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July, 2012 - Herbal and Health News

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“Veggie” diet blamed for poor performance of China’s women volleyball team
en.mercopress.com - 7-29-12
Fearing tainted meat, China's women's volleyball team has stuck to a strict vegetarian diet for the last three weeks, which the team's coach is now blaming for his athletes' abysmal performance.
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Common Household Chemical May Increase Kids' Risk of Eczema
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 7-29-12
Exposure to a household chemical in the womb may increase children's risk of eczema, a new study suggests.
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The Truth About Guar Gum
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 7-29-12
How can the process of extracting natural gas bring wealth to once-destitute bean farmers in India, and at the same time, drive up the price of ice cream?
Two words: guar gum.
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How Stress Makes Us Lose Sight of Our Goals
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 7-29-12
People who are stressed out are more likely to lapse back into easy habits rather than to work toward their goals, and now researchers say they may know why.
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Pregnant may get whooping cough jab to protect babies as number of cases rockets
dailymail.co.uk - 7-29-12
Pregnant women and teenagers could be vaccinated against whooping cough amid the worst outbreak in more than a decade. It has claimed the lives of five babies – the age group most vulnerable to the illness.
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Decoding The Secrets Of Balance
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-29-12
A new study, conducted by Corentin Massot, a Postdoctoral in the Department of Physiology, and Adam Schneider a Ph.D. student in the Department of Physics, has developed a new understanding of how the brain processes information from the inner ear that offers hope for those suffering from vertigo. People who suffer from symptoms of vestibular dysfunction, such as vertigo and dizziness, encounter many challenges. If you have ever gazed over the edge of a cliff and felt dizzy, you understand their difficulties.
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Wakeful Resting Fights Memory Loss
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-29-12
Most of us are familiar with the expression 'My memory is like a sieve', meaning that important information that should be captured and remembered just simply disappears somehow. Millions of adults, especially older people, religiously do crossword puzzles, acrostics and Sudoko every day in an effort to enhance their failing grey cells.
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Excess Iodine Supplementation During Pregnancy Associated With Congenital Hypothyroidism
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-29-12
Congenital hypothyroidism is thyroid hormone deficiency at birth that, if left untreated, can lead to neurocognitive impairments in infants and children. Although the World Health Organization recommends 200-300 µg of iodine daily during pregnancy for normal fetal thyroid hormone production and neurocognitive development, the US Institute of Medicine considers 1,100 µg to be the safe upper limit for daily ingestion. A case series scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics describes three infants who developed congenital hypothyroidism as a result of excess maternal iodine supplementation.
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Why polio hasn't gone away yet
cnn.com - 7-29-12
Two little girls in matching gingham jumpers -- Pam is crouching and pulling on her sister Patricia's leg brace -- appeared in a poster for the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis in the early 1950s. They'd both recovered from polio.
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Ebola outbreak in Uganda kills 13: official
reuters.com - 7-29-12
An outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus has killed 13 people in Uganda and efforts are under way to contain the hemorrhagic fever, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Saturday.
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Sex content in movies linked to teen sex
upi.com - 7-29-12
Young people who watch more sexual content in movies tend to engage more than others in sexual behavior, U.S. researchers found.
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Drowning toll in U.S.: 2 children per day
upi.com - 7-29-12
Sun and swimming make summer fun, but they are also the cause of countless childhood emergency room visits, a Pennsylvania physician says.
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Even Usain Bolt Can't Beat Greyhounds, Cheetahs...or Pronghorn Antelope
sciencedaily.com - 7-29-12
Even Usain Bolt, currently the fastest man in the world, couldn't outpace greyhounds, cheetahs, or the pronghorn antelope, finds a light-hearted comparison of the extraordinary athleticism of humans and animals in the Veterinary Record.
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Night artificial light, depression linked
upi.com - 7-28-12
Chronic exposure to artificial light at night may play some role in the rising rates of depression in humans during the past 50 years, U.S. researchers say.
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Your stressful job is indeed aging you, study confirms
msnbc.msn.com - 7-28-12
Everybody knows too much stress and anxiety is bad for you. It dents the immune system, the cardiovascular system and may even contribute to cancer. Now it appears that one common source of stress -- our jobs -- could be having damaging effects on critical DNA in our cells. And that could lead to early aging, and the diseases and conditions that go along with it.
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Severe Flu Increases Risk Of Parkinson's
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-28-12
Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement and difficulty with walking and gait and later on, often by cognitive and behavioral problems.
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Sexual Dissatisfaction Is Common Among Female Diabetes Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-28-12
A study by UCSF researchers and published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology reveals that the level of sexual desire and sexual activity is similar in diabetic women and non-diabetic women, even though women suffering from diabetes are more likely to report low overall sexual satisfying action.
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Scientists Use Waste-Water Analysis To Determine Drug Use In 19 European Cities
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-28-12
By analyzing the waste using urinary biomarkers, researchers can reliably detect actual drug consumption in cities. A large group of scientists has for the first time conducted a comparative study of illegal drug consumption in 19 European cities based on wastewater analysis. The findings are published in the specialist journal Science of the Total Environment.
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Yoga Can Help Stroke Survivors Regain Their Balance
time.com - 7-28-12
You don’t have to be a devoted yogi to reap the benefits of the cobra pose. A new study in chronic stroke survivors shows that practicing yoga can improve balance in patients, giving them more confidence to handle day-to-day activities and potentially reducing disability.
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Driving sobriety tests likely to miss medical pot
reuters.com - 7-28-12
A new, small study suggests medicinal marijuana may impair users' driving skills - but might be missed by typical sobriety tests.
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Firm sued for alleged unnatural ingredients
upi.com - 7-28-12
A lawsuit filed in California against Nature Valley alleges its granola bars advertised as "100 percent natural ingredients," contain artificial ingredients.
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Only 1 in 4 Americans With HIV Has Virus Under Control: CDC
healthday.com - 7-28-12
Among the 1.1 million Americans living with HIV, just one in four has the virus under control, U.S. health researchers say.
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Most Prostate Cancer Patients Don't Die From the Disease: Study
healthday.com - 7-28-12
Men with prostate cancer are more likely to die from other conditions, such as heart disease, than from their cancer, a new study finds.
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Olympic-Class Athletes Abound in Animal Kingdom
healthday.com - 7-28-12
When it comes to speed, strength and endurance, even Olympic athletes can't compete with the animals who are champions in their fields, a British researcher says.
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Childbirth After 30 Lowers Risk of Endometrial Cancer: Study
healthday.com - 7-28-12
Women who have their last child after age 30 have a reduced risk of endometrial cancer, according to a new study.
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Researchers Find Link Between Childhood Abuse and Age at Menarche
sciencedaily.com - 7-28-12
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found an association between childhood physical and sexual abuse and age at menarche. The findings are published online in the Journal of Adolescent Health.
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Fluoxetine -- A.k.a., Prozac -- Is Effective as an Anti-Viral, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-28-12
UCLA researchers have come across an unexpected potential use for fluoxetine -- commonly known as Prozac -- which shows promise as an antiviral agent. The discovery could provide another tool in treating human enteroviruses that sicken and kill people in the U.S. and around the world.
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Airports ranked in spreading disease
upi.com - 7-27-12
Researchers say of the 40 largest U.S. airports, a contagious disease would spread most quickly from New York's Kennedy International Airport.
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Illness, recession cause early retirement
upi.com - 7-27-12
Those hardest hit by recessions and those who are ill are more likely than others to enroll early for Social Security, U.S. researchers said.
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Women who give birth LATER have lower risk of womb cancer
dailymail.co.uk - 7-27-12
Mothers who have their children earlier are less likely to suffer from complications during the pregnancy. However, a new study has found giving birth later has its advantages.
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A couple were told by doctors they should say goodbye to their severely ill newly born baby but were astounded when a hug from his mother brought him out of a coma.
dailymail.co.uk - 7-27-12
A woman has hailed her pet dog as a 'guardian angel' after it sniffed out a cancerous lump growing in her breast. Sharon Rawlinson only went to see her doctor because her Cavalier King Charles spaniel, Penny, had been pestering her for months, sniffing and nuzzling the area where the aggressive tumour was growing.
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Cuddle from mother brings newborn out of coma
telegraph.co.uk - 7-27-12
A couple were told by doctors they should say goodbye to their severely ill newly born baby but were astounded when a hug from his mother brought him out of a coma.
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Two apples a day keeps the cardiologist away
telegraph.co.uk - 7-27-12
Scientists found apples significantly lowered blood fat levels in postmenopausal women, the group most at risk of heart attacks and strokes.
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High-carb diet tied to breast cancer risk
msnbc.msn.com - 7-27-12
Older women who eat a lot of starchy and sweet carbohydrates may be at increased risk of a less common but deadlier form of breast cancer, a new study suggests.
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Aging AIDS epidemic raises new questions
msnbc.msn.com - 7-27-12
AIDS is graying. By the end of the decade, the government estimates, more than half of Americans living with HIV will be over 50. Even in developing countries, more people with the AIDS virus are surviving to middle age and beyond.
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Malnutrition And Starvation Cause Inflamed Intestines
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-27-12
Starvation and malnutrition are still major problems and leading causes of mortality worldwide. Over a billion people are starving in poor countries and malnutrition affects rich countries, as well.
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Laser Maps And Zaps Cancer Tumors
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-27-12
Scientists in the US have developed a laser that can locate, map, and then precisely destroy cancer tumors non-invasively.
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Hunter gatherer clue to obesity
bbc.co.uk - 7-27-12
The idea that exercise is more important than diet in the fight against obesity has been contradicted by new research.
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Yoga Might Help With Stroke Reha
healthday.com - 7-27-12
The ancient practice of yoga might boost stroke survivors' balance and help them become more active, a small new study suggests.
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More Evidence That Shift Work Might Raise Heart Risks
healthday.com - 7-27-12
People working evening shifts, irregular shifts, night shifts and rotating shifts are at an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, a large, new review finds.
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HIV Undetectable in 2 Men After Bone Marrow Transplants: Study
healthday.com - 7-27-12
Following bone marrow transplants, two men infected with HIV no longer have any traces of the AIDS-causing virus in their lymphocytes, researchers report.
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What Biological Clock? Ovaries Continue to Produce Eggs During Adulthood?
sciencedaily.com - 7-27-12
A compelling new genetic study tracing the origins of immature egg cells, or 'oocytes', from the embryonic period throughout adulthood adds new information to a growing controversy. The notion of a "biological clock" in women arises from the fact that oocytes progressively decline in number as females get older, along with a decades-old dogmatic view that oocytes cannot be renewed in mammals after birth.
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Efficacy of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Depression Confirmed in New Study
sciencedaily.com - 7-27-12
In one of the first studies to look at transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in real-world clinical practice settings, researchers at Butler Hospital, along with colleagues across the U.S., confirmed that TMS is an effective treatment for patients with depression who are unable to find symptom relief through antidepressant medications. The study findings are published online in the June 11, 2012 edition of Depression and Anxiety in the Wiley Online Library.
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Alcohol Could Intensify Effects of Some Drugs in the Body
sciencedaily.com - 7-27-12
Scientists are reporting another reason -- besides possible liver damage, stomach bleeding and other side effects -- to avoid drinking alcohol while taking certain medicines. Their report in ACS' journal Molecular Pharmaceutics describes laboratory experiments in which alcohol made several medications up to three times more available to the body, effectively tripling the original dose.
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I don't bee-lieve it! Man, 62, cures painful eye infection with 99p jar of honey
dailymail.co.uk - 7-26-12
A man who spent eight years searching for a cure for a chronic eye condition was amazed when he finally found the remedy in a 99p jar of Tesco Value honey.
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Loneliness won't leave you alone? How mindful meditation can ease your woes
dailymail.co.uk - 7-26-12
Older adults who suffer from loneliness are at far greater risk of health problems such as heart disease, Alzheimer's and premature death.
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Blindness can be cured by simply injection in eye, claim scientists
telegraph.co.uk - 7-26-12
Scientists in the US used the approach to restore a level of vision to congenitally blind mice. They hope an improved version of the compound may help people with inherited and age-related forms of blindness. The chemical, called AAQ, works by making normally ''blind'' cells in the retina sensitive to light.
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'Bath salts' ban may do little to curb new drugs
msnbc.msn.com - 7-26-12
People are inventing so many new ways to get high that lawmakers can't seem to keep up. Over the past two years, the U.S. has seen a surge in the use of synthetic drugs made of legal chemicals that mimic the dangerous effects of cocaine, amphetamines and other illegal stimulants.
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Higher Incidence Of Diabetes In Native-Americans Linked To Fat-Hoarding Genes Likely Developed Due To The Nature Of Ancient Feasts
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-26-12
Why do Native Americans experience high rates of diabetes? A common theory is that they possess fat-hoarding "thrifty genes" left over from their ancestors - genes that were required for survival during ancient cycles of feast and famine, but that now contribute to the disease in a modern world of more fatty and sugary diets.
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Cognitive Function Improved By Ginseng-Fortified Milk
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-26-12
Research has shown that American Ginseng is beneficial to combat aging, for central nervous system disorders and that it has neurocognitive effects, yet incorporating American Ginseng into foods presented scientists with challenges due to its bitter taste and because processing food can destroy its healthy benefits.
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Drug For Alzheimer's, Parkinson's And MS Shows Promise
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-26-12
A "one-size-fits-all" new class of drugs that targets a particular type of brain inflammation is showing early promise for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injury.
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Hepatitis outbreak in New Hampshire strikes fear in 7 other states
cnn.com - 7-26-12
Hospitals in at least eight states want to know how many hundreds or thousands of their patients have come in contact with a lab technician accused of spreading hepatitis C.
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CPSC bans sale of Buckyballs magnetic toys, cites hazard
reuters.com - 7-26-12
The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) ordered a halt to sale of Buckyballs magnetic toys on Wednesday, calling them a serious hazard in the panel's first stop-sale order in 11 years.
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Aurora rampage shows dangers of ignoring men's health
upi.com - 7-26-12
Behind closed doors in tiny U.S. towns, vast suburban ranch houses and apartments in big cities, many lonely, angry, disconnected men feel helpless, hopeless. These men's role in massacres, Rob Okun says, means it's time to talk about male violence.
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Lab-Grown Blood Vessels May Improve Heart Bypass
healthday.com - 7-26-12
Researchers have grown small blood vessels in a lab using stem cells from fat gathered through liposuction. Such cultured blood vessels might someday play a role in transplant operations, including heart bypass surgery.
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High-Tech CT Scan May Get People With Chest Pain Home Faster
healthday.com - 7-26-12
Using a specialized type of CT scan can help doctors rule out heart attacks faster in people who've come to the emergency room with chest pain, researchers say.
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Basal Cell Carcinoma Risk Can Be Chronic
sciencedaily.com - 7-26-12
A new analysis of factors that predict basal cell carcinoma recurrence in high-risk people finds that for many people it's more of a chronic disease. High sun exposure before the age of 30 was a major predictor, as was a history of eczema.
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How a Low-Protein Diet Predisposes Offspring to Adulthood Hypertension
sciencedaily.com - 7-26-12
Studies have shown that the offspring of mothers on a low-protein diet are more likely to develop hypertension as adults. Now, Drs. Gao, Yallampalli, and Yallampalli of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston report that in rats, the high maternal testosterone levels associated with a low-protein diet are caused by reduced activity of an enzyme that inactivates testosterone, allowing more testosterone to reach the fetus and increase the offspring's susceptibility to adulthood hypertension.
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High Blood Sugar, Obesity Increase Risk for Surgical Site Infection
sciencedaily.com - 7-26-12
Two recent studies in the July issues of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS) looked at surgical site infections and hyperglycemia, the technical term for high blood glucose, or high blood sugar.
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More teens using condoms over past two decades
wtop.com - 7-25-12
Nearly half of high school students say they've had sex, yet progress has stalled in getting them to use condoms to protect against the AIDS virus, government researchers reported Tuesday.
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Banned bath salts 'act the same way on the brain as cocaine'
dailymail.co.uk - 7-25-12
Designer drug Meow Meow effects the brain in the same way as cocaine, scientists say. The drug's active ingredient is mephedrone, which has been banned in the UK and classified as a Class B drug in 2010. It is also one of the active ingredients in the family of drugs known as bath salts, which have been blamed for a wave of cannibal attacks in the US.
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New drug cocktail 'can kill off tuberculosis bacteria'
telegraph.co.uk - 7-25-12
The groundbreaking trial, using a cocktail of of three drugs including one not yet licensed for use, killed more than 99 per cent of patients' TB bacteria after a fortnight of treatment.
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Single pill could treat Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and MS
telegraph.co.uk - 7-25-12
A single pill could be used to treat a variety of brain conditions including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and multiple sclerosis, scientists claim.
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Man believed cured of AIDS says he's still cured
msnbc.msn.com - 7-25-12
The first person believed to have been cured of AIDS says reports he still has the HIV virus are false. Timothy Ray Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," says doctors have told him he's "cured of AIDS and will remain cured."
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Does Your Skin Have A Biological Clock? Researchers Say Yes
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-25-12
The skin is one of the body's vital organs and possible one of the most versatile organ. Aside form its sensory, communicative and representative role, the skin acts as an active and passive barrier, protecting the body against germs, but also safeguarding inner organs and vital body systems from environmental conditions, such as heat, frost, moisture and sunlight, by ensuring a constant condition. Environmental factors expose the skin to numerous challenges, all with different effects depending on the time of the day.
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Forgiveness - Restitution Vs. Apology
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-25-12
A new study by researchers from Baylor University revealed that people are more likely to act forgivingly if they receive compensation, whilst they are more likely to forgive if they receive an apology.
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Tick Bites May Cause Red Meat Allergy
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-25-12
A new study by Susan Wolver, MD, and Diane Sun, MD, from Virginia Commonwealth University, and colleagues, discovered that the tick bite is the cause for a delayed allergic reaction to red meat. Their research, published by Springer in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, explains why people bitten by a tick may become allergic to red meat.
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Cutting Salt Could Reduce Stomach Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-25-12
If people in the UK cut the amount of salt they consumed to the recommended daily maximum, it could prevent one in seven cases of stomach cancer, said the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) on Tuesday, after examining the latest figures for diet and cancer incidence.
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Study: Fewer U.S. teens having sex
upi.com - 7-25-12
The average age -- 16 -- at which U.S. teens begin having sex hasn't changed in about 20 years, federal health officials say.
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Raisins provide workout boost
upi.com - 7-25-12
Raisins may provide the same workout boost as sports chews, a study funded by the California Raisin Marketing Board suggests.
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Neglect May Harm Brain Growth in Children
healthday.com - 7-25-12
Severe social and physical neglect harms a child's brain development, but these effects can be partially reversed if the child is moved to a more positive environment, a new study indicates.
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Physical Ailments Take Toll on Mental Health: Study
healthday.com - 7-25-12
People with physical health problems ranging from back pain to cancer are three times more likely to seek mental health care than those without such woes, a new study finds.
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Child Abuse Linked to Higher Odds for Cancer as Adult
healthday.com - 7-25-12
Adults who suffered frequent emotional or physical abuse as children are at increased risk for cancer, a new study suggests.
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1 in 20 Cases of Melanoma Linked to Tanning Beds: Study
healthday.com - 7-25-12
Those who bronze themselves in tanning beds face a 20 percent increased risk of skin cancer, and that raised risk reaches 87 percent if they start before they are 35 years old, new research indicates.
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How a Common Fungus Knows When to Attack
sciencedaily.com - 7-25-12
The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans inconspicuously lives in our bodies until it senses that we are weak, when it quickly adapts to go on the offensive. The fungus, known for causing yeast and other minor infections, also causes a sometimes-fatal infection known as candidemia in immunocompromised patients. An in vivo study, published in mBio, demonstrates how C. albicans can distinguish between a healthy and an unhealthy host and alter its physiology to attack.
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Diet high in fish and nuts could cut pancreatic cancer risk
telegraph.co.uk - 7-24-12
Eating a diet rich in fish, nuts and vegetables could reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer by up to two thirds, a study suggests.
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Localized Prostate Cancer: Removal No Better Than Observation, Study
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-24-12
A large study that followed men across the US diagnosed with localized prostate cancer for over 10 years found they lived just as long whether they had surgery to remove the prostate or underwent observation. The researchers say their findings support observation over surgery for men with localized prostate cancer, especially if it is low-risk.
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Dr Google And The Unwise Practice Of Self-Diagnosis
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-24-12
Am I having a heart attack? My self-diagnosis concludes I must be, because the symptoms match what I found on Google. However, a more objective reflection that also takes into account the risk of having a particular condition, might lead someone else, like a doctor, to suggest I have the hiccups.
This somewhat exaggerated example, highlights the findings of a new study, published recently in the Journal of Consumer Research, that propose using the internet to self-diagnose can be unwise because we tend to focus on symptoms rather than the risk of having the illness.
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Moms saddest when kids back in school
upi.com - 7-24-12
The return of school days is more emotionally tolling for mom than kids; she is the saddest when classes start, a U.S. survey indicates.
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Many see e-cigarettes as less harmful
upi.com - 7-24-12
Current U.S. smokers are more likely to use e-cigarettes -- formally known as Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems -- than non-smokers, researchers say.
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Self-esteem irresistible to opposite sex
upi.com - 7-24-12
A sense of humor and self-confidence are the most irresistible traits in a potential love interest, not physical traits, a U.S. survey indicates.
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Severely obese children's hearts already in danger
bbc.co.uk - 7-24-12
Severely obese children are putting their heart at danger even while they are still in primary school, according to a Dutch study.
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Drug-resistant HIV 'on increase' in sub-Saharan Africa
bbc.co.uk - 7-24-12
Drug-resistant HIV has been increasing in parts of sub-Saharan Africa over the last decade, according to experts writing in the Lancet.
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Doctors Spar Over Cholesterol Screening in Kids
healthday.com - 7-24-12
Researchers are debating the merits of recent guidelines that recommend all children aged 9 through 11 be screened for high cholesterol levels, along with certain groups of younger children and teenagers.
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Many Teens With High Blood Pressure Don't Get Needed Tests
healthday.com - 7-24-12
High blood pressure is a growing problem in teens, partly due to the rising number of obese teens, and federal guidelines suggest specific tests be done to diagnose the effects of the condition.
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Heavy Drinking in Pregnancy Linked to Host of Problems in Children
healthday.com - 7-24-12
Central nervous system abnormalities are common among children whose mothers drink large amounts of alcohol during pregnancy, a small new study finds.
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YouTube Videos Might Help Ease Form of Vertigo
healthday.com - 7-24-12
Videos posted on YouTube might come to the rescue of people suffering from a common cause of vertigo, a new study shows.
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Synthetic Stimulants Called 'Bath Salts' Act in the Brain Like Cocaine
sciencedaily.com - 7-24-12
The use of the synthetic stimulants collectively known as "bath salts" have gained popularity among recreational drug users over the last five years, largely because they were readily available and unrestricted via the Internet and at convenience stores, and were virtually unregulated.
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Sex really does make men fall asleep
telegraph.co.uk - 7-23-12
Men automatically fall asleep after having sex because their brains are programmed to shut down, scientists claim.
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More than half of 14 and 15 year old girls are unhappy with their figures despite being healthy or underweight
dailymail.co.uk - 7-23-12
Schoolgirls as young as 12 are unhappy with their weight and some are skipping meals in an effort to be skinnier, a study has found. Half of girls in year eight – who are aged 12 and 13 – said they wanted to be thinner.
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Sex really does make men fall asleep
telegraph.co.uk - 7-23-12
Men automatically fall asleep after having sex because their brains are programmed to shut down, scientists claim.
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What Is Lipitor (atorvastatin)?
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-23-12
Lipitor, generic name atorvastatin, is a member of a class of drugs called HMG CoA reductase inhibitors or "statins". It reduces levels of triglycerides and bad cholesterol (LDL cholesterol) in the blood, while at the same time increasing levels of good cholesterol (HDL cholesterol).
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Sexual Dysfunction May Be A Tip-off To Heart Disease In Diabetic Men
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-23-12
Sexual dysfunction may be a marker of cardiovascular disease in men with longstanding type 1 diabetes,
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City Street Pollution Reduced By Up To 8 Times More Than Previously Believed By Green Plants
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-23-12
Trees, bushes and other greenery growing in the concrete-and-glass canyons of cities can reduce levels of two of the most worrisome air pollutants by eight times more than previously believed, a new study has found. A report on the research appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.
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Billions saved if patients took medication
upi.com - 7-23-12
If U.S. doctors better monitored whether patients took their medications, patients would have better outcomes and billions would be saved, researchers say.
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Sugary drinks can change muscles in month
upi.com - 7-23-12
Sugary drinks lead to alterations in muscles similar to those in people with obesity problems and type 2 diabetes, researchers in Britain said.
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More U.S. men worrying about their weight
upi.com - 7-23-12
Although most U.S. women worry they are overweight and men are catching up, neither men nor women may be concerned enough, a U.S. survey indicates.
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Mom's HIV Drugs May Pass to Baby in Womb, Breast-Feeding
healthday.com - 7-23-12
Babies born to HIV-positive women taking antiretroviral drugs to fight the disease may become exposed to the drugs in the womb and during breast-feeding, new research shows.
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Not All HIV Patients in U.S. Show Same Characteristics: Study
healthday.com - 7-23-12
Among people with HIV in the United States, those born outside the country are more likely than U.S.-born patients to be Hispanic or Asian and to have acquired HIV through heterosexual sex, a new study finds.
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Decisions About Condom Use Among Gay Couples Vary by Race
healthday.com - 7-23-12
Decisions about condom use among gay couples vary by race, a new study reveals.
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Weight loss linked to lower estrogen level
upi.com - 7-22-12
Women with higher levels of estrogen have an increased risk of breast cancer because estrogen can spur the growth of some tumors, U.S. researchers say.
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Cravings could be defeated with two little words
latimes.com - 7-22-12
Why is it that we crave chocolate chip cookies rather than chard? Or bread instead of broccoli? Take heart: It's biological.
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Making an Important Decision? Grab a Sweet Snack First
health.com - 7-22-12
Chances are that at some point this week, you’ll get home from work, tired and hungry, and feel very, very tempted to flop down in front of the TV instead of putting on your gym clothes. At least I know that’s usually in the cards for me. And I now know what I’ll do when I’m in such a pickle: I’ll have a sweet snack.
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Drinking fizzy pop for a month 'can lead to lifelong health problems’
telegraph.co.uk - 7-22-12
Too much fizzy pop or sweetened fruit juice alters the body’s metabolism, so that the muscles use sugar for energy, instead of burning fat, a study found.
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Whooping Cough Epidemic In Washington State
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-22-12
The number of pertussis (whooping cough) cases registered in the state of Washington, USA, has risen considerably this year; in April 2012, the Washington State Secretary of Health declared an emergency.
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Flavor Perception Is Influenced By Fat In Food
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-22-12
Fat in foods has a direct impact on taste perception by activating certain regions of the brain that control taste, aroma, and 'reward', say researchers.
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Western fast food tied to heart risks in Asia
reuters.com - 7-22-12
Even relatively clean-living Singaporeans who regularly eat burgers, fries and other staples of U.S.-style fast food are at raised risk of diabetes and significantly more likely than peers to die of heart disease, according to a new study.
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Mom's nut consumption tied to less allergy in kids
reuters.com - 7-22-12
In a study based on 62,000 Danish mothers, the children of those who ate peanuts and tree nuts while pregnant were less likely to develop asthma or allergies than the kids whose mothers shunned nuts.
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Diet, exercise fight diabetes disability
upi.com - 7-22-12
Overweight people with diabetes can improve their ability to get around if they can control their weight and be more physically active, a U.S. researcher says.
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Vitamin E lowers risk of liver cancer
upi.com - 7-22-12
Vitamin E, a fat-soluble vitamin, consumed in the diet or vitamin supplements, may lower the risk of liver cancer, U.S. and Chinese researchers suggest.
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Gene therapy nears approval in Europe
bbc.co.uk - 7-22-12
Europe is on the cusp of approving a gene therapy for the first time, in what would be a landmark moment for the field.
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FDA Gives Nod to New Breast Cancer Drug
healthday.com - 7-22-12
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the use of the drug Afinitor (everolimus) for use by women with a particular form of advanced breast cancer.
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Vitamin D May Delay Deterioration of Smokers' Lungs: Study
healthday.com - 7-22-12
Among smokers, lung function may decline faster in those who have a vitamin D deficiency than in those with normal vitamin D levels, a new study suggests.
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Beware of the Potato Salad: Preventing Foodborne Illness in Summer
healthday.com - 7-22-12
Ever eye a bowl of potato salad or plate of chicken that's been sitting in the sun for hours and wonder if it's still OK to eat?
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Biology Leaves Gay Men Highly Vulnerable to HIV: Study
healthday.com - 7-22-12
New research pinpoints a major reason why gay and bisexual men remain so vulnerable to the AIDS epidemic: When it comes to the transmission of HIV, a man who has unprotected anal intercourse is at especially high risk.
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Mom's HIV Drugs May Pass to Baby in Womb, Breast-Feeding
healthday.com - 7-22-12
Babies born to HIV-positive women taking antiretroviral drugs to fight the disease may become exposed to the drugs in the womb and during breast-feeding, new research shows.
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Dairy Researchers Identify Bacterial Spoilers in Milk
sciencedaily.com - 7-22-12
Our days of crying over spoiled milk could be over, thanks to Cornell food scientists.
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CDC: 1 in 13 pregnant women say they drink alcohol
msnbc.msn.com - 7-21-12
A government survey shows 1 in 13 pregnant women drink alcohol and some even go on binges.
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Eating almonds, peanuts and dried apricots could cut the risk of liver cancer
dailymail.co.uk - 7-21-12
Eating food rich in vitamin E intake could cut the risk of liver cancer, a study has found. Researchers discovered taking vitamin E supplements or snacking on foods such as almonds, peanuts, pine nuts and dried apricots lowered the risk in middle-aged or older people. It is also known to help protect against heart disease and eye damage in old age.
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The Lungs Perceive Hospital Ventilators As Infections
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-21-12
When hospital patients need assistance breathing and are placed on a mechanical ventilator for days at a time, their lungs react to the pressure generated by the ventilator with an out-of-control immune response that can lead to excessive inflammation, new research suggests.
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The Ancients Knew A Thing Or Two About Plants' Healing Qualities
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-21-12
An international team of researchers, led by the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and the University of York, has provided the first molecular evidence that Neanderthals not only ate a range of cooked plant foods, but also understood its nutritional and medicinal qualities.
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Ongoing Study Reveals Similarities Between Sexual Fantasies In Men And Women
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-21-12
A study conducted at the University of Granada have demonstrated that there are not significant differences between men's and women's sexual fantasies. The fact is that both sexes have intimate and romantic sexual fantaies involving their partner or loved one. In addition, men have more sexual fantasies (positive and negative) than women, which would confirm the old belief that men think more frequently about sex than women.T
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Consuming Vitamin E Lowers Chance Of Liver Cancer
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-21-12
Individuals could reduce their risk of developing liver cancer by consuming more vitamin E, either from diet or vitamin supplements, according to a new study.`
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Multiple Sclerosis Associated With Sodium Build-Up In The Brain
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-21-12
Sodium buildup in the brain appears to be associated with disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a French study.
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Sun Damage Causes Newly Discovered Melanoma-Driving Genetic Changes
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-21-12
Melanoma researchers have been struggling with this question: Which mutations drive this cancer that lead to ultraviolet (UV)-induced genetic damage in tumor cells caused by sunlight exposure?
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Google Is Not A Doctor
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-21-12
A new study published in the Journal of Consumer Research has revealed that people who self-diagnose have a higher tendency of believing they suffer from a serious illness because they concentrate on their symptoms instead of the likelihood of a certain disease. The finding has important implications for both public health professionals and consumers alike.
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European regulators back first gene therapy drug
reuters.com - 7-21-12
European regulators have recommended approval of the Western world's first gene therapy drug -- after rejecting it on three previous occasions -- in a significant advance for the novel medical technology.
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AIDS is a women's problem, too
upi.com - 7-21-12
The International AIDS Conference convenes in Washington July 22-27 and activists are demanding more policies and investments reflecting the fact that women are now more than half of all people living with HIV.
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The Health Benefits, and Risks, of Alcohol
healthday.com - 7-21-12
Mirroring so much of life, alcohol consumption comes with plusses and minuses.
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Alcohol Poses Serious Risks for Those With Diabetes
healthday.com - 7-21-12
People who have certain chronic medical conditions, such as type 1 diabetes, are even more susceptible than most to the ill effects of alcohol, though they may not be aware of how potentially dangerous alcohol can be.
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Biology Leaves Gay Men Highly Vulnerable to HIV: Study
healthday.com - 7-21-12
New research pinpoints a major reason why gay and bisexual men remain so vulnerable to the AIDS epidemic: When it comes to the transmission of HIV, a man who has unprotected anal intercourse is at especially high risk.
More...


Vitamin D May Delay Deterioration of Smokers' Lungs: Study
healthday.com - 7-21-12
Among smokers, lung function may decline faster in those who have a vitamin D deficiency than in those with normal vitamin D levels, a new study suggests.
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Paramedics Can Speed Treatment for Severe Heart Attacks With Use of ECGs
sciencedaily.com - 7-21-12
A new program that trains emergency medical service technicians (EMS) to read electrocardiograms so that they can evaluate patients with chest pain, and expedite treatment for the severe heart condition known as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), a serious form of heart attack, has excellent results and should become the standard of care, according to two studies published in the current issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.
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SF Considers Strict Outdoor Smoking Ban – Except For Medical Pot
sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com - 7-20-12
Smoking anything other than medically-prescribed marijuana at San Francisco street fairs, festivals and other outdoor events held on city property would be banned under new legislation before the Board of Supervisors.
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Husbands show love by initiating sex
upi.com - 7-20-12
Men and women in Western societies, show love differently in marriage -- for example, husbands showed love by initiating sex, U.S. researchers say.
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Whooping cough could reach highest levels since 1959
usatoday.com - 7-20-12
Health officials said Thursday that the number of cases of whooping cough could reach the highest level in more than 50 years.
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Drugged Britain: ARE WE HOOKED ON HAPPY PILLS?
telegraph.co.uk - 7-20-12
Anti-depression Professor David Healy believes the rise in depression is linked to drug companies’ marketing ploys.
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Nearly 36pc of Fukushima children diagnosed with abnormal thyroid growths
telegraph.co.uk - 7-20-12
Nearly 36 percent of children in Fukushima Prefecture have been disgnosed with abnormal growths on their thyroids, although doctors insist there is no link between the "cluster" of incidents and the disaster at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in March of last year.
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FDA data dump shows few toxins in jerky treats; complaints rise to 1,800
nbcnews.com - 7-20-12
Newly posted results of more than five years of testing chicken jerky pet treats made in China appear to confirm assertions from government officials that they don’t know what’s making America’s dogs sick, even as complaints about the products have nearly doubled.
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Smells like nostalgia: Why do scents bring back memories?
nbcnews.com - 7-20-12
The smell of chlorine wafts through the air. Suddenly, you recall childhood summers spent in a swimming pool. Or maybe it's a whiff of apple pie, or the scent of the same perfume your mom used to wear. Our noses have a way of sniffing out nostalgia.
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New research offers tips for Alzheimer's caregivers
cnn.com - 7-20-12
This week, health care professionals and scientists from around the world met in Vancouver to present the latest cutting-edge research on Alzheimer's disease for the annual Alzheimer's Association International Conference. There was a lot of buzz about new studies, including drug advancements that could be potential treatments in the future. But for the average patient with Alzheimer's, or for their caregivers, it's easy to get lost in the abundance of abstracts and scientific minutia.
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Few foods naturally contain vitamin D
upi.com - 7-20-12
Many people get vitamin D from 15 minutes of sun exposure a day, but for those who cannot be outdoors some food contains vitamin D, a U.S. food expert says.
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Moms may not see if kids are overweight
upi.com - 7-20-12
Many mothers can't tell whether their toddlers are big kids or too-big kids, U.S. researchers discovered.
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Kidney stones are on the rise
upi.com - 7-20-12
U.S. researchers found the number of Americans with kidney stones more than doubled from 1994 to the period of 2007 to 2010.
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Monkey Study Suggests Long-Term Use of ADHD Drugs Safe
healthday.com - 7-20-12
Long-term use of drugs to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) does not affect brain development or increase the risk of drug abuse, according to a study conducted in monkeys.
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Dad's Early Engagement With Son May Shape Behavior Later
healthday.com - 7-20-12
A father's strong connection with his child during infancy may reduce the risk of behavioral problems later in life, a new study suggests.
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In Utero Exposure to Diesel Exhaust a Possible Risk Factor for Obesity
sciencedaily.com - 7-20-12
Pregnant mice exposed to high levels of air pollution gave birth to offspring with a significantly higher rate of obesity and insulin resistance in adulthood than those that were not exposed to air pollution. This effect seemed especially prevalent in male mice, which were heavier regardless of diet. These findings, published online in the FASEB Journal, suggests a link between diesel exhaust exposure in utero and bulging waistlines in adulthood.
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Report finds black gay males in US worst hit by HIV-AIDS
ca.news.yahoo.com - 7-19-12
HIV-AIDS is affecting black gay men in the United States on a scale unseen among any other group in the developed world, said a report issued Wednesday ahead of the International AIDS Conference.
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How a boy with anxiety disorder which stops him saying 'I love you' was taught to show emotion. . . by his cat
dailymail.co.uk - 7-19-12
A little boy with a form of mutism who struggles to express himself has been 'taught' to show his emotions - by his pet cat. Lorcan Dillon, 7, suffers from an anxiety condition that leaves him virtually unable to communicate with teachers and classmates at school. He also find it difficult to express love and affection towards his family.
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Polypill 'will give over 50s years more healthy life'
telegraph.co.uk - 7-19-12
The pill, which reduces blood pressure and cholesterol, would cut the risk of heart attack by three quarters and a stroke by two thirds, they found.
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Hepatitis C May Be Treated With Vitamin B12
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-19-12
Early research published online in the journal Gut suggests that patients with chronic hepatitis C receiving the standard HCV treatment could significantly benefit by taking vitamin B12 supplements.
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Birth Defects Associated With Dads' Jobs
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-19-12
The occupation of future fathers may be associated to a higher risk of birth defects in their infants. A study published online in Occupational and Environmental Medicine has revealed that the risk of birth defects in their offspring is higher if the father has a certain type of job.
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Alzheimer's Treatment Halts Symptoms For 3 Years
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-19-12
A group of Alzheimer's patients treated for 3 years with an immunotherapy drug showed no symptom decline over the treatment period. The patients were taking part in a small placebo-controlled phase 2 trial testing Baxter's intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) as an immunotherapy for Alzheimer's.
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Physical inactivity causes 1 in 10 deaths worldwide, study says
cnn.com - 7-19-12
Physical inactivity causes 1 in 10 deaths worldwide, according to a series of studies released in British medical journal The Lancet, putting it on par with the dangers of smoking and obesity. The results also suggest that public health officials treat this situation as a pandemic.
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Baby heart risk for hairdressers and nail bar workers?
bbc.co.uk - 7-19-12
Pregnant women exposed to organic solvents at work have a slightly higher chance of having a baby with a heart defect, a study shows.
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Drinking alcohol, even in moderation, 'a dementia risk'
bbc.co.uk - 7-19-12
Drinking even "moderate" amounts of alcohol increases dementia risk, US research suggests.
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Scientists Say Blood Test May Help Predict Alzheimer's
healthday.com - 7-19-12
Researchers say they've identified an indicator, or "biomarker," in the blood that may help predict a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.
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Study Gives First Evidence That Adult Human Lungs Can Regrow
healthday.com - 7-19-12
Researchers have uncovered the first evidence that the adult human lung is capable of growing back -- at least in part -- after being surgically removed.
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Infection With 2 HIV Strains Slows Disease Progression
healthday.com - 7-19-12
While many people don't know it, there's more than one kind of AIDS virus. Besides the HIV-1 strain that's common throughout the world, a type known as HIV-2 is found in some parts of Africa. Now, a new study finds that people infected with HIV-2 and later with HIV-1 appear to be better equipped to fight off the virus.
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Surgery Not Best Option for Early Stage Prostate Cancers: Study
healthday.com - 7-19-12
When a man learns he has localized prostate cancer, he has to make the difficult choice of surgery, and its possible side effects, or watchful waiting.
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Oral Immunotherapy Shows Promise as Treatment for Egg Allergy
sciencedaily.com - 7-19-12
Giving children and adolescents with egg allergy small but increasing daily doses of egg white powder holds the possibility of developing into a way to enable some of them to eat egg-containing foods without having allergic reactions, according to a study supported by the National Institutes of Health.
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Harmful Effects of CFL Bulbs to Skin; Energy-Efficient Bulbs Safest When Placed Behind Additional Glass Cover
sciencedaily.com - 7-19-12
Inspired by a European study, a team of Stony Brook University researchers looked into the potential impact of healthy human skin tissue (in vitro) being exposed to ultraviolet rays emitted from compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs.
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Gold, tea may help treat prostate cancer
upi.com - 7-18-12
A compound in tea delivered via radioactive gold nanoparticles may be an effective treatment for prostate cancer, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Physical inactivity kills 5 million a year: reportPhysical inactivity kills 5 million a year: report
ca.news.yahoo.com - 7-18-12
A third of the world's adults are physically inactive, and the couch potato lifestyle kills about five million people every year, experts said in the medical journal The Lancet on Wednesday.
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To lose weight, keep a food journal
upi.com - 7-18-12
Women who want to lose weight should faithfully keep a food journal and avoid skipping meals and eating in restaurants, U.S. researchers advise.
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Diabetes sufferers 'go through bereavement process' after diagnosis
dailymail.co.uk - 7-18-12
Diabetes sufferers have a 'bereavement-style' response to finding out they have the condition, a study suggests. Researchers said that following diagnosis, type 2 diabetes sufferers go on a journey of denial, anger, depression, acceptance and finally a sense of hope and positivity for the future. Experts from the University of Nottingham called for healthcare professionals to treat patients as individuals after they identified the various stages of coping following diagnosis.
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Here's what paralyzes you during sleep
msnbc.msn.com - 7-18-12
During the most dream-filled phase of sleep, our muscles become paralyzed, preventing the body from acting out what's going on in the brain. Now, researchers have discovered the brain chemicals that keep the body still in sleep.
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Antibiotic Resistance Taken Head On With ICT Technology
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-18-12
Researchers in Europe have developed a new system which could help in the war on resistance to antibiotics. According to the World Health Organization, approximately 440,000 new cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis emerge each year, resulting in at least 150,000 deaths. In addition, hospital-acquired infections caused by highly resistant bacteria, such as 'Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus' (MRSA) are also on the rise.
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Dendritic Cells Key To Activating Human Immune Responses
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-18-12
Scientists at A*STAR's Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), in collaboration with Newcastle University, UK, the Singapore Institute of Clinical Sciences and clinicians from multiple hospitals in Singapore, have identified a new subset of dendritic cells (DCs) in human peripheral tissue which have a critical role in activating our immune response against harmful pathogens.
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Psychotic Depression - A Valid Psychiatric Syndrome?
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-18-12
The number of studies reporting significant and clinically relevant differences between psychotic depression (PD) and non-PD has increased considerably over the past decades. This summary of the current evidence suggests that psychotic depression now fulfills the criteria for a valid psychiatric syndrome.
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What Is Breast Cancer? What Causes Breast Cancer?
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-18-12
Breast cancer is a kind of cancer that develops from breast cells. Breast cancer usually starts off in the inner lining of milk ducts or the lobules that supply them with milk. A malignant tumor can spread to other parts of the body. A breast cancer that started off in the lobules is known as lobular carcinoma, while one that developed from the ducts is called ductal carcinoma.
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When should I be screened for stomach cancer?
cnn.com - 7-18-12
Stomach cancer is rare in the United States, but that's not how it used to be. The American Cancer Society estimates about 21,320 cases of stomach cancer will be diagnosed in 2012 and about 10,540 people will die from the disease in the U. S. this year.
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Leaky bladder affects young women too
reuters.com - 7-18-12
Bladder control problems may be seen as a problem of older people, but a good percentage of college-age women have symptoms too, a study published Monday suggests.
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Baxter Alzheimer's drug keeps four patients stable for 3 years
reuters.com - 7-18-12
Four Alzheimer's patients treated with an immune system therapy have seen their disease stabilize for at least three years, raising hope that the drug from Baxter International Inc will prove effective in larger trials.
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Media violence a risk factor for bullying
upi.com - 7-18-12
Knowing students' risks for aggression can help schools determine which students may be more likely to get in fights or bully others, U.S. researchers say.
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Exposure high in BPS, a BPA substitute
upi.com - 7-18-12
The skin may absorb more bisphenol S, often used to substitute for bisphenol A in thermal and recycled paper and paper money, than BPA, U.S. researchers say.
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Mammograms Have 'Limited or No Effect' on Breast Cancer Deaths: Study
healthday.com - 7-18-12
Regular mammography screening has limited -- if any -- impact on breast cancer deaths, a new evaluation of Swedish women contends.
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Milk Thistle of Little Help Against Hepatitis C: Study
healthday.com - 7-18-12
Many patients with chronic hepatitis C turn to an alternative herbal treatment known as milk thistle, but a new study finds that it has little effect on the liver disease.
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Drug Widely Used to Treat MS May Not Slow Progression
healthday.com - 7-18-12
Interferon beta, a widely used treatment for multiple sclerosis, does not stave off the time to disability, new research finds.
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Mom's Pot Use Doubles Risk of 'Preemie' Birth: Study
healthday.com - 7-18-12
Marijuana use prior to her pregnancy greatly raises a woman's risk of premature birth, according to a study that identified the most common risk factors for preterm delivery.
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Study Ties Infant Birth Weight to Mothers' Breast Cancer Risk
healthday.com - 7-18-12
Women who give birth to large infants may have a more than twofold increased risk of developing breast cancer, according to a new study.
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FDA Bans BPA From Baby Bottles, Sippy Cups
healthday.com - 7-18-12
The controversial plastics chemical bisphenol A (BPA) is now banned for use in baby bottles and sippy cups, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday.
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Closer to a Cure? Chemists Synthesize Compound That Flushes out Latent HIV
sciencedaily.com - 7-18-12
A new collection of compounds, called "bryologs" -- derived from a tiny marine organism -- activate hidden reservoirs of the virus that currently make the disease nearly impossible to eradicate.
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Drug Shown to Improve Memory in Those With Down Syndrome
sciencedaily.com - 7-18-12
Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have found a drug that boosts memory function in those with Down syndrome, a major milestone in the treatment of this genetic disorder that could significantly improve quality of life.
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How Aging Impairs Immune Response
sciencedaily.com - 7-18-12
Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have uncovered one of the mechanisms by which aging may compromise the ability of the immune system to fight infections and respond to vaccines. The study, conducted in aging mice, shows that administering antioxidants may help reverse this loss of immune function. The findings were published online this month in the journal Cell Reports.
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US West Coast to receive dangerous levels of Fukushima radiation
rt.com - 7-18-12
It’s been over a year since natural disaster ravaged a nuclear plant in Fukushima and interrupted the lives of millions of Japanese. Scientists now fear though that contaminated water is on course to America, and it could be more toxic than thought.
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Banned product may cause liver damage
upi.com - 7-17-12
Fu Fang Zaoren Jiaonang, an unauthorized natural health product promoted for anxiety and/or insomnia could damage organs, Canadian officials said.
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How a third of gastric surgery patients put ALL the weight back on
dailymail.co.uk - 7-17-12
Seventeen firefighters and ambulance staff were needed to carry a 40 st woman from her home to an ambulance in Croydon, it was reported last week.
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Your child's snoring could harm their IQ: Obstructive sleep apnoea can hinder development
dailymail.co.uk - 7-17-12
Carly Redwood was watching TV when she heard a rumbling noise from upstairs. ‘It was drowning out the TV,’ says Carly, a 36-year-old PA, who lives with her husband Dan, 36, a retail manager, in Farnham, Surrey. ‘When I listened harder I realised it was actually loud snoring and snorting.’ But it wasn’t Dan making all the racket, but the couple’s son Jack, who was just three at the time.
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It took just a wave of a wand and my painful fibroid was gone: 15-minute treatment could ease misery for thousands
dailymail.co.uk - 7-17-12
Thousands of women suffer from fibroids, which often cause pain and heavy periods as well as affecting fertility. Diana Noufal, 47, a healthcare assistant from Mansfield in Nottinghamshire, underwent a new procedure, as she tells CAROL DAVIS.
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New Platinum Drug Kills Cancer Cells Better
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-17-12
Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US who are testing phenanthriplatin, a new experimental drug based on platinum, say it kills cancer cells better and may provide a more effective alternative to cisplatin, the most commonly used approved platinum chemotherapy drug.
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TV habits 'can predict kids' waist size and fitness'
bbc.co.uk - 7-17-12
Children who increase the number of hours of weekly television they watch between the ages of two and four years old risk larger waistlines by age 10.
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Aspirin a 'no brainer' against cancer after screening
bbc.co.uk - 7-17-12
A mass-screening programme for 50- to 70-year-olds could cut the risk of stomach bleeds due to daily doses of aspirin, cancer experts have said.
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Plastics Chemical in Dental Fillings Might Affect Children's Behavior: Study
healthday.com - 7-17-12
Children who receive dental fillings made from the controversial plastics chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) could undergo small but long-term changes in their behavior, a new study suggests.
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Poor Sleep May Age Your Brain
healthday.com - 7-17-12
Evidence is building that poor sleep patterns may do more than make you cranky: The amount and quality of shuteye you get could be linked to mental deterioration and Alzheimer's disease, four new studies suggest.
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Obesity Might Hinder Treatment of Some Breast Cancers
healthday.com - 7-17-12
Being obese may affect a woman's response to breast cancer treatment, a small new study suggests.
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FDA Approves 1st Pill to Help Prevent HIV Infection
healthday.com - 7-17-12
For the first time, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of a pill to help prevent HIV infection in uninfected, high-risk people.
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Gold Nanoparticles Could Treat Prostate Cancer With Fewer Side Effects Than Chemotherapy
sciencedaily.com - 7-17-12
Currently, large doses of chemotherapy are required when treating certain forms of cancer, resulting in toxic side effects. The chemicals enter the body and work to destroy or shrink the tumor, but also harm vital organs and drastically affect bodily functions. Now, University of Missouri scientists have found a more efficient way of targeting prostate tumors by using gold nanoparticles and a compound found in tea leaves. This new treatment would require doses that are thousands of times smaller than chemotherapy and do not travel through the body inflicting damage to healthy areas.
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Cannabis 'Pharma Factory' Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 7-17-12
U of S researchers have discovered the chemical pathway that Cannabis sativa uses to create bioactive compounds called cannabinoids, paving the way for the development of marijuana varieties to produce pharmaceuticals or cannabinoid-free industrial hemp. The research appears online in the July 16 early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Increased Recommended Dietary Vitamin C Could Help Reduce Heart Disease, Stroke, Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 7-17-12
The recommended dietary allowance, or RDA, of vitamin C is less than half what it should be, scientists argue in a recent report, because medical experts insist on evaluating this natural, but critical nutrient in the same way they do pharmaceutical drugs and reach faulty conclusions as a result.
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China on alert as disease outbreak kills 112 in June
google.com - 7-16-12
The Chinese province of Hunan urged parents on Sunday to seek immediate treatment for children showing symptoms of hand, foot and mouth disease after official figures showed 112 people died from the illness last month.
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Does Medical Marijuana Increase Teen Pot Use?
wsj.com - 7-16-12
In states where marijuana is legal, for medicinal purposes, some law-enforcement officials have expressed concern about an increase in teenage drug use. When the U.S.
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Weightlifting 'slows down memory loss'
telegraph.co.uk - 7-16-12
People with mild memory problems that can precede Alzheimer’s disease could be helped by exercise, a conference has heard.
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In vast effort, FDA spied on emails of its own scientists
msnbc.msn.com - 7-16-12
A wide-ranging surveillance operation by the Food and Drug Administration against a group of its own scientists used an enemies list of sorts as it secretly captured thousands of e-mails that the disgruntled scientists sent privately to members of Congress, lawyers, labor officials, journalists and even President Obama, previously undisclosed records show.
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A 'Clearer' Way To Treat Huntington's Disease
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-16-12
In a paper published in the online issue of Science Translational Medicine, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified two key regulatory proteins critical to clearing away misfolded proteins that accumulate and cause the progressive, deadly neurodegeneration of Huntington's disease (HD).
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Why The Human Body Cannot Fight HIV Infection
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-16-12
University of Washington researchers have made a discovery that sheds light on why the human body is unable to adequately fight off HIV infection.
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Some Personal Care Products May Raise Diabetes Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-16-12
Women may be at higher risk of developing diabetes because of phthalates that exist in such personal care products as soaps, hair sprays, moisturizers, nail polish, and even perfume. Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital published a report in Environmental Health Perspectives explaining that the higher concentrations of phthalate metabolites in the urine of females compared to males might mean that women have a higher risk of developing diabetes.
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Tsunami of boomer mental illness looms
upi.com - 7-16-12
U.S. health officials need to address the mental illness and substance abuse needs of baby boomers, a non-profit group warns.
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Faltering Steps May Indicate Oncoming Dementia
healthday.com - 7-16-12
Three new studies suggest that a person's walking ability or type of gait may give hints about oncoming Alzheimer's disease.
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Exercise Can Shield the Aging Brain, Studies Show
healthday.com - 7-16-12
Evidence is mounting that exercise provides some protection from memory loss and Alzheimer's disease, with three new studies showing that a variety of physical activities are associated with healthier brains in older adults.
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Study: N. America’s West Coast to be most contaminated by Fukushima cesium of all regions in Pacific in 10 years — “An order-of-magnitude higher” than waters off Japan (MAPS)
enenews.com - 7-16-12
In the following years, the tracer cloud continuously expands laterally, with maximum concentrations in its central part heading east. While the northern portion is gradually invading the Bering Sea, the main tracer patch reaches the coastal waters of North America after 5–6 years, with maximum relative concentrations ( > 1 × 10-4) covering a broad swath of the eastern North Pacific between Vancouver Island and Baja California.
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Monsanto Promises Pain to EU, Assault Underway
setyoufreenews.com - 7-15-12
Since the introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops into the food supply in the mid-1990s, the European Union has generally resisted allowing these crops to be planted in member countries.
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Treating HIV and preventing it at the same time
latimes.com - 7-15-12
Antiretroviral medications can reduce the spread of HIV to sexual partners. But experts are now divided about whether the treatment-as-prevention approach can essentially halt the AIDS epidemic.
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Why We Sunburn
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 7-15-12
Sunburns readily advertise that we've had fun in the sun, and perhaps have been a bit careless, but what exactly goes on in our cells to produce the painful, red inflammation has not been clear.
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Is Soy Milk Bad for Teeth?
myhealthnewsdaily.com - 7-15-12
Soy milk may be worse for your teeth than cow's milk, a new study suggests. The results show bacteria commonly found in the mouth produce five to six times more acid when they feed on soy milk compared to cow's milk.
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Detecting Alzheimer's early could change lives
usatoday.com - 7-15-12
When Karen Frost got a call from her mother saying "I just want to keep you in the loop," she knew to pay attention. Her father got lost trying to find his wife in the hospital after a routine appointment and was missing for several hours before she found him.
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Why antibiotics are losing the war against bacteria
telegraph.co.uk - 7-15-12
As bacteria become ever more resistant to drugs, world health experts fear a future without antibiotics.
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What Is Atherosclerosis? What Causes Atherosclerosis?
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-15-12
Atherosclerosis (or arteriosclerotic vascular disease) is a condition where the arteries become narrowed and hardened due to an excessive build up of plaque around the artery wall. The disease disrupts the flow of blood around the body, posing serious cardiovascular complications.
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Vitamin D Deficiency And Lung Function In Asthmatic Children
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-15-12
A new study from researchers in Boston has found that poorer lung function in asthmatic children, treated with inhaled corticosteroids, is linked with vitamin D deficiency.
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Nut Allergy Linked To Breast Milk
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-15-12
Researchers from the Australian National University have discovered that children who only receive breast milk during the first six months have a higher risk of developing a nut allergy. The study has been published in the online issue of International Journal of Pediatrics.
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Safe Composting Tips for People With Food Allergies
healthday.com - 7-15-12
Composting food waste is safe for people with food allergies if they take some basic precautions, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI).
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Gut Microbes Might Reflect Health, Diet of Older Adults
healthday.com - 7-15-12
The health of elderly people appears closely linked with their diet and the type of microorganisms living in their gut, suggesting that what you eat may affect how well you age, according to new research.
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Study Ties Chemicals in Beauty Products to Women's Diabetes Risk
healthday.com - 7-15-12
Chemicals in beauty and personal care products may boost women's risk of diabetes, a new study suggests, although the authors cautioned that the finding is far from conclusive.
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Choosing Sunscreen? How to Decode the Labels
healthday.com - 7-15-12
You may know that it's important to protect your skin when you're outdoors this summer, but you need to know how to pick the correct sunscreen and how to apply it, the American Academy of Dermatology says.
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Alcohol in moderation boosts bone health
upi.com - 7-14-12
Drinking a moderate amount of alcohol as part of a healthy lifestyle may lower a post-menopausal woman's risk of developing osteoporosis, U.S. researchers say.
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Reducing stress reduced MS development
upi.com - 7-14-12
atients with multiple sclerosis who participated in a weekly stress management program developed fewer new brain lesions, U.S. researchers said.
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Discovery of Chemical That Affects Biological Clock Offers New Way to Treat Diabetes
sciencedaily.com - 7-14-12
Biologists at UC San Diego have discovered a chemical that offers a completely new and promising direction for the development of drugs to treat metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes -- a major public health concern in the United States due to the current obesity epidemic.
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7 walnuts a day deliver health benefits
upi.com - 7-14-12
Walnuts may be considered the king of nuts for health benefits, with a combination of more healthful and higher quality antioxidants, U.S. researchers say.
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Owner Of First U.S. Marijuana Pharmacy Now Broke And Fighting IRS
forbes.com - 7-14-12
Lynnette M. Shaw, the colorful pot activist who opened the first licensed medical marijuana dispensary in the United States, is fighting an Internal Revenue Service bill for $1.27 million in back income taxes and penalties and has filed for personal bankruptcy, listing $276,000 in state sales taxes among her debts.
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She's my little hero: Black and white cat saves diabetic owner by alerting sleeping husband after she collapses
dailymail.co.uk - 7-14-12
A cat called Charley could scoop a national award after saving the life of her diabetic owner. The three-year-old black and white moggy sprang into action when Susan March-Armstrong had a potentially fatal hypoglycaemic attack in the middle of the night. Susan, 47, had collapsed unconscious on the bathroom floor of the family home in Haltwhistle, Northumberland, as her husband Kevin, 49, slept on the room next door.
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Children spend 10 times as long watching TV as playing outside: survey
telegraph.co.uk - 7-14-12
Children nowadays spend 10 times as long watching television or on the computer as they do playing outside, a poll has found.
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Reflexology 'improves heart efficiency', claim researchers
telegraph.co.uk - 7-14-12
Reflexology can make the heart pump more efficiently, say researchers who think they have found the first scientifically robust evidence that it does have a physical effect.
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Anxiety Linked To Accelerated Aging
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-14-12
New research suggests middle-aged and older women who experience high levels of a common form of anxiety known phobic anxiety, such as being unreasonably fearful of crowds and heights, are more likely to carry a risk factor tied to premature aging: they have shorter telomeres. The effect is equivalent to another six years of age compared to a person with no phobic symptoms, suggest the researchers.
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Study Ties Chemicals in Beauty Products to Women's Diabetes Risk
healthday.com - 7-14-12
Chemicals in beauty and personal care products may boost women's risk of diabetes, a new study suggests, although the authors cautioned that the finding is far from conclusive.
More...


Gut Microbes Might Reflect Health, Diet of Older Adults
healthday.com - 7-14-12
The health of elderly people appears closely linked with their diet and the type of microorganisms living in their gut, suggesting that what you eat may affect how well you age, according to new research.
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Weight-Loss Keys: Food Journals, Eating In, Not Skipping Meals
healthday.com - 7-14-12
If you are trying to lose weight, adopting three key strategies will boost your chances of success, new research suggests.
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Copper's Previously Unknown Exit Strategy from the Body
sciencedaily.com - 7-14-12
Scientists have long known that the body rids itself of excess copper and various other minerals by collecting them in the liver and excreting them through the liver's bile. However, a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers and published June 22 in PLoS One suggests that when this route is impaired there's another exit route just for copper: A molecule sequesters only that mineral and routes it from the body through urine.
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CDC warns of tick-borne disease babesiosis
upi.com - 7-14-12
The tick that spreads Lyme disease also spreads babesiosis, a malaria-like parasitic disease reported in 1,100 cases in 2011, U.S. health officials say.
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Multiple pesticides found in Texas homes
upi.com - 7-14-12
Air samples contained multiple pesticides in most homes of Hispanic mothers-to-be along the Texas-Mexico border.
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Binge eating may be linked to addiction
upi.com - 7-14-12
People with a history of binge eating may be at higher risk of addiction-like behaviors, including substance abuse, a U.S. researcher says.
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California medical marijuana operation targeted by feds
latimes.com - 7-13-12
The federal government is moving to shut down the nation's largest and highest-profile medical marijuana dispensary operation, filing papers to seize properties in Oakland and San Jose where Harborside Health Center does business.
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Medical marijuana sales becoming cash only
sfgate.com - 7-13-12
If you're about ready to refill your supply of medical marijuana, you might want to stop by an ATM first. In the past few days, a number of Bay Area dispensaries have told their clients that from now on it's cash only, because Visa and MasterCard aren't allowing their cards to be used for marijuana purchases anymore.
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Baldness drug Wayne Rooney took 'could cause permanent impotence and shrink genitals in some men'
dailymail.co.uk - 7-13-12
A hair-loss medication reportedly tried by Wayne Rooney may cause prolonged and possibly irreversible impotence, scientists have claimed. The recent findings come after one patient bravely stepped forward to reveal the drug left him with no sex drive and even shrank his genitals.
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Why it pays to stay calm: Anxiety may age you by SIX YEARS
dailymail.co.uk - 7-13-12
It will do nothing to calm a fearful person, but a new study has found that anxiety could make you grow old more quickly. Researchers found that a common form of the condition, known as phobic anxiety, could trigger cellular damage leading to premature ageing. Older women with an unreasonable fear of situations such as crowds or heights had shorter telomeres than their calmer peers. Telomeres are the caps on the ends of chromosomes that protect our genetic material from damage.
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Fashion for tight jeans is increasing testicular problems among men
telegraph.co.uk - 7-13-12
Medical experts, including Dr Hilary Jones, have reported an increase in injuries being caused by the jeans, which are favoured by celebs such as Russell Brand, Jude Law and Joey Essex.
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No, sleep deprivation probably won't make you go temporarily insane
msnbc.msn.com - 7-13-12
Chronic sleep deprivation – or a severe, short-term lack of Z’s from, say, cramming for exams over two straight nights – can make you silly or sad, slow to react, memory-impaired and more apt to take risks.
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Tick trouble: 1,100 people got babesiosis in 2011
msnbc.msn.com - 7-13-12
People who live in or travel to the Northeast or upper Midwest this summer should take precautions to avoid contracting babesiosis, a tick-born disease native to those areas, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Native American Ancestors Came From Asia In Three Migrations
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-13-12
The ancestors of Native American populations from the tip of Chile in the south to Canada in the north, migrated from Asia in at least three waves, according to a new international study published online in Nature this week that involved over 60 investigators in 11 countries in the Americas, plus four in Europe, and Russia.
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BPA In Rivers May Encourage Fish Species To Interbreed
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-13-12
Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate and other plastics, changes the appearance and behavior of river fish enough to encourage inter-species breeding, say the authors of a new study published online this week, that warns of the potential threat to biodiversity from blurring of inter-species boundaries.
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Food In Smaller Pieces May Help Control Weight
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-13-12
Cutting up food into smaller pieces may help people control their weight more easily because they are more satisfying to eat than one large piece with the same number of calories, according to a new study presented at a conference this week.
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How Memory Affects Decision Making
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-13-12
According to researchers at the The University of Texas at Austin, a person's memory plays a vital role in how new information is processed.
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How To Treat A Cold
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-13-12
The common cold, usually referred to as just a cold is caused by a viral infection in the upper airways, sinuses, throat and nose. Experts say a cold affects primarily the nose. There may also be a fever. In the vast majority of cases, despite making you feel dreadful with all the sneezing, sore throat, cough, and runny nose, a cold is a self-limiting infection; this means it gets better on its own without requiring any special treatment. Most people get better within a week - in some cases, it may last a little longer.
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Alcohol And Birth Control Use In Teens May Result In High Blood Pressure
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-13-12
Male adolescents who consume alcohol and teenage girls who are on the pill are more likely to have high blood pressure in later life, according to results from a large pregnancy follow-up study in Australia.
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Rare genetic mutation protects against Alzheimer's
cnn.com - 7-13-12
With more than 5 million Americans suffering from Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, the race is on to surface clues about causes and prevention.
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"Chemical intolerance" a common complaint: study
reuters.com - 7-13-12
A sizable percentage of low-income patients in primary care may be particularly sensitive to chemicals in household cleaners, perfumes and other everyday products, a small study suggests.
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Heavy people more likely to have colon polyps
reuters.com - 7-13-12
Obese and overweight people are more likely to develop colon polyps, a possible precursor to cancer, than are slimmer individuals, according to a new review of past research.
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U.S. having more sex, but liking it less
upi.com - 7-13-12
U.S. adults say they're having sex 151 times a year, on average, compared to 120 times last year, but sexual satisfaction has declined, a survey indicated.
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Almonds have fewer calories than thought
upi.com - 7-13-12
Whole almonds provide about 20 percent fewer calories than originally thought, scientists from the U. S. Department of Agriculture said.
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Alzheimer's 'early signs timeline developed'
bbc.co.uk - 7-13-12
Scientists have assembled a "timeline" of the unseen progress of Alzheimer's before symptoms appear.
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Reused Vials, Unsafe Injections Threatening Patients: CDC
healthday.com - 7-13-12
Life-threatening but completely preventable infections are being contracted by patients in the United States because health care providers fail to follow safe-injection recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, according to a new study.
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Babies Born to Obese Mothers May Have Low Iron: Study
healthday.com - 7-13-12
Obese women who become pregnant may give birth to babies with low levels of iron, a new study reveals.
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Stimulant Marketed as 'Natural' in Sports Supplement Actually of Synthetic Origin, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-13-12
A new study published in the journal Drug Testing and Analysis found that DMAA, a stimulant often found in many nutritional and sports supplements, does not originate from natural substances and is actually composed of synthetic compounds.
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Many agencies place unqualified caregivers
upi.com - 7-12-12
A U.S. researcher warns against being fooled by Web sites of agencies that supply personnel to aid the elderly in their home -- many have criminal records.
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Old boys network effective in monkeys
upi.com - 7-12-12
A male whose father is a strong leader is much more likely to become a leader too, due to the father's social advantages, in primates, U.S. researchers say.
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Facebook, Skype Give Cosmetic Surgery Industry a Lift
betabeat.com - 7-12-12
One day in 2008, while using the popular videochat service Skype, Tina Consorti had an uncomfortable realization. She didn’t like how she looked on the little web screen. Her chin was sagging a bit, and shadowy wrinkles were forming like rings on a tree stump around her neck. It actually wasn’t so bad in the mirror—she checked—but on Skype and other social media services, the flaws seemed amplified.
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Patients Paying Top Dollar For Excedrin Migraine Since Recall
pittsburgh.cbslocal.com - 7-12-12
No Excedrin Migraine has been available since January. That’s when Novartis recalled the popular product, along with Bufferin, No-Doz, and Gas-X because of quality control issues at the drug maker’s Nebraska plant.
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Truvada drug trials signal 'turning point' in AIDS epidemic
usatoday.com - 7-12-12
A trio of new studies highlights the promise and challenges of preventing the spread of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS: Giving anti-AIDS drugs to healthy but high-risk patients can dramatically reduce the risk of infection.
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Breastfeeding your baby for six months will 'keep you slim in later life'
dailymail.co.uk - 7-12-12
Many mothers have long believed that breastfeeding helps them to get their figure back after giving birth. Now scientists have found it can help them to stay slim for decades. They discovered that women who breastfed their babies even for a few months after the birth were less likely to be obese 30 years later.
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Former-smokers gain up to 11lbs a year after they quit the habit
dailymail.co.uk - 7-12-12
Former smokers gain up to 11lbs in weight after they kick the habit, research suggests. Researchers, based in the UK and France, found that former smokers gained an average of 10lbs in the 12 months after they quit.
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Taking iron tablets 'can reduce tiredness by 50%'
dailymail.co.uk - 7-12-12
Iron tablets can reduce tiredness by 50 per cent, according to researchers - even if you're not anaemic. Taking supplements for 12 weeks reduced fatigue by almost a half in women who had low levels but were not deficient. Fatigue is commonly reported by patients visiting their GP with nearly a third complaining of the symptom at appointments.
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The deadly toll of crack cocaine addiction
telegraph.co.uk - 7-12-12
The popularity of cocaine climbed steadily in the 1990s and 2000s and use in Britain and Spain are the highest in Europe. Although estimates suggest around 800,000 people used cocaine powder in 2009/10, it is thought less than a quarter of that number are crack users. Crack cocaine is smoked through a pipe and it delivers a short, intense high which wears off quickly.
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Don't eat raw crawfish or a worm might invade your insides
msnbc.msn.com - 7-12-12
For those who need another reason, beyond the ick factor, to not eat raw crawfish, here’s a frightening fact: many of these crunchy crustaceans carry the infinitely more icky lungworms – which can burrow from your digestive tract into your lungs, cheeks, or even your brain.
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Suffering from hot flashes? A low-fat diet may help
msnbc.msn.com - 7-12-12
Losing weight by eating a low-fat diet may reduce menopausal women's symptoms of hot flashes and night sweats, according to a new study.
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Yes, you can use pills to prevent AIDS, review finds
msnbc.msn.com - 7-12-12
Drugs used to control the AIDS virus can also be used to protect uninfected people, researchers concluded on Tuesday in a “last-word” review of the data.
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Four Drinks A Week May Keep Rheumatoid Arthritis Away
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-12-12
A study published in BMJ (British Medical Journal) indicates that moderate alcohol consumption is linked to a reduced risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.
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Are Your Friends An Influence On Your Weight? Probably
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-12-12
How much your friends weigh could influence your own weight, according to a new study published in the journal PLoS ONE.
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OxyContin abuse down with time-release formula
reuters.com - 7-12-12
There's more evidence that the new formulation of OxyContin, the time-release version of oxycodone, is discouraging abuse of the powerful drug.
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Deaf develop sense of touch differently
upi.com - 7-12-12
People who are born deaf process the sense of touch differently than people born with normal hearing, U.S. researchers said.
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Pets boost infant immunity to infections
upi.com - 7-12-12
Infants, who had contact with dogs at home had fewer respiratory tract symptoms or infections than children with no dog contacts, researchers in Finland found.
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West Nile detected in New York City area
upi.com - 7-12-12
New York City Health Department officials said they increased surveillance after detecting West Nile virus in some Staten Island mosquitoes.
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Pill, alcohol raise teen blood pressure
upi.com - 7-12-12
Alcohol use in boys, the pill in girls, high salt intake and increasing weight in both sexes are risk factors for blood pressure, Australian researchers say.
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Timeline Detected for Rare, Early Alzheimer's
healthday.com - 7-12-12
hanges in compounds found in spinal fluid may identify a rare form of Alzheimer's disease 25 years before symptoms appear, researchers say.
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'Abuse-Resistant' Oxycontin May Be Driving Addicts to Heroin
healthday.com - 7-11-12
A new version of the prescription painkiller Oxycontin that makes the medication harder to abuse does not appear to reduce drug abuse. Instead, the drug seems to drive people toward more dangerous opioids, including heroin, a new study suggests.
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Does Stress Management Slow MS?
healthday.com - 7-11-12
When researcher David Mohr began working with people with multiple sclerosis about 20 years ago, patients would tell him that stress made their disease worse. At the time, most physicians didn't believe there was a connection, he said.
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Air in Expectant Moms' Homes Contains Pesticides, Texas-Mexico Border Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-11-12
Air samples from homes of Hispanic mothers-to-be along the Texas-Mexico border contained multiple pesticides in a majority of the houses, according to a study conducted by the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio.
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Why the Thrill Is Gone: Potential Target for Treating Major Symptom of Depression
sciencedaily.com - 7-11-12
Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have laid bare a novel molecular mechanism responsible for the most important symptom of major depression: anhedonia, the loss of the ability to experience pleasure. While their study was conducted in mice, the brain circuit involved in this newly elucidated pathway is largely identical between rodents and humans, upping the odds that the findings point toward new therapies for depression and other disorders.
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Monsanto rider: New bill could make biotech companies immune to courts
rt.com - 7-11-12
If passed, an amendment in the Agricultural Appropriations Bill will not just allow, but require the secretary of agriculture to grant permits for planting or cultivating GM crops – even if a federal court has given an injunction against it.
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New chemical makes teeth 'cavity proof' - and could do away with dentist visits forever
dailymail.co.uk - 7-11-12
A new chemical could make human teeth 'cavity proof' - and do away with the need for visits to the dentists forever.
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5 Old-School Ways to Stay Cool this Summer
rodale.com - 7-11-12
Hot summers are going to get even hotter, scientists say. So it's more important than ever to find cheap, easy ways to stay cool when the mercury climbs.
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Taking iron tablets 'can reduce tiredness by 50 per cent'Taking iron tablets 'can reduce tiredness by 50 per cent'
dailymail.co.uk - 7-11-12
Iron tablets can reduce tiredness by 50 per cent, according to researchers - even if you're not anaemic. Taking supplements for 12 weeks reduced fatigue by almost a half in women who had low levels but were not deficient. Fatigue is commonly reported by patients visiting their GP with nearly a third complaining of the symptom at appointments.
More...


Mothers who breastfeed are slimmer into their 50s: study
telegraph.co.uk - 7-11-12
Women who breastfeed their babies are slimmer for decades later and encouraging natural feeding could save thousands of lives lives, a study has found.
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Deadly black lung surges back in coal country
msnbc.msn.com - 7-11-12
Ray Marcum bears the marks of a bygone era of coal mining. At 83, his voice is raspy, his eastern Kentucky accent thick and his forearms leathery. A black pouch of Stoker’s 24C chewing tobacco pokes out of the back pocket of his jeans. “I started chewing in the mines to keep the coal dust out of my mouth,” he says.
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Eons after words, why do humans still need body language?
msnbc.msn.com - 7-11-12
Flat screens, phones and laptops soon will blaze with a body-language blitz: sweaty palms clasping mouths in disbelief, muscled arms folded in disagreement and – the sweetest Olympic pose – two fists hoisted aloft in displays of golden bliss.
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Colon Cancer Cells Use "Let Me Pass" Signals
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-11-12
In what reads like a chilling tale of skulduggery and subterfuge, researchers writing online in the journal Cancer Cell this week, describe how colon cancer tumor cells send "let me pass" signals to make blood vessel walls permeable, thus allowing them to travel through and establish themselves in neighbouring tissue (extravasation).
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Facebook Use Feeds Anxiety And Inadequacy Says Small Study
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-11-12
Use of social media like Facebook and Twitter may be feeding anxiety and increasing feelings of inadequacy, according to a small UK study reported in The Telegraph on Monday.
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Being at home may soothe terminally ill cancer patients
cnn.com - 7-11-12
For patients with terminal cancer who have exhausted all treatment options, being as comfortable and relaxed as possible during their final days often becomes a priority. Staying out of the hospital may be key to attaining that frame of mind, a new study suggests.
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Study confirms uncircumcised boys' UTI risk
reuters.com - 7-11-12
Baby boys who are uncircumcised have an increased risk of urinary tract infection - whether their foreskin is "tight" or not, a study published Monday finds.
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Ways to avoid age-related eye diseases
upi.com - 7-11-12
People who find they are holding a book farther away to read it may need reading glasses, a U.S. eye specialist says.
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Aging Boomers' Mental Health Woes Will Swamp Health System: Report
healthday.com - 7-11-12
The United States faces an unprecedented number of aging baby boomers with mental health or substance use issues, a number so great it could overwhelm the existing health care system, a new report warned Tuesday.
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Motherhood, Breast-Feeding May Affect Long-Term Weight
healthday.com - 7-11-12
How many children a woman bears and whether or not she breast-feeds them may affect her weight decades later, according to new research.
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Drug discovery for depression promising
upi.com - 7-10-12
In a study using mice, U.S. researchers found a hormone with anti-diabetic properties also reduces depression-like symptoms.
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Cuba scrambles to fight rare cholera outbreak
myfoxny.com - 7-10-12
Authorities in eastern Cuba are in full prevention mode to contain a rare cholera outbreak amid fears that it may have spread to the capital, distributing chlorine and water purification drops and quarantining hospital patients with diarrhea until they are checked for the disease.
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Why a dog is a child's best friend: They bring immune-boosting dirt and allergens into the home
dailymail.co.uk - 7-10-12
They have long been thought of as man’s best friend. But it seems dogs could also have benefits for babies. Having a pet dog helps keep under-ones free from breathing problems and infections, studies suggest. Researchers found babies who lived with a dog spent fewer weeks with ear infections, coughs or running noses. They were also less likely to need antibiotics.
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Hormone study still worries women, 10 years later
msnbc.msn.com - 7-10-12
When her aunt died of breast cancer, Mari-Anne Pisarri had no doubts about what caused it. She was certain it was estrogen pills. “So when the Women’s Health Initiative released their findings, I thought, ‘Well, of course, Aunt Betty could have told them that years ago’,” said Pisarri, a 56-year-old partner at a Washington, D.C. law firm.
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Drinking Coffee: More Good Than Harm?
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-10-12
There was a time when the only news about coffee and health was how it was bad for the heart, likely to give us ulcers and aggravate our nerves, but now it seems this popular beverage is receiving a more favorable kind of press.
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Virus suspected in Cambodia outbreak
upi.com - 7-10-12
The World Health Organization said Monday it was finding a high incidence of the virus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease among children in Cambodia.
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Consumer Reports rates U.S. hospitals
upi.com - 7-10-12
A rating of 1,159 U.S. hospitals in 44 states by Consumer Reports indicates 51 percent received a score below 50 on a scale of 1 to 100.
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Work stress or no work keeps many awake
upi.com - 7-10-12
Work stress or the stress of being unemployed is keeping many U.S. adults up at night or from getting back to sleep after waking up, a survey indicates.
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Gene flaw 'explains why drugs failed to treat MS'
bbc.co.uk - 7-10-12
Scientists have identified why a once-promising class of drugs do not help people with multiple sclerosis.
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Nutrient Drink Might Boost Memory in Early Alzheimer's: Study
healthday.com - 7-10-12
A daily drink combining several nutrients appears to help people with early Alzheimer's disease improve their memory, a new study suggests.
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Want to Live Longer? Turn Off That TV and Stand Up
healthday.com - 7-10-12
Reducing the amount of time you spend sitting each day and cutting back on TV watching could add years to your life, according to a new study.
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Teach Prescribers About Dangers of Long-Acting Pain Meds: FDA
healthday.com - 7-10-12
As part of its efforts to curb the abuse of narcotic painkillers, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is requiring drug makers to educate doctors about the risks of long-acting and extended-release forms of the drugs.
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New Guidelines Issued for Biopsy Use in Melanoma Patients
healthday.com - 7-10-12
Sentinel lymph node biopsy -- a minimally invasive surgical technique that lets doctors see whether cancer has spread -- should be performed on patients with melanoma tumors of intermediate thickness and may also be appropriate for thick melanoma tumors, according to new guidelines released Monday.
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What Makes the End-of-Life Experience Peaceful?
healthday.com - 7-10-12
Dying patients face their final days better if they are not in the hospital, not on a feeding tube or chemotherapy and feel that they have a trusting relationship with their doctor, a new survey of terminally ill cancer patients reveals.
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More Proof Cranberry Juice Thwarts Infection
healthday.com - 7-10-12
Cranberry juice and cranberry supplements really do help prevent urinary tract infections, a new study confirms.
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Newer Technology to Control Blood Sugar Works Better Than Conventional Methods
sciencedaily.com - 7-10-12
Newer technologies designed to help people with type 1 diabetes monitor their blood sugar levels daily work better than traditional methods and require fewer painful needle sticks, new Johns Hopkins research suggests.
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Drug from Mediterranean Weed Kills Tumor Cells in Mice
sciencedaily.com - 7-10-12
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, working with Danish researchers, have developed a novel anticancer drug designed to travel -- undetected by normal cells -- through the bloodstream until activated by specific cancer proteins. The drug, made from a weedlike plant, has been shown to destroy cancers and their direct blood supplies, acting like a "molecular grenade," and sparing healthy blood vessels and tissues.
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Violence exposure has long-term affects
upi.com - 7-9-12
Healthy children exposed to community violence demonstrated a physical stress response one year after the exposure, U.S. and British researchers said.
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Special K for Depression Renews Hope in Hallucinogens
bloomberg.com - 7-9-12
Donald says he thought he’d died minutes after ketamine, a popular club drug known as Special K, was infused into his vein at a Sydney hospital in March. “I couldn’t see anything except pure white,” recalled the 63-year-old depression sufferer, who declined to be identified by his last name. “I thought, ‘oh well, I must have died.’”
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New optimism about stemming spread of AIDS virus
usatoday.com - 7-9-12
An AIDS-free generation: It seems an audacious goal, considering how the HIV epidemic still is raging around the world. Yet more than 20,000 international HIV researchers and activists will gather in the nation's capital later this month with a sense of optimism not seen in many years — hope that it finally may be possible to dramatically stem the spread of the AIDS virus.
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Your ultimate passport to a perfect healthy holiday: Everything you'll ever need to know about staying healthy abroad
dailymail.co.uk - 7-9-12
No one imagines spending their hard-earned holiday convalescing in some godforsaken hospital ward. But, with alarming regularity, it happens. More than 3,700 British tourists need hospital treatment while abroad each year and many thousands more find their annual trip blighted by accidents or illness. As a freelance repatriation doctor for the insurance industry, I bring sick Britons home every summer, before returning to my day job in a hospital.
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Cannabis could be used to treat obesity-related diseases
telegraph.co.uk - 7-9-12
Researchers have discovered two compounds from cannabis leaves that can increase the amount of energy the body burns.
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'Prescription tourists' thwart states' crackdown on illegal sale of painkillers
msnbc.msn.com - 7-9-12
As he sat in the doctor's office, ex-boxer and weightlifter Gerald Dixon explained that years of sports had left him in pain, especially his hands, and he was looking for relief.
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What Has Killed 56 Children In Cambodia? World Health Organization Baffled
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-9-12
Fifty-six children have died so far in Cambodia from an "undiagnosed syndrome", the Cambodian Ministry of Health and WHO (World Health Organization) announced on Friday. Initially, health officials placed the death toll at 61 children - and recently revised the figure to 56. WHO added that 74 cases of children being hospitalized with this mystery illness from April to 5th July 2012 have been identified.
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Metformin Makes Brain Cells Grow
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-9-12
The discovery is an important step toward therapies that aim to repair the brain not by introducing new stem cells but rather by spurring those that are already present into action, says the study's lead author Freda Miller of the University of Toronto-affiliated Hospital for Sick Children. The fact that it's a drug that is so widely used and so safe makes the news all that much better.
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How A Protein Meal Lets Your Brain Know You're Full
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-9-12
Feeling full involves more than just the uncomfortable sensation that your waistband is getting tight. Investigators reporting online in the Cell Press journal Cell have now mapped out the signals that travel between your gut and your brain to generate the feeling of satiety after eating a protein-rich meal. Understanding this back and forth loop between the brain and gut may pave the way for future approaches in the treatment and/or prevention of obesity.
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Adversity ups depression, inflammation
upi.com - 7-9-12
U.S. and Canadian researchers say they have confirmed links between early childhood adversity, depression and chronic inflammation.
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Can't win war on fat without more exercise
upi.com - 7-9-12
The United States will not solve its obesity problems unless it increases physical activity -- not just reducing the amount of calories, researchers say.
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Increase in teen track-related injuries
upi.com - 7-9-12
From 1991 through 2008 more than 159,000 U.S. adolescents ages 10-18 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for track-related injuries, doctors say.
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Sunburn May Help Rid Body of Radiation-Damaged Cells
healthday.com - 7-9-12
In examining exactly what happens when skin gets sunburned, researchers studying human skin cells and mice found that sunburn is the result of RNA damage.
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Urinary Infections Steal from Hosts' Defense Arsenals
sciencedaily.com - 7-9-12
Humans have known for centuries that copper is a potent weapon against infection. New research shows that the bacteria that cause serious urinary tract infections "know" this, too, and steal copper to prevent the metal from being used against them.
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Natural, organic items grab bigger share in supermarkets
usatoday.com - 7-8-12
There's shower gel made from carrots. Egg-white protein powder. Diapers with no chlorine. Medjool dates and dried papaya. This isn't some exotic, hippy supermarket au natural. This is Kroger, one of the largest mainstream grocers in the nation.
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Life experiences influence genes
upi.com - 7-8-12
World experts from social, biological and medical science met in Scotland to discuss how behavior and life experience influenced genes, researchers say.
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Being a 'helicopter mother' could land you with depression: Parents whose lives revolve around their children damage their health
dailymail.co.uk - 7-8-12
Parenthood is supposed to be one of life’s most fulfilling experiences. But mothers whose lives revolve around their children may be more likely to suffer from depression, according to a study. American researchers questioned 181 women with children under five and found ‘intensive mothering’ damaged their mental health.
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Bad knees may be more of a guy thing
msnbc.msn.com - 7-8-12
Despite research suggesting women's knees are more prone to ligament injuries, a new Swedish study finds that men in that country have a greater number of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, and surgeries to fix them, than do Swedish women.
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Why Do Cancer Rates Increase As We Age?
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-8-12
As we age, our risk of developing cancer increases, now researchers at the University of Colorado Cancer Center say that this is because our tissue landscape changes as we age.
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Obesity Linked To Acute Kidney Injury After Heart Surgery
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-8-12
Obesity increases the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) following cardiac surgery, according to a Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
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Some People Suffer Allergy-Like Symptoms After Drinking Wine
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-8-12
Around seven percent of adults suffer from an intolerance to wine. This is the result of a survey presented by Peter Wigand and co-authors in the current edition of Deutsches Arzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztelb Int 2012; 109 (25): 437-44).
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Ibuprofen improves bone repair after break
upi.com - 7-8-12
A therapeutic dose of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug -- ibuprofen -- improves bone repair after a fracture or surgery, researchers in Spain found.
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Parents less apt to have colds
upi.com - 7-8-12
When exposed to a common cold virus, parents are 52 percent less likely to develop a cold than non-parents, U.S. researchers found.
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Britain: Strawberries berry of choice
upi.com - 7-8-12
Strawberries are the favorite at Wimbledon, and a survey also indicates strawberries are the berry of choice of 64 percent of people living in Britain.
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Unsuccessful Fertility Drug Users Have Reduced Breast Cancer Risk, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 7-8-12
Women using fertility drugs who did not conceive a 10-plus week pregnancy were at a statistically significant reduced risk of breast cancer compared to nonusers; however, women using the drugs who conceived a 10-plus week pregnancy had a statistically significant increased risk of breast cancer compared to unsuccessfully treated women, but a comparable risk to nonusers, according to a study published July 6 in the Journal of The National Cancer Institute.
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Algae Extract Increases Good Cholesterol Levels, Research Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-8-12
A Wayne State University researcher has found that an extract from algae could become a key to regulating cardiovascular disease.
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Diabetes drug may up bladder cancer risk
upi.com - 7-7-12
The medication pioglitazone, used to treat type 2 diabetes, is linked to an increased risk of bladder cancer, Canadian researchers say.
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Breast milk aids digestive bacteria
upi.com - 7-7-12
Babies can't digest part of what's in breast milk, but it gives them a big health boost just the same, a U.S. researcher says.
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U.S. sugar program pitting growers against soda and candy firms
latimes.com - 7-7-12
Soda and candy makers seek to end a program that keeps U.S. sugar prices high by restricting imports. U.S. growers say that part of the farm bill, up for renewal, is vital.
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Coffee, Fats May Affect Fertility Treatment
webmd.com - 7-7-12
What a woman drinks and eats -- especially coffee and fat -- may affect her chances of success with infertility treatments, two new studies suggest.
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Two thirds 'hit the bottle' to relax after a stressful day at work
dailymail.co.uk - 7-7-12
Most adults admit they turn to alcohol to help them cope after a stressful day, according to new research. A survey for the charity Drinkaware found almost two-thirds of people aged 30-45 drank alcohol to unwind. A fifth of men and nearly one in six women said they drank every day or most days of the week.
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The strange reason diet soda makes you fat
msnbc.msn.com - 7-7-12
Want one reason for your beer belly? How about 100 quintillion? That's about how many bacteria live in your gut. And scientists now believe these bacteria can have a significant impact on your weight.
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Bad knees may be more of a guy thing
msnbc.msn.com - 7-7-12
Despite research suggesting women's knees are more prone to ligament injuries, a new Swedish study finds that men in that country have a greater number of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, and surgeries to fix them, than do Swedish women.
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Depression And Chronic Inflammation Result From Childhood Adversity
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-7-12
Inflammation is the body's natural response to injury caused by invading pathogens, whether this be a sore throat due to bacteria from a cold, a wound that has become infected, or any other foreign pathogen that the body has to fight in order to get rid of it. Evidence is now growing that psychological traumas cause a similar response, although this type of inflammation can be destructive.
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People Who Lack Control Are More Likely To Be Superstitious
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-7-12
During the 2010 soccer World Cup, Paul the Octopus became a worldwide superstar for correctly "predicting" the winner of all games in the competition. Queensland University researchers have found that people who felt a lack of control in their lives were more likely to believe in the claimed "psychic abilities" of the famous octopus.
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Treatment guidelines for Gender Identity Disorder in development
cnn.com - 7-7-12
In recent years, stories about transgender people have been front page news. The transformation of Chaz Bono, son of singers Sonny and Cher, from female to male is perhaps the most well known.
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How to choose a healthy breakfast cereal
cnn.com - 7-7-12
Increasingly, breakfast-cereal makers are offering more nutritious, low-sugar options. The trick is trying to find them amidst the Cocoa Puffs, Frosted Flakes, Lucky Charms and all the other sugary concoctions on grocery store shelves. Even cereals that seem healthy -- if you're to trust the front-of-the-box labels on many brands -- may be just the opposite.Increasingly, breakfast-cereal makers are offering more nutritious, low-sugar options. The trick is trying to find them amidst the Cocoa Puffs, Frosted Flakes, Lucky Charms and all the other sugary concoctions on grocery store shelves. Even cereals that seem healthy -- if you're to trust the front-of-the-box labels on many brands -- may be just the opposite.
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Study finds mismatch between kids and vitamins
reuters.com - 7-7-12
Vitamin supplements are meant to fill-in where diet may be lacking, but a new study finds that U.S. kids may not be getting some of the most needed nutrients from their vitamin pills and the kids taking vitamins may not be the ones who need them the most.
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Rest is a key part of life
upi.com - 7-7-12
The lost art of introspection -- even daydreaming -- may be an increasingly valuable but elusive part of life, U.S. researchers said.
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Infant Formula Can Be a Major Source of BPA: Experts
healthday.com - 7-7-12
When Hacah Boros gave birth to her daughter three years ago, giving her infant formula was "completely out of the question," said the 35-year-old nurse from central Connecticut.
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Dogs May Mourn as Deeply as Humans Do
healthday.com - 7-7-12
Jon Tumilson's dog, Hawkeye, was an important part of his life. And, as it turns out, Tumilson was an important part of Hawkeye's life.
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Algae Extract Increases Good Cholesterol Levels, Research Finds
sciencedaily.com - 7-7-12
A Wayne State University researcher has found that an extract from algae could become a key to regulating cardiovascular disease.
More...


Finding Right Meditation Technique Key to User Satisfaction
sciencedaily.com - 7-7-12
New to meditation and already thinking about quitting? You may have simply chosen the wrong method. A new study published online July 7 in Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing highlights the importance of ensuring that new meditators select methods with which they are most comfortable, rather than those that are most popular.
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Pistachios may reduce cancer risk
upi.com - 7-6-12
All nuts are good for the heart, but researchers found pistachios in a varied and balanced diet may reduce the risk of some cancers, a U.S. food expert says.
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Study: 7 percent wine intolerant
upi.com - 7-6-12
About 7 percent of adults suffer from an intolerance to wine, researchers in Germany found.
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First-time teen tobacco and marijuana use booms in June and July
cbsnews.com - 7-6-12
Teenagers aged 13 to 17 are more likely to start smoking cigarettes or weed on an average day in June and July than any other month in the year, according to study results released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).Teenagers aged 13 to 17 are more likely to start smoking cigarettes or weed on an average day in June and July than any other month in the year, according to study results released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).
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Care routinely rationed to 15-minute slots to save cash, study shows
telegraph.co.uk - 7-6-12
Three quarters of all trips to help frail older people in England now have to be completed in less than half an hour, a survey of care providers found.
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Prescription drug addiction among pregnant women becoming 'monstrous tidal wave'
msnbc.msn.com - 7-6-12
They are the youngest victims of the prescription drug epidemic, tiny babies born already addicted to the drugs their mothers were taking when they were pregnant. More than13,000 babies a year are born in America addicted to prescription painkillers like OxyContin, hydrocodone and other narcotic drugs, according to a recent study released by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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Raising Vitamin D Concentrations May Reduce Hospital Acquired Infection Rates
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-6-12
In the United States, hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are the leading cause of death in the health care arena, with over 1.7 million cases per year and 100,000 deaths. Now, new research shows that the risk of hospital-acquired infections could be significantly reduced by increasing vitamin D concentrations among hospital patients.
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Pregnancy Later In Life Increases Risk Of Heart Attacks
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-6-12
Although more women are waiting until they are older to have children, a new study conducted by researchers at UCLA has found that the risk of cardiovascular disease in pregnancy increases the older a women is when she conceives her first child.
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Neupro Shows Promise For Restless Legs Syndrome Patients
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-6-12
At the 16th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders in Dublin, Ireland, German researchers presented results from a clinical analysis of Neupro® (rotigotine transdermal patch), which demonstrated improvements in both day- and night-time symptoms of moderate to severe idiopathic Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS).
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Weird science: Kitty litter increases risk of suicide?
cnn.com - 7-6-12
A small subset of suicide attempts may be linked to an infection that starts in the litter box. A new study suggests an association between Toxoplasma gondii and suicide attempts among women.
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Schizophrenia, autism may be linked in families
reuters.com - 7-6-12
Families with a history of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are also more likely to have a child with autism, new research from Sweden and Israel suggests.
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Smoking mothers' embryos 'grow more slowly
bbc.co.uk - 7-6-12
Time-lapse photography has shown that embryos of smoking women develop more slowly.
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California Woman Finds Ways to Control IBS
healthday.com - 7-6-12
Rachel Byrd doesn't remember a time before she had stomach pain and digestive issues. But her symptoms got so bad in 2009 that she rushed to the hospital, thinking her appendix had burst because the pain was so intense.
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300,000 People in U.S. Living With Chagas Disease: Report
healthday.com - 7-6-12
As many as 300,000 people in the United States may have chronic Chagas disease -- mostly spread by blood-sucking insects -- health officials report.
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Deadly Black Widow Spider Edged Aside in California
healthday.com - 7-6-12
What's bad news for the black widow spider may be good news for California homeowners: The less-toxic brown variety appears to be taking over.
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Living alone ups death risk from 45 to 80
upi.com - 7-6-12
An study of stable outpatients at risk of or with coronary disease found those ages 45-80 who lived alone had an increased risk of death, U.S. researchers say.
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Diet of fresh food fights BPA, chemicals
upi.com - 7-5-12
Fresh foods and limited use of products likely to contain environmental chemicals reduce exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals, U.S. researchers say.
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Medical Marijuana Use Sprouting In Israel
npr.org - 7-5-12
Israel has become a world leader in the use of medical marijuana. More than 10,000 patients have received government licenses to consume the drug to treat ailments such as cancer and chronic pain.
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Does it pay to eat organic? 'Natural' tomatoes are packed with more disease-fighting antioxidants, claim scientists
dailymail.co.uk - 7-5-12
It's an argument that continues to exercise consumers and growers across the UK - organic produce may be good for the environment, but is it any better for your health?
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People with kids half as likely to develop colds due to 'psychological benefits of parenthood'
dailymail.co.uk - 7-5-12
You may think parents couldn't escape from picking up bugs due to the constant stream of virus-ridden children traipsing through their homes. However, scientists have discovered they are actually very adept at batting off illness.
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Women with bigger breasts DO have higher risk of breast cancer, finds genetic study
dailymail.co.uk - 7-5-12
Women with larger breasts are more likely to develop breast cancer, say scientists. A study of more than 16,000 women found those with a larger bra size were at greater risk of the disease.
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Patients can demand a private hospital if they wait 18 weeks for surgery
telegraph.co.uk - 7-5-12
People will be able to demand they are treated privately if they have to wait more than 18 weeks for NHS care, the Health Secretary will announce.
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Gene healing in a lotion? Researchers say they're close
msnbc.msn.com - 7-5-12
Most people who buy cosmetic lotions and potions know that while the people working behind the department store makeup counters may wear white lab coats, the stuff they sell is more about packaging than science.
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Parental Use Of Methamphetamines Leads To Increase In Child Abuse And Foster Care Admissions
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-5-12
Methamphetamine abuse leads to an increase in child abuse and neglect, which causes an increase in foster care admissions, according to a study* from Baylor University.
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3 Genes Identified As Possible Markers For Academic Success
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-5-12
Researchers have identified genetic markers that may influence whether a person finishes high school and goes on to college, according to a national longitudinal study of thousands of young Americans. The study is in the July issue of Developmental Psychology, a publication of the American Psychological Association.
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The Surprising Answer To Why Cancer Rate Increases With Age
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-5-12
Cancers are age-related, much more frequent in the old than in the young. A University of Colorado Cancer Center review published in the journal Oncogene argues against the conventional wisdom that the accumulation of cancer-causing mutations leads to more cancer in older people, instead positing that it is the changing features of tissue in old age that promote higher cancer rates in the elderly.
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Sleep apnea gets worse in the winter
reuters.com - 7-5-12
The breathing problems caused by sleep apnea appear to worsen during the colder months of the year, according to a new study from Brazil.
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U.S. teen anger higher than thought
upi.com - 7-5-12
Two-thirds of U.S. teens showed anger attack threatening violence, destroying property or engaging in violence at some point in their lives, researchers say.
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Seaweed toothpaste 'to stop tooth decay'
bbc.co.uk - 7-5-12
Adding enzymes from seaweed microbes to toothpaste and mouthwash could provide better protection against tooth decay, a team of UK scientists have said.
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Higher Doses of Vitamin D Prevent Fractures in Older Women
healthday.com - 7-5-12
In the latest study to look at the effect of vitamin D on fracture risk, Swiss researchers found that taking more than 800 international units (IU) of vitamin D daily could reduce the risk of hip fractures in older women by 30 percent.
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Post-Op Delirium's Toll on Mental Function May Linger: Study
healthday.com - 7-5-12
The delirium that sometimes follows surgery may leave older heart patients with lingering problems with their mental function, including memory and attention, a new study shows.
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New Drug Prospect Offers Hope Against Hookworm Infections
sciencedaily.com - 7-5-12
A drug candidate that is nearing clinical trials against a Latin American parasite is showing additional promise as a cure for hookworm, one of the most widespread and insidious parasites afflicting developing nations, according to a collaborative study at UCSF and Yale University.
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Women could delay the menopause indefinitely with ovary transplant: doctors
telegraph.co.uk - 7-5-12
A technique to remove pieces of ovary, store it for decades and then replace it with delicate surgery could effectively put a woman's menopause 'on ice', doctors said.
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Parents' pro-fighting attitude can rub off
upi.com - 7-4-12
Parents who fight at home -- and demonstrate pro-fighting attitudes among family members -- may pass the habit onto their children, a U.S. researcher says.
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Eating 40% less food could extend your life by 20 years, claim scientists developing treatment for 'disease' of ageing
dailymail.co.uk - 7-4-12
Eating 40 per cent less food could extend a person's life by 20 years, according to scientists. Researchers at the Institute of Health Ageing at University College London are developing a treatment they hope will combat the 'disease' of getting older. They are looking into how genetics and lifestyle can be adapted to offset the effects of ageing and add years, possibly decades, to a person's life.
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Mediterranean diet 'can help women get pregnant'
telegraph.co.uk - 7-4-12
New research indicates a diet containing lots of monounsaturated fat - found in the fleshy green fruit, olive oil, as well as peanuts, almonds and cashews - can as much as triple the chance of success in women resorting to fertility treatment to conceive.
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Five cups of coffee a day ’as bad as smoking’ for IVF success
telegraph.co.uk - 7-4-12
The Danish team found women who drank that amount halved their chances of getting pregnant via fertility treatment, compared to those who drank none.
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Honey Bees Reveal Link Between Sugar Sensitivity And Metabolic Disorders
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-4-12
Scientists studying the genetics of honey bees found they reveal some insights into the link between sugar sensitivity, diabetic physiology and carbohydrate metabolism that may also be relevant to humans.
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Organ Regeneration Steps Closer With "3D Sugar Printing"
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-4-12
A team of bioengineers has taken a step closer to the day when it will be possible to regenerate new organs from patient's own cells. The researchers have "printed" 3D patterns of blood vessel networks out of sugar that allow tissue to grow around them and then dissolve, leaving behind a hollowed-out "vascular architecture".
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What a drag, Israeli firm grows "highless" marijuana
reuters.com - 7-4-12
They grow in a secret location in northern Israel. A tall fence, security cameras and an armed guard protect them from criminals. A hint of their sweet-scented blossom carries in the air: rows and rows of cannabis plants, as far as the eye can see.
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Infertility has higher psychiatric risk
upi.com - 7-4-12
Danish investigators found childless women with fertility problems are at elevated risk of hospitalization for psychiatric disorders.
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Avoid aggression by 'self-distancing'
upi.com - 7-4-12
A simple strategy, so-called self-distancing, can minimize anger and aggressiveness people feel when they are provoked by others, U.S. researchers suggested.
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Rising temps linked to cyanobacteria
upi.com - 7-4-12
Global warming may be behind a rise in toxic cyanobacteria in global waterways, researchers in Spain said.
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US approves first over-the-counter HIV home-use test
bbc.co.uk - 7-4-12
A home HIV test is expected to go on sale in the US within months, after winning regulator approval.
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Having a Blast on the Fourth? Keep Fido Safe
healthday.com - 7-4-12
The July Fourth holiday may mean happy times for humans, but your best furry friend may well want to hide, veterinary experts say.
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Exercise Might Keep Menopausal Hot Flashes at Bay
healthday.com - 7-4-12
For women experiencing menopausal hot flashes, a new study may offer a helpful preventive approach. The researchers found that most women who exercised had fewer hot flashes for 24 hours afterwards.
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Methadone for Pain Relief Leading Cause of Fatal Overdoses: CDC
healthday.com - 7-4-12
Although methadone accounts for only 2 percent of the painkiller prescriptions in the United States, it is tied to more than 30 percent of painkiller overdose deaths, according to a government report released Tuesday.
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'Superbug' MRSA Making a Retreat in Communities
healthday.com - 7-4-12
The number of infections occurring in community settings, such as gyms or schools, that are caused by the so-called "superbug" MRSA are declining, according to a study of more than 9 million active and non-active military personnel and their immediate families.
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Bees Can 'Turn Back Time,' Reverse Brain Aging
sciencedaily.com - 7-4-12
Scientists at Arizona State University have discovered that older honey bees effectively reverse brain aging when they take on nest responsibilities typically handled by much younger bees. While current research on human age-related dementia focuses on potential new drug treatments, researchers say these findings suggest that social interventions may be used to slow or treat age-related dementia.
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Natural Plant Protein Converted Into Drug-Delivery Vehicles
sciencedaily.com - 7-4-12
Finding biocompatible carriers that can get drugs to their targets in the body involves significant challenges. Beyond practical concerns of manufacturing and loading these vehicles, the carriers must work effectively with the drug and be safe to consume. Vesicles, hollow capsules shaped like double-walled bubbles, are ideal candidates, as the body naturally produces similar structures to move chemicals from one place to another. Finding the right molecules to assemble into capsules, however, remains difficult.
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Skin cancer may be linked to type of HPV
upi.com - 7-3-12
U.S., French and German researchers found links between cutaneous human papillomavirus and a kind of skin cancer -- squamous cell carcinoma.
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Childhood abuse may contribute to obesity
upi.com - 7-3-12
The severity of sexual and physical abuse during childhood and adolescence may be linked to obesity during adulthood, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Cesium found in Fukushima children
upi.com - 7-3-12
Low levels of radioactive cesium were found in 141 infants and children in Japan's Fukushima prefecture, a study found.
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8,733,461: Workers on Federal 'Disability' Exceed Population of New York City
cnsnews.com - 7-3-12
A record of 8,733,461 workers took federal disability insurance payments in June 2012, according to the Social Security Administration. That was up from 8,707,185 in May. It also exceeds the entire population of New York City, which according to the Census Bureau's latest estimate hit 8,244,910 in July 2011.
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The battle of the body: Incredible video shows how the immune system takes on bacterial infection... and wins
dailymail.co.uk - 7-3-12
It is one of nature's most fierce battles, in many cases a matter of life and death. And now for the first time scientists have shown, in real-time, how a bacterial infection can spread - and how the immune system kicks in to fight it off. Researchers infected a mouse with a light-emitting stomach bug and tracked to see where it took hold and how far it spread through the body before it was eventually killed off. They discovered that the entire infection cycle took 12 days.
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'Cat ladies' more likely to commit suicide, scientists claim
telegraph.co.uk - 7-3-12
Women who own cats are more likely to have mental health problems and commit suicide because they can be infected by a common parasite that can be caught from cat litter, a study has found.
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Study: Spanking may increase risk of mental illness
msnbc.msn.com - 7-3-12
Spanking or hitting children as a means of punishment may increase their risk of mental disorders later in life, a new study finds.
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HPV Infection Increases Risk Of Skin Cancer In Men
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-3-12
Although sunlight exposure is known to increase the risk of developing skin cancer, researchers have also discovered that people are more likely to develop non-melanoma skin cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), if they have antibodies for cutaneous types of human papillomavirus (HPV).
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Kidney Failure Going Untreated Too Often In Older Adults
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-3-12
According to a study in the June 20 issue of JAMA, the progression rate of untreated kidney failure is significantly higher in older than in younger individuals. The study involved almost two million Canadian adults.
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Potential Explanation For Why A Diet High In DHA Improves Memory
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-3-12
We've all heard that eating fish is good for our brains and memory. But what is it about DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish, that makes our memory sharper?
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You'd Be Amazed At How Much You Can Learn From A Plant
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-3-12
In a paper publishedin the journal Science, a Michigan State University professor and a colleague discuss why if humans are to survive as a species, we must turn more to plants for any number of valuable lessons.
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GlaxoSmithKline settles healthcare fraud case for $3 billion
reuters.com - 7-3-12
GlaxoSmithKline Plc agreed to plead guilty to misdemeanor criminal charges and pay $3 billion to settle what government officials on Monday described as the largest case of healthcare fraud in U.S. history.
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HIV quad pill 'may improve care'
bbc.co.uk - 7-3-12
A new once-a-day pill which combines four HIV drugs into a single daily treatment is safe and effective, according to a US study.
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Five millionth 'test tube baby'
bbc.co.uk - 7-3-12
Five million "test tube babies" have now been born around the world, according to research presented at a conference of fertility experts.
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No Health Risk When Jehovah's Witnesses Refuse Blood: Study
healthday.com - 7-3-12
Jehovah's Witnesses routinely refuse blood transfusions, and new research suggests the religious custom has some benefits, at least when it comes to heart surgery.
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More Than 1 in 4 Teens Have 'Sexted': Study
healthday.com - 7-3-12
A new survey of hundreds of high school students in the Houston area finds that 28 percent have "sexted" -- sent a naked photo of themselves through email or cell-phone texting. And more than half said they'd been asked to send someone else a naked photo.
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Dangerous Rage May Be Common Among U.S. Teens
healthday.com - 7-3-12
Almost two-thirds of U.S. teens have had an anger attack so severe they have destroyed property, or threatened or attacked another person, a new study finds.
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Antipsychotic Drugs Linked to Higher Odds for Diabetes in Pregnancy
healthday.com - 7-3-12
New research suggests pregnant mothers who take certain antipsychotic drugs may face a higher risk of gestational diabetes, which can appear during pregnancy.
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Why Heart Attacks Cause So Much More Damage in Late Pregnancy
sciencedaily.com - 7-3-12
Heart attacks during pregnancy are uncommon, but the prevalence of heart disease in pregnant mothers has increased over the past decade as more women delay pregnancy until they are older. These women, who are generally less physically active than their younger peers, tend to have higher cholesterol levels and are at greater risk of heart disease and diabetes.
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Day Dreaming Good for You? Reflection Is Critical for Development and Well-Being
sciencedaily.com - 7-3-12
As each day passes, the pace of life seems to accelerate -- demands on productivity continue ever upward and there is hardly ever a moment when we aren't, in some way, in touch with our family, friends, or coworkers. While moments for reflection may be hard to come by, a new article suggests that the long-lost art of introspection -- even daydreaming -- may be an increasingly valuable part of life.
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ALZHEIMER'S 'COULD BE TRIGGERED BY INFECTION'
express.co.uk - 7-3-12
A SIMPLE infection early in life could trigger Alzheimer’s, scientists claim.
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PAINKILLERS FOR KIDS
thedaily.com - 7-3-12
The maker of OxyContin is seeking Food and Drug Administration approval to label the controversial painkiller for use by children as young as 6 in a move that could serve to extend the company’s expiring patent on the lucrative drug, The Daily has learned.
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Intravenous Oxygen Injection For Patients Who Cannot Breathe
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-2-12
An injection that delivers oxygen directly into the bloodstream for patients who cannot breathe has been invented by scientists at Boston Children's Hospital, according a report published in Science Translational Medicine. The authors explained that when patients suffer from an obstructed airway or acute lung failure, they urgently need oxygen to reach their blood, otherwise they have brain injury or suffer from cardiac arrest.
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Key Step in Immune System-Fueled Inflammation Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 7-2-12
Like detectives seeking footprints and other clues on a television "whodunit," science can also benefit from analyzing the tracks of important players in the body's molecular landscape. Klaus Ley, M.D., a scientist at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology, has done just that and illuminated a key step in the journey of inflammation-producing immune cells. The finding provides powerful, previously unknown information about critical biological mechanisms underlying heart disease and many other disorders.
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Why it pays to shell out on seafood: It's filled with nutrients and could cut your risk of a heart attack in half
dailymail.co.uk - 7-2-12
If you include one portion of seafood in your weekly diet, you may halve the chances of suffering a heart attack. Prawns, crabs, squid and octopus are just as packed with vitamins, minerals and fish oils as fish like salmon or cod. They all contain Omega-3 – a key fatty acid known to help with heart health.
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What fat pigs (and other animals) can teach us about our own waistlines
dailymail.co.uk - 7-2-12
Around the world, doctors are wringing their hands over an obesity epidemic. But this isn’t the human outbreak you’re thinking of, nor are these the physicians you would envisage. Vets are seeing more and more overweight animals; the scale of the problem is now comparable to the human battle against the bulge.
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Chronic pain is determined by emotions, scientists believe
telegraph.co.uk - 7-2-12
The emotional state of the brain can explain why different individuals do not respond the same way to similar injuries, say scientists.
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Communicating With People Described As Being In An Unconscious, Vegetative State
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-2-12
Researchers have come up with a device that may enable people who are completely unable to speak or move at all to nevertheless manage unscripted back-and-forth conversation. The key to such silent and still communication is the first real-time, brain-scanning speller, according to the report published online on June 28 in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication.
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Study Suggests New Screening Method For Sudden Death In Athletes
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-2-12
A new study suggests that echocardiography be included as part of screenings to help identify student athletes with heart problems that could lead to sudden death.
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Lung Diseases Leading Cause Of Death, Most People Don't Know
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-2-12
Despite lung disease killing 4 million people every year, the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) revealed alarming data showing that most people are ignorant about lung disease, which kills more people than any other disease worldwide. The data was released to coincide with World Spirometry Day.
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When ADHD drugs given affects schoolwork
upi.com - 7-2-12
U.S. researchers found when a child begins taking medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder could affect their academic progress.
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Tips offered for allergy sufferers
upi.com - 7-2-12
Many patients believe nothing can be done for seasonal allergies, but that's just not true, a New York allergy expert says.
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Severe sleep deprivation hurt immunity
upi.com - 7-2-12
Severe sleep deprivation affects the body's immune system the same way physical stress does, researchers in the Netherlands and Britain found.
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Diet, exercise key to cancer prevention
upi.com - 7-1-12
Healthy nutrition and exercise have just as much, if not more, impact on lowering cancer risks and mortality rates as screening, a U.S. nutritionist says.
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Cities Balk as Federal Law on Marijuana Is Enforced
nytimes.com - 7-1-12
Faced with growing chaos in the state’s medical marijuana industry, this city in Northern California passed an ordinance in 2008 that meticulously detailed, over 11 pages, how the drug could be grown and sold here.
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Safety warning over Britain’s most common antidepressant
telegraph.co.uk - 7-1-12
A warning has been sounded over antidepressant drugs taken by more than a million patients in Britain.
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Psst: asparagus pee. Are you in the club?
msnbc.msn.com - 7-1-12
Many of you -- maybe three-quarters of our readers here -- are about to learn a small bathroom secret that the rest of us rarely, if ever, mention.
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Type 1 Diabetes Prevented In Animal Study
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-1-12
Researchers from the Karolinska Institute, Sweden, managed to prevent Type 1 Diabetes onset in genetically susceptible mice, according to an article published in Diabetes. The scientists explain that they injected the mice with specifically prepared cells, which stopped their immune systems from destroying the pancreatic beta cells - cells that produce insulin - just in time.
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The Most Successful Strategy For Diabetes Is Early, Intensive Treatment
medicalnewstoday.com - 7-1-12
Intensive early treatment of type 2 diabetes slows down progression of the disease by preserving the body's insulin-producing capacity, a UT Southwestern study has shown.
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Are men 'sexually fluid'?
cnn.com - 7-1-12
In a new critically-acclaimed off-Broadway play, with a title too controversial for print, a gay man finds himself falling for a woman, which makes him - and his male partner - wonder whether he’s “really” gay after all.
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Small babies at higher risk of autism, not Asperger
reuters.com - 7-1-12
Babies born small or prematurely go on to develop autism at higher rates, although the risk is still small, according to a new study from Finland.
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Parents must prepare children before camp
upi.com - 7-1-12
A New York doctor said preparing children for camp can be an anxious time for parents, but preparation can ease the minds of mom and dad.
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Case study: Man gets headaches from porn
upi.com - 7-1-12
A 24-year-old unmarried man in India complained of intense "exploding" headaches while watching pornography, researchers said.
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Young Athletes Face Unhealthy Food Choices, Parents Say
healthday.com - 7-1-12
Children who play organized sports often consume unhealthy foods and beverages, a new study finds.
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Hot Flashes Don't Signal Poor Heart Health for Most Women: Study
healthday.com - 7-1-12
The hot flashes that bedevil so many women as they enter menopause don't appear to be linked to poorer heart health, new research suggests.
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Bees Shed Light On Human Sweet Perception and Metabolic Disorders
sciencedaily.com - 7-1-12
Scientists at Arizona State University have discovered that honey bees may teach us about basic connections between taste perception and metabolic disorders in humans.
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