
usatoday.com - 7-30-11
As the surgeons cut into her neck, Marianne Marquis was thinking of the beach.
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Patients struggle even to get on NHS waiting lists
telegraph.co.uk - 7-30-11
Patients have told how they have struggled even to get on NHS waiting lists, forcing them to endure lengthy delays for treatment or to go private, as managers ration treatment to save money.
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Happiness research may help depressed
upi.com - 7-30-11
U.S. researchers propose a new approach for treating depression by teaching patients to increase their positive thinking and positive behaviors.
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Fructose may up heart disease risk factors
upi.com - 7-30-11
Adults who ate high fructose corn syrup for two weeks increased their cholesterol and triglycerides levels, U.S. researchers say.
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'Super antibody' fights off flu
bbc.co.uk - 7-30-11
The first antibody which can fight all types of the influenza A virus has been discovered, researchers claim.
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Pregnancy stroke surge in the US
bbc.co.uk - 7-30-11
The numbers of US women having a stroke during pregnancy has surged, according to doctors.
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NPR poll: Majority of Americans prefer organics, most want produce from either farmers markets or home gardens rather than supermarkets
naturalnews.com - 7-30-11
When it comes down to pure consumer preference, the majority of Americans prefer organic food over conventional food, according to the results of a new poll released by NPR. Most Americans also prefer to obtain produce from either a farmers market or from a home garden rather than from a supermarket, which represents an important shift in public awareness concerning food.
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GMOs killing off Monarch butterflies, report finds
naturalnews.com - 7-30-11
You have likely seen them dancing through the air and gracing the petals and leaves of various plants and shrubs. But a new study published in the journal Insect Conservation and Diversity says that the popular Monarch butterfly, which is an absolute necessity for farmers, is on the decline. And the cause? Genetically-modified (GM) crops like corn, soy, and cotton, which today blanket millions of acres of American cropland.
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Shootings Spark Interest in Spotting the Violence-Prone
healthday.com - 7-30-11
Any time there's a violent tragedy -- the killing of at least 86 people at a youth camp in Norway, the shootings of a congresswoman and others in Tucson, the Virginia Tech massacre -- one question seems to ring clearer than others: Why didn't someone notice beforehand that the suspect might be disturbed and capable of committing deadly violence?
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Sexual Assault Doesn't Cause Binge Drinking in Girls: Study
healthday.com - 7-30-11
Teenage girls who develop post-traumatic stress disorder after being sexually assaulted aren't at increased risk for binge drinking, new research shows.
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Long-Term Opioid Therapy Often Leads to Addiction
healthday.com - 7-30-11
Addiction to prescription drugs is common among patients with chronic pain, with 35 percent of patients receiving long-term treatment with opioids now meeting the criteria for addiction, a new study has found.
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Out-Of-The-Blue Panic Attacks Aren't Without Warning: Body Sends Signals for Hour Before
sciencedaily.com - 7-30-11
Panic attacks that seem to strike sufferers out-of-the-blue are not without warning after all, according to new research.
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Aging Brains Are Different in Humans and Chimpanzees; Evolution of Human Longevity Led to Both a Large Brain and Brain Shrinkage
sciencedaily.com - 7-30-11
Brains shrink in humans, potentially causing a number of health problems and mental illnesses as people age, but do they shrink to the same extent in the closest living relatives to humans--the chimpanzees?
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Traumatic Brain Injury Linked With Tenfold Increase in Stroke Risk
sciencedaily.com - 7-30-11
If you suffer traumatic brain injury, your risk of having a stroke within three months may increase tenfold, according to a new study reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.
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Gov't: Health tab to hit $4.6 trillion in 2020
news.yahoo.com - 7-30-11
WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's health care tab is on track to hit $4.6 trillion in 2020, accounting for about $1 of every $5 in the economy, government number crunchers estimate in a report released Thursday.
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Monsanto Nation: Taking Down Goliath
organicconsumers.org - 7-29-11
After two decades of biotech bullying and force-feeding unlabeled and hazardous genetically engineered (GE) foods to animals and humans, it's time to move beyond defensive measures and go on the offensive. With organic farming, climate stability, and public health under the gun of the gene engineers and their partners in crime, it's time to do more than complain. With over 1/3 of U.S. cropland already contaminated with Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), with mounting scientific evidence that GMOs cause cancer, birth defects, and serious food allergies and with new biotech mutants like alfalfa, lawn grass, ethanol-ready corn, 2,4 D-resistant crops, and genetically engineered trees and animals in the pipeline, time is running out.
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Meditation 101: Tips for Beginners
abcnews.go.com - 7-29-11
Little by little, meditation is shedding its image as a strange spiritual discipline practiced by monks and ascetics in Asia. Gwyneth Paltrow meditates. Rivers Cuomo, lead singer of the rock band Weezer, meditates. David Lynch -- his movies are strange, but he is strangely normal -- meditates. Meditation has helped recent military veterans deal with post-traumatic stress disorder.
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Miracle? Cancer-stricken father defies odds and beats disease by stopping chemo - because God told him to
dailymail.co.uk - 7-29-11
With a ten per cent chance of survival, he needed a miracle - and that's exactly what God gave him.
Jacob Berger, from Indiana, was diagnosed in 2002 with stage four cancer that was spreading from the upper part of his throat to his brain.
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Not enough sunshine is putting millions of us at risk from diabetes
dailymail.co.uk - 7-29-11
A lack of sunshine is putting millions of people at risk of diabetes because they don't have enough vitamin D, researchers have said.
A large study found that people with plenty of it in their system were less likely to develop type 2 diabetes.
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Beef recalled over possible animal drug
upi.com - 7-29-11
A Miami meat company is recalling more than 6,000 pounds of frozen Honduran beef that may have been contaminated by animal drugs, federal officials said.
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Why Americans live shorter lives
upi.com - 7-29-11
The U.S.-European life expectancy gap would disappear if obesity, diabetes and hypertension among middle-age Americans dropped to European levels, experts say.
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Study: Worrying can harm relationships
upi.com - 7-29-11
Worrying can be so intrusive and preoccupying that it interferes in one's quality of life and endangers social relationships, U.S. researchers found.
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Talking heads? Brain lives on after decapitation (briefly)
msnbc.msn.com - 7-29-11
We've seen it in comedies - someone is decapitated, but still talking - usually scolding or lecturing in some way. Now, a new study shows that the brain may live on after being separated from the body, at least for a while, reports LiveScience.
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Mouthwashing moms less likely to have a preemie
msnbc.msn.com - 7-29-11
Expectant mothers who have gum disease are less likely to deliver their babies prematurely if they use mouthwash throughout their pregnancy, a new study suggests.
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Do you obsessively check your smartphone?
cnn.com - 7-29-11
There I was at a long-awaited dinner with friends Saturday night, when in the midst of our chatting, I watched my right hand sneaking away from my side to grab my phone sitting on the table to check my e-mail.
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WHO: Hepatitis toll 'in millions'
bbc.co.uk - 7-29-11
Medical experts are calling for global action to tackle the viruses that cause the liver disease hepatitis.
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What's really in the food? The A to Z of the food industry's most evil ingredients
naturalnews.com - 7-29-11
Ever wonder what's really in the food sold at grocery stores around the world? People keep asking me, "What ingredients should I avoid?" So I put together a short list that covers all the most toxic and disease-promoting ingredients in the food supply. These are the substances causing cancer, diabetes, heart disease and leading to tens of billions of dollars in unnecessary health care costs across America (and around the world).
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Pregnancy-Related Strokes Jump 54 Percent
healthday.com - 7-29-11
The risk of suffering a stroke during -- or soon after -- pregnancy has increased dramatically in recent years, according to new U.S. government research.
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Brain Injury Appears to Boost Stroke Risk
healthday.com - 7-29-11
In the three months after a traumatic brain injury, the risk of stroke may increase 10-fold, Taiwanese researchers report.
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How Memory Is Lost: Loss of Memory Due to Aging May Be Reversible
sciencedaily.com - 7-29-11
Yale University researchers can't tell you where you left your car keys -- but they can tell you why you can't find them.
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New Therapy May Help People With Unexplained Symptoms of Pain, Weakness and Fatigue
sciencedaily.com - 7-29-11
A new type of therapy may help people with symptoms such as pain, weakness, or dizziness that can't be explained by an underlying disease, according to a study published in the July 27, 2011, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. These symptoms, which can also include fatigue, tingling and numbness, are also known as functional or psychogenic symptoms.
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Gout Prevalence Swells in U.S. Over Last Two Decades; Increase in Obesity and Hypertension Are Likely Contributors
sciencedaily.com - 7-29-11
A new study shows the prevalence of gout in the U.S. has risen over the last twenty years and now affects 8.3 million (4%) Americans. Prevalence of increased uric acid levels (hyperuricemia) also rose, affecting 43.3 million (21%) adults in the U.S. Greater frequency of obesity and hypertension may be associated with the jump in prevalence rates, according to the findings now available in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).
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Genetically engineered maize with synthetic toxin approved for usage in EU food and feed
farmwars.info - 7-29-11
Safety of Monsanto’s Synthetic-Toxin maize to be re-examined
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Can the cat give you cancer? Parasite in their bellies linked with brain tumours
dailymail.co.uk - 7-28-11
Cats may be spreading brain cancer to their owners, scientists warned last night.
They have linked a parasite that breeds in cats’ stomachs with brain tumours in people.
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Human brains wired to empathize, study finds
usatoday.com - 7-28-11
A person's brain works hard to empathize or understand what it's like to walk in other people's shoes, no matter how different they may be, a new study indicates.
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Self-image problems tied to nose jobs
upi.com - 7-28-11
A third of people seeking a nose job suffer from self-image problems and show signs of body dysmorphic disorder, a study in a U.S. journal says.
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Severe ADHD lowers child quality of life
upi.com - 7-28-11
The greater the severity of a child's attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms, the more negative the child's quality of life, U.S. researchers say.
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Do Calorie Counts on Menus Curb Eating? Not So Much
healthland.time.com - 7-28-11
Over 200,000 fast food and chain restaurants will soon include calorie counts on their menus, as mandated in the healthcare bill President Obama signed last spring. But even if our favorite fast food chains and restaurants start deluging us with caloric information, are we going to pay attention? The whole idea behind the counts is to help Americans get better informed about how much we're eating and —hopefully—start choosing foods that are lighter and healthier. And the latest study on the effect of caloric information shows that it's only marginally effective in improving eating habits.
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New research reveals how natural health approach, not Big Pharma, can prevent more than half of all Alzheimer's cases
naturalnews.com - 7-28-11
If you've ever had a relative fade away from you and lose the ability to remember names, faces, events and even how to get dressed or hold a cup of coffee, you know the heartbreaking horror of the disease known as Alzheimer's (AD). And let's face it, the prospect of one day having AD is downright terrifying. Despite millions of dollars poured into potential treatments for AD, none of Big Pharma's drug approaches work for long to alleviate the memory deficits and other problems of this form of dementia.
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Scientists ID Gene Linked to Syndrome Behind Elephant Man Disease
healthday.com - 7-28-11
Researchers say they've identified the gene mutation that causes the same condition that Joseph Merrick, the 19th century Englishman famously known as "The Elephant Man," was thought to have had.
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Computer-Aided Mammography Doesn't Improve Breast Cancer Detection: Study
healthday.com - 7-28-11
The widely used mammography software known as computer-aided detection (CAD) doesn't improve detection of invasive breast cancer, new research suggests.
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Hepatitis Rates Soar Among IV Drug Users, Study Finds
healthday.com - 7-28-11
About 10 million injection drug users worldwide have hepatitis C, and 1.3 million have hepatitis B, a new study reports.
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More Powerful 'Lab-On-A-Chip' Made for Genetic Analysis
sciencedaily.com - 7-28-11
University of British Columbia researchers have invented a silicone chip that could make genetic analysis far more sensitive, rapid, and cost-effective by allowing individual cells to fall into place like balls in a pinball machine.
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Weak Synchronization in Toddler Brains May Be a Biological Marker for Autism
sciencedaily.com - 7-28-11
The biological causes of autism are still not understood. A diagnosis of autism is only possible after ages three or four; and the tests are subjective, based on behavioral symptoms. Now, in research that appeared in Neuron, scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of California, San Diego have found, for the first time, a method that can accurately identify a biological sign of autism in very young toddlers. By scanning the brain activity of sleeping children, the scientists discovered that the autistic brains exhibited significantly weaker synchronization between brain areas tied to language and communication, compared to that of non-autistic children.
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Could Patients' Own Kidney Cells Cure Kidney Disease? Reprogrammed Kidney Cells Could Make Transplants and Dialysis Things of the Past
sciencedaily.com - 7-28-11
Approximately 60 million people across the globe have chronic kidney disease, and many will need dialysis or a transplant. Breakthrough research published in the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN) indicates that patients' own kidney cells can be gathered and reprogrammed. Reprogramming patients' kidney cells could mean that in the future, fewer patients with kidney disease would require complicated, expensive procedures that affect their quality of life.
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Yoga Boosts Stress-Busting Hormone, Reduces Pain, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-28-11
A new study by York University researchers finds that practicing yoga reduces the physical and psychological symptoms of chronic pain in women with fibromyalgia.
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Stevia: The Best Natural Sweetener, or Just Another Fad?
http://botanical.com - 7-28-11
What if there were a natural substance that had no calories, was sweeter than sugar, and did not cause any of the health problems associated with sweet foods? What if, moreover, this substance actually had health benefits, containing numerous beneficial minerals and antioxidants? Many people might assume that this magical sweetener was too good to be true, but there is a real substance by the name of stevia that actually fits this description. You have probably heard of stevia by now, but many people still have misconceptions about what it is, exactly.
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Stroke victims given new hope with discovery of protein that can limit damage after just 12 hours
dailymail.co.uk - 7-27-11
A protein that can reduce the damage from a stroke up to 12 hours after it strikes has been discovered.
It could mean that thousands of survivors retain the ability to eat, dress or walk unaided, greatly improving life for them and their carers, researchers say.
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Three out of four mums wouldn't know what to do if their child suffers a severe allergic reaction to a wasp sting
dailymail.co.uk - 7-27-11
Three out of four mums don't know what to do if their child suffers a severe allergic reaction to a wasp sting, new research warns.
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Zinc lozenges may shorten cold
upi.com - 7-27-11
Zinc lozenges may shorten a cold by as much as 40 percent, depending on the total dosage of zinc and the composition of lozenges, Finish researchers say.
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Mail-order meds provide better outcomes
upi.com - 7-27-11
Patients who got statin medication via a mail-order achieved better cholesterol control than patients who got them from a pharmacy, U.S. researchers say.
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Addiction: The disease that lies
cnn.com - 7-27-11
I learned of four addiction-related deaths this weekend. Three were people I knew in Portland, Oregon, recovery circles and the fourth was Amy Winehouse.
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Alzheimer's: Early detection, risk factors are crucial
cnn.com - 7-27-11
With more than 5 million people suffering from Alzheimer's disease in the United States, a number that's expected to rise to 16 million by 2050, the pressure is on to find better methods of diagnosis, treatment and prevention.
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Early birth link to stress disorder
bbc.co.uk - 7-27-11
Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a risk factor for premature birth, research suggests.
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Poor Health Linked to Very Preemie Birth Stabilizes by Adolescence
healthday.com - 7-27-11
Children who are born at extremely low birth weights (below 2.2 pounds) are susceptible to a number of chronic health conditions, such as asthma. But, new research suggests that between 8 and 14 years of age, any lingering chronic illness in extremely low birth weight babies tends to stay about the same -- not getting better, but also not getting worse.
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Newly Developed Fluorescent Protein Makes Internal Organs Visible
sciencedaily.com - 7-27-11
Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have developed the first fluorescent protein that enables scientists to clearly "see" the internal organs of living animals without the need for a scalpel or imaging techniques that can have side effects or increase radiation exposure.
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Excluding Children from Discussions About Their Hospital Care Causes Unnecessary Distress
sciencedaily.com - 7-27-11
Children who are excluded from discussions about their hospital care often feel scared and angry that no-one is listening to them or telling them what is going on. That's why health professionals and parents need to do more to consult them and include them in decisions, according to research published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Nursing.
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Worrying Can Impact Interpersonal Relationships, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-27-11
Most people worry from time to time. A new research study, led by a Case Western Reserve University faculty member in psychology, also shows that worrying can be so intrusive and obsessive that it interferes in the person's life and endangers the health of social relationships.
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Half of men would ditch woman who gained weight: poll
reuters.com - 7-27-11
Men are more concerned with their partner's body type than women but they also seem to value family more highly, according to a new survey released on Tuesday.
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America conned: Psycho pharma drug pushing empire under fire
naturalnews.com - 7-27-11
Is America truly stricken with widespread mental illness? Do tens of millions need mind-altering drugs? A recent flurry of media articles lead readers to a realization that Big Pharma and the "mental health" industry have deceived Americans on a grand scale.
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One Tiny Electron Could Be Key to Furture Drugs That Repair Sunburn
sciencedaily.com - 7-27-11
Researchers who have been working for nearly a decade to piece together the process by which an enzyme repairs sun-damaged DNA have finally witnessed the entire process in full detail in the laboratory.
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Cancer-Causing Mineral Found in U.S. Road Gravel: Erionite in Roads May Increase Risk of Mesothelioma
sciencedaily.com - 7-27-11
As school buses drive down the gravel roads in Dunn County, North Dakota, they stir up more than dirt. The clouds of dust left in their wake contain such high levels of the mineral erionite that those who breathe in the air every day are at an increased risk of developing mesothelioma, a type of cancer of the membranes around the lungs, new research shows. Erionite is a natural mineral fiber that shares similar physical similarities with asbestos. When it's disturbed by human activity, fibers can become airborne and lodge themselves in people's lungs. Over time, the embedded fibers can make cells of the lung grow abnormally, leading to mesothelioma, a form of lung cancer most often associated with the related mineral asbestos.
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Hormone Therapy May Be Hazardous for Men With Heart Conditions, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-27-11
Adding hormone therapy to radiation therapy has been proven in randomized clinical trials to improve overall survival for men with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer. However, adding hormone therapy may reduce overall survival in men with pre-existing heart conditions, even if they have high-risk prostate cancer according to a new study just published online in advance of print in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology•Biology•Physics, the official scientific journal of ASTRO.
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Certain Antidepressants Linked to Falls in Nursing Homes
healthday.com - 7-27-11
In the days after they start taking non-SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) antidepressants, such as bupropion or venlafaxine, nursing home residents are at significantly greater risk for falls, according to a new study.
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Fatty 'Comfort' Foods May Alter Brain's Response to Sadness
healthday.com - 7-27-11
New research suggests that fatty foods do more than satisfy our stomachs. They may also soothe our psyche, literally serving as comfort foods.
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For Countries, Wealth May Not Buy Happiness
abcnews.go.com - 7-27-11
The old adage that money can't buy happiness may be true not only for individuals, but for society as a whole, according to new international research on depression.
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Is a shrinking brain is the price of being human? Only our grey matter gets smaller with age
dailymail.co.uk - 7-26-11
A shrinking brain may be the price that has to be paid for being human, a study has found.
Only humans have brains that progressively get smaller with increasing age, the research has shown.
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Barbecue may contain hidden dangers
usatoday.com - 7-26-11
Backyard barbecues are a big part of summer fun, but avoiding their hidden dangers is key to staying healthy and enjoying a cookout, a doctor suggests.
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How trying to lose weight can cost you the chance of having children
dailymail.co.uk - 7-26-11
As my GP fiddled with some papers, I guessed he had bad news. Nervously he blurted out: 'I'm afraid that you will never have children naturally.'
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New drug gives sight loss hope to thousands
telegraph.co.uk - 7-26-11
A new drug has reversed sight loss in sufferers of an eye condition passed down through families, giving hope to thousands that they could be spared blindness.
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Stoke drug could reduce brain damage 12 hours later
telegraph.co.uk - 7-26-11
Brain damage after stroke could be limited by administering a drug within 12 hours of the attack, more than twice as long as current treatments, scientists have claimed.
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Sex performance anxiety linked to cheating
upi.com - 7-26-11
Men who are risk-takers, easily aroused and anxious sexual performers are more likely to cheat on their partners, U.S. and Canadian researchers say.
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Drug prices to plummet in wave of expiring patents
msnbc.msn.com - 7-26-11
The cost of prescription medicines used by millions of people every day is about to plummet.
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Paralysis tied to food poisoning in border towns
msnbc.msn.com - 7-26-11
A cluster of cases of a rare illness that can lead to nerve damage and paralysis has been identified along a small stretch of the United States-Mexico border. An outbreak of food poisoning is the likely culprit, health officials in the two countries said.
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Why does toxicology take so long?
cnn.com - 7-26-11
Lab tests to determine what killed singer Amy Winehouse will take two to four weeks, according to the Scotland Yard.
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Cocaine: The evolution of the once 'wonder' drug
cnn.com - 7-26-11
Long before drug cartels, crack wars and TV shows about addiction, cocaine was promoted as a wonder drug, sold as a cure-all and praised by some of the greatest minds in medical history, including Sigmund Freud and the pioneering surgeon William Halsted.
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Molecular scalpel hope for Duchenne muscular dystrophy
bbc.co.uk - 7-26-11
A 'molecular scalpel' shows promise in patients with a deadly muscle wasting condition, according to researchers.
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Fragmented sleep 'harms memory'
bbc.co.uk - 7-26-11
Broken sleep affects the ability to build memories, a study of mice suggests.
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Amazing food facts: The seed of a peach contains an almond-like nut containing the anti-cancer medicine laetrile
naturalnews.com - 7-26-11
Peaches, nectarines, plums, apricots and almonds are all closely related fruit trees with very similar pits. In all these fruits, the pit must be broken open to reveal the almond-shaped kernel within. In fact, this is what almonds actually are: the kernel within the pit of the fruit of the almond tree!
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Gardening activities reduce lung cancer risk by 50%
naturalnews.com - 7-26-11
Not only is having a green thumb a great way to stay healthier and happier, but new research shows it can actually protect you from cancer.
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Cookware chemical linked to causing arthritis
naturalnews.com - 7-26-11
Sometimes the technological innovations that appear to make our lives a lot easier are the same ones that are now destroying our health. A new study out of West Virginia University's (WVU) School of Medicine has found that people with the highest blood levels of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), a chemical used in non-stick and stain-resistant coatings, are 40 percent more likely to develop arthritis than people with the lowest blood levels.
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Denied: DEA refuses to reclassify marijuana, claims it's as dangerous as heroin
naturalnews.com - 7-26-11
The US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has finally acknowledged a nine-year-old petition filed by The Coalition for Rescheduling Cannabis to reclassify marijuana as a schedule III, IV, or V drug, rather than its current, and more-serious, schedule I classification.
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Blood Test May Better Predict Diabetics' Heart Risk: Study
healthday.com - 7-26-11
A standard test used to measure blood sugar levels in people with diabetes could also help predict their risk of cardiovascular disease, a new study suggests.
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Kids With ADHD Less Adept at Crossing the Street: Study
healthday.com - 7-26-11
Parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder have one more worry to add to their list: Kids younger than 10 years old with ADHD may be unable to cross the street safely on their own.
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Smoking After Heart Attack Raises Risk of Dying
healthday.com - 7-26-11
People who resume smoking after hospitalization for a heart attack are more likely to die than those who quit for good, a new Italian study confirms.
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New Evidence of Age-Related Decline in the Brain's Master Circadian Clock
sciencedaily.com - 7-26-11
A new study of the brain's master circadian clock -- known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus, or SCN -- reveals that a key pattern of rhythmic neural activity begins to decline by middle age. The study, whose senior author is UCLA Chancellor Gene Block, may have implications for the large number of older people who have difficulty sleeping and adjusting to time changes.
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Exercise Has Numerous Beneficial Effects On Brain Health and Cognition, Review Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-26-11
It's no secret that exercise has numerous beneficial effects on the body. However, a bevy of recent research suggests that these positive effects also extend to the brain, influencing cognition. In a new review article highlighting the results of more than a hundred recent human and animal studies on this topic, Michelle W. Voss, of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and her colleagues show that both aerobic exercise and strength training play a vital role in maintaining brain and cognitive health throughout life. However, they also suggest that many unanswered questions remain in the field of exercise neuroscience -- including how various aspects of exercise influence brain physiology and function and how human and animal studies relate to each other -- and issue the call for further research to fill in these gaps.
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Anti-Clotting Drug May Cause Severe Bleeding With No Benefit
healthday.com - 7-25-11
For patients suffering chest pain, adding a new anti-clotting drug, Eliquis, to dual antiplatelet therapy may result in severe bleeding without reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke, a new study finds.
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Cellular Stress Can Induce Yeast to Promote Prion Formation
sciencedaily.com - 7-25-11
It's a chicken and egg question. Where do the infectious protein particles called prions come from? Essentially clumps of misfolded proteins, prions cause neurodegenerative disorders, such as mad cow/Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, in humans and animals. Prions trigger the misfolding and aggregation of their properly folded protein counterparts, but they usually need some kind of "seed" to get started.
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Therapists Say People Can Develop Addictions To Herbal Incense Like K2
digtriad.com - 7-25-11
Last year the number of people in emergency rooms from synthetic marijuana became a huge concern for law enforcement. In March, state legislators banned the sale of "K2" and "Spice."
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South Africa's super tea
smh.com.au - 7-25-11
Already a hit with Hollywood stars, could redbush tea, also known as rooibos, steal the crown from white and green teas to become the next super-tea?
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C-section rate in U.S. climbs to all-time high
usatoday.com - 7-25-11
Between 2002 and 2009, the number of cesarean deliveries rose significantly, from 27 percent of births to 34 percent, finds a new report based on information from 19 U.S. states.
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Study finds self-esteem levels vary by age, race
usatoday.com - 7-25-11
Study finds self-esteem levels vary by age, race
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Losing weight on the diet? It won't last
telegraph.co.uk - 7-25-11
They have found that while diets may help in the short term, the vast majority of dieters just put the weight back on afterwards.
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Pet Parade: Pets are good for you mentally and physically
upi.com - 7-25-11
Research by psychologists at Miami University and St. Louis University indicates pet ownership is good for the average person's health as well as happiness.
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Spuds get bad rap in study
upi.com - 7-25-11
The potato, often thought of as a healthy vegetable, actually contributes to obesity, a federally funded study claims.
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8 ways to help prevent prostate cancer
msnbc.msn.com - 7-25-11
It's one of those weird anatomical-arboreal coincidences: The human prostate is about the size and shape of a walnut. But what if it really were a walnut? For one thing, you'd never get prostate cancer. Which sounds great, until you realize that you could get "walnut curculio" or "walnut-husk maggot" instead. Better to deal with the devil you know.
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Chopra tackles superheroes, science and spirituality
cnn.com - 7-25-11
With more than 60 books to his name and countless speaking engagements, Dr. Deepak Chopra is widely known for his opinions on topics from spirituality to medicine.
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Study: Drinking diet soda actually causes weight gain, blood sugar spikes
naturalnews.com - 7-25-11
Contrary to popular belief, diet soda and other foods and beverages made with artificial sweeteners like aspartame are not healthy, and they do not bring about weight loss.
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Misuse of Pain Medication Is Pathway to High-Risk Behaviors, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-25-11
A new study by researchers at Drexel University's School of Public Health suggests that abuse of prescription painkillers may be an important gateway to the use of injected drugs such as heroin, among people with a history of using both types of drugs.
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150 human animal hybrids grown in UK labs: Embryos have been produced secretively for the past three years
dailymail.co.uk - 7-24-11
Scientists have created more than 150 human-animal hybrid embryos in British laboratories.
The hybrids have been produced secretively over the past three years by researchers looking into possible cures for a wide range of diseases.
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All babies could get hepatitis B jab as infections soar: Numbers affected have doubled in past decade
dailymail.co.uk - 7-24-11
All children could be vaccinated against hepatitis B in a bid to curb soaring rates of infection.
The numbers affected by the deadly illness have almost doubled in the past decade.
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Autism wandering new medical diagnosis
upi.com - 7-24-11
There is new recognition of wandering as a medical diagnosis involving those with autism, a U.S. autism non-profit group says.
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Giving up Net as hard as quitting smoking
upi.com - 7-24-11
Giving up online and digital technology is considered by some to be as hard as quitting smoking or drinking, a British survey indicates.
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Hundreds of beef cattle contaminated by Fukushima radiation have been shipped all over Japan, inspection finds
naturalnews.com - 7-24-11
The Fukushima Prefecture, a roughly 5,300 square mile region in Japan where the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility is located, recently conducted an area-wide inspection of local farms after discovering levels of radioactive cesium three-to-six times higher than maximum safety thresholds in some beef cattle. To their surprise, they also found that 14 different farms throughout the region had shipped 554 heads of cattle across Japan that had eaten highly-radioactive rice straw.
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New Target Found for Nitric Oxide's Attack On Salmonella Bacteria
sciencedaily.com - 7-24-11
A new target for nitric oxide has been revealed in studies of how it inhibits the growth of Salmonella. This bacterium is a common cause of food-poisoning.
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Life Scientists Use Novel Technique to Produce Genetic Map for African Americans
sciencedaily.com - 7-24-11
UCLA life scientists and colleagues have produced one of the first high-resolution genetic maps for African American populations. A genetic map reveals the precise locations across the genome where DNA from a person's father and mother have been stitched together through a biological process called "recombination." This process results in new genetic combinations that are then passed on to the person's children.
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Positive Teens Become Healthier Adults: Adolescents With a Sunny Outlook On Life May Have Better Health in Their Adult Years
sciencedaily.com - 7-24-11
Teenagers are known for their angst-ridden ways, but those who remain happy and positive during the tumultuous teenage years report better general health when they are adults, according to a new Northwestern University study.
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Most teenage girls face a life of illness because they shun healthy food
dailymail.co.uk - 7-23-11
Teenage girls are condemning themselves to a lifetime of ill health by eating fewer than three servings of fruit and vegetables every day.
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Seaweed 'is natural way to protect the heart' as algae helps bring down blood pressure
dailymail.co.uk - 7-23-11
It's hardly the most appetising vegetable side dish.
But tucking into a clump of seaweed at dinner time could help stave off heart attacks, say researchers.
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School success can be predicted just FIVE minutes after a child is born, scientists claim
dailymail.co.uk - 7-23-11
A health test given to babies minutes after they are born could reveal how well they will do in secondary school, it has been claimed.
A study of 877,000 Swedish teenagers compared school exam results with their Apgar scores after birth.
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What heat exhaustion looks like
upi.com - 7-23-11
With the U.S. heatwave ongoing and many major cities experiencing temperature in triple digits, a doctor explains what heat exhaustion looks like.
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Pain medication misuse pathway to heroin
upi.com - 7-23-11
Prescription painkillers may be an important gateway to the use of injected illegal drugs such as heroin, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Men who buy sex, more violent toward women
upi.com - 7-23-11
Men who pay for sex are far more likely than those who do not buy sex to commit crimes related to violence against women, a U.S. researcher says.
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7 do-it-yourself ways to fight Alzheimer's
msnbc.msn.com - 7-23-11
Up to half of Alzheimer's disease cases worldwide are potentially attributable to seven preventable risk factors, a new study suggests.
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Sigmund Freud's cocaine problem
cnn.com - 7-23-11
Whenever Big Pharma unfurls its latest “blockbuster” drug, I am carried back to the era when the biggest wonder drug on the market was cocaine. Yes, cocaine!
In the early 1880s, pharmaceutical houses touted it as a cure for everything from morphine addiction and depression to dyspepsia and fatigue. It was widely available in tonics, powders, wines and soft drinks before its mass consumption created a cadre of raging addicts demanding medical attention.
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Gardening in the Brain: Cells Called Microglia Prune the Connections Between Neurons, Shaping How the Brain Is Wired
sciencedaily.com - 7-23-11
Gardeners know that some trees require regular pruning: some of their branches have to be cut so that others can grow stronger. The same is true of the developing brain: cells called microglia prune the connections between neurons, shaping how the brain is wired, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Monterotondo, Italy, discovered. Published online in Science, the findings could one day help understand neurodevelopmental disorders like autism.
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How to Combat Hospital-Acquired Infections and Life-Threatening Toxins
sciencedaily.com - 7-23-11
A team of scientists from A*STAR's Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) has discovered the secret recipe for 'antidotes' that could neutralize the deadly plant toxin Ricin, widely feared for its bioterrorism potential, as well as the Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE) responsible for the tens of thousands of hospital-acquired infections in immune-compromised patients all over the world.
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Quick Test to Diagnose Bacterial or Viral Infection
sciencedaily.com - 7-23-11
Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have developed a new test that quickly and accurately distinguishes between bacterial and viral infections in as little as five hours.
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150 human animal hybrids grown in UK labs: Embryos have been produced secretively for the past three years
dailymail.co.uk - 7-23-11
Scientists have created more than 150 human-animal hybrid embryos in British laboratories.
The hybrids have been produced secretively over the past three years by researchers looking into possible cures for a wide range of diseases.
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Benefit of MS drugs comes at steep price: study
reuters.com - 7-22-11
Drugs used in the hope of slowing multiple sclerosis progression may help some patients, but at a very high cost, according to a study out Wednesday.
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Fear of Alzheimer's high, but denial less, survey shows
usatoday.com - 7-22-11
Attitudes about memory-robbing Alzheimer's disease are evolving in a positive direction, a five-country survey suggests.
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Alzheimer's debate: Test if you can't treat it?
usatoday.com - 7-22-11
icture yourself in Barbara Lesher's shoes: 54 years old and fearing you are developing Alzheimer's disease.
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One in four men have mutant gene 'that makes it harder for them to have children'
dailymail.co.uk - 7-22-11
Up to a quarter of men around the world have a genetic defect that could reduce their chances of having children.
Scientists have found some sperm lacks a protective protein that helps it to reach the egg.
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Dogs and cats have trouble with heat wave
upi.com - 7-22-11
With the stretch of hot weather and high humidity baking much of the United States, animal experts warn the heat wave also affects dogs and cats.
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Many suffer with Bachmann-type migraines
upi.com - 7-22-11
GOP presidential candidate Michele Bachmann's migraine disclosure puts her in good company with U.S. presidents and voters, a migraine expert says.
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Husbands happier in marriage if wives are skinnier
upi.com - 7-22-11
Husbands are more satisfied initially and wives are more satisfied over time when wives weigh less than their husbands, a U.S. study finds.
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Yoga poses for what ails you
cnn.com - 7-22-11
When Dr. Carolyn LaFleur was in a car accident six years ago, she couldn't move her neck for a year and a half, she had terrible pain in her hip, and she would get headaches at her temples.
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Swine flu jab 'narcolepsy risk'
bbc.co.uk - 7-22-11
A swine flu jab has been linked to rare cases of a sleeping disorder and should be the last line of protection for young people, European regulators say.
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Scientists find a mass of synthetic chemicals in every glass of milk
naturalnews.com - 7-22-11
When you wake up and go to the kitchen to pour yourself a cold glass of milk, it seems you are filling your body with calcium, vitamins, and an abundance of goodness. That seemingly white beverage may look innocent, but the hidden ingredients packed into the liquid that is a popular staple in the American diet are anything but.
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Supreme Court: Generic drug makers cannot be sued in state court for permanent damage caused by bad labeling
naturalnews.com - 7-22-11
Federal officials appear to have once again sided with Big Pharma rather than the people they are supposed to represent. In a 5 - 4 ruling, the US Supreme Court has decreed that patients injured by improperly or inadequately labeled generic drugs cannot sue their makers in state court for damages. The decision marks yet another nail in the coffin of compromised consumer protection laws, which have morphed into drug company protection laws.
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Vitamin D and calcium slashes risk of skin cancer by 50 percent
naturalnews.com - 7-22-11
Another study has verified the outstanding health benefits of taking vitamin D and calcium, this one showing that the supplements can reduce a womans risk of developing skin cancer by as much as 50 percent.
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Smartphones May Be Taxing Your Eyes
healthday.com - 7-22-11
People reading text messages or browsing the Internet on their smartphones tend to hold the devices closer than they would a book or newspaper, forcing their eyes to work harder than usual, new research shows.
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Breast-feeding for 6 Months or More Protects Against Asthma
healthday.com - 7-22-11
Babies who are exclusively breast-fed for six months or more are less likely to develop symptoms of asthma in early childhood, new research suggests.
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Seaweed as a Rich New Source of Heart-Healthy Food Ingredients
sciencedaily.com - 7-22-11
In an article that may bring smiles to the faces of vegetarians who consume no dairy products and vegans, who consume no animal-based foods, scientists have identified seaweed as a rich new potential source of heart-healthy food ingredients. Seaweed and other "macroalgae" could rival milk products as sources of these so-called "bioactive peptides," they conclude in an article in ACS's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
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Kidney Dopamine Regulates Blood Pressure, Life Span
sciencedaily.com - 7-22-11
The neurotransmitter dopamine is best known for its roles in the brain -- in signaling pathways that control movement, motivation, reward, learning and memory.
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Skin Sentry Cells Promote Distinct Immune Responses
sciencedaily.com - 7-22-11
A new study reveals that just as different soldiers in the field have different jobs, subsets of a type of immune cell that polices the barriers of the body can promote unique and opposite immune responses against the same type of infection. The research, published online on July 21st by Cell Press in the journal Immunity, enhances our understanding of the early stages of the immune response and may have important implications for vaccinations and treatment of autoimmune diseases.
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Attitude Adjustment: Optimism Can Stave Off Stroke in Older Patients
abcnews.go.com - 7-22-11
Looking on the brighter side of life just may save your life, according to new research from the University of Michigan. In a study of 6,000 adults over 50 with no history of stroke, optimism was associated with significantly reduced risk of stroke, even when controlling for stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, heart disease, hypertension and body mass index.
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Attack of the Urban Mosquitoes
wsj.com - 7-21-11
The Asian tiger mosquito, named for its distinctive black-and-white striped body, is a relatively new species to the U.S. that is more vicious, harder to kill and, unlike most native mosquitoes, bites during the daytime. It also prefers large cities over rural or marshy areas—thus earning the nickname among entomologists as "the urban mosquito."
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Lack of sperm coating plays role in infertility
usatoday.com - 7-21-11
Scientists have found a new contributor to male infertility, a protein that is supposed to coat sperm to help them swim to an egg, unless that coating goes missing.
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Why ARE young women hitting the menopause? New research reveals their fertile years could be shorter than feared – as these women discovered...
dailymail.co.uk - 7-21-11
Sitting in her GP's surgery, Lindsey Foots had no idea of the bombshell that was about to destroy her cherished dreams. 'My GP was quite blunt,' recalls the marketing professional from Urmston in Manchester. 'I think he was as shocked as me.
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Brain-injured veterans twice as likely to get dementia
msnbc.msn.com - 7-21-11
Two new studies - one in veterans and the other in retired football players - add to the mounting evidence linking head injuries to an increased the risk of dementia later in life.
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Water frogs linked to illness in young kids
cnn.com - 7-21-11
Frogs might be cute to look at but they might be hazardous to your children's health, which is why The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning parents to keep young kids away from water frogs and their habitats.
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Obesity 'leading driver' of breast cancer
bbc.co.uk - 7-21-11
Obesity is the biggest driving force behind the most common form of breast cancer in older women, say researchers.
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Are Taller People at Heightened Cancer Risk?
healthday.com - 7-21-11
Tall folks may be more likely than shorter people to develop cancer, new British research says.
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Climate change sceptics should get less BBC coverage and be challenged 'more vigorously', says report on science output
dailymail.co.uk - 7-21-11
Climate change sceptics will get less of a hearing on the BBC because they are at odds with the majority view among scientists, a report reveals.
The corporation’s governing body is set to change the way the BBC covers the issue by urging it to focus less on those who disagree with the majority 'consensus'.
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Biofuel demand in US driving higher food prices, says report
guardian.co.uk - 7-21-11
Demand for biofuels in the US is driving this year's high food prices, a report has said. It predicts that food prices are unlikely to fall back down for another two years.
The report, produced by Purdue University economists for the Farm Foundation policy organisation, said US government support for ethanol, including subsidies, had fuelled strong demand for corn over the last five years.
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Obesity 'leading driver' of breast cancer
bbc.co.uk - 7-21-11
Obesity is the biggest driving force behind the most common form of breast cancer in older women, say researchers.
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Heartworm drugs for pets; Big Pharma's cash cow
naturalnews.com - 7-21-11
In a seemingly diabolical plot, veterinarians and pharmaceutical companies have teamed up in a marketing campaign to frighten pet guardians into giving year-round heartworm preventatives to their cats, as well as dogs. These so-called experts say they're doing this to improve protection for individual pets, but the facts say their motives may be less pure.
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Does Food Act Physiologically Like a 'Drug of Choice' for Some?
sciencedaily.com - 7-21-11
Variety is considered the "spice of life," but does today's unprecedented level of dietary variety help explain skyrocketing rates of obesity? Some researchers think it might.
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How the Early Human Embryo Acquires Its Shape Through 'Organizer' Cells
sciencedaily.com - 7-21-11
How is it that a disc-like cluster of cells transforms within the first month of pregnancy into an elongated embryo? This mechanism is a mystery that people have tried to unravel for millennia.
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Vegetarian Diet May Protect Against Common Bowel Disorder
sciencedaily.com - 7-21-11
Vegetarians are a third less likely to get a common bowel disorder (diverticular disease) than their meat eating counterparts, finds a new study published on the British Medical Journal website.
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International Poll Shows Many Fear Alzheimer's as Much as Cancer
healthday.com - 7-21-11
A new international survey reveals that many people view Alzheimer's disease as a major health threat, fearing its onset nearly as much as they do cancer.
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Cheaper DNA Sequencing Coming Closer
healthday.com - 7-21-11
The race to develop the $1,000 genome test may be heating up. New technology promises to cut costs while speeding the amount of time it takes to decipher all of your genes and potentially provide a personalized report of health risks and possible therapies, a new report says.
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Experimental Drug Might Help Fight Alzheimer's After All
healthday.com - 7-21-11
An experimental drug for treating Alzheimer's disease that previously showed troubling side effects may actually be safe in the long run, researchers report.
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Are Safety-Obsessed Playgrounds Spoiling Our Children?
abcnews.go.com - 7-20-11
Current safety standards veer public playgrounds towards the benign realm of soft and cushy: sharp edges are covered, jungle gyms and monkey bars are miniaturized to reduce the height children can climb and the whole things are placed on shock-absorbent wood chips or rubber mats to cushion the blow when children inevitably fall.
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Babies fed home-cooked food from birth are 'more likely to eat fruit and vegetables later in life'
dailymail.co.uk - 7-20-11
Babies fed home-cooked food are more likely to eat fruit and vegetables when they are older than those given meals from jars and packets, researchers say.
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Stressful pregnancy 'programmes' babies to be anxious
telegraph.co.uk - 7-20-11
Being stressed in pregnancy genetically programmes the developing baby to be more susceptible to anxiety and behavioural problems in life, according to research.
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Hospital cleanliness not linked to cost
upi.com - 7-20-11
Hospitals that spend the most on cleaning and maintenance do not get the highest grades for cleanliness from patients, U.S. researchers say.
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Seafood ingredients can be hidden in food
upi.com - 7-20-11
Food shopping is more difficult for the 2.3 percent of Americans allergic to seafood because fish can be a hidden ingredient, a U.S. food industry analyst says.
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Gallup: Exercise drops during bad economy
upi.com - 7-20-11
As the U.S. financial crisis took hold, adults curbed their weekly exercise and they still haven't recovered to 2008 levels, a Gallup poll indicates.
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Mum's stress is passed to baby in the womb
bbc.co.uk - 7-20-11
A mother's stress can spread to her baby in the womb and may cause a lasting effect, German researchers propose.
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Deadly new disease linked to recent crop failures and animal miscarriages caused by GM crops, pesticides
naturalnews.com - 7-20-11
The recent upswing in crop failures and spontaneous animal miscarriages appears to be the result of a deadly new plant disease, suggests a prominent researcher. According to ongoing research being conducted by Emeritus Professor Don Huber from Purdue University in Indiana, this disease is likely a result of genetically-modified (GM) crops and the pesticides and herbicides used to grow them.
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Stopping Daily Aspirin Boosts Heart Attack Risk: Study
healthday.com - 7-20-11
People with heart disease who stop taking their daily low-dose aspirin may put themselves at a greater risk of having a heart attack, a new study finds.
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Lifestyle Changes Might Prevent Millions of Cases of Alzheimer's
healthday.com - 7-20-11
More than half of Alzheimer's cases globally could be prevented if modifiable risk factors such as depression, obesity and smoking were eliminated, either with lifestyle changes or treatment of underlying conditions, new research suggests.
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Research in 'Westie' Dogs May Hold Answers to Similar Human Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 7-20-11
The Westie Foundation of America (WFA) has announced preliminary findings in two major studies involving the health of West Highland White Terriers also known as Westies. Findings in these and other studies of Westies and other dogs may hold answers for similar human conditions like Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The studies are jointly funded by the WFA and the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF).
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Making Blood Sucking Deadly for Mosquitoes
sciencedaily.com - 7-20-11
Mosquitoes die soon after a blood meal if certain protein components are experimentally disrupted, a team of biochemists at the University of Arizona has discovered. The approach could be used as an additional strategy in the worldwide effort to curb mosquito-borne diseases like dengue fever, yellow fever and malaria.
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Physical Activity Linked to Lower Rates of Cognitive Impairment
sciencedaily.com - 7-20-11
Engaging in regular physical activity is associated with less decline in cognitive function in older adults, according to two studies published Online First by Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. The articles are being released on July 19 to coincide with the International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Paris and will be included in the July 25 print edition.
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Gradual Bone Reduction Seen in Some Birth Control Pill Users
sciencedaily.com - 7-20-11
Birth control pills may reduce a woman's bone density, according to a study published online July 13 in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism by Group Health Research Institute (GHRI) scientists. Impacts on bone were small, depended on the woman's age and the pill's hormone dose, and did not appear until about two years of use. The study size and design allowed the researchers to focus on 14- to 18-year-old teenagers, and to look at how bone density might change when a woman stops using the pill.
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Hungary destroys all GMO maize fields
allaboutfeed.net - 7-19-11
Some 400 hectares of maize found to have been grown with genetically modified seeds have been destroyed throughout Hungary deputy state secretary of the Ministry of Rural Development Lajos Bognar said.
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Study: Certain painkillers might raise odds of stroke, heart attack
usatoday.com - 7-19-11
Heart disease patients with high blood pressure who take a class of painkillers called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are at greater risk for heart attack, stroke or even death, new research shows.
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Cancer, memory loss top Boomers' health concerns
usatoday.com - 7-19-11
Baby boomers say their biggest health fear is cancer. Given their waistlines, heart disease and diabetes should be atop that list, too.
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A shedload of pills to combat old age
telegraph.co.uk - 7-19-11
In a telling commentary on our times, Mr Andrew Brain from south London, now in his eighties, writes to tell how his family doctor, the practice nurse and an optician have each on separate occasions expressed the same astonishment (even indignation) on reviewing his medical records, “But Mr Brain, you are not on any medication!”
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Birth defects linked to coal smoke, pesticides: China study
msnbc.msn.com - 7-19-11
Pregnant women who are exposed to coal smoke and pesticides are up to four times more likely to have babies with serious birth defects than women not exposed to these chemicals, a Chinese study has found.
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Secondhand smoke tied to teens' hearing loss
msnbc.msn.com - 7-19-11
Teens who are exposed to secondhand smoke may be at a higher risk of hearing loss, researchers have found.
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Drugs Can Bring HIV-Infected Africans Normal Life Spans
healthday.com - 7-19-11
Since their advent in the mid-1990s, powerful antiretroviral therapies have radically improved the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the developed world.
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Mechanism Behind Virally-Caused Vomiting Identified
sciencedaily.com - 7-19-11
Every year, more than 800,000 children in impoverished countries die from diarrhea and vomiting caused by rotavirus and norovirus -- 'winter vomiting disease'. Researchers at Linköping University and other institutions have now discovered how vomiting develops in viral infections and have found a way to quickly treat these children and others in the risk zone for dehydration.
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Women Bear Greatest Burden of Alzheimer's
healthday.com - 7-19-11
Women fear Alzheimer's disease more than any other illness except cancer, and they are more often on the front lines of providing care for loved ones battling the disease, new research shows.
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More Evidence That Early Treatment Can Stop HIV's Spread to Partners
healthday.com - 7-19-11
Researchers on Monday released yet more evidence that early treatment of HIV in an infected heterosexual can protect his or her partner from becoming infected.
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Sharing Bed With Toddler Won't Harm Development: Study
healthday.com - 7-19-11
Allowing your toddler to share your bed does not lead to behavioral or learning problems down the road, new research suggests.
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Lymphoma Drug Shrinks Dog Tumors, Could Lead to Human Treatment
sciencedaily.com - 7-18-11
There are many kinds of cancers of the immune system, but one, Activated B-Cell Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, or ABC-DLBCL, is particularly common and pernicious. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine have shown for the first time that dogs that develop this disease spontaneously share the same aberrant activation of a critical intracellular pathway with humans. They also found that a drug designed to disrupt this pathway helps to kill tumor cells in the dogs' cancerous lymph nodes.
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How To Protect Your Dignity From The TSA
forbes.com - 7-18-11
Much of the fury and rebellion directed at the Transportation Security Administration just a month ago has gone the way of so much left-over turkey. Opt-out day, a protest against the TSA's full-body scanners and more intensive pat-downs planned for the busiest 24 hours of Thanksgiving travel, came and went. The revolution failed to put a dent in the TSA's invasive new practices.
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Mentat from Himalaya – Natural Herbal Remedy to Improve Memory Power
sbwire.com - 7-18-11
A recent study report gives details of memory loss statistics as around 5 million Americans are suffering from memory loss and this figure to touch 15 million till 2050. No doubt the situation is not different worldwide. Depression and stress are other aspects creating more worries as not less than 120 million people suffering from the same worldwide. Medically, an individual suffers brain related issues like memory loss, depression as age progresses due to death of brain cells.
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Ingredient in Chinese herbal remedy shows promise in fighting brain cancer
dispatch.com - 7-18-11
An ingredient in a Chinese herbal remedy might stop brain cancer tumors from growing and spreading, a recent study found.
Ohio State University researchers found that indirubin, a component in the herbal therapy, successfully blocked human glioblastoma cells from invading mouse brains or moving once they are inside them.
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Study shows how binge drinking harms memory
usatoday.com - 7-18-11
Binge drinking may not necessarily kill or even damage brain cells, as commonly thought, a new animal study suggests.
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Some patients worse off with more-experienced docs
msnbc.msn.com - 7-18-11
In a study that flies in the face of common sense, sicker patients turned out to fare worse under the care of seasoned doctors than when newcomers to medicine looked after them.
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Scientists find 'better way' to grow adult stem cells
bbc.co.uk - 7-18-11
A new plastic surface which overcomes the difficulties associated with growing adult stem cells has been developed, according to scientists.
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USDA trying to run organic leafy green growers out of business
naturalnews.com - 7-18-11
Results of the passage of S. 510, the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act, are beginning to come into play -- and in this case the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), rather than the FDA, has decided to take the helm.
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Coming in 2012: Genetically modified front lawns and the mass spraying of neighborhoods and playgrounds with RoundUp
naturalnews.com - 7-18-11
Thanks to a recent admission by the USDA that it does not have the regulatory framework to even regulate GMOs, the world of biotech is set to unleash a tidal wave of genetically modified seeds upon the United States. This is the upshot of Scotts Miracle-Gro challenging the USDA over its GMO grass seeds, to which the USDA threw in the towel and essentially announced it can't technically regulate many GMOs at all.
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Why Americans can't afford to eat healthy
salon.com - 7-17-11
The real reason Big Macs are cheaper than more nutritious alternatives? Government subsidies
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Upbeat Boomers say they're not old yet
usatoday.com - 7-17-11
The generation that once powered a youth movement isn't ready to symbolize the aging of America, even as its first members are becoming eligible for Medicare. A new poll finds three-quarters of all baby boomers still consider themselves middle-aged or younger, and that includes most of the boomers who are ages 57-65.
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Dentists can identify undiagnosed diabetes
upi.com - 7-17-11
Dental visits may offer a way to help identify people with diabetes or pre-diabetes who are unaware of their condition, U.S. researchers say.
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Grapes may prevent, delay Alzheimer's
upi.com - 7-17-11
Grape seed polyphenols -- an antioxidant -- may help prevent the development or delay the progression of Alzheimer's disease, New York researchers say.
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Biotech farm to milk mutant transgendered offspring of GM goats
naturalnews.com - 7-17-11
The insatiable lust among genetic engineers to tamper with the natural order has reached new freak-show proportions. Genetic butchers from AgResearch, which NaturalNews recently reported had reluctantly abandoned a 13-year animal cloning operation due to an overwhelming number of animal deformities and deaths, are once again in the news, this time for their plans to milk the transgendered offspring of genetically-engineered (GE) goats.
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AIDS drugs linked to premature aging, dementia, and heart disease
naturalnews.com - 7-17-11
A study recently published in the journal Nature Genetics explains that nucleoside analog reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, or NRTIs, which are drugs used primarily in Africa and other developing regions of the world to treat HIV and AIDS, are responsible for causing heart disease, dementia, premature aging, and other age-related illnesses.
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Novel Compound Selectively Kills Cancer Cells by Blocking Their Response to Oxidative Stress
sciencedaily.com - 7-17-11
A cancer cell may seem out of control, growing wildly and breaking all the rules of orderly cell life and death. But amid the seeming chaos there is a balance between a cancer cell's revved-up metabolism and skyrocketing levels of cellular stress. Just as a cancer cell depends on a hyperactive metabolism to fuel its rapid growth, it also depends on anti-oxidative enzymes to quench potentially toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by such high metabolic demand.
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Weight-Loss Surgery Cost-Effective for All Obese, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-17-11
Bariatric surgery is not only cost-effective for treating people who are severely obese, but also for those who are mildly obese, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings support making bariatric surgery available to all obese people, the researchers say.
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Stem Cells Restore Cognitive Abilities Impaired by Brain Cancer Treatment
sciencedaily.com - 7-17-11
Human neural stem cells are capable of helping people regain learning and memory abilities lost due to radiation treatment for brain tumors, a UC Irvine study suggests.
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Stem Cells Restore Cognitive Abilities Impaired by Brain Cancer Treatment
sciencedaily.com - 7-17-11
Human neural stem cells are capable of helping people regain learning and memory abilities lost due to radiation treatment for brain tumors, a UC Irvine study suggests.
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Breaking the Chain: 'Molecular Cap' Blocks Processes That Lead to Alzheimer's, HIV
sciencedaily.com - 7-17-11
A new advance by UCLA biochemists has brought scientists one step closer to developing treatments that could delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease and prevent the sexual transmission of HIV.
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Coffee and Tea Drinkers Less Likely to Carry MRSA
abcnews.go.com - 7-16-11
People who drink hot tea or coffee are less likely to carry the superbug known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in their noses, researchers found.
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Older means happier: Most over-50s are content ... and their lives will get even better in 20 years
dailymail.co.uk - 7-16-11
In this age of austerity you might think the older generation would be depressed by the prospect of working longer and retiring on a smaller pension.
Not a bit of it.
Far from being down in the mouth, the over-50s are feeling healthy, happy and in good spirits about their financial futures, according to a survey.
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Binge drinking hits teen girls harder
upi.com - 7-16-11
High school girls may have a harder time after binge drinking that boys at the same age, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Depression increases cocaine/crack risk
upi.com - 7-16-11
Women clinically depressed when they enter drug court run a substantially higher risk of using crack cocaine within four months afterward, U.S. researchers say.
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'Super' blueberries from South America
upi.com - 7-16-11
Wild blueberries native to the tropical regions of Central and South America have two to four times more antioxidants than U.S. blueberries, researchers say.
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HIV medicines 'boost prevention'
bbc.co.uk - 7-16-11
HIV drugs can be used to boost protection against HIV as well as treating symptoms after infection, research suggests.
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Antimicrobial copper kills 97 percent of deadly bacteria, reduces infection rate by 40 percent
naturalnews.com - 7-16-11
A new study presented at the World Health Organization's (WHO) 1st International Conference on Prevention and Infection Control (ICPIC) in Geneva, Switzerland, has revealed that the use of antimicrobial copper surfaces in hospitals helps reduce the rate of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) by 40 percent. The metal also effectively kills 97 percent of bacteria, as well as many viral and fungal pathogens.
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Drinking Alcohol May Prolong, Not Relieve, Stress
healthday.com - 7-16-11
Although many people think that having a cocktail will help them relax, the relationship between stress and alcohol is a two-way street, researchers say.
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Binge Drinking May Impair Teen Brain Development
healthday.com - 7-16-11
Binge drinking can damage teenagers' spatial working memory (the ability to perceive their environment or their surroundings) at a critical time when their brains are still developing, according to a new study.
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Alcohol Affects Left, Right Heart Chambers Differently
healthday.com - 7-16-11
The left and right ventricles of the heart have very different reactions to small amounts of alcohol, a new study finds.
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Dogs Adept at Reading People's Minds
healthday.com - 7-16-11
To anyone who is familiar with the eerily human-like qualities of man's best friend, the news that dogs can read your mind shouldn't come as any surprise.
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Novel Compound Selectively Kills Cancer Cells by Blocking Their Response to Oxidative Stress
sciencedaily.com - 7-16-11
A cancer cell may seem out of control, growing wildly and breaking all the rules of orderly cell life and death. But amid the seeming chaos there is a balance between a cancer cell's revved-up metabolism and skyrocketing levels of cellular stress. Just as a cancer cell depends on a hyperactive metabolism to fuel its rapid growth, it also depends on anti-oxidative enzymes to quench potentially toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by such high metabolic demand.
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Black men survive longer in prison than out: study
reuters.com - 7-15-11
Black men are half as likely to die at any given time if they're in prison than if they aren't, suggests a new study of North Carolina inmates.
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Big push for home births: Too many babies are being born in hospital, say doctors
dailymail.co.uk - 7-15-11
Women should no longer assume they will give birth in hospital with a doctor on hand.
In a watershed moment, leading medical experts declared that mothers should be given more opportunity to have babies at home because a maternity ward is not necessarily the 'safer option'.
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Knee surgery complications if ill health
upi.com - 7-15-11
Patients with medical problems such as congestive heart failure are at increased risk for major knee surgery complications, U.S. researchers say.
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Meditation may be pushups for the brain
upi.com - 7-15-11
Just as pushups help the physical body, meditation may be pushups for the brain by combating brain shrinkage, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Whether it's food or drugs, addiction is the same, new study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 7-15-11
You may think you’re addicted to chocolate, but it’s unlikely you cut yourself off from your friends because you’re too embarrassed to scarf down Hershey bar after Hershey bar in front of them.
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Scientists question cancer risks of full-body scanners
msnbc.msn.com - 7-15-11
Millions of fliers pass through them, but scientific experts are still at odds about the safety of full-body airport scanners that use an X-ray technology called backscatter. The machines use low-level beams to create an image of the body, revealing weapons or other concealed items beneath a passenger’s clothing.
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Facing chronic pain without drugs
cnn.com - 7-15-11
For two years after a hip surgery that didn't work out as well as he'd hoped, pain shot down Jim Heckler's leg like electrical shocks. Several doctors, eager to help Heckler feel better, prescribed various narcotic painkillers.
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Gene link to 70% of hard-to-treat breast cancers
bbc.co.uk - 7-15-11
A gene has been linked to 70% of hard-to-treat breast cancers which are resistant to hormone therapies, in US research.
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Westerners 'programmed for fatty foods and alcohol'
bbc.co.uk - 7-15-11
Westerners could be genetically programmed to consume fatty foods and alcohol more than those from the east, researchers have claimed.
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7 reasons schools should NOT mandate vaccines
healthday.com - 7-15-11
Health authorities do not believe that your child is entitled to be educated unless he or she has first been indoctrinated and intoxicated by the demigods of vaccination. Parents who question the necessity and morality of this dangerous and invasive policy are derisively informed that unvaccinated children are a scourge on society. We are told that everyone -- your children and mine -- must be vaccinated or the "protective cocoon" will fail. Apparently, vaccines are a colossal waste of technology unless market share is complete!
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Study: Many sunscreens increase skin cancer risk, FDA has known for a decade but done nothing
healthday.com - 7-15-11
A new report issued by the consumer protection organization Environmental Working Group (EWG) reveals that many popular sunscreens contain ingredients known to spur the growth and spread of skin cancer cells, which defeats their stated purpose of preventing skin cancer.
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The low-calorie myth: Artificial fat substitutes actually cause weight gain
healthday.com - 7-15-11
Trying to lose weight by eating foods with imitation fat substitutes and artificial sweeteners can actually be a cause of weight gain, according to a new study published online in the American Psychological Association (APA) journal Behavioral Neuroscience. According to researchers from Purdue University in Indiana, consuming low-calorie fat and sugar substitutes appears to actually induce weight gain rather than weight loss.
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Novel Virus 'Jumped' From Monkeys to Humans, Researchers Find
healthday.com - 7-15-11
A novel version of a virus responsible for many well-known illnesses in humans and animals has managed to jump from one species and spark infection in another, according to researchers.
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Genes Linked to Restless Legs Syndrome Identified
healthday.com - 7-15-11
An international team of researchers has identified two genetic regions that seem to be implicated in restless legs syndrome.
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Poorer, Less Educated Youth More Prone to Hypertension
healthday.com - 7-15-11
Young American adults with low incomes and less education are at increased risk for high blood pressure, a new study finds.
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Neuroscientists Uncover Neural Mechanisms of Object Recognition
sciencedaily.com - 7-15-11
Certain brain injuries can cause people to lose the ability to visually recognize objects -- for example, confusing a harmonica for a cash register.
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Secret to Successful Aging: How 'Positivity Effect' Works in Brain
sciencedaily.com - 7-15-11
Whether we choose to accept or fight it, the fact is that we will all age, but will we do so successfully? Aging successfully has been linked with the "positivity effect," a biased tendency towards and preference for positive, emotionally gratifying experiences. New research published in Biological Psychiatry now explains how and when this effect works in the brain.
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Molasses Extract Decreases Obesity Caused by a High-Fat Diet, Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-14-11
Experimental results to be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, suggests that dietary supplementation with molasses extract may provide a novel approach for weight management in humans.
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Researchers Demystify a Fountain of Youth in the Adult Brain
sciencedaily.com - 7-14-11
Duke University Medical Center researchers have found that a "fountain of youth" that sustains the production of new neurons in the brains of rodents is also believed to be present in the human brain. The existence of a vital support system of cells around stem cells in the brain explains why stem cells by themselves can't generate neurons in a lab dish, a major roadblock in using these stem cells for injury repair.
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Your mother was right: Standing up straight IS good for you (by helping you tolerate pain)
dailymail.co.uk - 7-14-11
For generations mothers have admonished children who hunch over the dinner table to 'sit up straight.'
Now scientists have found lengthening the spine and pushing the shoulders back can have a real medical benefit.
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Expert: U.S. bladder cancer care gets 'F'
upi.com - 7-14-11
U.S. patients with non-invasive bladder cancer are not receiving the guideline-recommended care that would best protect them from recurrence, researchers say.
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Fame most important value of kid TV shows
upi.com - 7-14-11
In television shows popular with U.S. children ages 9-11, the top value emphasized was fame, which may reflect the culture, psychologists say.
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Stinky feet odor may prevent malaria deaths
msnbc.msn.com - 7-14-11
The old adage that you catch more flies with honey may be true, but researchers are betting that the scent of smelly feet will be the best lure to catch disease-spreading mosquitoes.
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General health may tell your Alzheimer's risk
cnn.com - 7-14-11
Age and genetics are the two greatest known factors contributing to Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, but new research is showing there may be some other surprising indicators.
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The secret history of Monsanto, Agent Orange and the mutilation of innocent Vietnamese
naturalnews.com - 7-14-11
We still find it difficult to completely forget one of the uglier and far-reaching atrocities of the Vietnam War - the dissemination of a deadly herbicide, Agent Orange. But where we only have movies like Apocalypse Now and a host of war novels to remind us of the majority of the unpalatable actions that took place in the 60s, the repercussions of Agent Orange are still rising and expanding - through the world and media.
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How to protect your mobile phone and computer from illegal police searches
naturalnews.com - 7-14-11
The U.S. Constitution is clear about the issue of privacy. In fact, the Fourth Amendment states, in part, "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated..."
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Delving Into the Mystery of Placebos
healthday.com - 7-14-11
A new study finds that the power of the placebo effect left asthma patients thinking that real and fake drugs were doing the same level of good, even though the real medication actually had a much greater physical effect on their lungs.
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Drugs May Prevent HIV Spread Among Heterosexuals
healthday.com - 7-14-11
Giving antiretroviral drugs to heterosexuals at high risk of HIV infection can significantly reduce the chance they will develop the AIDS-causing virus, two new studies suggest.
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Biologists Identify New Strategy Used by Bacteria During Infection
sciencedaily.com - 7-14-11
Purdue University biologists identified a new way in which bacteria hijack healthy cells during infection, which could provide a target for new antibiotics.
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The Metabolic Effects of Antipsychotic Drugs
sciencedaily.com - 7-14-11
Research to be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, may explain why some antipsychotic drugs can promote overeating, weight gain, and insulin resistance.
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Contact Allergies May Trigger Immune System Defences to Ward Off Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 7-14-11
Contact allergies (reactions caused by direct contact with substances like common metals and chemicals) may help prime the immune system to ward off certain types of cancer, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open.
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Killer Combo of High Gas, Food Prices at Key Tipping Point
cnbc.com - 7-14-11
The combination of rising gasoline prices and the steepest increase in the cost of food in a generation is threatening to push the US economy into a recession, according to Craig Johnson, president of Customer Growth Partners.
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Itching to stop mosquitoes? Zoom in on the options
usatoday.com - 7-13-11
When it comes to stopping bites, not all repellents have equal might.
The quest to find the perfect insect repellent attracts not only campers and hikers, but just about anyone who dares to go outside on a summer day. A variety of products, from sprays to creams to lanterns - even smartphone apps - promise to keep insects away and mosquitoes from biting. But not all products are created equal.
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Want an allergy-free pet? Don't waste your money on a hypoallergenic dog, urge experts
dailymail.co.uk - 7-13-11
A hypoallergenic dog is viewed by many as the perfect pet for allergy-prone children.
But health-conscious parents in the UK could be paying out hundreds of pounds in vain, after a study found they produced just as much allergen in the home as the average hound.
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Study finds elevated risk of glaucoma
upi.com - 7-13-11
U.S. researchers say measurements taken during eye surgery may explain why African-Americans have a higher risk of glaucoma than Caucasians.
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Chinese kids exercise, shun sweets are fat
upi.com - 7-13-11
Teenage boys in China, who are physically active and eat plenty of vegetables but few sweets are more likely to be overweight, U.S. researchers say.
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Drug shortages slam patients, health workers, surveys show
msnbc.msn.com - 7-13-11
Escalating shortages of vital drugs could be affecting nearly every hospital in the nation, forcing delays or substitutions in patient care, diverting pharmacy staff from crucial duties and racking up $216 million in costs to manage the situation nationwide.
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Gonorrhoea strain found to be 'resistant to antibiotics'
bbc.co.uk - 7-13-11
A new strain of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhoea has become resistant to antibiotics, international research shows.
Analysis of the bacterium that causes gonorrhoea found a new variant which is very effective at mutating.
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Smoking during pregnancy 'raises birth defect risk'
bbc.co.uk - 7-13-11
Women who smoke while pregnant should be aware that they are increasing the chance their baby will be born malformed, say experts.
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Family History of Cancer Needs to Be Updated as You Age
healthday.com - 7-13-11
Family history remains one of the best ways to identify people at high risk for breast, prostate and colon cancer, and now new research suggests that updating your doctor between ages 30 and 50 about any close relatives who develop these cancers may lead to lifesaving changes in how and when you are screened.
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More U.S. Men Die From Cancer Than Women: Study
healthday.com - 7-13-11
Men in the United States are much more likely than women to die of cancer, a new report from the U.S. National Cancer Institute found.
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Soaring Temps Can Pose Serious Health Risks
healthday.com - 7-13-11
Scorching heat and oppressive humidity continued to grip much of the United States Tuesday, with temperatures exceeding 90 degrees -- and in some cases 100 degrees -- from the Southwest to the Northeast.
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Physical Activity Levels Linked to Employment Status
healthday.com - 7-13-11
People's employment status has an impact on how physically active they are during the workweek, but men and women are affected differently, new research shows.
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Family History of Cancer Needs to Be Updated as You Age
healthday.com - 7-13-11
Family history remains one of the best ways to identify people at high risk for breast, prostate and colon cancer, and now new research suggests that updating your doctor between ages 30 and 50 about any close relatives who develop these cancers may lead to lifesaving changes in how and when you are screened.
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Eating Nuts Daily Could Help Control Type 2 Diabetes and Prevent Complications, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-13-11
Eating nuts every day could help control Type 2 diabetes and prevent its complications, according to new research from St. Michael's Hospital and the University of Toronto.
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Indirubin, Component Of Chinese Herbal Remedy, Might Block Brain Tumor's Spread, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-13-11
The active ingredient in a traditional Chinese herbal remedy might help treat deadly brain tumors, according to a new study by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC -- James).
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Cuddling More Important to Men in Long-Term Relationships
abcnews.go.com - 7-12-11
Despite traditional beliefs about what makes men and women happy in relationships, a new study found that kissing, cuddling and caressing are more important to men than they are to women.
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Scan Your Skin, Know Your Moles
abcnews.go.com - 7-12-11
In a sense, you are your own dermatologist. If you see a new mole, give yourself the alphabet exam...
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Betty Ford told her story of addiction and left a legacy
usatoday.com - 7-12-11
When she co-founded the non-profit Betty Ford Center in Rancho Mirage, Calif., in 1982, Ford was a former first lady who fought drug and alcohol dependency, then paved the way for others fighting addiction.
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Magnets easing pain. Healing vibes curing cancer. The Moon affecting your health...The medical mumbo-jumbo that's actually all TRUE
dailymail.co.uk - 7-12-11
No matter how many high-tech cures modern medicine brings us, alternative evangelists will always argue loudly that the true secrets of well-being lie in esoteric notions such as ‘healing frequencies’, magnets and astrological alignments.
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Secondhand smoke boosts kids' ADHD, learning disability risks
cnn.com - 7-12-11
Two new studies from the American Academy of Pediatrics look at how exposure to secondhand smoke affects American youths' learning behaviors and their attitudes toward smoking.
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The top 20 foods for reversing type-2 diabetes
naturalnews.com - 7-12-11
The CDC has estimated that by 2050, as much of thirty percent of the American population could suffer with diabetes. New studies show that diabetics, in addition to coping with the effects of their disease, also have nearly double the risk of cancer compared to the rest of the population.
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Food prices continue to skyrocket, even when gas prices fall
naturalnews.com - 7-12-11
Food prices are skyrocketing. Part of the reason why is because, as the world's population rises, so too has food consumption.
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Fluoride consumption leads to brain damage, says study
naturalnews.com - 7-12-11
It is becoming increasingly difficult for fluoride fanatics to defend the practice of artificial water fluoridation, thanks to a plethora of new reports highlighting its many dangers. A new study published in the journal Neurologia reveals that chronic exposure to, and ingestion of, the synthetic fluoride chemicals added to water supplies can cause serious brain and neurological damage. Confirming several others recently published, the study further exposes the lunacy of deliberately adding toxic chemicals to the water supply in the name of saving teeth.
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Deaths Up, Care Levels Down at Teaching Hospitals in July
healthday.com - 7-12-11
The dog days of summer are a perfect time for hitting the beach. But a summer visit to your local teaching hospital?
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Fast Food Is King of the Neighborhood, Study Reports
healthday.com - 7-12-11
Into America's fight against obesity comes new research pitting fast food against fruits and veggies, and fast food, it seems, is the winner.
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Sleep Apnea Linked to Blood Vessel Disorders in Study
healthday.com - 7-12-11
Obstructive sleep apnea, a condition that causes pauses in breathing during sleep, plays a role in blood vessel abnormalities and should be treated to prevent potentially fatal heart conditions, a new study suggests.
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Study: Potassium Boosts Heart Health, Salt Harms It
healthday.com - 7-12-11
Too much salt and too little potassium in your diet may boost your risk for cardiovascular disease and death, a new study shows.
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Parkinson's Patients Still Prescribed Antipsychotics Despite Warning
healthday.com - 7-12-11
Antipsychotic drugs are still prescribed to more than half of U.S. patients with Parkinson's disease and psychosis even though a warning that these drugs can worsen Parkinson's symptoms was issued six years ago, a new study reveals.
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Genetic Basis of Rare Human Diseases Described
sciencedaily.com - 7-12-11
Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and in Michigan, North Carolina and Spain have discovered how genetic mutations cause a number of rare human diseases, which include Meckel syndrome, Joubert syndrome and several other disorders.
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The Truth About Cats and Dogs: Pets Are Good for Mental Health of 'Everyday People'
sciencedaily.com - 7-12-11
Pets can serve as important sources of social and emotional support for "everyday people," not just individuals facing significant health challenges, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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Do-It-Yourself Brain Repair Following Stroke
sciencedaily.com - 7-12-11
Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability and death in the United States. A team of researchers -- led by Gregory Bix, at Texas A&M College of Medicine, College Station -- has identified a way to exploit one of the brain's self-repair mechanisms to protect nerve cells and enhance brain repair in rodent models of stroke. The authors suggest that this approach could provide a nontoxic treatment for stroke.
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Resilience Amongst the Long Term Ill
sciencedaily.com - 7-12-11
People who have a long term debilitating physical illness demonstrate mental resilience according to Understanding Society, the world's largest longitudinal household study. The first findings reveal that people diagnosed with cancer, diabetes, respiratory or cardiovascular disease report similar mental health scores to those without physical illness. The survey's findings suggest that those people who may not be able to function well physically because of an illness do not necessarily suffer problems with their mental health -- for example with their concentration, confidence and feelings of strain.
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Scientists find first superbug strain of gonorrhea
reuters.com - 7-12-11
Scientists have found a "superbug" strain of gonorrhea in Japan that is resistant to all recommended antibiotics and say it could transform a once easily treatable infection into a global public health threat.
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Does too little sleep lead to weight gain?
reuters.com - 7-11-11
People who got very little sleep ate more but didn't burn any extra calories, according to a U.S. study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that adds to evidence supporting a link between sleep deprivation and weight gain.
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5 Self-Tests to Rank Ailments From So-So to Serious
abcnews.go.com - 7-11-11
Bear down as if you're having a bowel movement, and feel the area in question. "A lot of times you can feel a soft protrusion where intestines have poked through the abdominal muscles," says Travis Stork, M.D., MH's emergency-medicine advisor and the author of The Lean Belly Prescription. That's a hernia.
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A deadly new reason to avoid deer ticks
usatoday.com - 7-11-11
Move over, Lyme disease: Another tick-borne illness is on the rise in various parts of the country, and this one can kill.
Known as babesiosis, the disease is caused by a microscopic parasite that attacks blood cells, causing flu-like symptoms that can make it difficult to accurately diagnose. Like Lyme disease, which is caused by bacteria, babesia microti parasites are carried by deer ticks.
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Want to cut back on salt? Try seaweed granules on your chips instead
dailymail.co.uk - 7-11-11
High blood pressure, strokes and early deaths could be prevented by replacing salt with seaweed granules in bread and processed foods, scientists claim.
The granules deliver a strong flavour but are low in salt, which is blamed for thousands of early deaths every year.
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Breast cancer gene test could be available on NHS 'in months'
dailymail.co.uk - 7-11-11
A genetic test to help breast cancer patients get the best treatment could be available on the NHS within months.
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Huge numbers of Obamacare waivers granted to luxury business in Pelosi's district
naturalnews.com - 7-11-11
If you recall during the debate over the healthcare reform law that became known as "Obamacare" because it was shepherded through Congress by the president, one of its primary selling points was that it would cover everyone. That was, after all, the point: Universal coverage - no exceptions, no person left out.
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High fructose corn syrup contaminated with mercury and made using a toxic chemical catalyst that can burn a hole in your stomach
naturalnews.com - 7-11-11
High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is used as a sweetener in thousands of mainstream packaged foods sold in the United States and around the world, from bread to soda and even breakfast cereal. It has been blamed for increasing the number of empty calories in the U.S. diet, and researchers have linked it to type-2 diabetes and obesity.
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The Biology Behind Alcohol-Induced Blackouts
sciencedaily.com - 7-11-11
A person who drinks too much alcohol may be able to perform complicated tasks, such as dancing, carrying on a conversation or even driving a car, but later have no memory of those escapades. These periods of amnesia, commonly known as "blackouts," can last from a few minutes to several hours.
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A Change of Heart: Researchers Reprogram Brain Cells to Become Heart Cells
sciencedaily.com - 7-11-11
For the past decade, researchers have tried to reprogram the identity of all kinds of cell types. Heart cells are one of the most sought-after cells in regenerative medicine because researchers anticipate that they may help to repair injured hearts by replacing lost tissue. Now, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania are the first to demonstrate the direct conversion of a non-heart cell type into a heart cell by RNA transfer.
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Stroke Risk in Pregnant Women 2.4 Times Higher, Review Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-11-11
High blood pressure during pregnancy is a leading cause of maternal and fetal mortality worldwide.
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Teaching the Neurons to Meditate
sciencedaily.com - 7-11-11
In the late 1990s, Jane Anderson was working as a landscape architect. That meant she didn't work much in the winter, and she struggled with seasonal affective disorder in the dreary Minnesota winter months. She decided to try meditation and noticed a change within a month. "My experience was a sense of calmness, of better ability to regulate my emotions," she says. Her experience inspired a new study which will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, which finds changes in brain activity after only five weeks of meditation training.
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Attack of the hyperbugs: We've had superbugs, but now there are strains so resilient that no drugs will kill them
dailymail.co.uk - 7-10-11
The term superbug has become frighteningly familiar over the past decade. These bacteria, which have become resistant to the antibiotics used to treat them - in other words, the medicines no longer work - are a major cause of hospital-acquired infections and cost the NHS £1billion a year to tackle.
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Teenage girls' junk food diet leading to health problems later in life
telegraph.co.uk - 7-10-11
Nutritionists have discovered that a diet of pizza, sweets, and sugary drinks is taking a severe toll on the health of young women which is having implications as they get older.
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24 dead in Canada C. difficile outbreak
upi.com - 7-10-11
At least 24 people have died in Ontario hospitals during an outbreak of the so-called superbug C. difficile, Canadian health officials say.
The Globe and Mail reported the Niagara Health System said Friday one patient had died in its Niagara-on-the-Lake facility and two more at its St. Catharines General site, bringing the C. difficile death toll in its seven hospitals to 20.
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Child personalities linked to stress
upi.com - 7-10-11
Children's personalities -- cautious and submissive or bold and assertive -- are linked to their chemical response to stress, U.S. researchers say.
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Why gardening is good for your health
cnn.com - 7-10-11
Gillian Aldrich started growing vegetables in her backyard three years ago, and she's now working on planting a bed of hydrangeas, butterfly bushes, rose campion, and -- her favorite -- pale-pink hardy geraniums along one side of her property.
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Suicide rates in Europe 'linked' to financial crisis
bbc.co.uk - 7-10-11
The financial crisis "almost certainly" led to an increase in suicides across Europe, health experts say.
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Stink bug invasion strikes fruit, grain crops in North America
naturalnews.com - 7-10-11
Stink bugs are more than annoying for many people in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. One variety, the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is wreaking havoc on many crops in the region. This invasive bug is native to Asia and was first encountered on US soil in Pennsylvania in the late 1990s. These stinky pests are taking a huge bite out of many types of crops including tomatoes, fruits, soy beans and corn.
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'Magic mushrooms' create positive mental and physical health benefits that can last a year
naturalnews.com - 7-10-11
Taking just the right amount of a substance found in "magic mushrooms" can help to positively improve attitude, mood, behavior, and happiness levels, according to new study published in the peer-reviewed journal Psychopharmacology. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md., determined that psilocybin, a psychedelic substance found in certain mushrooms, can help improve a person's general well-being for up to a year after taking it -- and it allegedly does not cause any known negative side effects.
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Record one in six Americans now on food stamps as depression escalates
naturalnews.com - 7-10-11
While the mainstream media has all but convinced most Americans that the nation is slowly climbing out of the "recession," new statistics released by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) suggest otherwise. According to just-released participation numbers for the agency's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known more commonly as "food stamps," nearly one in six Americans now participates in the program, which represents a new record high.
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Parents Can Help Stop Spread of Water Park Illnesses
healthday.com - 7-10-11
Too few parents understand their role in stopping the spread of infections at water parks, a new survey suggests.
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Chesapeake Bay Pesticides: Some Diminish, Some Persist
sciencedaily.com - 7-10-11
Scientists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are identifying factors that influence pesticide levels in the Chesapeake Bay airshed, including traces of "legacy" pesticides that still linger even though they are no longer being used.
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Viruses Bathe in Rivers and at the Beach, Too, European Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-10-11
European researchers have found viruses in nearly 40% of more than 1,400 bathing water samples gathered from coastal and inland areas in nine countries, including Spain. The concentrations found are low, but the scientists are calling for these microorganisms to be monitored in recreational waters, above all at times when their populations skyrocket, as is the case after heavy rains.
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Navel-gazing scientists discover the human belly button harbours 1,400 strains of bacteria
dailymail.co.uk - 7-9-11
A team of scientists has taken navel-gazing to a whole new level and discovered there are 1,400 strains of bacteria lurking in human belly buttons.
North Carolina State University's Belly Button Biodiversity study even found 662 unrecognised strains - which could be unique new species.
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Gonorrhea growing resistant to antibiotics
upi.com - 7-9-11
Gonorrhea may be growing resistant to the only remaining class of antibiotics left to treat the sexually transmitted disease, U.S. health officials say.
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'Hypoallergenic' dogs not less allergic
upi.com - 7-9-11
So-called hypoallergenic dogs do not have lower household allergen levels than other dogs, U.S. researchers say.
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Survey: Fatigue is top diabetes challenge
upi.com - 7-9-11
Eighty-five percent of people with diabetes say fatigue is their top challenge and it makes it difficult to get through their day, a U.S. survey indicates.
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Bill would let federal health researchers ban certain chemicals
cnn.com - 7-9-11
A new bill could alter the landscape of chemical regulation in the United States by empowering researchers to take swift action against the most potentially harmful chemicals in use today.
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Too little salt intake during pregnancy inhibits proper kidney development in offspring, study finds
naturalnews.com - 7-9-11
It has become common knowledge that consuming too much sodium is unhealthy and leads to high blood pressure. But a new study published in the American Journal of Physiology -- Renal Physiology has found that consuming too little sodium is also damaging. According to researchers from both the University of Heidelberg in Germany and the University of Aarhus in Denmark, children born to women who consume too much or too little sodium during pregnancy can end up with poorly-developed kidneys, which in turn can cause a lifetime of heart problems.
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Losing Weight, Keeping It Off Can Be Two Different Worlds
healthday.com - 7-9-11
Many dieters feel jubilant when they reach their weight goal, only to find that the pounds somehow return after that.
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Heart Disease and Stroke Worldwide Tied to National Income
sciencedaily.com - 7-9-11
An analysis of heart disease and stroke statistics collected in 192 countries by the World Health Organization (WHO) shows that the relative burden of the two diseases varies widely from country to country and is closely linked to national income, according to researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.
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Brain Co-Opts the Body to Promote Moral Behavior, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-9-11
The human brain may simulate physical sensations to prompt introspection, capitalizing on moments of high emotion to promote moral behavior, according to a USC researcher.
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Discovery of Natural Antibody Brings a Universal Flu Vaccine a Step Closer
sciencedaily.com - 7-9-11
Annually changing flu vaccines with their hit-and-miss effectiveness may soon give way to a single, near-universal flu vaccine, according to a new report from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the Dutch biopharmaceutical company Crucell. They describe an antibody that, in animal tests, can prevent or cure infections with a broad variety of influenza viruses, including seasonal and potentially pandemic strains.
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A Change of Heart: Researchers Reprogram Brain Cells to Become Heart Cells
sciencedaily.com - 7-9-11
For the past decade, researchers have tried to reprogram the identity of all kinds of cell types. Heart cells are one of the most sought-after cells in regenerative medicine because researchers anticipate that they may help to repair injured hearts by replacing lost tissue. Now, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania are the first to demonstrate the direct conversion of a non-heart cell type into a heart cell by RNA transfer.
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Brain Stimulation Preserves a Memory When Other Memories Interfere
sciencedaily.com - 7-9-11
As any student who's had to study for multiple exams can tell you, trying to learn two different sets of facts one after another is challenging. As you study for the physics exam, almost inevitably some of the information for the history exam is forgotten. It's been widely believed that this interference between memories develops because the brain simply doesn't have the capacity necessary to process both memories in quick succession. But is this truly the case?
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Vitamin E may reduce stroke damage
upi.com - 7-8-11
A study in dogs found 10 weeks of preventive supplementation with a natural form of vitamin E helped prevent brain damage after a stroke, U.S. researchers say.
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Two ways to deal with negative emotions
upi.com - 7-8-11
Confronted with high-intensity negative emotions, some choose to be distracted, but with lower-intensity emotions, they think it over, U.S. researchers say.
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How to avoid bed bugs while traveling
upi.com - 7-8-11
Although bedbugs pose no real threat to human health, many U.S. tourists and vacationers prefer never meeting any, cleaning experts say.
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Unhealthy lifestyle may kill sex
upi.com - 7-8-11
Overweight, physical inactivity, high alcohol consumption, smoking and hard drugs are linked to sexual dysfunction in men, Danish researchers say.
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Older moms told to avoid estrogen pill in weeks after baby arrives
msnbc.msn.com - 7-8-11
New government guidelines suggest that women who have recently given birth and are older than 34 or who had a C-section steer clear of certain types of oral contraceptives.
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Warning over legal Russian drug phenazepam
bbc.co.uk - 7-8-11
Russian epilepsy medication is being increasingly used in the UK as a substitute for illegal drugs, scientists have warned.
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Surgeons carry out first synthetic windpipe transplant
bbc.co.uk - 7-8-11
Surgeons in Sweden have carried out the world's first synthetic organ transplant.
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Is your medication causing you to suffer from malnutrition?
naturalnews.com - 7-8-11
Most people trust that the medicines that they take will help them overcome illness, enhance their health and promote well-being. Unfortunately medications often deplete important nutrients from the body, and people don't find the relief that they seek.
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U.S. Obesity Epidemic Continues to Spread
healthday.com - 7-8-11
A new report outlining how obesity threatens America's future reveals that obesity rates climbed over the past year in 16 states, and not a single state reported a decline in the proportion of excessively overweight residents.
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Gonorrhea's Growing Resistance to Antibiotics Concerns CDC
healthday.com - 7-8-11
Gonorrhea appears to be growing increasingly resistant to drugs called cephalosporins, the only remaining class of antibiotics available to treat the sexually transmitted disease, according to a new report.
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Men Seem More Likely Than Women to Develop Hole in Knee Cartilage
healthday.com - 7-8-11
Men who undergo surgery for a torn or overstretched anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) appear to face a higher risk than women for developing a hole in their knee cartilage, new Norwegian research indicates.
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Cellular Origin of Deadly Brain Cancer Identified
sciencedaily.com - 7-8-11
Using a mouse genetic system co-developed by researchers at the University of Oregon and Stanford University, a research team led by UO biologist Hui Zong has isolated the cellular origin for malignant glioma, a deadly human brain cancer.
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Discovery of Why Sunburn Hurts Could Lead to New Pain Relief for Inflammatory Conditions
sciencedaily.com - 7-8-11
Researchers at King's College London have found a molecule in the body which controls sensitivity to pain from UVB irradiation, identifying it as a new target for medicines to treat pain caused by other common inflammatory conditions such as arthritis
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Unexpected Cell Repairs the Injured Spinal Cord
sciencedaily.com - 7-8-11
A study from Karolinska Institutet has revealed how scar tissue is formed after damage to the central nervous system. For more than a century, scientists thought that glial cells were responsible for scar formation; now, however, a paper published in Science shows that spinal cord scar tissue largely derives from a completely unexpected type of cell called a pericyte, opening new opportunities for the treatment of damaged nerve tissue.
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Mississippi most obese state, Colorado least
reuters.com - 7-8-11
The number of obese U.S. adults rose in 16 states in the last year, helping to push obesity rates in a dozen states above 30 percent, according to a report released on Thursday.
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Concerns over use of legal drug
telegraph.co.uk - 7-7-11
The drug, called Phenazepam, was developed in eastern Europe in the 1970s to treat epilepsy, alcohol withdrawal syndrome, insomnia and anxiety.
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Eggs may reduce heart and cancer risk
upi.com - 7-7-11
Eggs -- said to be one of nature's perfect foods -- may be better than previously thought, with as many antioxidants as apples, researchers in Canada found.
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Overuse of elective angioplasty found
upi.com - 7-7-11
Of the approximately 600,000 angioplasties performed yearly in the United States, about 12 percent are inappropriate, researchers say.
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Kids ingesting embalming fluid in unlikely wave of '90s nostalgia
msnbc.msn.com - 7-7-11
Today in misguided things young people do: Emergency physicians at Corpus Christi, Texas, hospital say they've seen a marked increase in patients -- including three teenagers this holiday weekend -- who've overdosed on embalming fluid, in what may be an unlikely casualty of the recent wave of 1990s nostalgia.
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Study helps explain why 'they' all look alike
msnbc.msn.com - 7-7-11
You might feel pretty uncomfortable admitting it, but "they" -- as in, people of another race -- really might all look alike to you.
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U.S. kids' health: Teen births down, early drug use up
cnn.com - 7-7-11
New statistics from the annual report on America’s children and their well-being point to some good news and bad news when it comes to the health of our kids.
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Non-invasive embryo gene screen
bbc.co.uk - 7-7-11
Fertility doctors say they have found a non-invasive way to screen IVF embryos for genetic abnormalities.
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New diabetes drug linked to infections and cancer
naturalnews.com - 7-7-11
Tests on a new diabetes drug being developed by drug giants Bristol-Myers Squibb and AstraZeneca have revealed that the new class of drug may be linked to causing urinary tract and genital infections, and several forms of cancer. Add to that dapagliflozin's many other known side effects, and the experimental drug fares even worse than metformin, the more-common drug for treating type 2 diabetes.
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FDA unleashes end game scheme to outlaw virtually all dietary supplements formulated after 1994
naturalnews.com - 7-7-11
In the wake of hundreds of dietary supplements recently being outlawed across the EU, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has quietly unleashed a regulatory scheme that, if fully implemented, could ban virtually all dietary supplements in the USA that were formulated after 1994.
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A Deadly New Reason to Avoid Deer Ticks
healthday.com - 7-7-11
Move over, Lyme disease: Another tick-borne illness is on the rise in various parts of the country, and this one can kill.
Known as babesiosis, the disease is caused by a microscopic parasite that attacks blood cells, causing flu-like symptoms that can make it difficult to accurately diagnose. Like Lyme disease, which is caused by bacteria, babesia microti parasites are carried by deer ticks.
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Surprising Culprits Behind Cell Death from Fat and Sugar Overload
sciencedaily.com - 7-7-11
Excess nutrients, such as fat and sugar, don't just pack on the pounds but can push some cells in the body over the brink. Unable to tolerate this "toxic" environment, these cells commit suicide.
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Mercury Vapor Released from Broken Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs Can Exceed Safe Exposure Levels for Humans, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-7-11
Once broken, a compact fluorescent light bulb continuously releases mercury vapor into the air for weeks to months, and the total amount can exceed safe human exposure levels in a poorly ventilated room, according to study results reported in Environmental Engineering Science, a peer-reviewed online only journal published monthly by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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Those Aching Joints Could Be in Your Genes
sciencedaily.com - 7-7-11
A common complaint, back pain is one of the many side effects of aging. Over three quarters of the population experience it at some point, and until now, researchers have had little conclusive proof of the causes and mechanisms of the pain.
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Vitamin D Can Help Elderly Women Survive, Review Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-7-11
Giving vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) to predominantly elderly women, mainly in institutional care, seems to increase survival. These women are likely to be vitamin D deficient with a significant risk of falls and fractures. This is the key conclusion in a systematic review published in the latest edition of The Cochrane Library.
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Higher Daily Dose of Aspirin Could Play Key Role in Preventing Heart Attacks for Those With Diabetes
sciencedaily.com - 7-7-11
In some cases, an apple a day may keep the doctor away, but for people with diabetes, regular, over-the-counter Aspirin may also do the job.
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A Mother's Salt Intake Could Be Key to Prenatal Kidney Development
sciencedaily.com - 7-7-11
A new animal study from Europe has drawn an association between pregnant mothers' sodium intake and their newborn's kidney development. Among the most significant aspects of the study's findings is that either too much or too little salt during pregnancy had an adverse effect on the prenatal development of the offspring's kidneys. The consequence of such disruption can lead to high blood pressure in later years.
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Preventive Use of One Form of Natural Vitamin E May Reduce Stroke Damage
sciencedaily.com - 7-6-11
Ten weeks of preventive supplementation with a natural form of vitamin E called tocotrienol in dogs that later had strokes reduced overall brain tissue damage, prevented loss of neural connections and helped sustain blood flow in the animals' brains, a new study shows.
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A little bit of exercise makes a big difference
usatoday.com - 7-6-11
Lazy Americans, you are not off the hook, but health experts are cutting you some slack.
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Why 'you can't eat just one' potato chip
upi.com - 7-6-11
The body's natural marijuana-like chemicals may be the reason why people find it hard to eat only one potato chip or one french fry, U.S. researchers say.
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Vitamin D lack linked to Mozart's death
upi.com - 7-6-11
Classical composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart may have died from a lack of vitamin D, U.S. and Austrian researchers suggest.
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What's really in that hot dog?
msnbc.msn.com - 7-6-11
Each year between Memorial Day and Labor Day, Americans consume 7 billion hot dogs (that's 818 every second!), according to the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council.
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Healthy Lifestyle May Ward Off Sudden Cardiac Death in Women
healthday.com - 7-6-11
Healthy living significantly reduces a woman's risk of sudden cardiac death, a new study says.
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Study Finds Most Urgent Angioplasties Warranted
healthday.com - 7-6-11
New research shows that most urgent angioplasty procedures performed in the United States are warranted, but the same can't be said for those done on a non-emergency basis.
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Colon Cancer Death Rates Continue to Drop, CDC Reports
healthday.com - 7-6-11
The death rates from colon cancer continue to drop in the United States, but they could fall even further if more people were screened, government health officials reported Tuesday.
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Laser, Electric Fields Combined for New 'Lab-On-Chip' Technologies
sciencedaily.com - 7-6-11
Researchers are developing new technologies that combine a laser and electric fields to manipulate fluids and tiny particles such as bacteria, viruses and DNA for a range of potential applications, from drug manufacturing to food safety.
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Critic cuts through haze on Denver's medical marijuana beat
thedaily.com - 7-6-11
There are now more medical marijuana dispensaries in Denver than there are Starbucks. Glossy guidebooks list nearly 300 locations where Colorado's 125,000 residents who have been prescribed medical marijuana can get their "medicine." Many offer a free joint to new customers, allowing them to sample exotic strains like Jah Kush, Golden Goat and Romulan Cotton Candy.
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Dentists' Role in Painkiller Abuse
sciencedaily.com - 7-6-11
In the cover article of this month's Journal of the American Dental Association, a group of nine dentists, pharmacists, and addiction experts provides new research and recommendations to help dentists combat, rather than contribute to, abuse of addictive painkillers.
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Gold Nanoparticles Bring Scientists Closer to a Treatment for Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 7-6-11
Scientists at the University of Southampton have developed smart nanomaterials, which can disrupt the blood supply to cancerous tumours.
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New Technology Enables Quick and Scarless Surgery for Stomach Tumors
sciencedaily.com - 7-6-11
Patients with gastric tumours in their stomach will no longer have to suffer an eight-hour long surgery, but instead can look forward to a short day surgery which last a few minutes to an hour without the need for hospitalisation.
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Behavioral Treatment for Migraines a Cost-Effective Alternative to Meds, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-6-11
Treating chronic migraines with behavioral approaches -- such as relaxation training, hypnosis and biofeedback -- can make financial sense compared to prescription-drug treatment, especially after a year or more, a new study found.
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Answers for Treating Obesity-Related Diseases May Reside in Fat Tissue, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 7-6-11
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center (BMC) have shown that the quality -- not just the quantity -- of adipose, or fat, tissue is a significant contributing factor in the development of inflammation and vascular disease in obese individuals. The study, which is a special feature on the iPad version of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, provides compelling evidence that the answer to treating cardiovascular disease and other obesity-related disorders, such as type 2 diabetes and cancer, might be found in the adipose tissue itself.
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Statin prescriptions in 20-fold rise
telegraph.co.uk - 7-6-11
The cholesterol-lowering drugs have rapidly increased in popularity despite questions over their effectiveness as a preventive treatment for heart disease among low-risk patients and concerns they can cause other health problems.
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Third of women have taken anti-depressants
independent.co.uk - 7-6-11
A third of women have taken anti-depressants at some point in their lives, according to new research.
The study by women's campaign group Platform 51 found that 48% of women currently using the drugs have taken then for at least five years, while 24% have taken them for 10 years or more.
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SO MUCH FOR GLOBAL WARMING AS PLANET EARTH GETS COLDER
express.co.uk - 7-6-11
THE controversy over global warming hotted up last night after US scientists revealed that the Earth's temperature declined over the past -decade.
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Got Low Back Pain? Massage Therapy May Rub It Out
npr.org - 7-5-11
Low back pain is second only to cold symptoms when it comes to complaints that send people to the doctor. Sooner or later, back pain seems to get most of us.
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University Of Western Australia Study Shows Late Talkers Develop Normally
thirdage.com - 7-5-11
A University of Western Australia study, published in Pediatrics, shows that children who were late talkers showed no ill effects as they developed into their teens. Although previous studies had shown no developmental delays for late talkers, this was the first study to follow children through their teens and demonstrate that there was no lasting effect from being slow to talk.
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Are Antidepressants Linked to Autism?
abcnews.go.com - 7-5-11
Women with depression who are pregnant or hoping to get pregnant may be alarmed at new research that points to a link between the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a type of antidepressant, and the occurrence of autism in unborn kids.
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Ibuprofen and aspirin linked to irregular heart rhythm
telegraph.co.uk - 7-5-11
The anti-inflammatories, which are widely available in supermarkets and pharmacies, have been previously linked to a higher chance of heart attacks and strokes.
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Insurance no guard against medical debt
upi.com - 7-5-11
Having health insurance coverage is no guarantee against accumulating medical debt among working-age adults, U.S. researchers say.
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Avoiding cardiac arrest while exercising
upi.com - 7-5-11
Summer is the perfect time to exercise outdoors, but it can also lead to dehydration, sweating, exhaustion and even a cardiac event, a U.S. doctor says.
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Who wants to live forever? Scientist sees aging cured
msnbc.msn.com - 7-5-11
If Aubrey de Grey's predictions are right, the first person who will live to see their 150th birthday has already been born. And the first person to live for 1,000 years could be less than 20 years younger.
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'Quit smoking' drug linked to heart risk
bbc.co.uk - 7-5-11
A drug used by smokers to help them quit increases the risk of heart attacks and other serious cardiovascular problems, research says.
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Fresh meat versus processed meat: Here's why it matters
naturalnews.com - 7-5-11
Every July 4th, Americans gobble down enormous quantities of meat. Some of it actually from animals. The rest comes from factories that assemble bits and pieces of meat scraps, using chemical additives to make the final substance resemble something edible. That's where hot dogs come from... and sausage, pepperoni and deli meats.
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Forest density study blows hole in excess CO2 myth and the supposed need for carbon taxes
naturalnews.com - 7-5-11
We have all heard it before. Humans are supposedly producing too much carbon dioxide (CO2), which is contributing to "global warming" -- and the only solution, of course, is to have the United Nations (UN) distribute carbon use credits and implement carbon taxes to offset an impending global disaster. However, a new study published in the online journal PLoS One helps debunk this myth by showing that the natural world is basically taking care of this excess CO2 naturally, without the need for increased government control over individuals.
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Environment May Be Especially Key to Autism: Study
healthday.com - 7-5-11
Contrary to current thinking, environmental factors may play a larger role than shared genes in the development of autism, a new study in twins suggests.
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Could Finger Length Predict Penis Length?
healthday.com - 7-5-11
A look at the relative length of a man's index and ring fingers might be a good predictor of the length of his penis, according to South Korean researchers.
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Genetic Variant Linked to Development of Liver Cancer in Hepatitis C Virus Carriers
sciencedaily.com - 7-5-11
A genome-wide study by researchers at the RIKEN Center for Genomic Medicine, Hiroshima University Hospital and Sapporo-Kosei General Hospital has identified a genetic variant associated with the development of liver cancer in chronic hepatitis C virus carriers. The findings are based on a study of 3,312 Japanese individuals and appear in the journal Nature Genetics.
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How first 24 hours shaped Japan's nuclear crisis
news.yahoo.com - 7-4-11
When Unit 2 began to shake, Hiroyuki Kohno's first hunch was that something was wrong with the turbines. He paused for a moment, then went back to logging the day's radioactivity readings.
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Study hints at why heart disease is more deadly for blacks
usatoday.com - 7-4-11
A new study hints at one reason that black Americans are at a higher risk of death from heart disease than whites: Blacks appear to have higher levels of a certain type of plaque that builds up in arteries and is not detected in standard screening.
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One impaired-driving fatality every 48 min
upi.com - 7-4-11
Almost 11,000 people died in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes in 2009 -- nearly 32 percent of all U.S. traffic-related fatalities, officials say.
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Historical fact: Independence Day is a celebration of freedom from government tyranny
naturalnews.com - 7-4-11
Happy July 4th, my fellow Americans. It's the Independence Day weekend! Independence from what, you might ask? As even the somewhat revisionist history taught in public schools readily admits, July 4th is a celebration of independence from government tyranny under British rule.
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Listening to radio healthier than watching TV
naturalnews.com - 7-4-11
Sitting in front of the television for hours on end is not healthy. Listening to the radio is a better alternative.
According to new British research, time spent listening to the radio makes people happier and gives them higher energy levels overall compared to television viewing and surfing the Internet.
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Got arthritis pain? Try frankincense
naturalnews.com - 7-4-11
Reducing or even eliminating the inflammation associated with chronic arthritis does not require the use of side effect-ridden pharmaceutical drugs. A new study conducted by researchers from Cardiff University in the UK suggests that frankincense, a resin derived from Boswellia trees, may just do the trick naturally.
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Red Wine: Exercise in a Bottle?
sciencedaily.com - 7-4-11
As strange as it sounds, a new research study published in the FASEB Journal, suggests that the "healthy" ingredient in red wine, resveratrol, may prevent the negative effects that spaceflight and sedentary lifestyles have on people. The report describes experiments in rats that simulated the weightlessness of spaceflight, during which the group fed resveratrol did not develop insulin resistance or a loss of bone mineral density, as did those who were not fed resveratrol.
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Droplets for Detecting Tumoral DNA
sciencedaily.com - 7-4-11
New research suggests it may be possible, in the near future, to detect cancer by a simple blood or urine test.
More...


Meltdown: What Really Happened at Fukushima?
theatlanticwire.com - 7-4-11
It’s been one of the mysteries of Japan’s ongoing nuclear disaster: How much of the damage did the March 11 earthquake inflict on Fukushima Daiichi’s reactors in the 40 minutes before the devastating tsunami arrived? The stakes are high: If the quake alone structurally compromised the plant and the safety of its nuclear fuel, then every other similar reactor in Japan is at risk.
More...


Mosquitoes With West Nile Virus Appearing In Various Parts Of The USA
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-4-11
"The detection of infected mosquitoes in June suggests early amplification of virus activity. With warming temperatures, the isolation of West Nile virus in mosquitoes can be expected to increase and expand to other areas of the state throughout the summer."
More...


Half a million children facing liver disease timebomb
independent.co.uk - 7-4-11
Half a million children are under threat from a liver disease "timebomb" fuelled by obesity and under-age drinking, a government expert warned last night.
More...


Feds won't give assurance on medical pot
usatoday.com - 7-3-11
The U.S. Justice Department says that marijuana dispensaries and licensed growers in states with medical marijuana laws could face prosecution for violating federal drug and money-laundering laws.
More...


Beetroot juice could keep athletes at the top of their game by boosting stamina
dailymail.co.uk - 7-3-11
Beetroot juice could help athletes beat the best.
The brightly-coloured juice gives cyclists such a boost that they can shave vital seconds off their time, Exeter University research shows.
More...


Doctors sanctioned for drug industry ties
upi.com - 7-3-11
A child psychiatrist and two colleagues were sanctioned for allegedly taking money from drug companies and not reporting it, officials in Massachusetts said.
More...


Men have advantage pinpointing sound
upi.com - 7-3-11
Men may have an advantage over women in sound localization -- pinpointing where a sound originates in a noisy environment, researchers in Germany say.
More...


Many things on TV scary to small children
upi.com - 7-3-11
Many images on television -- not just the ones adults typically think of as frightening -- can be disturbing to young children, U.S. researchers say.
More...


Urgent: Johnson & Johnson recall of more than 60,000 bottles of contaminated Tylenol
naturalnews.com - 7-3-11
It appears as though Johnson & Johnson (J&J) may soon have nothing left to recall, as the company announced this week yet another recall in a long line of recalls in the past several years.
More...


Weather experts: California mega-quake could be at the door
naturalnews.com - 7-3-11
A new study conducted by researchers from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography in La Jolla, Calif., suggests that the ill-famed California mega-earthquake could happen literally any day now. Overdue for experiencing the "big one" by as much as 100 years, the San Andreas fault line, which stretches about 810 miles along the California coastline and branches inland to the south where it ends at the Salton Sea, could very soon experience a devastating 7.5 magnitude or greater quake.
More...


Living in the country really is healthier than city life
naturalnews.com - 7-3-11
A sound diet, exercise, plenty of sleep - and escaping the concrete jungle of city life. All of these things contribute to a longer, healthier and less stressful life, according to new research.
More...


How to Stay Hydrated in Hot Weather
healthday.com - 7-3-11
Staying hydrated is critical if you're physically active in hot weather.
More...


In Pilot Study, Screening Detects Potentially Serious Heart Conditions in Healthy Children
sciencedaily.com - 7-3-11
A pilot study in healthy children and adolescents shows that it is feasible to screen for undiagnosed heart conditions that increase the risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Adding a 10-minute electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG) to a history and physical examination identified unsuspected cases of potentially serious heart conditions.
More...


Loudest Animal Is Recorded for the First Time
sciencedaily.com - 7-2-11
Scientists have shown for the first time that the loudest animal on earth, relative to its body size, is the tiny water boatman, Micronecta scholtzi. At 99.2 decibels, this represents the equivalent of listening to an orchestra play loudly while sitting in the front row.
More...


Nearsightedness linked to serious eye disease
reuters.com - 7-2-11
People who are nearsighted may be nearly twice as likely to also develop glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness, according to a study.
More...


14-Year-Old Girl May Need Cornea Transplant After Wearing $20 Colored Contact Lenses
abcnews.go.com - 7-2-11
A 14-year-old girl from Queens, N.Y., may need a cornea transplant after wearing colored contact lenses she bought at a beauty store for $20.
More...


Specialized Summer Camp Teaches Social Skills, Sportsmanship
abcnews.go.com - 7-2-11
Reed Tucker is a bright 8-year-old who lights up a room and delights others with his wicked sense of humor. But when he entered the second grade last fall, the impulsivity and defiance from his ADHD escalated. Medications helped somewhat, but his mother credits his ability to complete tasks to a special summer day camp north of Chicago where arts and crafts, sports and field trips provide as much therapy as recreation.
More...


Scientists 'mend broken hearts'
telegraph.co.uk - 7-2-11
Injecting proteins similar to insulin directly into the heart can cause damaged cells to repair themselves and begin regenerating again, researchers said.
More...


Black kids hospitalized more for asthma
upi.com - 7-2-11
African-American children are four times as likely as white children to be hospitalized for a severe asthma attack, U.S. health officials say.
More...


FDA now admits breast implants only last 10 years and have to be removed in all women
naturalnews.com - 7-2-11
Reversing earlier statements that breast implants are completely safe and never have to be replaced, the Food and Drug Administration now says many women who have implants must have them removed or replaced within a decade.
More...


Fireworks and Fido Don't Always Mix
healthday.com - 7-2-11
Most people look forward to watching fireworks illuminate the night sky on the Fourth of July.
But for many family pets, the celebratory pops, booms and bangs trigger a full-blown panic attack. Some dogs are so terrified, they dig out of backyards, jump through glass windows, or scale walls to escape from the sound. Others pant, pace, tremble, whine and hide under beds or behind furniture.
More...


Post-Op Nausea May Be Hereditary
healthday.com - 7-2-11
Nausea and vomiting after waking from general anesthesia may be hereditary, a new study says.
More...


Understanding Numbers Isn't as Simple as 1, 2, 3
healthday.com - 7-2-11
Preschool children need to be able to go beyond the number 3 to grasp the true concept of counting, according to researchers.
More...


E. Coli Can Survive in Streambed Sediments for Months
sciencedaily.com - 7-2-11
Studies by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have confirmed that the presence of Escherichia coli pathogens in surface waters could result from the pathogen's ability to survive for months in underwater sediments. Most E. coli strains don't cause illness, but they are indicator organisms used by water quality managers to estimate fecal contamination.
More...


Foods With Baked Milk May Help Build Tolerance in Children With Dairy Allergies, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-2-11
Introducing increasing amounts of foods that contain baked milk into the diets of children who have milk allergies helped a majority of them outgrow their allergies, according to a study conducted at Mount Sinai School of Medicine's Jaffe Food Allergy Institute.
More...


Intravenous Nutrition for Critically Ill Patients Must Not Be Administered Too Early, Belgian Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-2-11
Intravenous nutrition does not have a positive effect on the recovery of critically ill patients if it is administered early, according to new research from Belgium. Recovery from critical illness is in fact faster when patients receive supplementary intravenous nutrition one week after their admission to intensive care.
More...


Older Workers Could Face Cost Disparities in Health Law Glitch
foxnews.com - 7-1-11
Older adults of the same age and income with similar medical histories would pay sharply different amounts for private health insurance due to what appears to be an unintended consequence of the new health care law.
More...


Revealed: British government's plan to play down Fukushima
guardian.co.uk - 7-1-11
British government officials approached nuclear companies to draw up a co-ordinated public relations strategy to play down the Fukushima nuclear accident just two days after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan and before the extent of the radiation leak was known.
More...


Drunk Underage Boys Visit ER Twice as Much During July 4th Weekend
abcnews.go.com - 7-1-11
The Fourth of July is one of the worst days of the year for teenage boys to drink -- and get hurt.
A new study from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, or SAMHSA, found that underage males visit the emergency room twice as much during Fourth of July weekend than the rest of the month.
More...


Vitamin D, calcium combo may halve melanoma risk some women
usatoday.com - 7-1-11
Certain women at risk for developing melanoma, the most severe form of skin cancer, may cut the likelihood in half by taking vitamin D/calcium supplements, a new study suggests.
More...


Kids still need 9 hours of sleep in summer
upi.com - 7-1-11
No matter the season, school-age kids and teens need an average of 9 hours sleep per night, but summer can wreak havoc on sleep patterns, U.S. researchers say.
More...


Problem gambling linked to impulsivity
upi.com - 7-1-11
University of Cambridge researchers report they found a link between impulsivity and belief in superstitious rituals and luck among in problem gamblers.
More...


1 in 3 high schoolers who use drugs, alcohol, cigarettes are addicted
msnbc.msn.com - 7-1-11
Nearly half of all U.S. high school students currently smoke, drink or use other drugs, and a third of users meets the medical criteria for addiction, according to a report out Wednesday.
More...


How does a baby get to be obese?
cnn.com - 7-1-11
A 4-year-old lumbered into a Boston pediatric clinic. He walked with a limp.
"He was carrying so much weight, he displaced his hips," recalled Dr. Elsie Taveras, co-director of the Obesity Prevention Program at Harvard Medical School.
More...


Babies can 'hear' emotion as early as three months old
bbc.co.uk - 7-1-11
Babies can respond to emotions in a human voice at just three months old - earlier than previously thought - researchers believe.
More...


E. coli outbreaks linked to Egypt
bbc.co.uk - 7-1-11
E. coli outbreaks in Germany and France could have come from seeds sourced in Egypt, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control has said.
More...


Eating blueberries helps build strong bones, suggests study
Hexane may be lurking in the soy protein found in popular food bars
naturalnews.com - 7-1-11
Move over calcium, there is a new bone builder in town. Research published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research back in 2010 showed that blueberry compounds helped improve bone development in lab rats, and new research conducted by the same team of scientists is now investigating how the fruit works in humans to boost bone development.
More...


Hexane may be lurking in the soy protein found in popular food bars
naturalnews.com - 7-1-11
Protein bars, breakfast bars, really anything in bar form just makes sense in our dine while dashing society. The question is, what is it you're really eating? Most of these bars claim to offer healthy, wholesome energy, but what you may not have realized is that the process to create "soy protein isolate," which is often a primary ingredient in protein bars, utilizes a toxic solvent called Hexane.
More...


Medicare Will Pay for Pricey Prostate Cancer Drug
healthday.com - 7-1-11
The cost of Provenge, an expensive and newly approved therapeutic prostate cancer vaccine, will be covered by Medicare for men with metastatic prostate cancer, the agency announced late Thursday.
More...


Fetal Exposure to Common Epilepsy Drugs May Harm Kids' IQ: FDA
healthday.com - 7-1-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday advised doctors to warn women of childbearing age that fetal exposure to certain drugs used to control seizures or migraines appears to diminish intellectual abilities in offspring.
More...


Nanoparticles Disguised as Red Blood Cells to Deliver Cancer-Fighting Drugs
sciencedaily.com - 7-1-11
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a novel method of disguising nanoparticles as red blood cells, which will enable them to evade the body's immune system and deliver cancer-fighting drugs straight to a tumor. Their research will be published next week in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
More...


Preventing Diabetes Damage: Zinc's Effects On a Kinky, Two-Faced Cohort
sciencedaily.com - 7-1-11
In type 2 diabetes, a protein called amylin forms dense clumps that shut down insulin-producing cells, wreaking havoc on the control of blood sugar. But zinc has a knack for preventing amylin from misbehaving.
More...


Electromagnetic Fields Can Disturb Learning, Study Suggests, but Only at Very High Levels
sciencedaily.com - 7-1-11
The effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones on humans have been hotly debated for years. In a new study, neuroscientists from Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum (RUB) in Germany have shed light on this question. For the first time, they provide evidence that extremely high-powered electromagnetic fields can influence learning processes on the synaptic level within the brain, independent from other factors such as stress. However, such high levels are not encountered during typical use of mobile phones, the researchers note.
More...


Older Workers Could Face Cost Disparities in Health Law Glitch
foxnews.com - 7-1-11
Older adults of the same age and income with similar medical histories would pay sharply different amounts for private health insurance due to what appears to be an unintended consequence of the new health care law.
More...


Revealed: British government's plan to play down Fukushima
guardian.co.uk - 7-1-11
British government officials approached nuclear companies to draw up a co-ordinated public relations strategy to play down the Fukushima nuclear accident just two days after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan and before the extent of the radiation leak was known.
More...


Drunk Underage Boys Visit ER Twice as Much During July 4th Weekend
abcnews.go.com - 7-1-11
The Fourth of July is one of the worst days of the year for teenage boys to drink -- and get hurt.
A new study from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, or SAMHSA, found that underage males visit the emergency room twice as much during Fourth of July weekend than the rest of the month.
More...


Vitamin D, calcium combo may halve melanoma risk some women
usatoday.com - 7-1-11
Certain women at risk for developing melanoma, the most severe form of skin cancer, may cut the likelihood in half by taking vitamin D/calcium supplements, a new study suggests.
More...


Kids still need 9 hours of sleep in summer
upi.com - 7-1-11
No matter the season, school-age kids and teens need an average of 9 hours sleep per night, but summer can wreak havoc on sleep patterns, U.S. researchers say.
More...


Problem gambling linked to impulsivity
upi.com - 7-1-11
University of Cambridge researchers report they found a link between impulsivity and belief in superstitious rituals and luck among in problem gamblers.
More...


1 in 3 high schoolers who use drugs, alcohol, cigarettes are addicted
msnbc.msn.com - 7-1-11
Nearly half of all U.S. high school students currently smoke, drink or use other drugs, and a third of users meets the medical criteria for addiction, according to a report out Wednesday.
More...


How does a baby get to be obese?
cnn.com - 7-1-11
A 4-year-old lumbered into a Boston pediatric clinic. He walked with a limp.
"He was carrying so much weight, he displaced his hips," recalled Dr. Elsie Taveras, co-director of the Obesity Prevention Program at Harvard Medical School.
More...


Babies can 'hear' emotion as early as three months old
bbc.co.uk - 7-1-11
Babies can respond to emotions in a human voice at just three months old - earlier than previously thought - researchers believe.
More...


E. coli outbreaks linked to Egypt
bbc.co.uk - 7-1-11
E. coli outbreaks in Germany and France could have come from seeds sourced in Egypt, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control has said.
More...


Eating blueberries helps build strong bones, suggests study
Hexane may be lurking in the soy protein found in popular food bars
naturalnews.com - 7-1-11
Move over calcium, there is a new bone builder in town. Research published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research back in 2010 showed that blueberry compounds helped improve bone development in lab rats, and new research conducted by the same team of scientists is now investigating how the fruit works in humans to boost bone development.
More...


Hexane may be lurking in the soy protein found in popular food bars
naturalnews.com - 7-1-11
Protein bars, breakfast bars, really anything in bar form just makes sense in our dine while dashing society. The question is, what is it you're really eating? Most of these bars claim to offer healthy, wholesome energy, but what you may not have realized is that the process to create "soy protein isolate," which is often a primary ingredient in protein bars, utilizes a toxic solvent called Hexane.
More...


Medicare Will Pay for Pricey Prostate Cancer Drug
healthday.com - 7-1-11
The cost of Provenge, an expensive and newly approved therapeutic prostate cancer vaccine, will be covered by Medicare for men with metastatic prostate cancer, the agency announced late Thursday.
More...


Fetal Exposure to Common Epilepsy Drugs May Harm Kids' IQ: FDA
healthday.com - 7-1-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday advised doctors to warn women of childbearing age that fetal exposure to certain drugs used to control seizures or migraines appears to diminish intellectual abilities in offspring.
More...


Nanoparticles Disguised as Red Blood Cells to Deliver Cancer-Fighting Drugs
sciencedaily.com - 7-1-11
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a novel method of disguising nanoparticles as red blood cells, which will enable them to evade the body's immune system and deliver cancer-fighting drugs straight to a tumor. Their research will be published next week in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
More...


Preventing Diabetes Damage: Zinc's Effects On a Kinky, Two-Faced Cohort
sciencedaily.com - 7-1-11
In type 2 diabetes, a protein called amylin forms dense clumps that shut down insulin-producing cells, wreaking havoc on the control of blood sugar. But zinc has a knack for preventing amylin from misbehaving.
More...


Electromagnetic Fields Can Disturb Learning, Study Suggests, but Only at Very High Levels
sciencedaily.com - 7-1-11
The effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones on humans have been hotly debated for years. In a new study, neuroscientists from Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum (RUB) in Germany have shed light on this question. For the first time, they provide evidence that extremely high-powered electromagnetic fields can influence learning processes on the synaptic level within the brain, independent from other factors such as stress. However, such high levels are not encountered during typical use of mobile phones, the researchers note.
More...


 



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