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August, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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EU votes to spend £1.8million on homeopathy for farm animals
dailymail.co.uk - 8-31-11
European politicians yesterday voted to spend £1.8million on research into homeopathy for farm animals.
The European Parliament’s agriculture committee agreed to spend two million euros – part funded by British taxpayers’ money – on investigating whether cattle, sheep and pigs can benefit from the alternative therapy.
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Is It Mom's Fault When Sons Turn Delinquent?
abcnews.go.com - 8-31-11
Are teenage boys delinquent because they don't have a close relationship with their mothers, or does a child's character determine how easy it is for a parent to foster warmth and closeness? Is it anyone's fault?
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Chocolate lowers heart, stroke risk
usatoday.com - 8-31-11
People who eat chocolate regularly may not only be feeding their sweet tooth, but lowering their risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.
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Choosing death can be like a 'birth,' advocates say
cnn.com - 8-31-11
James Powell could barely speak on the day he died; cancer had confined him to bed and heavy painkillers left him only semi-lucid. Yet the mood was almost celebratory as 25 people -- family, friends and volunteers -- gathered in a large living room to tell stories and say goodbye on the day Powell chose to end his suffering.
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Coral could hold key to sunscreen pill
bbc.co.uk - 8-31-11
Scientists hope to harness coral's natural defence against the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays to make a sunscreen pill for humans.
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Flame Retardants Tied to Lower Birth Weights
healthday.com - 8-31-11
A flame retardant that was phased out of use but is still present in older furnishings is linked to lower birth weights in newborns of women exposed to it during pregnancy, a new study suggests.
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Green Tea Is Effective in Treating Genetic Disorder and Types of Tumors, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 8-31-11
A compound found in green tea shows great promise for the development of drugs to treat two types of tumors and a deadly congenital disease. The discovery is the result of research led by principal investigator, Dr. Thomas Smith at The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and his colleagues at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
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From Mild-Mannered to Killer: Study Explains Plague's Rapid Evolution and Sheds Light On Fighting Deadly Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 8-31-11
In the evolutionary blink of an eye, a bacterium that causes mild stomach irritation evolved into a deadly assassin responsible for the most devastating pandemics in human history. How did the mild-mannered Yersinia pseudotuberculosis become Yersinia pestis, more commonly known as the Plague?
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U.S. newborn death rate tied with Qatar
msnbc.msn.com - 8-31-11
Babies in the United States have a higher risk of dying during their first month of life than do babies born in 40 other countries, according to a new report.
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Areas near Japan nuclear plant may be off limits for decades
reuters.com - 8-31-11
Areas surrounding Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant could remain uninhabitable for decades due to high radiation, the government warned on Saturday as it struggles to clean up after the world's worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.
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Why we're right to trust our gut instincts: Scientists discover first decision IS the right one
dailymail.co.uk - 8-31-11
Go on your gut feeling when setting goals - because more often than not it'll be right, researchers have revealed.
According to a study by Canada's University of Alberta, when it comes to working out where the future lies your unconscious mind is both smarter than you think and can be a great motivator.
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Monsanto Corn Plant Losing Bug Resistance
online.wsj.com - 8-31-11
Widely grown corn plants that Monsanto Co. genetically modified to thwart a voracious bug are falling prey to that very pest in a few Iowa fields, the first time a major Midwest scourge has developed resistance to a genetically modified crop.
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Inattention: Why ADHD kids don't graduate
upi.com - 8-31-11
A lack of focus, not hyperactivity, is the main reason students with attention-deficient hyperactivity disorder don't finish high school, Canadian experts say.
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Watching Viruses 'Friend' a Network: Researchers Develop Facebook Application to Track the Path of Infection
sciencedaily.com - 8-31-11
From SARS to swine flu, virus outbreaks can be unpredictable -- and devastating. But now a new application through the ubiquitous social networking site Facebook, developed in a Tel Aviv University lab, is poised to serve as a better indicator of how infections spread among populations.
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Canada warns not to buy 'fresh' semen online
breitbart.com - 8-31-11
Canada's health agency on Tuesday warned would-be parents not to purchase "fresh" semen online, saying it may be tainted with infectious diseases.
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Patients' Underlying Health Linked to Worse Outcomes for Melanoma
sciencedaily.com - 8-31-11
It's not how old but how frail patients are that can predict how well they will fare after a melanoma diagnosis. In fact, young patients in poor health may have worse outcomes than older patients in good shape.
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Study Finds Day Care Rivaling College In Expenses
dfw.cbslocal.com - 8-31-11
Jessica Rivera wants the best for her children. Being a working mom, she has had no choice but to pay for day care so that she could help her husband keep the house up and running.
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Sex: Why it makes women fall in love - but just makes men want MORE!
dailymail.co.uk - 8-30-11
Sex is one of our biggest preoccupations — causing thrills, heartache and downright confusion. But until recently, exactly what happens in the brain during sex was something of a mystery to scientists.
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'Black Death' bacteria likely extinct, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 8-30-11
The bacteria that caused the Black Death, which wiped out millions in mid-14th century Europe, may be extinct, according to a new study.
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Hurricane Irene spawns baby boom in some hospitals
msnbc.msn.com - 8-30-11
Hurricane Irene's sweep up the East Coast spawned a swath of damage from powerful winds and rains, but also a legacy of a happier sort — a crew of new babies born in the heart of a howling storm.
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Single vaccine covers ebola and rabies
upi.com - 8-30-11
A new single vaccine protects against both rabies and the Ebola virus, U.S. researchers say.
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Chocolate good for heart -- confirmed
upi.com - 8-30-11
People who eat chocolate have reduced risk of heart attack and stroke but the benefit may be due to something else chocolate eaters do, British researchers say.
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'Smelling' Heart Failure: Evaluation of an Electronic Nose
sciencedaily.com - 8-30-11
A German team has developed a completely new non-invasive method to identify heart failure. It consists of an "electronic nose" which could make the "smelling" of heart failure possible.
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Black Death Bacterium Identified: Genetic Analysis of Medieval Plague Skeletons Shows Presence of Yersinia Pestis Bacteria
sciencedaily.com - 8-30-11
The Black Death claimed the lives of one-third of Europeans in just five years from 1348 to 1353. Until recently, it was not certain whether the bacterium Yersinia pestis -- known to cause the plague today -- was responsible for that most deadly outbreak of disease ever.
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Bird flu fear as mutant strain hits China and Vietnam
bbc.co.uk - 8-30-11
Avian flu shows signs of a resurgence, while a mutant strain - able to sidestep vaccines - could be spreading in Asia, the United Nations has warned.
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Poor Sleep, High Blood Pressure?
healthday.com - 8-30-11
If you sleep poorly, your chances of developing high blood pressure may increase, new research suggest.
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'Gimme' Kids Often Grow Into 'Gimme' Adults
healthday.com - 8-30-11
Kids who have trouble resisting temptation are more likely than patient preschoolers to grow into adults who lack self-control, a new study suggests.
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Dementia expert supports assisted suicide
upi.com - 8-30-11
A British expert on dementia says terminally ill patients should be able to choose when they want to die.
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The Brittleness of Aging Bones: More Than Loss of Bone Mass
sciencedaily.com - 8-30-11
It is a well-established fact that as we grow older, our bones become more brittle and prone to fracturing. It is also well established that loss of mass is a major reason for older bones fracturing more readily than younger bones, hence medical treatments have focused on slowing down this loss. However, new research from scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) shows that at microscopic dimensions, the age-related loss of bone quality can be every bit as important as the loss of quantity in the susceptibility of bone to fracturing.
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Virus Attacks Childhood Cancers
sciencedaily.com - 8-30-11
Researchers from Yale University are looking to a virus from the same family as the rabies virus to fight a form of cancer primarily found in children and young adults. They report their findings in the September 2011 issue of the Journal of Virology.
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New Device Helps the Blind to Move Independently
sciencedaily.com - 8-30-11
A team of engineers from the Research Center for Graphic Technologies (CITG) of the Universitat Politècnica de València, coordinated by Guillermo Peris Fajarnés, have developed a new device that helps the blind to move independently. This system, called EYE 21, has been awarded the Vodafone Prize for Innovation in Telecommunications.
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Popular Fruit Shoot children's drink contains no fruit at all amid claims many popular brands are loaded with sugar
dailymail.co.uk - 8-30-11
The popular children's drink Fruit Shoot can contain no fruit at all, while many have a content of just 5 per cent, health campaigners say.
And to make matters worse, many are loaded with added sugar.
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Labor of Love: Physically Active Moms-To-Be Give Babies a Head Start On Heart Health
sciencedaily.com - 8-29-11
Moms-to-be long have been told by their doctors and baby-related books and websites that staying fit during pregnancy is good for both mother and child. When it was reported a couple of years back that exercising strengthens a fetus' heart control, many pregnant women took heed and hit the ground running, literally. Some signed up for prenatal yoga classes; others found new ways to incorporate low-impact aerobic activities into their daily lives.
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Blacks' kidney failure rate explained
upi.com - 8-29-11
Blacks are more likely to excrete protein in their urine than whites and this may account for why blacks have more kidney failure, U.S. researchers say.
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Teen vaccinations against cervical cancer lagging
usatoday.com - 8-29-11
Only about half of the teenage girls in the U.S. have rolled up their sleeves for a controversial vaccine against cervical cancer — a rate well below those for two other vaccinations aimed at adolescents.
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Eczema now biggest skin disease in children
telegraph.co.uk - 8-29-11
A survey of 123 dermatologists carried out by the British Skin Foundation found that 88 per cent believed childhood eczema had increased over the past three years to reach a “problematic scale”.
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'Baby fever' is a real thing -- and not just in women, study claims
msnbc.msn.com - 8-29-11
They squeal, they scream, they burble and burp -- and according to popular culture (not to mention various episodes of "30 Rock" and "Sex and the City"), nearly every American female over the age of 30 is ga-ga to get their hands on one of them.
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Psoriasis 'linked to stroke risk'
bbc.co.uk - 8-29-11
People with psoriasis have nearly three times the normal risk of stroke and abnormal heart rhythm, according to scientists in Denmark.
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Lack of vitamin D can lead to diabetes, study finds
naturalnews.com - 8-29-11
The array of undiscovered health benefits afforded by high vitamin D intake is vast thanks to several new studies linking deficiency in this important hormone to diabetes.
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How vitamin B-12 treats Alzheimer's disease
naturalnews.com - 8-29-11
Go ahead and tell someone that they should give their loved one, who is suffering from Alzheimer's Disease (AD) or Dementia, a dose of vitamin B12 that is 300 times the recommended daily intake, and they'll probably cover their ears and run the other way or tell you they are afraid of "overdosing."
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Avoid aluminum - Locate the unexpected sources of aluminum in products
naturalnews.com - 8-29-11
Senile dementia is the term given to many different diseases producing dementia. Over half of all dementia cases are sufferers of Alzheimer's disease. Protect yourself as best you can by avoiding products containing aluminum.
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Experience helps brains of elderly compete
upi.com - 8-29-11
The brains of older adults can achieve very close to the same performance as those of younger ones because of experience, researchers in Canada say.
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America fatter since recession began
upi.com - 8-29-11
West Virginia has the highest obesity rate in the United States at 34.3 percent, while Colorado has the lowest at 20 percent, the Gallup poll indicates.
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Sweet Sparrow Songs May Actually Be Shouting Matches
healthday.com - 8-29-11
Although it may sound sweet and friendly, song-sharing among sparrows is actually a hostile behavior, similar to arguing or slinging insults, Canadian scientists have found.
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New Blood Thinner May Outperform Warfarin for Irregular Heartbeat
healthday.com - 8-29-11
An experimental drug, apixaban (Eliquis), appears better than the old standby warfarin in preventing strokes in people with the abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation, a new study finds.
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Genetic Link to Mesothelioma Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 8-29-11
Scientists have found that individuals who carry a mutation in a gene called BAP1 are susceptible to developing two forms of cancer -- mesothelioma, and melanoma of the eye. Additionally, when these individuals are exposed to asbestos or similar mineral fibers, their risk of developing mesothelioma, an aggressive cancer of the lining of the chest and abdomen, may be markedly increased.
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In Cell Culture, Like Real Estate, the Neighborhood Matters
sciencedaily.com - 8-29-11
Ever since scientists first began growing human cells in lab dishes in 1952, they have focused on improving the chemical soup that feeds the cells and helps regulate their growth. But surfaces also matter, says Laura Kiessling, a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who observes that living cells are normally in contact with each other and with a structure called the extracellular matrix, not just with the dissolved chemicals in their surroundings.
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Eradicating Dangerous Bacteria May Cause Permanent Harm
sciencedaily.com - 8-29-11
In the zeal to eliminate dangerous bacteria, it is possible that we are also permanently killing off beneficial bacteria as well, posits Martin Blaser, MD, Frederick H. King Professor of Medicine, professor of Microbiology and chair of the Department of Medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center.
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Cholera Pandemic's Source Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 8-29-11
Researchers have tracked the spread of antibiotic resistant strains back to the Bay of Bengal. Researchers have used next generation sequencing to trace the source and explain the spread of the latest (seventh) cholera pandemic. They have also highlighted the impact of the acquisition of resistance to antibiotics on shaping outbreaks and show resistance was first acquired around 1982.
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Response to sad movies linked to depression relapse
msnbc.msn.com - 8-28-11
The brains of people who relapse into depression differ from those of people who maintain a recovery, a new study shows.
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Resveratrol, grape seed extract help prevent skin cancer
naturalnews.com - 8-28-11
Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have made a fascinating discovery about the synergistic effects of certain fruit and vegetable compounds on preventing skin cancer. Resveratrol, a powerful antioxidant found in grape skins, grape seed extract, D-glucarate, a cellular detoxifier, calcium and ellagic acid all seem to work in harmony together to protect against skin cancer.
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Could a Tumor Suppressor Also Fight Obesity? Research Reveals Hormone Receptor GCC's Role in Appetite
sciencedaily.com - 8-28-11
The hormone receptor guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) has been established as a suppressor of colorectal cancer tumors, but new evidence from Thomas Jefferson University suggests it may also help fight one of the country's biggest pandemics: obesity.
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Novel Control of Dengue Fever
sciencedaily.com - 8-28-11
The spread of Dengue fever in northern Australia may be controlled by a bacterium that infects mosquitoes that harbor the virus, Australian and U.S. researchers report Aug. 25 in two papers published in the journal Nature.
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Greater Impact of Chemotherapy On Fertility
sciencedaily.com - 8-28-11
Current estimates of the impact of chemotherapy on women's reproductive health are too low, according to a University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) study. The researchers say their analysis of the age-specific, long-term effects of chemotherapy provides new insights that will help patients and clinicians make more informed decisions about future reproductive options, such as egg harvesting.
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Uncovering the Spread of Deadly Cancer: New Imaging Device Enables Scientists to See Tumor Cells Traveling in the Brain
sciencedaily.com - 8-28-11
For the first time, scientists can see pathways to stop a deadly brain cancer in its tracks. Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have imaged individual cancer cells and the routes they travel as the tumor spreads.
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Mosquitoes 'disappearing' in some parts of Africa
bbc.co.uk - 8-28-11
Malaria-carrying mosquitoes are disappearing in some parts of Africa, but scientists are unsure as to why.
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Heat in Chili Peppers Can Ease Sinus Problems, Research Shows
sciencedaily.com - 8-27-11
Hot chili peppers are known to make people "tear up," but a new study led by University of Cincinnati allergy researcher Jonathan Bernstein, MD, found that a nasal spray containing an ingredient derived from hot chili peppers (Capsicum annum) may help people "clear up" certain types of sinus inflammation.
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Antidepressants 'cut bowel and brain cancer risk'
telegraph.co.uk - 8-27-11
Tricyclic antidepressants also reduce the risk of glioma - the most common type of brain cancer - by up to two-thirds, found the study by academics at three British universities.
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Half of hospitals buy back-door drugs, new survey shows
msnbc.msn.com - 8-27-11
Amid growing reports of price-gouging for life-saving drugs, half of hospital officials said they’ve bought medications from back-door suppliers during recent drug shortages, a new survey shows.
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In early Alzheimer's, work is possible with support
cnn.com - 8-27-11
About 200,000 Americans are estimated to have early-onset Alzheimer's disease, which means the disease is found before age 65. Alzheimer's is the most common form of dementia, and it a causes significant memory and thinking problems. There is no cure.
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Vitamin A pills 'could save thousands of children'
bbc.co.uk - 8-27-11
Giving vitamin A supplements to children under the age of five in developing countries could save 600,000 lives a year, researchers claim.
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Greenpeace finds highly toxic chemicals in branded clothing
naturalnews.com - 8-27-11
Earlier this week Greenpeace announced at the launch of its report "Dirty Laundry 2" that traces of toxic chemicals have been detected in products made by 14 big brand top clothing manufacturers.
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Violence remains a top cause of U.S. death
upi.com - 8-27-11
The estimated annual cost of U.S. medical care and productivity lost due to violence each year is estimated at more than $70 billion, researchers say.
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Many Health-Care Workers Have Turned to Alternative Medicine
healthday.com - 8-27-11
Three out of every four U.S. health-care workers use some form of complementary or alternative medicine or practice to help stay healthy, a new report shows.
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Service Members Twice as Likely to Have Affairs: Study
healthday.com - 8-27-11
Almost a third of current or former U.S. military service members who were ever married have had affairs -- twice the rate of the general population, a new study found.
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Quitting Even Tougher When Smokers Battle Other Addictions
healthday.com - 8-27-11
Four out of every 10 smokers is also burdened with alcohol or drug addictions, or mental health disorders, and getting them to quit cigarettes can be a big challenge.
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Could New Drug Cure Nearly Any Viral Infection? Technology Shows Promise Against Common Cold, Influenza and Other Ailments, Researchers Say
sciencedaily.com - 8-27-11
Most bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics such as penicillin, discovered decades ago. However, such drugs are useless against viral infections, including influenza, the common cold, and deadly hemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola.
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No Bones About It: Eating Dried Plums Helps Prevent Fractures and Osteoporosis, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 8-27-11
When it comes to improving bone health in postmenopausal women -- and people of all ages, actually -- a Florida State University researcher has found a simple, proactive solution to help prevent fractures and osteoporosis: eating dried plums.
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Omega-3s Reduce Stroke Severity, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 8-27-11
A diet rich in omega-3s reduces the severity of brain damage after a stroke, according to a study conducted by Université Laval researchers. The team, co-directed by professors Jasna Kriz and Frédéric Calon, showed that the extent of brain damage following a stroke was reduced by 25% in mice that consumed DHA type omega-3s daily. Details of the study can be found on the website of the journal Stroke.
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Life Expectancy Success Story
sciencedaily.com - 8-27-11
Life expectancy is increasing all the time due to better quality of life and better health care. Despite this, increases in life expectancy can be patchy, with some sources reporting that the gap in life expectancy between rich and poor is getting bigger as time goes on. However, a new report in BioMed Central's open access journal International Journal for Equity in Health finds that the life expectancy for people living in deprived areas in Campinas, Brazil, is catching up, rising at three times the rate of people living in more affluent areas.
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Natural Alzheimer's-Fighting Compound Created Inexpensively in Lab
sciencedaily.com - 8-27-11
Scientists at Yale University have developed the first practical method to create a compound called huperzine A in the lab. The compound, which occurs naturally in a species of moss found in China, is an enzyme inhibitor that has been used to treat Alzheimer's disease in China since the late 1990s and is sold in the U.S. as a dietary supplement to help maintain memory. Scientists believe it could also potentially combat the effects of chemical warfare agents.
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New Genetic Clue in Development of Rheumatoid Arthritis
sciencedaily.com - 8-27-11
Scientists at Mount Sinai Hospital, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Toronto, University Health Network and McGill University have obtained significant new insights into the causes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune disorders including type 1 diabetes, lupus and Graves disease.
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Obesity Rates Projected to Soar
abcnews.go.com - 8-26-11
If waistlines keep expanding at current rates, half of the U.S. population will be obese by 2030, according to a new report.
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'Cancer risk' of perfumed products that go in your tumble-dryer as chemicals are found in air from vents
dailymail.co.uk - 8-26-11
Scented laundry products could be releasing cancer-causing chemicals when clothes are tumble-dried, research suggests.
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One or two drinks a day 'can protect against dementia' especially in older people
dailymail.co.uk - 8-26-11
Drinking could reduce the risk of dementia, especially in older people, according to two new reviews.
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Tropical plants could be used to fight cancer
telegraph.co.uk - 8-26-11
The extracts, blends of chemicals and other ingredients found inside several plants from tropical regions, could form the base ingredients of new medicines to combat the disease, experts said.
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Salmonella fears spur ban of Mexican papayas in U.S.
msnbc.msn.com - 8-26-11
The federal Food and Drug Administration is banning imports of all papayas grown in Mexico because of widespread and ongoing salmonella contamination, the agency announced Thursday.
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Men's sex problems go beyond erectile dysfunction
msnbc.msn.com - 8-26-11
A large percentage of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) also suffer from other sexual problems that can't be treated with drugs, a new study says.
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Global governments 'must get tough on obesity'
bbc.co.uk - 8-26-11
Tougher action - including taxing junk food - is needed by all governments if the obesity crisis is going to be tackled, experts say.
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COBRA's federal subsidy to end Sept. 1
upi.com - 8-26-11
The federal subsidy for the unemployed to continue their health insurance from their former employer is set to end next week, a U.S. non-profit group says.
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Why the return trip seems shorter
upi.com - 8-26-11
People tend to estimate their vacation destination trip as longer than it is, a faulty estimate that makes the return trip seem shorter, Dutch researchers say.
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Obesity Continues to Balloon in U.S. and U.K.: Study
healthday.com - 8-26-11
The number of obese people in the United States will increase from 99 million in 2008 to 164 million by 2030, and the number of obese people in the United Kingdom will increase from 15 million to 26 million, a new study predicts.
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Interbreeding Between Modern Humans and Evolutionary Cousins Gave Healthy Immune System Boost to Human Genome, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 8-26-11
For a few years now, scientists have known that humans and their evolutionary cousins had some casual flings, but now it appears that these liaisons led to a more meaningful relationship.
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Young Brains Lack the Wisdom of Their Elders, Clinical Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 8-26-11
The brains of older people are not slower but rather wiser than young brains, which allows older adults to achieve an equivalent level of performance, according research undertaken at the University Geriatrics Institute of Montreal by Dr. Oury Monchi and Dr. Ruben Martins of the University of Montreal.
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New Sensors Streamline Detection of Estrogenic Compounds
sciencedaily.com - 8-26-11
Researchers have engineered new sensors that fluoresce in the presence of compounds that interact with estrogen receptors in human cells. The sensors detect natural or human-made substances that alter estrogenic signaling in the body.
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Fukushima caesium leaks 'equal 168 Hiroshimas'
telegraph.co.uk - 8-26-11
Japan's government estimates the amount of radioactive caesium-137 released by the Fukushima nuclear disaster so far is equal to that of 168 Hiroshima bombs.
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Gene Study Sheds New Light On Origins of British Men
sciencedaily.com - 8-25-11
New genetic evidence reveals that most British men are not descended from immigrant farmers who migrated east 5,000-10,000 years ago -- contrary to previous research.
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Dust mite test may help predict asthma
upi.com - 8-25-11
Toddlers with a family history of allergy and test positive in a skin prick test for dust mites have a higher asthma risk later, Australian researchers say.
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Taking certain antidepressants could cut the risk of both bowel and brain cancer
dailymail.co.uk - 8-25-11
A type of drug that treats depression and migraines could also reduce the risk of bowel cancer, say researchers from Lincoln University.
Tricyclic drugs, which account for almost a third of all prescriptions for antidepressants, cut the risk of bowel cancer by up to 21 per cent, according to a study.
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Undernutrition in teenage years can lead to heart disease
telegraph.co.uk - 8-25-11
Teenage girls who starve themselves in an attempt to lose weight could raise their risk of heart disease later in life by up to a third, a new study suggests.
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Early Alzheimer's disclosures to become more common
msnbc.msn.com - 8-25-11
The revelation that Pat Summitt, the 59-year-old women’s basketball coach at the University of Tennessee, not only has Alzheimer’s disease, but plans to continue her career, might seem astounding at first. But doctors expect such disclosures to become ever more common as experts get better at detecting the disease in its earliest stages.
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Pregnant women now being dosed with toxic chemotherapy drugs
naturalnews.com - 8-25-11
In the world of medicine, the toxicity of chemotherapy drugs is widely known. They make your hair fall out, after all, and that's on top of the muscle wasting, vomiting and overall health deterioration that chemo drugs admittedly produce. But now the insanity has reached a new low with doctors routinely prescribing chemotherapy drugs to pregnant women!
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Dengue fever kills at least 20 in India
upi.com - 8-25-11
An outbreak of dengue fever, a mosquito-borne tropical disease, has killed at least 20 people in India's eastern coastal Orissa state, health authorities said.
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Long-Term Antibiotic Use May Lessen COPD Flare-Ups
healthday.com - 8-25-11
Taking a daily dose of the antibiotic azithromycin may help prevent life-threatening complications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), researchers say.
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Antidepressant Tied to Dangerous Heart Rhythm: FDA
healthday.com - 8-25-11
High doses of the popular antidepressant Celexa can cause potentially fatal abnormal heart rhythms and should no longer be prescribed to patients, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday.
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Mechanism Links Substance Abuse With Vulnerability to Depression
sciencedaily.com - 8-25-11
It is well established that a mood disorder can increase an individual's risk for substance abuse, but there is also evidence that the converse is true; substance abuse can increase a person's vulnerability to stress-related illnesses. Now, a new study finds that repeated cocaine use increases the severity of depressive-like responses in a mouse model of depression and identifies a mechanism that underlies this cocaine-induced vulnerability.
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Why Only Some Obese People Develop Chronic Diseases: Disease-Causing Fat Cells Found in Those With Metabolic Syndrome
sciencedaily.com - 8-25-11
UC Davis Health System researchers have discovered biological indicators that help explain why some obese people develop chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and others do not.
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Scented Laundry Products Emit Hazardous Chemicals Through Dryer Vents
sciencedaily.com - 8-25-11
The same University of Washington researcher who used chemical sleuthing to deduce what's in fragranced consumer products now has turned her attention to the scented air wafting from household laundry vents.
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Erectile dysfunction linked to orgasm lack
upi.com - 8-25-11
Most men with erectile dysfunction are unable to have an orgasm and have problems with ejaculation, U.S. researchers found.
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Zoo Animals Go Wild Ahead of Quake
nbcwashington.com - 8-25-11
Well before any humans ducked beneath desks or sought shelter in doorways on Tuesday, wildlife at the zoo started to react to the oncoming earthquake.
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Newfound Hijacked Proteins Linked to Salmonella Virulence
sciencedaily.com - 8-24-11
Scientists have discovered that bacteria like E. coli and Salmonella have a sneaky way of making minor alterations to their genes to boost their chances for infection.
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Cholesterol-Lowering Foods Reduce LDL Levels More Than Low-Fat Foods
abcnews.go.com - 8-24-11
Millions of Americans pop statins to keep their cholesterol levels down. But new research suggests that cholesterol-friendly foods, such as soy products and tree nuts, may also contribute to lowering LDL, or "bad," cholesterol levels.
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"Bulletproof skin" created with help of artist
usatoday.com - 8-24-11
A bio-art project to create bulletproof skin has given a Utah State researcher even more hope his genetically engineered spider silk can be used to help surgeons heal large wounds and create artificial tendons and ligaments.
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High salt, low activity also bad for brain health
usatoday.com - 8-24-11
Research has shown consuming too much salt and being inactive leads to heart disease, but now a new study shows the same combination also can be bad for brain health.
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HPV test may be better predictor of cervical cancer than pap smear
usatoday.com - 8-24-11
A test that detects the two strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) that are most likely to raise the risk of invasive cervical cancer, when combined with the Pap test, may be more accurate for many women than the Pap test alone, a new study indicates.
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Why boys bottle it up and girls can’t keep quiet: The different ways the sexes deal with problems
dailymail.co.uk - 8-24-11
Men's reluctance to discuss their problems can be infuriating for their chattier wives and girlfriends.
And the habit, it seems, starts in childhood.
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Pardon? Did you say Viagra can make you deaf?
dailymail.co.uk - 8-24-11
We all know that some things can affect our hearing — working in a noisy environment, for instance, or diseases such as mumps and measles.
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Richer people less likely to care for parents
telegraph.co.uk - 8-24-11
Richer people are less likely to care for their elderly parents than those earning lower salaries, according to a new study.
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Call to measure duration of obesity
bbc.co.uk - 8-24-11
Experts say the health hazards of obesity may have been grossly underestimated because we are not measuring the condition adequately.
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Breast cancer drugs may stop cancer, but they also cut life short due to toxicity
naturalnews.com - 8-24-11
Here's another case of a so-called "wonder drug" heavily promoted by Big Pharma having a darker side than anyone knew. It turns out aromatase inhibitors (sold under the names Femara, Aromasin, and Arimidex), widely prescribed to huge numbers of women who've been diagnosed with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, could be so toxic in the body they do nothing to prolong life -- and might even shorten it.
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Sexist men and women made for each other
upi.com - 8-24-11
Men who prefer "one-night stands" are apt to use aggressive courtship strategies that sexist women who favor casual sex respond to, U.S. researchers say.
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Metal hip replacement complaints soar
upi.com - 8-24-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration received more than 5,000 reports this year about metal-on-metal hips, an analysis by The New York Times indicated.
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Cholesterol-lowering food tops low-fat
upi.com - 8-24-11
People counseled to eat cholesterol-lowering food such as soy and nuts had lower cholesterol than those on a low-fat diet, researchers in Canada say.
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Certain Foods Said to Help Lower Bad Cholesterol
healthday.com - 8-24-11
Adding specific cholesterol-lowering foods, such as nuts, to your diet can lower your cholesterol more than a low-fat diet alone can, new research suggests.
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Common Heart Dysfunction Can Help Bring on Heart Failure
healthday.com - 8-24-11
A common form of heart trouble called diastolic dysfunction appears to worsen over time and may lead to an increased risk of heart failure, new research shows.
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New Heart Scan May Speed Up Diagnosis With Less Radiation
sciencedaily.com - 8-24-11
New technology appears to provide faster, more accurate heart scans for both viewing blood vessels in the heart and measuring blood supply to the heart muscle, while exposing patients to less radiation, researchers report in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, a journal of the American Heart Association.
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Afghan Patients a Common Source of Drug-Resistant Bacteria, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 8-24-11
Afghan patients treated at a U.S. military hospital in Afghanistan often carry multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, according to a report in the September issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The findings underscore the need for effective infection control measures at deployed hospitals where both soldiers and local patients are treated, the study's authors say.
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Coriander Oil Could Tackle Food Poisoning and Drug-Resistant Infections
sciencedaily.com - 8-24-11
Coriander oil has been shown to be toxic to a broad range of harmful bacteria. Its use in foods and in clinical agents could prevent food-borne illnesses and even treat antibiotic-resistant infections, according to the authors of a study published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology.
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Patients Discharged from a Hospital at Increased Risk of Unintentional Discontinuation of Medications for Chronic Diseases
sciencedaily.com - 8-24-11
Following discharge from a hospital, patients are at an increased risk of unintentional discontinuation of commonly prescribed chronic disease medications, with this risk even greater for patients who were admitted to an intensive care unit, according to a study in the August 24/31 issue of JAMA.
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Deaths from Strong Prescription Painkillers Are On the Increase, Experts Say
sciencedaily.com - 8-24-11
Action is needed to tackle the increasing number of deaths in the United States and Canada from prescription painkillers known as opioids, say experts in an article published online in the British Medical Journal.
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When Well-Known Flu Strains 'Hook Up' Dangerous Progeny Can Result
sciencedaily.com - 8-23-11
A new University of Maryland-led study finds that 'sex' between the virus responsible for the 2009 flu pandemic (H1N1) and a common type of avian flu virus (H9N2) can produce offspring -- new combined flu viruses -- with the potential for creating a new influenza pandemic.
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Older Adults With Too Much Salt in Diet and Too Little Exercise at Greater Risk of Cognitive Decline, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 8-23-11
Older adults who lead sedentary lifestyles and consume a lot of sodium in their diet may be putting themselves at risk for more than just heart disease.
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Marijuana Genetic Code Unlocked, New Treatments Underway
emaxhealth.com - 8-23-11
A company called Medicinal Genomics has published the genetic code for the marijuana plant, specifically the cannabis species Cannabis sativa and C. indica. This advancement opens the door to new treatments using the highly controversial plant, which has been legalized in 16 states for medicinal purposes.
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Scientists find why stress damages DNA
upi.com - 8-23-11
For years, studies showed chronic stress creates chromosomal damage and now U.S. researchers say they know why.
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Too much stress 'turns you grey': Adrenaline from being put under pressure could cause hair to change colour
dailymail.co.uk - 8-23-11
Stress really can turn your hair grey, say scientists.
They have got to the root of how the ‘fight or flight chemical’ adrenaline causes damage that may eventually lead to a variety of conditions from the superficial, such as grey hair, to the serious, such as cancer.
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Why a healthy marriage is good for the heart
telegraph.co.uk - 8-23-11
Happily married people who undergo major heart surgery are three times more likely to survive than those who are unmarried, according to a new study.
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Falls from windows injure 5,100 kids every year
msnbc.msn.com - 8-23-11
Every year, more than 5,100 American kids go to the hospital with injuries after falling out of windows, and a quarter of them are serious enough for the children to be admitted, according to the first nationwide study of the problem.
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Wedded bliss boosts heart surgery survival
upi.com - 8-23-11
Being married to a supportive spouse is as good for one's heart as quitting smoking or being obese, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Most Heart Attack Patients Who Need Angioplasty Quickly Get It: Study
healthday.com - 8-23-11
More than 90 percent of U.S. heart attack patients who required emergency angioplasty to open blocked coronary arteries received the treatment within the recommended time in 2010, a new study finds.
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Weight Gain Hits Women After Marriage, Men After Divorce: Study
healthday.com - 8-23-11
Tying or untying the knot seems to affect men's and women's waistlines differently: A new study shows that women are more apt to pile on excess pounds after marriage, while men add the weight after a divorce.
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Decline in Hormone Therapy Linked to Fewer Mammograms
healthday.com - 8-23-11
The dramatic decline in women's use of hormone therapy mid-decade also appears linked to a decline in mammograms, new research suggests.
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Tuning Natural Antimicrobials to Improve Their Effectiveness at Battling Superbugs
sciencedaily.com - 8-23-11
Ongoing research at the Institute of Food Research, which is strategically funded by BBSRC, is exploring the use of virus-produced proteins that destroy bacterial cells to combat potentially dangerous microbial infections. Bacteriophages produce endolysin proteins that specifically target certain bacteria, and IFR has been studying one that destroys Clostridium difficile, a common and dangerous source of hospital-acquired infections. New research is showing that it is possible to 'tune' these endolysin properties to increase their effectiveness and aid their development as a new weapon in the battle against superbugs.
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Hypnosis as health care quietly gains ground
msnbc.msn.com - 8-22-11
In 1987, Marilyn Bellezzo was diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a disorder that was, for her, debilitating.
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Americans fall in love slower than Europeans, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 8-22-11
Americans take longer to fall in love than their Eastern European counterparts, according to a new study. The findings also showed that Americans frequently cited friendship as a key part of romantic love, while Russians and Lithuanians rarely mentioned it.
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The fattier your heart, the greater your heart disease risk
usatoday.com - 8-22-11
The amount of hidden fat that collects around the heart may be a stronger indicator of cardiac disease risk than a bulging waistline or flabby thighs, a new study reports.
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First new skin cancer treatment since 1970s goes on sale
telegraph.co.uk - 8-22-11
Half of the patients who took the new drug in trials were still alive a year later, twice as many as those who did not receive it.
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Kids should hold cellphones away from head
upi.com - 8-22-11
A New York non-profit group is urging parents to teach their children five simple rules to limit their exposure to cellphone radiation.
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Four ways to live longer suggested
upi.com - 8-22-11
U.S. adults can reduce their odds of dying prematurely if they adopt four healthy lifestyle behaviors, including quitting smoking, health officials say.
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U.S. cohabitation rate eclipses divorce
upi.com - 8-22-11
Cohabiting U.S. households with children are linked to increased instability in children's lives and negative outcomes for children, researchers say.
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Celiac disease on the rise in the U.S.
usatoday.com - 8-22-11
Complaints of celiac disease are on the rise in the United States, with more and more people growing ill from exposure to products containing gluten.
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Triphala is the miraculous Ayurvedic herbal remedy
naturalnews.com - 8-22-11
Ayurveda, one of the oldest health sciences, is based on the understanding of a relation between the human body and the universe as a microcosm and macrocosm. The body (microcosm), as well as universe (macrocosm), is comprised of five basic elements -- earth, water, fire, air and space -- which are again grouped into three more categories -- kapha (earth+water), vata (air+space) and pitta (fire+water). Diseases are imbalances in the elemental composition of the body due to climate, toxins, improper diet and lifestyle etc. Herbs help to cleanse and restore the balance in the body. There are more than 7000 herbs described in ayurveda. To increase their effectiveness, they are prescribed in combined formulae. Triphala (translation - three fruits) is one such magical combination beneficial in toxin cleansing, balancing and rejuvenating the body. It was traditionally used to slow down the aging process and strengthen the body.
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Top five ingredients to avoid in deodorant
naturalnews.com - 8-22-11
Deodorant is an essential toiletry that most Americans have in their medicine cabinet today. Many are still unaware of the hidden dangers in the active ingredients of modern day deodorant. They continue to use these potentially hazardous chemicals on their underarms as a way of reducing perspiration and odor.
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The Obama administration love affair with GMOs is selling America down the river to agricultural ruin
naturalnews.com - 8-22-11
The freedom to grow one's own food is a foundational pillar of civilization, and one that absolutely must persist if humanity itself is to exist. But this freedom is rapidly disintegrating in the US, as multinational corporations like Monsanto seize control of the American food supply through the widespread propagation of patented, genetically-modified (GM) seeds and crops. And the Obama administration is currently at the helm of orchestrating this hostile takeover, as it continues to openly support any and all efforts to spread GMOs far and wide, whether it be on private farmland or public wildlife refuges.
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Cell recycling system 'damaged in nerve disease'
bbc.co.uk - 8-22-11
A breakdown of a recycling system in cells appears to be the underlying cause of a fatal nerve disease.
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Gut's hospital bug defence found
bbc.co.uk - 8-22-11
The way cells in the gut fight off toxins produced by a hospital bug has been discovered by US researchers.
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Kids of Unhealthy, Disadvantaged Moms More Likely to Be Sickly
healthday.com - 8-22-11
The children of disadvantaged, unhealthy mothers in the United States have many more health problems than children of disadvantaged mothers who are relatively healthy, says a new study.
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Many Less-Educated Whites Abandoning Religion
healthday.com - 8-22-11
Large numbers of less-educated white Americans are abandoning religion, a new study says.
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Common Cause of All Forms of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 8-22-11
The underlying disease process of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Lou Gehrig's disease), a fatal neurodegenerative disease that paralyzes its victims, has long eluded scientists and prevented development of effective therapies. Scientists weren't even sure all its forms actually converged into a common disease process.
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At Last, a Reason Why Stress Causes DNA Damage
sciencedaily.com - 8-22-11
For years, researchers have published papers that associate chronic stress with chromosomal damage. Now researchers at Duke University Medical Center have discovered a mechanism that helps to explain the stress response in terms of DNA damage.
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Children With Cerebral Palsy: Change the Environment, Not the Child, Researchers Say
sciencedaily.com - 8-22-11
A successful new rehabilitation approach to treating children with cerebral palsy puts its focus on where a child lives and plays, not just improving the child's balance, posture and movement skills.
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Study: Cholesterol drugs needlessly used
upi.com - 8-21-11
Tens of thousands of patients at low risk of heart attacks or strokes could be taking statin heart drugs needlessly, a study published in Britain says.
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Three cancers share genetic link
bbc.co.uk - 8-21-11
A gene has been linked to at least three cancers in different tissues in the body, US researchers say.
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Hookah use up among Calif. young adults
upi.com - 8-21-11
Researchers in California say they've tracked an alarming increase in the use of hookahs -- water pipes used for smoking tobacco -- among young adults.
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Metabolic syndrome, kidney disease cause
upi.com - 8-21-11
Metabolic syndrome, medical disorders that increase diabetes, heart disease, stroke and premature death risk, may add to kidney disease, U.S. researchers say.
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Why going to sleep in your contact lenses can blind you
dailymail.co.uk - 8-21-11
Falling asleep without taking out and rinsing contact lenses is a habit most of the three million Britons who use them will admit to, occasionally at least.
But as Katie Richardson, 24, discovered, poor lens hygiene can lead to a range of nasty eye ailments, including microbial keratitis, an infection of the cornea, the clear frontal part of the eye where lenses sit.
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Study: Doctors overtest for cervix cancer
upi.com - 8-21-11
Most U.S. doctors still urge women to get tested every year for cervical cancer even though guidelines say many do not need them, a study says.
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Disparity in official suicide reporting
upi.com - 8-21-11
Appointed medical examiners and coroners are less likely than elected coroners to under report suicides, U.S. researchers found.
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Emotionally healthier have more degrees
upi.com - 8-21-11
Older U.S. adults with a college education have higher emotional health scores than those the same age who have fewer years of education, a Gallup poll says.
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Gay or straight, couples swap bad habits
upi.com - 8-21-11
Straight people in marriages and gays in long-term, intimate cohabitation relationships may pick up unhealthy habits from their partners, U.S. researchers say.
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Trying to Be 'Supermom' Can Raise Risk for Depression
healthday.com - 8-21-11
Working moms are less likely to show symptoms of depression than stay-at-home moms, a new study finds.
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New Piece to the Puzzle of Brain Function
sciencedaily.com - 8-21-11
Researchers at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen have collaborated with the company NeuroSearch to generate new knowledge about an important part of the brain's complex communication system. The discovery could form the basis for future development of better medicines for patients with psychiatric disorders.
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Why Spiders Don't Drop Off of Their Threads: Source of Spider Silk's Extreme Strength Unveiled
sciencedaily.com - 8-21-11
Spider thread has five times the tensile strength of steel and is stronger then even the best currently available synthetic fibers. Scientists have now succeeded in unveiling a further secret of silk proteins and the mechanism that imparts spider silk with its strength.
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Snakes can sneak up on you
upi.com - 8-20-11
Snakes will strike when threatened or surprised but most will usually avoid people, a U.S. physician says.
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Scrambling for cancer drugs
boston.com - 8-20-11
Ellen McCarthy was scheduled to receive her monthly dose of an ovarian cancer drug at Massachusetts General Hospital last month when she got distressing news: The hospital had run out.
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Parasite Uses the Power of Sexual Attraction to Trick Rats Into Becoming Cat Food
sciencedaily.com - 8-20-11
When a male rat senses the presence of a fetching female rat, a certain region of his brain lights up with neural activity, in anticipation of romance. Now Stanford University researchers have discovered that in male rats infected with the parasite Toxoplasma, the same region responds just as strongly to the odor of cat urine.
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A glass or two of wine or beer a day can help to stave off Alzheimer's, biggest ever study finds
dailymail.co.uk - 8-20-11
A glass or two of wine each day can help reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's, the biggest ever study has found.
Researchers discovered those who indulged in light to moderate social drinking were 23 per cent less likely to develop forms of dementia and cognitive impairment.
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Travellers told to be wary of taking pills abroad
telegraph.co.uk - 8-20-11
Some would say there are enough hassles travelling these days without entry border officers digging in to your toilet bag. But a casually imported box of pills obtainable over the counter in Britain could spell trouble.
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Modified ecstasy 'attacks blood cancers'
bbc.co.uk - 8-20-11
Modified ecstasy could one day have a role to play in fighting some blood cancers, according to scientists.
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Global warming fraud: Iconic polar bear on melting ice cap a hoax
naturalnews.com - 8-20-11
Images of periled polar bears sinking into arctic seas because of melting polar ice caps have become an iconic symbol of the devastating consequences of so-called global warming. But a new government investigation into the supposed science surrounding this now-infamous urban legend has revealed that it was likely nothing more than a pseudoscientific hoax propagated by faulty math and perfunctory observations.
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Celiac Disease on the Rise in U.S.
healthday.com - 8-20-11
Complaints of celiac disease are on the rise in the United States, with more and more people growing ill from exposure to products containing gluten.
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Fukushima radiation alarms doctors
english.aljazeera.net - 8-20-11
Scientists and doctors are calling for a new national policy in Japan that mandates the testing of food, soil, water, and the air for radioactivity still being emitted from Fukushima's heavily damaged Daiichi nuclear power plant.
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Study: Cholesterol drugs needlessly used
upi.com - 8-20-11
Tens of thousands of patients at low risk of heart attacks or strokes could be taking statin heart drugs needlessly, a study published in Britain says.
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Boys Reach Sexual Maturity Younger and Younger: Phase Between Being Physically but Not Socially Adult Is Getting Longer
sciencedaily.com - 8-20-11
Boys are maturing physically earlier than ever before. The age of sexual maturity has been decreasing by about 2.5 months each decade at least since the middle of the 18th century. Joshua Goldstein, director of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock (MPIDR), has used mortality data to demonstrate this trend, which until now was difficult to decipher. What had already been established for girls now seems to also be true for boys: the time period during which young people are sexually mature but socially not yet considered adults is expanding.
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Mother's BMI Linked to Fatter Babies
sciencedaily.com - 8-20-11
Babies of mothers with a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) are fatter and have more fat in their liver, a study published in September's issue of the journal Pediatric Research has found. The researchers from Imperial College London say that the effect of a mother's BMI on her child's development in the womb might put them on a trajectory towards lifelong metabolic health problems.
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The “Non-GMO” Labeling Scam
farmwars.info - 8-20-11
This is what happens when you start reading labels, folks! You begin to understand the intricacies and outright deceptive labeling practices that are permeating our processed food industry. So, why should the Non-GMO label be any different? It isn’t. In fact, use of the Non-GMO label to purposely deceive people into paying a higher price for a product that they are led to believe is GMO free, but is chock full of GMO ingredients, is widespread. And it is not going to get any better even if regulations are put in place to require GMO labeling.
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Researchers Unravel the Magic of Flocks of Starlings
sciencedaily.com - 8-19-11
Do fish swimming in schools or birds flying in flocks have a collective spirit that enables them to move as one? Are they animals with highly developed cognition, a complex instinct or a telepathic gift? A recent study conducted by the research group led by Prof. Charlotte Hemelrijk of the University of Groningen points in another direction. Mathematical models of self-organization show that complicated collective behaviour can be the consequence of a few simple behavioural rules.
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Parasite-Infected Rodents Attracted to Cat Odor
sciencedaily.com - 8-19-11
New research shows how a brain parasite can manipulate rodent fear responses for the parasite's own benefit. The study, authored by Patrick House and Dr. Robert Sapolsky of Stanford University and released this week in PloS One, addressed how the single-celled parasite Toxoplasma gondii makes infected rodents more likely to spend time near cat odors.
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Bacteria from Dog Feces Present in Outdoor Air in Urban Areas
sciencedaily.com - 8-19-11
Bacteria from fecal material -- in particular, dog fecal material -- may constitute the dominant source of airborne bacteria in Cleveland's and Detroit's wintertime air, says a new University of Colorado Boulder study.
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Dissimilar Interaction of Opioid Receptors May Explain Why Men and Women Experience Pain Differently
sciencedaily.com - 8-19-11
Women and men experience pain, particularly chronic pain, very differently. The ability of some opioids to relieve pain also differs between women and men. While it has been recognized since the mid-nineties that some narcotic analgesics are more effective in women than men, the reason for this difference was largely unknown.
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Prunes exceptional in preventing fractures
upi.com - 8-19-11
Dried plums, or prunes, improve bone health in people of all ages, but may be most helpful for post-menopausal women, U.S. researchers say.
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'Birth tourism' not a widespread practice in U.S., data show
usatoday.com - 8-19-11
Hundreds of expectant women from Mexico come to Arizona every year specifically to deliver babies at hospitals near the border.
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Single people may die younger, new study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 8-19-11
It's great being single, isn't it? You get to sleep on either side of the bed; you never have to wait for the bathroom; you've got all that "me time." Except, well, you may be one of the unlucky singles who keel over about one decade earlier than your married friends, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
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1 in 10 US kids has ADHD, study finds
msnbc.msn.com - 8-19-11
Nearly one in 10 children in the United States is being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a new government study.
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Study finds mother's fat harms embryo development
msnbc.msn.com - 8-19-11
Exposing eggs to high levels of saturated fatty acids of the type commonly found in the ovaries of obese women and those with diabetes can harm the development of the embryo, according to research published on Wednesday.
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Breastfeeding may drop breast cancer risk
upi.com - 8-19-11
Giving birth to two or more children is linked to estrogen and progesterone receptor negative cancers in women who didn't breastfeed, U.S. researchers say.
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Addiction redefined as brain disorder
upi.com - 8-19-11
A U.S. group of doctors redefined addiction as a chronic brain disorder and not just a behavioral problem involving too much alcohol, drugs, gambling or sex.
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Study: Nice guys make lower salaries
upi.com - 8-19-11
Nice guys may or may not finish last, as the saying goes, but they make less money than their less agreeable counterparts, U.S. and Canadian researchers found.
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New Drug May Put the Squeeze on Heart Failure
healthday.com - 8-19-11
An experimental heart failure drug may change the way doctors treat this vexing condition, researchers say.
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Test for Calcium Buildup May Spot Heart Attack, Stroke Risk
healthday.com - 8-19-11
A calcium test performed with the assistance of a CT scanner seems to provide insight into the likelihood that certain patients at moderate risk of heart problems will have a heart attack or stroke, researchers say.
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Treatment With Vitamin C Dissolves Toxic Protein Aggregates in Alzheimer's Disease
sciencedaily.com - 8-19-11
Researchers at Lund University have discovered a new function for vitamin C. Treatment with vitamin C can dissolve the toxic protein aggregates that build up in the brain in Alzheimer's disease.
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Muscle-Building Effect of Protein Beverages for Athletes Investigated
sciencedaily.com - 8-19-11
Physical activity requires strong, healthy muscles. Fortunately, when people exercise on a regular basis, their muscles experience a continuous cycle of muscle breakdown (during exercise) and compensatory remodeling and growth (especially with weightlifting). Athletes have long experimented with methods to augment these physiologic responses to enhance muscle growth. One such ergogenic aid that has gained recent popularity is the use of high-quality, high-protein beverages during and after exercise, with dairy-based drinks enriched with whey proteins often taking front stage.
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US says Legionnaires cases triple over decade
hosted.ap.org - 8-19-11
Cases of Legionnaires' disease have tripled in the last decade, U.S. health officials said Thursday, but the risk of dying from it is lower because of more effective treatment.
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Researchers: World Population to Reach 7 Billion This Year
myfoxny.com - 8-19-11
The world population will reach seven billion later this year, with increases in the number of people in Africa off-setting birth rate drops elsewhere, according to a new French study published Thursday.
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One in five American children now living in poverty according to new report
dailymail.co.uk - 8-19-11
14.7million children in families with income less than $21,756 a year.
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IBM unveils chips that mimic the human brain
computing.co.uk - 8-19-11
IBM has unveiled a new experimental computer chip that it says mimics the human brain in that it perceives, acts and even thinks.
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Dangers Lurking In Pet Food
globalanimal.org - 8-19-11
When it comes to worries about food poisoning, human food typically gets all the attention. But a growing number of recalls of tainted foods in the past few years involve pet products.
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For first time, more corn used for ethanol than livestock
thegazette.com - 8-18-11
For the first time ever, more of the corn crop may go into gas tanks than into the stomachs of cattle and poultry destined for kitchen tables.
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Drug shortages lead to price gouging
usatoday.com - 8-18-11
With the nation in the midst of a record shortage of prescription drugs — including vital medications used in everything from surgery to chemotherapy — unscrupulous marketers are stockpiling hard-to-find drugs and attempting to sell them back to hospitals at up to 50 times their normal prices, a new report says.
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Chinese herb mix may shorten swine flu fever
msnbc.msn.com - 8-18-11
In mild cases of H1N1 influenza, a traditional Chinese herb mixture may relieve a fever about as well as the antiviral drug Tamiflu, researchers reported Monday.
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This is awkward: Your most insecure pals may save your life
msnbc.msn.com - 8-18-11
Mouth-breathers, eye contact avoiders and that girl who always stands way too close to whoever she's talking to: Come sit by me. A recent study suggests that the exact attributes that make the most awkward folks in your life so very, very awkward are the same traits that may enable them to save your life someday, reports MyHealthNewsDaily.
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More evidence links pesticides, diabetes
msnbc.msn.com - 8-18-11
People with relatively high levels of certain pesticides in their blood may have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes — particularly if they are overweight, a new study suggests.
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Brain-eating amoebas blamed in three deaths
cnn.com - 8-18-11
It's eerie but it's true: Three people have died this summer after suffering rare infections from a waterborne amoeba that destroys the brain.
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Sniffer dogs detect lung cancer
bbc.co.uk - 8-18-11
Sniffer dogs can be used to reliably detect lung cancer, according to researchers in Germany.
Writing in the European Respiratory Journal, they found that trained dogs could detect a tumour in 71% of patients.
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Mosquitoes 'developing resistance to bed nets'
bbc.co.uk - 8-18-11
Mosquitoes can rapidly develop resistance to bed nets treated with insecticide, a new study from Senegal suggests.
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Amazing Food Facts: Red grapes produce resveratrol as a defense against fungal invasion
naturalnews.com - 8-18-11
You may have heard of resveratrol, a miracle antioxidant found in grape skins (and many other foods) that's linked to a lower risk of heart disease and enhanced longevity. Unlike other antioxidants such as anthocyanins, which give blueberries their color and are an integral part of the fruit, plants produce resveratrol only in response to fungal or bacterial attack. That's right -- resveratrol is a natural antibiotic and fungicide that's intelligently synthesized by the grape plant in order to survive a biological attack!
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Things the government approves that are more dangerous than raw milk
naturalnews.com - 8-18-11
Among all the raw milk madness happening right now, NaturalNews recently covered the biased information coming from government sources and how it makes dispelling the myths and regulations surrounding raw milk difficult.
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Separation anxiety affects child, parents
upi.com - 8-18-11
Separation anxiety may affect both U.S. children and their parents on the first day of school, a professor of counseling says.
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Allowing cats to hide may help relax them
upi.com - 8-18-11
Allowing cats to hide may play an important role in having them relax, a University of Queensland researcher suggests.
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Method to Detect When Patients Wake During Surgery Fails to Impress
healthday.com - 8-18-11
A newer technology intended to alert doctors when patients are regaining consciousness while under anesthesia is no better than conventional monitoring systems in lowering the incidence of "anesthesia awareness," new research shows.
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Lessons From Tainted Peanut Butter Outbreak Apply Today
healthday.com - 8-18-11
A look back at the tainted-peanut butter salmonella outbreak of 2008-2009 is giving scientists valuable lessons on how to minimize deadly onslaughts of foodborne illness in the future.
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Most Doctors Will Face Malpractice Claims During Their Careers
healthday.com - 8-18-11
About three-quarters of U.S. doctors will be sued for malpractice at some point in their careers, though the vast majority will not end up paying any claims, a new study suggests.
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FDA Approves Novel Melanoma Drug
healthday.com - 8-18-11
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday gave its approval to Zelboraf (vemurafenib), a first-of-its-kind drug for the treatment of an often lethal form of melanoma.
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Ultrasound of Neck Arteries May Help Gauge Stroke Risk
healthday.com - 8-18-11
People who have narrowed carotid arteries in the neck and show no symptoms may be at risk for stroke and not know it, but a simple ultrasound test can identify the problem, a new study suggests.
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Dark Beer Has More Iron Than Pale Beer or Non-Alcoholic Beer
sciencedaily.com - 8-18-11
A team of researchers from the University of Valladolid (Spain) has analysed 40 brands of beer, discovering that dark beer has more free iron than pale and non-alcoholic beers. Iron is essential to the human diet, but also helps oxidise the organic compounds that give these beverages stability and flavour.
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Milk Better Than Water to Rehydrate Kids, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 8-18-11
Active children need to be watered with milk. It's a more effective way of countering dehydration than a sports drink or water itself, say researchers at McMaster University.
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Researchers Find New Hope for Treatment of Chronic Leukemia
sciencedaily.com - 8-18-11
While testing a new drug designed to treat chronic leukemia, researchers at Cleveland Clinic discovered new markers that could identify which patients would receive maximum benefit from the treatment.
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Effects of Prenatal Stress Passed Across Generations in Mice
sciencedaily.com - 8-18-11
Sons of male mice exposed to prenatal stress are more sensitive to stress as adults, according to a study in the August 17 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. These findings suggest experiences in the womb can lead to individual differences in stress response that may be passed across generations.
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Popular Herbal Supplements May Adversely Affect Chemotherapy Treatment
sciencedaily.com - 8-18-11
Acai berry, cumin, herbal tea, turmeric and long-term use of garlic -- all herbal supplements commonly believed to be beneficial to your health -- may negatively impact chemotherapy treatment according to a new report presented at the recent American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago. Researchers from Northwestern Memorial hospital say there is growing evidence that these popular supplements may intensify or weaken the effect of chemotherapy drugs and in some cases, may cause a toxic, even lethal reaction.
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GM corn being developed for fuel instead of food
guardian.co.uk - 8-17-11
US farmers are growing the first corn plants genetically modified for the specific purpose of putting more ethanol in gas tanks rather than producing more food.
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Cancer’s Secrets Come Into Sharper Focus
nytimes.com - 8-17-11
For the last decade cancer research has been guided by a common vision of how a single cell, outcompeting its neighbors, evolves into a malignant tumor.
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Suicide bacteria engineered to kill other bacteria
cbsnews.com - 8-17-11
In a lab in Singapore, scientists are designing and breeding suicide bombers. If their efforts pan out, they will be applauded rather than jailed, for their targets are neither humans nor buildings. They're bacteria.
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Second Death this Month Caused by Deadly Parasite
abcnews.go.com - 8-17-11
A second child died this month from a deadly parasite that grows in stagnant waters, health officials confirmed Tuesday.
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Possible Link Between Vitamin D Levels and Skin Cancer Risk, Study Says
abcnews.go.com - 8-17-11
A new study that links higher vitamin D levels to a higher risk of skin cancer simply emphasizes what doctors have been saying all along: Don't forget the sunscreen.
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Addiction a brain disorder, not just bad behavior
usatoday.com - 8-17-11
Addiction isn't just about willpower. It's a chronic brain disease, says a new definition aimed at helping families and their doctors better understand the challenges of treating it.
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A baby's first 1,000 days 'determines their health prospects for life'
dailymail.co.uk - 8-17-11
You have fought to get your children into the best school, helped them with their homework and paid for music lessons, so you might be confident you have given them the best start in life.
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Caffeine in sunscreen could protect against skin cancer
telegraph.co.uk - 8-17-11
Scientists believe the chemical found in coffee absorbs ultraviolet radiation when applied to the skin and prevents tumours after exposure to sunlight.
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Stressed-out partner can lead to early death
telegraph.co.uk - 8-17-11
Research on birds has found that those paired off with anxious partners were at a high risk of dying young.
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Will you have a heart attack? These tests might tell
cnn.com - 8-17-11
Most heart attacks strike with no warning, but doctors now have a clearer picture than ever before of who is most likely to have one, says Dr. Arthur Agatston, a Miami cardiologist and author of the best-selling South Beach diet books.
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Study: Children who take antibiotics more prone to contracting 'superbugs'
naturalnews.com - 8-17-11
A group of Canadian researchers has found a link between taking antibiotics and a higher likelihood of harboring deadly "superbugs" like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which kills tens of thousands of people every year. Published in the journal Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, the breakthrough study found that children who take at least one antibiotic are three times as likely to develop MRSA than children who take no antibiotics, while children who take four or more antibiotics are 18 times more likely to develop MRSA.
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Proof that the FDA's assault on raw milk has nothing to do with consumer safety
naturalnews.com - 8-17-11
An astonishing two-thirds of all fresh chicken meat sold in grocery stores today is contaminated with salmonella. Diet soda is laced with aspartame, a chemical sweetener made from the feces of genetically engineered bacteria (http://www.naturalnews.com/030918_a...). "Natural" corn chips are made from genetically modified corn plants linked to widespread infertility when consumed by mammals.
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Vitamin D receptor slows colon tumors
upi.com - 8-17-11
Vitamin D, specifically its receptor, slows the action of a key protein in the carcinogenic process of colon cancer cells, researchers in Spain say.
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Heavy drinking results in poor diet
upi.com - 8-17-11
Heavy drinking, binge drinking, a preference for spirits and drinking alcohol during meals are associated with poor dietary habits, researchers in Spain say.
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New Drug May Relieve Severe, Tough-to-Treat Gout
healthday.com - 8-17-11
For some gout patients afflicted with a particularly severe, crippling form of the disease who find standard treatments either intolerable or ineffective, a recently approved alternative appears to afford relief.
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Moderate Drinking May Help Prevent Alzheimer's, Other Dementia
healthday.com - 8-17-11
Drinking moderate amounts of alcohol, especially wine, may lower the risk of dementia, according to a review of previous research.
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Does Her Diabetes Differ From His?
healthday.com - 8-17-11
Scientists who identified significant differences in male and female metabolism say there's a need for gender-specific drug therapies for some diseases.
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Some Thyroid Cancer Patients May Get Radioactive Iodine Unnecessarily
healthday.com - 8-17-11
Some thyroid cancer patients with early disease may be given radioactive iodine unnecessarily, while others with more advanced tumors who should get the treatment don't, a new study suggests.
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Antipsychotics Best for Controlling Mania: Study
healthday.com - 8-17-11
The manic episodes experienced by those with bipolar disorder are better controlled by antipsychotic drugs than mood stabilizers, a new, large study suggests.
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Possibility of Temporarily Reversing Aging in the Immune System
sciencedaily.com - 8-17-11
Researchers have discovered a new mechanism controlling aging in white blood cells. The research, published in the September issue of the Journal of Immunology, opens up the possibility of temporarily reversing the effects of aging on immunity and could, in the future, allow for the short-term boosting of the immune systems of older people.
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Malignant Stem Cells May Explain Why Some Breast Cancers Develop and Recur
sciencedaily.com - 8-17-11
Mutations that are found in stem cells could be causing some breast cancers to develop and may be the reason the disease recurs. These abnormal cells are likely controlling cell functions in the tumor and, given they are not targeted by chemotherapy and radiation, they enable the disease to recur.
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Cigarette Smoking Implicated in Half of Bladder Cancers in Women; Bladder Cancer Risk from Smoking Is Higher Than Previously Estimated, Study Confirms
sciencedaily.com - 8-17-11
Current cigarette smokers have a higher risk of bladder cancer than previously reported, and the risk in women is now comparable to that in men, according to a study by scientists from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.
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Antibody Discovered That May Help Detect Ovarian Cancer in Earliest Stages
sciencedaily.com - 8-17-11
Using a new approach to developing biomarkers for the very early detection of ovarian cancer, researchers at Rush University Medical Center have identified a molecule in the bloodstream of infertile women that could one day be used to screen for those at high risk for the disease -- or even those with early-stage ovarian cancer.
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Causes of High Incidence of Breast Cancer in African-American Women Identified
sciencedaily.com - 8-17-11
Investigators from the Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center have reported findings that may shed light on why African American women have a disproportionately higher risk of developing more aggressive and difficult-to-treat breast cancers, specifically estrogen and progesterone receptor negative (ER-/PR-) cancers.
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Every hour of TV watching shortens life by 22 minutes
telegraph.co.uk - 8-17-11
Anyone who spends six hours a day in front of the box is at risk of dying five years sooner than those who enjoy more active pastimes, it is claimed.
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Transgender Love: When Husband Becomes Wife
abcnews.go.com - 8-16-11
When Diane Daniel met her husband Wessel, she was attracted to his smile, quiet humor and gentleness -- "and of course his Dutch accent." Though it shocked her, she dismissed the occasional cross-dressing as they dated and lived together as just part of his nerdy nonconformity.
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Deadly Parasite Thought to Be Culprit in Fla. Teen's Death
/abcnews.go.com - 8-16-11
A deadly brain parasite contracted during a swim in a local river is thought to be the culprit behind the sudden and tragic death of 16-year-old Florida teen, Courtney Nash.
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'Tanorexia': Study Shows UV Light Activates Addictive Parts of Brain
abcnews.go.com - 8-16-11
Even though she has been diagnosed with skin cancer five times in the past 11 years, Lori Greenberg says she still dreams about tanning.
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Children bedridden by arthritis 'back to normal' thanks to new wonder drug
dailymail.co.uk - 8-16-11
A drug launched today could ease the agony of hundreds of children suffering from severe arthritis.
At least two thirds of children taking tocizilumab have been able to return to a normal life, after many were bedridden or forced into wheelchairs by the disease.
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15 minutes of fitness a day can add 3 years to your life
msnbc.msn.com - 8-16-11
Doing just 15 minutes of moderate exercise a day may add three years to your life, a large study in Taiwan has found.
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More evidence shows autism raises risk for later siblings
cnn.com - 8-16-11
It's already known that children with older siblings who have autism spectrum disorder or ASD, have a higher risk of developing the condition themselves, and a new study in Pediatrics finds that risk is even higher than previously expected.
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MIT Scientists Develop a Drug to Fight Any Viral Infection
time.com - 8-16-11
Scientists at MIT are developing a new drug that may fight viruses as effectively as antibiotics like penicillin dispatch bacteria. The broad-spectrum treatment is designed to trigger cell suicide in cells that have been invaded by a virus, thereby halting infection, while leaving healthy cells alone.
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Cancer discovery offers hope of tackling spread of disease
bbc.co.uk - 8-16-11
Scientists have discovered how cancerous cells can "elbow" their way out of tumours, offering clues for new drugs to prevent cancers spreading.
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Babies forced onto formula feeding because of IV fluids given to their mothers
naturalnews.com - 8-16-11
Breastfeeding has long been known to be one of the most important ways mothers can protect the health of their baby. According to the American College of Pediatrics, breastfeeding slashes the rate of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) during the first year of life and it also reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes, leukemia, lymphomas and asthma in older children.
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Relieve joint and muscle pain, maintain healthy bone density with high doses of vitamin D
naturalnews.com - 8-16-11
A recent study published in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment has found that taking high doses of vitamin D can help relieve the joint and muscle pain caused by taking aromatase inhibitor drugs for breast cancer. The research, which appears to apply generally to joint and muscle pain, also helps confirm that vitamin D helps to maintain bone density and prevent bone loss.
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Egg cholesterol depends on what hen eats
upi.com - 8-16-11
How much cholesterol eggs give a person depend on what the hen laying the eggs eats, researchers in Israel say.
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Too Much TV May Take Years Off Your Life
healthday.com - 8-16-11
Spending your days in front of the television may contribute to a shortened lifespan, a new study suggests.
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Chinese Herbs Equal to Tamiflu in Reducing H1N1 Fever: Study
healthday.com - 8-16-11
A traditional Chinese herbal treatment may reduce fever from H1N1 ("swine flu") influenza just as well as the prescription medication Tamiflu, a new study suggests.
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Obesity Before Pregnancy May Raise Child's Asthma Risk
healthday.com - 8-16-11
Teens of mothers who were overweight or obese when they became pregnant may be at increased risk for asthma symptoms, according to a new study.
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More Evidence That Alcohol Hinders Good Sleep
healthday.com - 8-16-11
You might want to take a pass on that nightcap, a new study suggests.
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Many More Kids Hospitalized for Mental Illness: Study
healthday.com - 8-16-11
Short-stay hospitalizations of children with mental illnesses surged between 1996 and 2007, while psychiatric admissions among the elderly declined in that period, according to a new study examining changing patterns in psychiatric hospitalization in the United States.
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Radiation From Japan Reached California Coast in Just Days
healthday.com - 8-16-11
New research finds that radiation from the nuclear plant accident in Japan in March reached California within days, showing how quickly air pollution can travel, but scientists say the radiation will not hurt people.
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Profound Reorganization in Brains of Adults Who Stutter: Auditory-Motor Integration Located in Different Part of Brain
sciencedaily.com - 8-16-11
Hearing Beethoven while reciting Shakespeare can suppress even a King's stutter, as recently illustrated in the movie "The King's Speech." This dramatic but short-lived effect of hiding the sound of one's own speech indicates that the integration of hearing and motor functions plays some role in the fluency (or dysfluency) of speech. New research has shown that in adults who have stuttered since childhood, the processes of auditory-motor integration are indeed located in a different part of the brain to those in adults who do not stutter.
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Scientists Have New Help Finding Their Way Around Brain's Nooks and Crannies
sciencedaily.com - 8-16-11
Like explorers mapping a new planet, scientists probing the brain need every type of landmark they can get. Each mountain, river or forest helps scientists find their way through the intricacies of the human brain.
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How Fatty Diets Cause Diabetes
sciencedaily.com - 8-16-11
Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics tend to have one thing in common: obesity. Exactly how diet and obesity trigger diabetes has long been the subject of intense scientific research. A new study led by Jamey D. Marth, Ph.D., director of the Center for Nanomedicine, a collaboration between the University of California, Santa Barbara and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham), has revealed a pathway that links high-fat diets to a sequence of molecular events responsible for the onset and severity of diabetes.
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E. Coli, Salmonella May Lurk in Unwashable Places in Produce
sciencedaily.com - 8-16-11
Sanitizing the outside of produce may not be enough to remove harmful food pathogens, according to a Purdue University study that demonstrated that Salmonella and E. coli can live inside plant tissues.
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Exercise May Help Prevent Brain Damage Caused by Alzheimer's Disease
sciencedaily.com - 8-16-11
Regular exercise could help prevent brain damage associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, according to research published this month in Elsevier's journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity.
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Revealed: sex hormone plan to feminise Hitler
telegraph.co.uk - 8-15-11
Now it has come to light that British spies looked at an even more audacious way of derailing the man behind the German war machine - by giving him female sex hormones.
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Many overestimate cost of home care
upi.com - 8-15-11
Some consumers may be deterred from using non-medical home care, or even from considering it, because they think it is too expensive, a U.S. survey indicates.
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Higher Estrogen Production in the Breast Could Confer Greater Cancer Risk Than Thought
sciencedaily.com - 8-15-11
Could some women who naturally produce excess aromatase in their breasts have an increased risk of developing breast cancer? Results of a new animal study suggests that may be the case, say researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, a part of Georgetown University Medical Center.
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Getting along with co-workers may add years to your life
usatoday.com - 8-15-11
Good relationships with your co-workers and a convivial, supportive work environment may add years to your life, new Israeli research finds.
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'Rub and Rinse' Best Way to Clean Soft Contact Lenses
healthday.com - 8-15-11
When it comes to soft contact lenses, rubbing and rinsing before soaking overnight is the best way to remove germs and prevent eye infection, according to new research.
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New Non-Invasive Technology Shows Promise in Shrinking Liver Tumors
sciencedaily.com - 8-15-11
A potential new option is beginning to emerge for patients with the fastest growing form of cancer in the United States, according to researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
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How Fatty Diets Cause Diabetes
sciencedaily.com - 8-15-11
Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics tend to have one thing in common: obesity. Exactly how diet and obesity trigger diabetes has long been the subject of intense scientific research. A new study led by Jamey D. Marth, Ph.D., director of the Center for Nanomedicine, a collaboration between the University of California, Santa Barbara and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham), has revealed a pathway that links high-fat diets to a sequence of molecular events responsible for the onset and severity of diabetes.
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New Treatment Option for Advanced Prostate Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 8-15-11
Prostate cancer that has become resistant to hormone treatment and that does not respond to radiation or chemotherapy requires new methods of treatment. By attacking stem cell-like cells in prostate cancer, researchers at Lund University are working on a project to develop a new treatment option.
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Roundup herbicide research shows plant, soil problems
reuters.com - 8-15-11
The heavy use of Monsanto's Roundup herbicide appears to be causing harmful changes in soil and potentially hindering yields of the genetically modified crops that farmers are cultivating, a government scientist said on Friday.
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Spicy Food May Boost Metabolism
abcnews.go.com - 8-14-11
Spicing up dinner may have metabolic benefits, particularly when it comes to insulin and triglyceride levels, a small study showed.
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Why women have fewer heart attacks: Oestrogen protects against blocked arteries
dailymail.co.uk - 8-14-11
The sex hormone oestrogen protects women from heart attacks and may explain why they are far less likely to be struck down than men, claim scientists.
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Fukushima update: Radiation danger continues
naturalnews.com - 8-14-11
Five months ago today, the nuclear crisis began in Fukushima, and the government began lying about the threat and the dangers to its people. Now they are beginning to build a gigantic tent over reactor number one. We do not have any information from Japan about people dying but the plants are dying in the middle of central Tokyo and it could be because of the increase in radiation. One irony of the radioactive fallout from Fukushima is that people in Japan are starting to pay more attention to nature.
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Program: Teen depression, suicide drops
upi.com - 8-14-11
A suicide prevention program has significantly helped teens overcome depression and thoughts of suicide, U.S. researchers say.
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Food health alerts issued in Canada
upi.com - 8-14-11
Canadian health officials have issued alerts for possibly tainted dip and meat products.
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Heat Safety Precautions May Save Student Athletes
healthday.com - 8-14-11
Heat safety needs to be at the forefront as training gets under way for many high school sports this month, an expert says.
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If Fat Dogs Are Cool, Could Fat People Be, Too?
sciencedaily.com - 8-14-11
Fat dogs are cool. And obese people may be, too. That's what research by a University of South Carolina Salkehatchie professor suggests.
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Study Sheds Light On Late Phase of Asthma Attacks
sciencedaily.com - 8-14-11
New research led by scientists from Imperial College London explains why around half of people with asthma experience a 'late phase' of symptoms several hours after exposure to allergens. The findings, published in the journal Thorax, could lead to better treatments for the disease.
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Scientists Highlight Link Between Stress and Appetite
sciencedaily.com - 8-14-11
Researchers in the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) at the University of Calgary's Faculty of Medicine have uncovered a mechanism by which stress increases food drive in rats. This new discovery, published online this week in the journal Neuron, could provide important insight into why stress is thought to be one of the underlying contributors to obesity.
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Skin cancer charity tricks 14,000 sun-worshippers into 'buying' tanning cream that 'triples the power of the sun'
dailymail.co.uk - 8-13-11
A product claiming to ‘triple the power of the sun’ for the ultimate tan might scare off health-savvy consumers - but it attracted thousands of sun worshippers to try and buy the cream.
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Are 'too clean' lives causing rise in child diet allergies? Healthy lifestyles 'causing' reaction to foods like milk and bread
dailymail.co.uk - 8-13-11
Increasing numbers of children need hospital treatment for gut allergies caused by reactions to everyday foods such as milk and bread, claims a leading doctor.
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Chest pain severity not a heart attack indicator
msnbc.msn.com - 8-13-11
A high degree of pain does not make it any more likely that someone coming into the emergency room with chest pains is having a heart attack, researchers found in a study of more than 3,000 patients.
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Not your imagination: Kids today really are less creative, study says
msnbc.msn.com - 8-13-11
It sounds like the complaint of a jaded adult: Kids these days are narrow-minded and just not as creative as they used to be.
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Depressed women 'have increased risk of stroke'
bbc.co.uk - 8-13-11
Women with depression may also be at increased risk of having a stroke, US researchers suggest.
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'Late' asthma research unearths potential new treatment
bbc.co.uk - 8-13-11
Scientists have stumbled on a potential new treatment for delayed asthma attacks which can occur several hours after exposure to allergens, a study shows.
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Study: Grape compound may provide natural protection against skin cancer
naturalnews.com - 8-13-11
If you spend a lot of time in the sun, and are looking for a way to help naturally protect your skin from potential damage caused by sun exposure, new research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry just might have your answer. Scientists from the University of Barcelona (UB) and the Spanish National Research Council have found that flavonoids in grapes help to protect against skin cancer.
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Pharma now pushing for 20 new vaccines in next decade
naturalnews.com - 8-13-11
The mainstream media is extremely one sided with its vaccine reporting. It is a PR outlet for the pharmaceutical industry, especially when it comes to the pharmaceutical industry's sacred cow - vaccines.
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Monsanto preys on popularity of omega-3s by developing GMO soybean that produces fake fish oil
naturalnews.com - 8-13-11
Leave it to Monsanto to take a good thing and corrupt it for financial gain. According to a recent report in Forbes, the multinational biotechnology-slash-agriculture-manipulating monolith has developed a new genetically-modified (GM) soybean that artificially produces stearidonic acid, a type of omega-3 fatty acid -- and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is expected to approve the "frankenbean" sometime this year.
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Obamacare ruled unconstitutional by federal appeals court
naturalnews.com - 8-13-11
The 11th circuit appeals court ruled today that Obama's health care mandate -- which forced Americans to purchase an insurance product that many did not want or need -- was unconstitutional and that Congress exceeded its constitutional authority in passing such a law. The rest of the health care reform law was not struck down, however, and indications are that the final legality of the so-called "individual mandate" will be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court.
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Rejection is bitter twin of acceptance
upi.com - 8-13-11
Acceptance is a fundamental aspect of human relationships, but so is its counterpart -- rejection -- a U.S. researcher says.
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Urban AIDS rate high among low-income
upi.com - 8-13-11
Two percent of low-income heterosexuals in 24 U.S. cities with high AIDS prevalence are infected with HIV, an analysis finds.
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Hysterectomy, ovary removal up stroke risk
upi.com - 8-13-11
Young women who have a hysterectomy and removal of ovaries in the same operation have an increased risk of stroke and heart disease, German researchers say.
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Man dies of rabies after vampire bat bite
upi.com - 8-13-11
Bats are a primary source of U.S. human rabies but a 19-year-old man is the first human to die from a vampire bat bite, health officials say.
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Taking the sting out of jellyfish
upi.com - 8-13-11
The ocean in the summer is fun but jellyfish can sting as vacationers wade into the waves or walk along the shore, U.S. emergency medicine physicians caution.
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Many Men Underestimate Prostate Surgery Side Effects
healthday.com - 8-13-11
New research finds that men who undergo prostate removal often suffer more from incontinence and impotence than they expected, even when counseled beforehand about possible aftereffects.
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Get Rid of Standing Water to Protect From Mosquitoes
healthday.com - 8-13-11
Standing water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes that can spread serious diseases such as the West Nile virus. Yet many urban families don't take simple steps such as dumping out standing water to reduce their risks, researchers say.
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Many Arthritis Patients May Not Be Exercising Enough
healthday.com - 8-13-11
Although being physically active is one of the best ways people with osteoarthritis can alleviate pain and improve their ability to get around, a new study shows that people with the joint disease are much more sedentary than previously thought.
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Flatworms Provide New Insight Into Organ Regeneration and the Evolution of Mammalian Kidneys
sciencedaily.com - 8-13-11
Our bodies are perfectly capable of renewing billions of cells every day but fail miserably when it comes to replacing damaged organs such as kidneys. Using the flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea -- famous for its capacity to regrow complete animals from minuscule flecks of tissue -- as an eloquent example, researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research demonstrated how our distant evolutionary cousins regenerate their excretory systems from scratch.
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Possible Therapeutic Target for Depression and Addiction Identified
sciencedaily.com - 8-13-11
Researchers studying mice are getting closer to understanding how stress affects mood and motivation for drugs. According to the researchers, blocking the stress cascade in brain cells may help reduce the effects of stress, which can include anxiety, depression and the pursuit of addictive drugs.
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Low Vitamin D Linked to Earlier First Menstruation
sciencedaily.com - 8-13-11
A study links low vitamin D in young girls with early menstruation, which is a risk factor for a host of health problems for teen girls as well as women later in life.
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'Good Fat' Most Prevalent in Thin Children
sciencedaily.com - 8-13-11
Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center and Children's Hospital Boston have shown that a type of "good" fat known as brown fat occurs in varying amounts in children -- increasing until puberty and then declining -- and is most active in leaner children.
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Increased Light May Moderate Fearful Reactions
sciencedaily.com - 8-13-11
Biologists and psychologists know that light affects mood, but a new University of Virginia study indicates that light may also play a role in modulating fear and anxiety.
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'Amazing' therapy destroys leukemia in 3 patients
usatoday.com - 8-12-11
Scientists are reporting the first clear success with gene therapy to treat leukemia, turning the patients' own blood cells into assasins that hunt down and wipe out their cancer.
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Sleep apnea may raise dementia risk in women
usatoday.com - 8-12-11
Elderly women who experience sleep apnea have a higher risk of developing mild cognitive impairment or dementia, new research finds.
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Greatest discovery since penicillin: A cure for everything - from colds to HIV
dailymail.co.uk - 8-12-11
Scientists may have found a cure for the common cold, flu, HIV – and almost any other virus you can think of.
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Eating meals laced with paprika and cinnamon 'protects your body from effects of fatty foods'
dailymail.co.uk - 8-12-11
Eating a diet rich in spices such as turmeric and cinnamon can protect you from the physical damage caused by fatty meals, say scientists.
A team from Penn State University has found a blend of antioxidant spices can reduce the stress that high-fat foods can place on the heart.
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New drug for irregular heartbeat patients
telegraph.co.uk - 8-12-11
Scientists say the new drug, rivaroxaban, is just as good as warfarin at preventing blood clots and lowering the risk of stroke for people with atrial fibrillation.
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Electronic tattoo 'could revolutionise patient monitoring'
bbc.co.uk - 8-12-11
An "electronic tattoo" could herald a revolution in the way patients are monitored and provide a breakthrough in computer gaming, say US scientists.
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Smoking increases heart risk more in women than men
bbc.co.uk - 8-12-11
Women who start smoking increase their risk of a heart attack by more than men who take up the habit, according to a review of more than 30 years of research.
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Pediatricians trying to obliterate parent's right to refuse vaccinations for children
naturalnews.com - 8-12-11
Just when you think some progress is being made for allowing exemptions from required vaccination schedules, along comes a threatening policy statement from a group that does most of those vaccinations. The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS) has issued a position statement opposing secular exemptions from vaccinations.
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Many medical journals have no policies regarding conflicts of interest in published research studies
naturalnews.com - 8-12-11
The clinical trial analysis and research studies published in some medical journals -- and that are used directly by doctors to diagnose and treat patients -- could be posited in biased language due to secret financial ties to drug or medical device companies, and nobody would ever know it.
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2,000 bad air days in the U.S. in 2011
upi.com - 8-12-11
Few regions of the United States have escaped health-threatening "bad air" days this year due to smog pollution, a non-profit organization says.
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Cancer patients' own cells fight cancer
upi.com - 8-12-11
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center and Perelman School of Medicine used patients' own immune cells to fight cancer.
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Kids improve reading by reading to dogs
upi.com - 8-12-11
The dog days of summer may go by more quickly and reading levels may improve if children read aloud to a dog, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Spices reduce triglyceride response
upi.com - 8-12-11
Adding spices to a high-fat meal reduces triglyceride response by about 30 percent, compared to a similar meal with no added spices, U.S. researchers say.
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Study: HIV detection varies by method
upi.com - 8-12-11
The odds of effectively detecting HIV in African-American men vary by, depending on the testing method used, U.S. researchers found.
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Playing hard-to-get may be effective
upi.com - 8-12-11
Things that are hard to get, dates or products stuck at the back of the shelf, are more attractive than what is more easily attainable, U.S. researchers say.
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Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Turkey Sickens More People
healthday.com - 8-12-11
Some 107 people in 31 states have now been infected with an outbreak strain of Salmonella Heidelberg found in some ground turkey made by Cargill Inc., the latest report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows.
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Depressed Women Could Face Raised Risk of Stroke
healthday.com - 8-12-11
Depressed women may be at greater risk for stroke, new research suggests.
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Parkinson's Patients May Fare Better in Neurologist's Care
healthday.com - 8-12-11
Parkinson's disease patients who receive care from a neurologist live longer and are less likely to break a hip or need nursing-home placement than those treated by a primary care doctor, according to a new study.
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Poorly Controlled Asthma Can Boost Chances of Pregnancy Complications
healthday.com - 8-12-11
Pregnant women with poorly controlled asthma are at increased risk for pregnancy complications and for having a low-birth weight or premature baby, a new study warns.
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New Bacteria Linked to Tattoo Infections
healthday.com - 8-12-11
An investigation into skin lesions that two people developed after getting tattoos has concluded that both were infected with a bacteria not previously linked to the practice.
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High Levels of Potentially Toxic Flame Retardants in California Pregnant Women
sciencedaily.com - 8-12-11
A new study finds that pregnant women in Northern California have the highest PBDE flame retardant exposures reported to date among pregnant women worldwide. It also describes some of the first evidence from humans that certain flame retardants may interfere with thyroid hormone signaling during pregnancy, which is critical to fetal brain development.
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Eating Protein Throughout the Day Preserves Muscle and Physical Function in Dieting Postmenopausal Women, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 8-12-11
Dieting postmenopausal women who want to avoid losing muscle as they lose fat should pay attention to a new University of Illinois study. Adding protein throughout the day not only holds hunger pangs at bay so that dieters lose more weight, it keeps body composition -- the amount of fat relative to muscle -- in better proportion.
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How a Particular Gene Makes Night Vision Possible
sciencedaily.com - 8-12-11
A scientist from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute has determined how a particular gene makes night vision possible. The study, which was published in the August 10, 2011 edition of The Journal of Neuroscience, focuses on a gene called nyctalopin. Mutations in the gene result in inherited "night blindness," a loss of vision in low-light environments.
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New Clues to the Formation of Hearts, Intestines and Other Key Organs
sciencedaily.com - 8-12-11
How do the intestines in tiny birds or large mammals form intricate looping patterns? How do hearts and vascular systems form? Why do some large dog breeds succumb to gastric torsion while others don't? Newly released research co-authored by a Cornell University assistant professor provides some key clues to these natural phenomena.
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Paper Money Worldwide Contains Bisphenol A
sciencedaily.com - 8-12-11
The cash register receipts that people place near paper money in billfolds, purses, and pockets has led to a worldwide contamination of paper money with bisphenol A (BPA) -- a potentially toxic substance found in some plastics, thermal paper and other products. The amounts of BPA on dollars, Euros, rubles, yuans, and other currencies, are higher than in house dust, but human intake from currency is at least 10 times less than those from house dust.
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Can Blaming Others Make People Sick?
sciencedaily.com - 8-12-11
Constant bitterness can make a person ill, according to Concordia University researchers who have examined the relationship between failure, bitterness and quality of life.
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Heat-Related Skin Infections On The Rise
cbslocal.com - 8-11-11
For Karrell Johnson of Dallas, a painful brush with a carbuncle started as a seemingly benign knot on his back.
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London riots: 'A generation who don't respect their parents or police'
guardian.co.uk - 8-11-11
"Just be ready with your shutters, yeah?" It was 1pm outside Hackney Downs train station and two police community support officers were offering advice to the manager of the Tesco store next door, who had popped out in his shirt sleeves for an update, looking fretful.
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Not So Fast: Premature Ejaculation Treatment Questioned
abcnews.go.com - 8-11-11
Researchers have called into question the effectiveness of a psychological approach to treating premature ejaculation, a sexual disorder that affects up to 30 percent of men worldwide.
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Pumping iron 'can double your chances of quitting smoking'
dailymail.co.uk - 8-11-11
Weightlifting can do more than just build muscle - it can also help smokers kick the habit, say researchers.
A team from The Miriam Hospital in Rhode Island found men and women are twice as likely to quit smoking if they do regular resistance training.
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Mothers who want their children to like vegetables 'should eat them during pregnancy'
dailymail.co.uk - 8-11-11
Many a parent has struggled to get their children to eat their greens. Now scientists think mothers can make a difference by starting them early - very early.
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New leukemia treatment exceeds 'wildest expectations'
msnbc.msn.com - 8-11-11
Doctors have treated only three leukemia patients, but the sensational results from a single shot could be one of the most significant advances in cancer research in decades. And it almost never happened.
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Mind and body: Worms to help depression? Could happen...
cnn.com - 8-11-11
When was the last time you, your children or anyone you know was treated for worms? If you’re under the age of 40, your likely answer is “Never!”
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Music soothes anxiety, pain in cancer patients
cnn.com - 8-11-11
(Health.com) -- Singing, playing an instrument or even just listening to music may lessen anxiety in cancer patients and improve their overall quality of life, according to a new analysis of previously published research.
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Food safety false flag? USDA waited for people to die before recalling ground turkey it knew was contaminated
naturalnews.com - 8-11-11
Adding yet more evidence to the proof that the U.S. government maliciously promotes dangerous food borne illness outbreaks rather than trying to prevent them, evidence has emerged today that the U.S. Department of Agriculture knew ground turkey produced by Cargill was widely contaminated with salmonella, yet it did nothing about it and waited for fatalities to occur. This breaking news has been published by the Wall Street Journal
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Large study confirms that omega 3s produce healthy babies
naturalnews.com - 8-11-11
Consumption of omega-3 fatty acids is crucial for the development and maintenance of the brain and nervous system, especially in young children (http://www.naturalnews.com/016353.html). And a new study published in the journal Pediatrics adds to this, having found that pregnant women who supplement with Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) during their pregnancies produce children that are much healthier and less prone to sickness than those born to women who do not supplement with, or otherwise consume enough, DHA.
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New research shows dementia is preventable with natural means
naturalnews.com - 8-11-11
To hear many people in the mainstream media as well as mainstream medicine describe it, dementia is something similar to a curse: you will get it or you won't, so all you can do as you get older is just wait and see. Fortunately, evidence is mounting that shows this simply isn't so, and healthy and natural lifestyle choices can protect the brain and may prevent various forms of memory and identity robbing dementia.
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Eating red meat, deli ups diabetes risk
upi.com - 8-11-11
Eating red meat -- particularly processed meat such as hot dogs, bacon and deli meats -- increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, U.S. researchers say.
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Cognitive deficits in schizophrenics
upi.com - 8-11-11
A team of U.S. psychiatrists and clinical psychologists found that errors due to cognitive difficulties were common among those with schizophrenia.
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Women May Face Greater Heart Risk From Smoking Than Men
healthday.com - 8-11-11
Women who smoke have a 25 percent higher risk of developing heart disease than male smokers do, according to a huge, new study.
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Study Pits New Blood Thinner Against Warfarin For Irregular Heartbeat
healthday.com - 8-11-11
A new drug that lowers stroke risk among people with an irregular heartbeat may give the old standby, warfarin, some competition, a new study shows.
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Experimental Drug May Help Ease Chronic Constipation
healthday.com - 8-11-11
An experimental drug called linaclotide can help reduce the symptoms of chronic constipation, according to new research funded by the drug maker.
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Gene Therapy Fights a Tough-to-Treat Leukemia: Study
healthday.com - 8-11-11
A small group of patients with an advanced form of tough-to-treat leukemia appears to have benefited from a radical new form of immune therapy, researchers say.
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Think Healthy, Eat Healthy: Scientists Show Link Between Attention and Self-Control
sciencedaily.com - 8-11-11
You're trying to decide what to eat for dinner. Should it be the chicken and broccoli? The super-sized fast-food burger? Skip it entirely and just get some Rocky Road?
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Multiple Sclerosis Research Doubles Number of Genes Associated With the Disease, Increasing the Number to Over 50
sciencedaily.com - 8-11-11
Dr. John Rioux, researcher at the Montreal Heart Institute, Associate Professor of Medicine at the Université de Montréal and original co-founder of the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium is one of the scientists who have identified 29 new genetic variants linked to multiple sclerosis, providing key insights into the biology of a very debilitating neurological disease. Many of the genes implicated in the study are relevant to the immune system, shedding light onto the immunological pathways that underlie the development of multiple sclerosis.
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New Discovery in Battle Against Infections
sciencedaily.com - 8-11-11
Researchers from Dr. Woodland's lab at the Trudeau Institute have now identified a previously unknown link between the migration of white blood cells to infected tissues and the ability of these cells to survive and become long-lived memory cells after the infection has been cleared. The new data is featured on the cover of this month's The Journal of Experimental Medicine.
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Fading Ability to Taste Iron Raises Health Concerns for People Over Age 50
sciencedaily.com - 8-11-11
People lose the ability to detect the taste of iron in drinking water with advancing age, raising concern that older people may be at risk for an unhealthy over-exposure to iron, Virginia Tech engineers are reporting in results they term "unique."
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Frequent Tanning Bed Users Exhibit Brain Changes and Behavior Similar to Addicts, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 8-11-11
People who frequently use tanning beds may be spurred by an addictive neurological reward-and-reinforcement trigger, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found in a pilot study.
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Study Finds New ADHD Genes, Links Susceptibility With Autism and Other Neuropsychiatric Conditions
sciencedaily.com - 8-11-11
New research led by The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and the University of Toronto has identified more genes in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and shows that there is an overlap between some of these genes and those found in other neuropsychiatric conditions such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
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Arthritis Sufferers Are Not Engaging in Physical Activity Critical to Their Health
sciencedaily.com - 8-11-11
Being physically active is one of best ways people with arthritis can improve their health, but a new study from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine shows that more than half of women and 40 percent of men with arthritis are virtually couch potatoes.
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Flaxseed may protect against radiation
upi.com - 8-10-11
Flax used for cloth and food may protect healthy tissues and organs from the harmful effects of radiation during cancer therapy, U.S. researchers said.
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African Rodent Uses 'Poison Arrow' Toxin to Deter Predators: First Known Mammal to Use Plant Poison in Defense
sciencedaily.com - 8-10-11
Woe to the clueless predator trying to make a meal of the African crested rat, a rodent that applies poisonous plant toxin to sponge-like hairs on its flanks, a discovery recently made by Jonathan Kingdon and colleagues from the National Museums of Kenya, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and University of Oxford.
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Infestation of the stink bug: America braces itself for plague of pest with unbearable smell
dailymail.co.uk - 8-10-11
They are hideous pests which invaded U.S. homes last year, emitting an unbearable stench and wreaking havoc on crops.
And it looks like the country is in for another shock, after experts warned that the bugs are coming back with a vengeance.
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ED linked to women's friendship with males
upi.com - 8-10-11
There is a link between erectile dysfunction in heterosexual men and strong relationships between their partners and their male friends, U.S. researchers found.
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Perfume, pollen, central heating... So THAT'S why your sinuses are bunged up!
dailymail.co.uk - 8-10-11
For anyone who’s not experienced sinusitis, it may be hard to imagine how being a little ‘bunged up’ in the head could be so painful.
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Soy 'does not ease the menopause'
bbc.co.uk - 8-10-11
Soy appears to do nothing to relieve the symptoms of menopause, scientists say, despite the high hopes of many.
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Teenage pregnancy is 'contagious'
bbc.co.uk - 8-10-11
Teenage pregnancy is "contagious" between sisters, researchers in the UK and Norway have claimed.
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Factors Before Birth Can Determine Child's Risk of Allergies: Study
healthday.com - 8-10-11
Key factors that affect a child's risk of developing allergies by age 2 include race, a mother's exposure to pets during pregnancy and the method of delivery, a new study suggests.
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Maternal Blood Test Can Determine Sex of Fetus at 7 Weeks
healthday.com - 8-10-11
A simple blood test from mom can spot the sex of a fetus as early as seven weeks into a pregnancy, researchers report.
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Tests That Use DNA from Mother’s Blood to Determine Sex of Fetus Often Effective
sciencedaily.com - 8-10-11
As a noninvasive method of determining the sex of a fetus, tests using cell-free fetal DNA obtained from the mother's blood after 7 weeks gestation performed well, while urine-based tests appear to be unreliable, according to a review and analysis of previous studies, reported in the August 10 issue of JAMA.
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Young Black Patients On Kidney Dialysis Do Much Worse -- Not Better -- Than White Counterparts, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 8-10-11
For years, medical studies have reached the same conclusion: African-American patients do better on kidney dialysis than their white counterparts. But new Johns Hopkins research, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, shows that younger blacks -- those under the age of 50 -- actually do much worse on dialysis than equally sick whites who undergo the same blood-filtering process.
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Curry Spice Could Offer Treatment Hope for Tendinitis
sciencedaily.com - 8-10-11
A derivative of a common culinary spice found in Indian curries could offer a new treatment hope for sufferers of the painful condition tendinitis, an international team of researchers has shown.
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Eating curry could cure your tennis elbow by reducing inflammation
dailymail.co.uk - 8-10-11
Eating curry could offer new hope for sufferers of tennis elbow and other forms of tendinitis, says new research.
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Mysterious Orange Goo in Alaska Tiny Eggs of Unknown Species
ibtimes.com - 8-10-11
The mysterious orange colored goo that washed upon the shores of an Alaskan village last week has been identified. Denying rumors that suggested that the orange stuff was a form of alien life, Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) lab said on Monday that it was a mass of microscopic eggs filled with fatty droplets, most likely to be of a small crustacean.
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ED linked to women's friendship with males
upi.com - 8-10-11
There is a link between erectile dysfunction in heterosexual men and strong relationships between their partners and their male friends, U.S. researchers found.
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7 walnuts a day deliver health benefits
upi.com - 8-9-11
Walnuts may be considered the king of nuts for health benefits, with a combination of more healthful and higher quality antioxidants, U.S. researchers say.
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Believers in benevolent God worry less
upi.com - 8-9-11
People who believe in a benevolent God tend to worry less and are more tolerant than those who believe in an indifferent or punishing God, U.S. researchers say.
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Does Facebook Really Make Teens More Narcissistic?
technorati.com - 8-9-11
We’ve all taken our turn at being kids and teens, riding that emotional tsunami as it comes barreling down upon the shores of responsibility, our parents running with hands in the air from the dirty, angst-filled tide. For many of us, now parents, our turn has arrived to stand on the ever-shifting sands, and face the approaching waves of hormones from our own teenagers, wondering aloud at the temporary and temporal madness known as the teen years.
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Obama Administration Exempting Schools From Federal Law’s Testing Mandate
cnsnews.com - 8-9-11
(AP) - State and local education officials have been begging the federal government for relief from student testing mandates in the federal No Child Left Behind law, but school starts soon and Congress still hasn't answered the call.
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Bag Lunch a Foodborne Illness Risk for Preschoolers: Study
abcnews.go.com - 8-9-11
Parents, take note: A simple sack lunch may increase the risk of foodborne illness for the young children who bring them into daycare and school, according to a new study.
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Eating disorders can harm women's fertility
usatoday.com - 8-9-11
Women with the eating disorders anorexia and bulimia may take a bit longer to get pregnant than other women, a new study has found.
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Spermless mosquitoes may be the key to controlling malaria, scientists discover
dailymail.co.uk - 8-9-11
Spermless male mosquitoes could be the answer to controlling the spread of malaria.
Female Anopheles mosquitoes cannot tell if males they have mated with are fertile or infertile a study has shown.
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Man with breast cancer denied coverage
upi.com - 8-9-11
A South Carolina construction worker with breast cancer and no insurance says he's been denied Medicaid coverage because he's not a woman.
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Scientists make schizophrenia breakthrough
bbc.co.uk - 8-9-11
US scientists say they have "fundamentally transformed" the understanding of the genetics of schizophrenia.
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Soy Supplements Don't Ease Bone Loss, Menopausal Symptoms: Study
healthday.com - 8-9-11
Soy supplements, sometimes promoted as a healthier alternative to estrogen for maintaining bone and relieving menopausal symptoms, don't appear to do so, according to a new study.
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Many Heart Patients Anemic After Too Many Blood Tests in Hospital
healthday.com - 8-9-11
One in five patients who are hospitalized for heart attacks develop anemia because so much of their blood is drawn for routine diagnostic tests, researchers have found.
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Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Parkinson's Symptoms Long-Term
healthday.com - 8-9-11
The benefit of deep brain stimulation in controlling tremors and improving motor function for those with Parkinson's disease appears to last at least 10 years, according to a small new study by Canadian researchers.
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Life-Threatening Leg Clots Run in Families, Study Shows
healthday.com - 8-9-11
People who have two or more siblings who have suffered blood clots in deep veins such as those in the legs and pelvis -- a disease known as venous thromboembolism (VTE) -- have a relative risk 50 times higher for developing such clots themselves, Swedish researchers report.
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CPAP Therapy Most Effective for Sleep Apnea, Experts Say
healthday.com - 8-9-11
The most effective treatment for the nighttime breathing disorder known as obstructive sleep apnea is the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine, according to a new report.
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Trying Out New Identities Key to Video Games' Appeal: Study
healthday.com - 8-9-11
One reason why people worldwide spend 3 billion hours per week playing video games may be because the games allow them to "try on" characteristics they might like to have, a new study suggests.
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Toe Deformities Should Be Treated Early: Experts
healthday.com - 8-9-11
Hammer toes, curly toes, crossover toes and bunions are not only painful, they can be a red flag for other health problems, a new report warns.
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Hiding Vegetables in Kids' Foods Can Increase Vegetable Intake
sciencedaily.com - 8-9-11
Preschool children consumed nearly twice as many vegetables and 11 percent fewer calories over the course of a day when researchers at Penn State added pureed vegetables to the children's favorite foods.
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Scientist Develops Virus That Targets HIV: Using a Virus to Kill a Virus
sciencedaily.com - 8-9-11
In what represents an important step toward curing HIV, a USC scientist has created a virus that hunts down HIV-infected cells.
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Early Morning Smokers Have Increased Risk of Lung and Head and Neck Cancers, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 8-9-11
Two new studies have found that smokers who tend to take their first cigarette soon after they wake up in the morning may have a higher risk of developing lung and head and neck cancers than smokers who refrain from lighting up right away.
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Northern Humans Had Bigger Brains, to Cope With the Low Light Levels, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 8-8-11
The farther that human populations live from the equator, the bigger their brains, according to a new study by Oxford University. But it turns out that this is not because they are smarter, but because they need bigger vision areas in the brain to cope with the low light levels experienced at high latitudes.
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Placenta Pills to Prevent Postpartum Depression?
abcnews.go.com - 8-8-11
Mother-of-three Tamara Guida believes that women should eat their own placenta because the nutrient-packed organ that feeds the fetus is rich in nutritional and hormonal properties. Guida says consuming the placenta helps women recover from pregnancy and even prevents postpartum depression.
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Remembering 6 Common Memory Myths
abcnews.go.com - 8-8-11
We use our memory in every aspect of our lives, but for all that use, many people are still confused by the myths and facts behind a human's ability to recall.
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Breaking Up Is So Very Hard to Do, Except on Facebook
abcnews.go.com - 8-8-11
Melissa Ng, an 18-year-old college-bound student from Cincinnati, was horrified when her friend told her about how her boyfriend broke up with her on Facebook.
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The Truth About 'Relaxation' Drinks
abcnews.go.com - 8-8-11
To unwind, perchance to sleep... In our frazzled world, these seem to be elusive goals. Now manufacturers are trying to cash in on our need to relax, and the market is anything but sluggish. More than 350 varieties of so-called relaxation drinks have hit the shelves, with revenues expected to reach $73 million this year.
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Scientists may have found missing link to common brain cancer
usatoday.com - 8-8-11
A map of the genetic mutations associated with the second most common form of brain cancer appears to reveal the biological cause of the tumors, researchers report.
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Families need to ask questions early about hospice care
usatoday.com - 8-8-11
When it comes to placing family members into hospice care, experts say, it's critical for families to ask questions to help make more informed decisions.
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Why you can't blame thunder or sudden rises in temperature for a migraine
dailymail.co.uk - 8-8-11
Headache sufferers often claim they can forecast a bad migraine with a sudden change in the weather.
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Record 45.8 million receiving food stamps
upi.com - 8-8-11
Alabama, hit by severe storms, pushed the total number of U.S. food stamp recipients to an all-time high of 45.8 million people in May, officials say.
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Poorly controlled asthma doubles costs
upi.com - 8-8-11
Asthma in children that is poorly controlled more than doubles the cost of treating it and hurts their school performance, U.S. researchers say.
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Hand hygiene knowledge, fewer infections
upi.com - 8-8-11
Healthcare workers who know more about hand hygiene are less likely to transmit infections at work, U.S. researchers say.
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Toxic or not? A guide to everyday products
msnbc.msn.com - 8-8-11
Triclosan, the chemical used in hundreds of germ-fighting products, may damage the liver and disrupt thyroid hormones. These products contribute to drug resistance, and people using antimicrobial soapget sick as often as regular suds users, a review in the American Journal of Public Health finds. Toss triclosan. Gotta sanitize? Opt for alcohol-based gels.
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Bad body odor? Try these five natural cures
msnbc.msn.com - 8-8-11
It's a fact of life: Sometimes you smell less than sweet. Whether it's from food, excess sweat, or clothes that aren't quite clean, here are some surprising solutions that can beat back body odor for good.
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Kids and social networking: Pros and cons
cnn.com - 8-8-11
Post this, comment on that. Social media are a part of the daily routines of many adults and children. And the identifiable pros and cons of social networking among kids are beginning to emerge, according to a presentation at the American Psychological Association meeting.
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Erectile dysfunction? Try losing weight
cnn.com - 8-8-11
Viagra gets the job done, but it's a quick fix. For many men, weaning themselves off the little blue pill and finding a longer-lasting solution to their sexual dysfunction may require hitting the gym and putting down the doughnuts.
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Exercise should be 'standard part of cancer care'
bbc.co.uk - 8-8-11
All patients getting cancer treatment should be told to do two and a half hours of physical exercise every week, says a report by Macmillan Cancer Support.
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Baby heart defect test 'could save lives'
bbc.co.uk - 8-8-11
A quick and cheap test could save the lives of babies born with congenital heart defects, doctors say.
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Gene Study Identifies Non-Hereditary Links to Schizophrenia
healthday.com - 8-8-11
More than half the cases of non-hereditary -- or sporadic -- schizophrenia are caused by "new" protein-altering gene mutations, researchers have found.
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Treat Gasoline With Respect
healthday.com - 8-8-11
Be careful around gasoline.
That's the message from the University of Michigan Health System's Trauma Burn Center, which has treated 14 gasoline-related burns in just the past month.
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Smart Food Choices Key to a Healthy Barbeque
healthday.com - 8-8-11
Choosing healthy foods to barbeque -- and even barbequing with marinades instead of high-fat sauces -- can help reduce your risk of heart disease as well as stroke, experts say.
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Adjusting Routines Before School Starts May Ease Transition to Class
healthday.com - 8-8-11
Adjusting routines before school starts can make it easier for families when children return to classrooms after summer vacation, an expert says.
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California Woman Claims Meth-Laced Breast Milk Not Cause of Her Baby's Death
abcnews.go.com - 8-7-11
Charges against a California mother have been upgraded from manslaughter to second-degree murder this week after evidence at preliminary hearings suggested that she knowingly endangered her infant's life by breast-feeding while using methamphetamine.
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Marbles in your socks. Scratched goggles. Straps and splints that make every move agony... THIS is what it feels like to be old
dailymail.co.uk - 8-7-11
This is a bloody nightmare. My ankles ache, my hips are stiff, my feet are throbbing and my legs have gone all floppy and hopeless. I can’t lift either arm above shoulder height, my fingers are unwieldy and my sight is slightly blurred.
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Keep healthy foods at eye level, psychologists tell dieters
telegraph.co.uk - 8-7-11
Simple changes like moving chocolate and crisps out of sight and putting more wholesome foods where they can easily be seen can help dieters to eat better without even realising it.
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U.S. farmers markets on the rise
upi.com - 8-7-11
More than 1,000 new farmers markets dot the U.S. landscape this year, bringing the total number to more than 7,000, federal officials say.
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Mindless Eating: Do You Eat More than You Think?
ibtimes.com - 8-7-11
Scientific experiments found that people make almost 20 times more daily decisions about food than they think, approximately 250 decisions per day. Because of this, we are affected by tiny cues such as family, friends, and packages.
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Eat gazpacho right away to save vitamin C
upi.com - 8-7-11
Scientists in Spain recommend eating gazpacho -- a soup containing vegetables eaten cold -- as soon as it is prepared to retain more vitamin C.
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What Shapes a Bone? Diet and Genetics Dictate Adult Jaw Shape
sciencedaily.com - 8-7-11
Researchers at Johns Hopkins found that use over time and not just genetics informs the structure of jaw bones in human populations. The researchers say these findings may be used to predict the diet of an ancient population, even if little evidence exists in the fossil record. It can also make it easier for scientists to pinpoint the genetic relationship between fossils.
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Why shouldn’t we drink raw milk?
telegraph.co.uk - 8-7-11
Those of us who choose to drink ''raw’’ milk are a tiny minority – barely more than 100,000 – so why is time and money being wasted trying to stop us?
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Monsanto’s FDA Goes After the Country’s Only Safe Milk
wordpress.com - 8-6-11
Dairy is central to both the food supply and to sustainable agriculture. The FDA (run by Monsanto) is taking it apart. Rather than being harmful, raw milk is the only safe milk in the US and has innumerable benefits not found in pasteurized milk.
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Scientists Developing Date Rape Drug Detector
abcnews.go.com - 8-6-11
A quick stir of your drink could soon reveal whether it's been spiked with date rape drugs, researchers say.
Israeli scientists say they've developed a sensor that looks like a straw or a stirrer that can detect two of the most commonly used date rape drugs with 100 percent accuracy.
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Is Your Diet Too Complicated?
abcnews.go.com - 8-6-11
A study published in the February 2010 issue of the journal Appetite showed that the simpler your diet, the easier it is for you to stick to it over the long haul. Follow these effortless steps to streamline your plan and shed unwanted pounds for good.
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Breast cancer gel shrinks tumours... and without tablets' unpleasant side-effects
dailymail.co.uk - 8-6-11
A breast cancer gel is being developed to shrink tumours in a development that could revolutionise treatment of the disease.
The treatment is rubbed on to the skin daily and has far fewer unpleasant side-effects than the tablet tamoxifen – the most commonly used drug in Britain.
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How to cure snoring... with a pair of inflight DVT tights
dailymail.co.uk - 8-6-11
Wearing compression stockings might help people suffering from a common sleep disorder, claim researchers.
They found sufferers who wore thigh-high stockings for a week cut their sleep problems by a third.
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Breakfast gives students an edge
upi.com - 8-6-11
Many studies show poor nutrition hurts school performance and achievement so providing a healthy breakfast should be a priority, a U.S. researcher says.
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How to prevent salmonella poisoning
upi.com - 8-6-11
With 36 million pounds of ground turkey being recalled due to reports of salmonella, a U.S. infectious disease expert advises how to avoid the disease.
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Centering meditation
naturalnews.com - 8-6-11
Today I am going to share about meditation and prayer. One of the goals is to get the mind's velocity below the supersonic level and further down to the point where you are ready to touch down on experiences of being. We will wash our minds and bring our awareness into the heart chakra, into the chest, and from that feeling center expand out. Then we will descend further into our vitality center and recharge our bodies.
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Scientists Take Navel-Gazing to New Level
healthday.com - 8-6-11
Germs used to be viewed as only bad, but scientists who have taken navel-gazing to a new level are finding that the ones living in your belly button coexist quite nicely with the rest of your body's microbes.
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With Age, Focus on Body Shifts From Appearance to Function
healthday.com - 8-6-11
For older Americans who decide to get more physically active, a new study finds that performance often trumps appearance.
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Less Worry, Better Coping Seen Among Religious Folks
healthday.com - 8-6-11
Believing in a benevolent God may help reduce worry and improve a person's ability to cope with uncertainty, researchers report.
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Adjusting Routines Before School Starts May Ease Transition to Class
healthday.com - 8-6-11
Adjusting routines before school starts can make it easier for families when children return to classrooms after summer vacation, an expert says.
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Smart Food Choices Key to a Healthy Barbeque
healthday.com - 8-6-11
Choosing healthy foods to barbeque -- and even barbequing with marinades instead of high-fat sauces -- can help reduce your risk of heart disease as well as stroke, experts say.
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Potential New Eye Tumor Treatment Discovered
sciencedaily.com - 8-6-11
New research from a team including several Carnegie scientists demonstrates that a specific small segment of RNA could play a key role in the growth of a type of malignant childhood eye tumor called retinoblastoma. The tumor is associated with mutations of a protein called Rb, or retinoblastoma protein. Dysfunctional Rb is also involved with other types of cancers, including lung, brain, breast and bone.
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Researchers Discover Natural Food Preservative That Kills Food-Borne Bacteria
sciencedaily.com - 8-6-11
University of Minnesota researchers have discovered and received a patent for a naturally occurring lantibiotic -- a peptide produced by a harmless bacteria -- that could be added to food to kill harmful bacteria like salmonella, E. coli and listeria.
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Sentinel Node Biopsy Safe, Effective in Head and Neck Melanomas, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 8-6-11
A common technique for determining whether melanoma has spread can be used safely and effectively even in tumors from the head and neck area, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.
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Mindless Eating: Losing Weight Without Thinking
sciencedaily.com - 8-6-11
Dieters may not need as much willpower as they think, if they make simple changes in their surroundings that can result in eating healthier without a second thought, said a consumer psychologist at the American Psychological Association's 119th Annual Convention.
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Human-Made Fat May Limit Damage to Heart Attack Victims
sciencedaily.com - 8-6-11
A human-made fat called Intralipid, which is currently used as a component of intravenous nutrition and to treat rare overdoses of local anesthetics, may also offer protection for patients suffering from heart attacks.
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Young Gay Men Have More Than 25% of New HIV Cases in U.S., Researchers Say
bloomberg.com - 8-5-11
The number of new HIV infections has surged among young, black homosexual males even as the overall spread of the virus that causes AIDS stabilized, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.
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Fish oil in pregnancy may ward off babies' colds, study shows
msnbc.msn.com - 8-5-11
Women who take fish oil supplements during pregnancy may boost their babies’ immune systems and help protect against colds during the first months of life, a new study shows.
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CDC: Salmonella outbreak more resistant to antibiotics than usual
cnn.com - 8-5-11
Federal health officials said Thursday that a recent salmonella outbreak may be more resistant than usual to antibiotics, leading to higher hospitalization rates.
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Do presidents age faster in office?
cnn.com - 8-5-11
President Barack Obama has had the weight of the free world on his shoulders for 2½ years, and he might be starting to look like it.
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Predicting Spinal Disc Degeneration
sciencedaily.com - 8-5-11
About 80% of the active population suffers from low back pain at some point in their lives. In a paper published on August 4th 2011 in PLoS Computational Biology, researchers at the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC) show that overloading on already degenerated discs is less damaging than on discs which are still healthy -- and that changes in cell density in discs are fundamental to the process of disc degeneration.
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Harnessing the Power of Positive Thoughts and Emotions to Treat Depression
sciencedaily.com - 8-5-11
Positive activity interventions (PAIs) offer a safe, low-cost, and self-administered approach to managing depression and may offer hope to individuals with depressive disorders who do not respond or have access to adequate medical therapy, according to a comprehensive review article in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
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14,000 U.S. deaths a year from opioids
upi.com - 8-5-11
Almost 14,000 U.S. deaths from prescribed opioids such as OxyContin and Vicodin occurred annually from 1999 to 2006, researchers found.
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Facebook and Twitter fuel iPhone and BlackBerry addiction, says Ofcom
guardian.co.uk - 8-5-11
Britons' appetite for Facebook and social networks on the go is driving a huge demand for smartphones – with 60% of teenagers describing themselves as "highly addicted" to their device – according to new research by the media regulator, Ofcom.
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Functional foods provide more than just nutrition
usatoday.com - 8-5-11
Say you eat yogurt for your health, and most Americans will know what you mean: You are targeting that food's bone-building calcium and gut-friendly probiotics.
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Reach 90 and 'your body will stop ageing'... but only if you have a Stone Age diet
dailymail.co.uk - 8-5-11
Reach the age of 90 and your body won’t get any older, it was claimed last night.
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Study: U.S. health insurance red tape costs $27 billion
upi.com - 8-5-11
The U.S. health insurance bureaucracy costs doctors some $27 billion extra per year compared with Canada's single-payer system, researchers found.
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CO exposures higher than thought
upi.com - 8-5-11
From 2000 to 2009, 45 percent of carbon monoxide exposure reported by the National Poison Data System was not treated at a hospital, U.S. officials say.
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U.S. HIV cases stable at 50,000 a year
upi.com - 8-5-11
Overall U.S. HIV incidence has been relatively stable but increases in new infections are being observed among young, black gay and bisexual men, officials say.
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USDA suspected maker of tainted turkey two weeks ago
msnbc.msn.com - 8-5-11
U.S. Department of Agriculture officials suspected as early as July 18 that samples of ground turkey tied to nationwide salmonella infections came from meat giant Cargill Inc., but it took two weeks to gather enough information to urge a recall, an expert said Thursday.
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What makes you happy? It may depend on your age
msnbc.msn.com - 8-5-11
People's happiness levels change with age, an idea reflected in personal experiences and public opinion polls, but a new study shows that much of that change may boil down to how people define happiness itself.
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Are you an exhibitionist?
cnn.com - 8-5-11
Are you an exhibitionist? Maybe even a little bit of one? Have you ever fooled around in the backseat of a taxi, or gotten it on at your parents’ house, or made out in an elevator or stairwell, or enjoyed some great sex amidst the great outdoors?
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Baby heart defect test 'could save lives'
bbc.co.uk - 8-5-11
A quick and cheap test could save the lives of babies born with congenital heart defects, doctors say.
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Cancer is curable NOW! Thirty experts reveal most advanced and effective cancer treatments and cures available today
naturalnews.com - 8-5-11
Alternative cancer treatment has grown into a powerful movement that is catching on quickly all over the world -- a movement which will finally reveal the ignorance of conventional treatments by showing how cancer is ALREADY curable right now: not with medicine or drugs, but with knowledge.
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Many Military Vets in College Plagued By Thoughts of Suicide
healthday.com - 8-5-11
American military veterans attending college are far more likely to entertain thoughts of suicide than fellow students who have never been in the military, a new national survey indicates.
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Scientists May Have Found Missing Link to Common Brain Cancer
healthday.com - 8-5-11
A map of the genetic mutations associated with the second most common form of brain cancer appears to reveal the biological cause of the tumors, researchers report.
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Today's Teens Less Likely to Be Heavy Smokers, Study Finds
healthday.com - 8-5-11
Compared with high school smokers two decades ago, today's teen smokers are more likely to smoke only occasionally, or smoke fewer cigarettes each day, according to a new study.
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A Wise Man's Treatment for Arthritis: Frankincense?
sciencedaily.com - 8-5-11
The answer to treating painful arthritis could lie in an age old herbal remedy -- frankincense, according to Cardiff University scientists. Cardiff scientists have been examining the potential benefits of frankincense to help relieve and alleviate the symptoms of the condition.
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U.S. Physicians Spend Nearly Four Times More On Health Insurance Costs Than Canadian Counterparts
sciencedaily.com - 8-5-11
U.S. physicians spend nearly $61,000 more than their Canadian counterparts each year on administrative expenses related to health insurance, according to a new study by researchers at Cornell University and the University of Toronto.
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Aggressive Drug Therapy Aids Superbug Evolution, Research Finds
sciencedaily.com - 8-5-11
New research raises troubling concerns about the use of aggressive drug therapies to treat a wide range of diseases such as MRSA, C. difficile, malaria, and even cancer.
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Drinking Just One Measure of Spirits Increases the Risk of Acute Pancreatitis, Study Finds; But Wine and Beer Do Not Appear to Have the Same Effect
sciencedaily.com - 8-5-11
Drinking just one 4cl measure of spirits can increase the risk of an acute attack of pancreatitis, but wine or beer does not appear to have the same effect, according to a study published online by BJS, the British Journal of Surgery.
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Gold Nanoparticles Used to Diagnose Flu in Minutes
sciencedaily.com - 8-5-11
Arriving at a rapid and accurate diagnosis is critical during flu outbreaks, but until now, physicians and public health officials have had to choose between a highly accurate yet time-consuming test or a rapid but error-prone test.
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Leukemia Drug Reverses Tamoxifen-Resistance in Breast Cancer Cells
sciencedaily.com - 8-5-11
Taking a leukemia chemotherapy drug may help breast cancer patients who don't respond to tamoxifen overcome resistance to the widely-used drug, new research from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson suggests.
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Japan’s Fukushima catastrophe brings big radiation spikes to B.C.
straight.com - 8-5-11
After Japan’s Fukushima catastrophe, Canadian government officials reassured jittery Canadians that the radioactive plume billowing from the destroyed nuclear reactors posed zero health risks in this country.
In fact, there was reason to worry. Health Canada detected massive amounts of radioactive material from Fukushima in Canadian air in March and April at monitoring stations across the country.
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Antibiotic resistance is a common feature of Cargill Salmonella outbreaks
foodpoisonjournal.com - 8-4-11
We now know it's Cargill's ground turkey that is at the epicenter of the 26 state, 77 illness Salmonella Heidleburg outbreak, so, inevitably, we have to take a deeper look at Cargill's other Salmonella outbreaks. Including the present ground turkey Salmonella outbreak, Cargill ground meat has been the source of multiple Salmonella outbreaks and recalls over the last decade:
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When Food Cravings Point to Health Problems – and When They Don't
abcnews.go.com - 8-4-11
Elsie Campbell's love of salad became more than a healthy habit when she started eating three or four heads of iceberg lettuce each day for several months.
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Urine test may help predict prostate cancer risk
usatoday.com - 8-4-11
A new urine test might help doctors detect prostate cancer and better evaluate a patient's treatment options, researchers say.
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Why are today's babies being born so BIG?
dailymail.co.uk - 8-4-11
As soon as a baby is born, there are three crucial pieces of information that family and friends demand to know — the sex, name ... and weight.
Which is why, when baby Hayden Church arrived six weeks ago, his delivery drew gasps — not to mention a few winces — from everyone with whom his mum Carly, 31, shared the crucial information.
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Mediterranean diet 'lengthens life by up to FIFTEEN years', researchers claim
dailymail.co.uk - 8-4-11
Those who follow a Mediterranean diet combined with exercise, not smoking and keeping to a healthy weight could live up to 15 years longer, researchers say.
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Certain foods reduce colon cancer risk
upi.com - 8-4-11
Diets including cooked green vegetables, dried fruit, legumes and brown rice are associated with fewer colon polyps, U.S. researchers found.
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One in 10 seniors skip costly medication
upi.com - 8-4-11
About 10 percent of U.S. Medicare patients -- including cancer survivors -- do not take their medication because it is too expensive, Harvard researchers found.
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So many food choices may add to obesity
upi.com - 8-4-11
The average U.S. supermarket has more than 50,000 products and this abundance of choice may contribute to excess eating and obesity, a U.S. food expert says.
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Cargill recalls 36 million pounds of ground turkey
msnbc.msn.com - 8-4-11
Meat giant Cargill Inc. is recalling nearly 36 million pounds of ground turkey linked to a California death and at least 78 other salmonella illnesses nationwide, company officials said.
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Hospitals need to do more to help moms breastfeed
cnn.com - 8-4-11
Hospitals could and should do a lot more to help women succeed at breastfeeding, according to a new report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Eating disorders delay pregnancy
bbc.co.uk - 8-4-11
Women with a history of eating disorders may struggle to fall pregnant quickly, research suggests.
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Salmonella superbug on the rise
bbc.co.uk - 8-4-11
A strain of Salmonella resistant to the most powerful antibiotics has been found in the UK, France and Denmark.
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Amazing food fact: Confectioner's glaze, a common coating on candies and pills, is made from the bodily excretions of an Asian beetle
naturalnews.com - 8-4-11
Confectioner's glaze, also called pharmaceutical glaze, resinous glaze, pure food glaze and natural glaze, is a common ingredient in candies and pills. By any name, it's the same ingredient as shellac, the chemical sold in hardware stores that's used for sealing and varnishing wood floors. Check the ingredients of any over-the-counter drugs you may own, too: It's a common ingredient in children's medicines and even some children's frozen foods.
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Court rules organic farmers can sue conventional, GMO farmers whose pesticides 'trespass' and contaminate their fields
naturalnews.com - 8-4-11
Purveyors of conventional and genetically-modified (GM) crops -- and the pesticides and herbicides that accompany them -- are finally getting a taste of their own legal medicine. Minnesota's Star Tribune has reported that the Minnesota Court of Appeals recently ruled that a large organic farm surrounded by chemical-laden conventional farms can seek damages for lost crops, as well as lost profits, caused by the illegal trespassing of pesticides and herbicides on its property.
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Another Blood Test for Alzheimer's Shows Promise
healthday.com - 8-4-11
A blood test that screens for certain markers in the blood called "autoantibodies" is showing promise in diagnosing Alzheimer's disease, researchers report.
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High Dose of Yeast Infection Drug Linked to Birth Defects, FDA Says
healthday.com - 8-4-11
Pregnant women who take ongoing, high doses of the drug fluconazole (brand name Diflucan) may be at increased risk of having babies with birth defects, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Wednesday.
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Obesity Counseling Should Stress Brain, Not Willpower: Study
healthday.com - 8-4-11
Obesity counseling should focus on neurobehavioral processes -- the ways the brain controls eating behavior in response to biological and environmental factors -- instead of personal choice and willpower, researchers suggest.
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'Infrared Detector' May Lead Vampire Bat to Blood
healthday.com - 8-4-11
Vampire bats have heat-detecting molecules that help guide them to blood-rich locations on victims, scientists say.
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New Tick-Borne Illness Infects Midwesterners
healthday.com - 8-4-11
First they spread Lyme disease, and then babesiosis. Now, deer ticks carrying a newly identified bacterium are infecting residents of the midwestern United States with a disease called ehrlichiosis, and experts say it will likely appear in other areas of the country.
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Lifestyles of the Old and Healthy Defy Expectations
sciencedaily.com - 8-4-11
People who live to 95 or older are no more virtuous than the rest of us in terms of their diet, exercise routine or smoking and drinking habits, according to researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.
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Why Knee Osteoarthritis Afflicts More Women Than Men
sciencedaily.com - 8-4-11
A Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon suspects that the nagging pain and inflammation that women can experience in their knees may be different from what men encounter, and she has been chosen to lead a novel U.S.-Canadian study to explore the question.
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Cooked Green Vegetables, Dried Fruit, Legumes, and Brown Rice Associated With Fewer Colon Polyps
sciencedaily.com - 8-4-11
Eating legumes at least three times a week and brown rice at least once a week was linked to a reduced risk of colon polyps by 33 percent and 40 percent respectively, according to Loma Linda University research recently published in Nutrition and Cancer. High consumption of cooked green vegetables and dried fruit was also associated with greater protection, the study shows.
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Breaking news: Multi-agency armed raid hits Rawesome Foods, Healthy Family Farms for selling raw milk and cheese
naturalnews.com - 8-4-11
This is a NaturalNews exclusive breaking new report. Please credit NaturalNews.com. A multi-agency SWAT-style armed raid was conducted this morning by helmet-wearing, gun-carrying enforcement agents from the LA County Sheriff's Office, the FDA, the Dept. of Agriculture and the CDC (Centers for Disease Control).
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HIV infections in U.S. stable but disparities exist
reuters.com - 8-4-11
The number of Americans newly infected with HIV remained stable between 2006 and 2009, but infections rose nearly 50 percent among young black gay and bisexual men, U.S. experts said on Wednesday.
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Sample seven snacks that will fire up your energy
usatoday.com - 8-3-11
It's 4 p.m. after a long day at the office — do you know where your energy is?
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Dieting forces brain to eat itself, scientists claim
telegraph.co.uk - 8-3-11
Dieters struggle to lose weight because a lack of nutrition forces their brain cells to eat themselves, making the feeling of hunger even stronger, scientists claim.
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Group says label serving sizes unrealistic
upi.com - 8-3-11
A U.S. food advocacy group is urging the Food and Drug Administration to revise its serving-size regulations because many underestimate serving size.
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Salmonella alert for ground turkey
upi.com - 8-3-11
The U.S. Department of Agriculture issued a public health alert after some 77 cases of Salmonella were reported in 26 states associated with ground turkey.
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Colon cleansing has no benefit
upi.com - 8-3-11
There's no evidence to back claims that colon cleansing has health benefits but it can have many side effects including vomiting and death, U.S. doctors advise.
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Nicotine protects against Parkinson's
upi.com - 8-3-11
Nicotine protects the brain from Parkinson's disease, researchers in Paris found.
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Get Some Sleep: Avoid frequent leg cramping
cnn.com - 8-3-11
It is frustrating, to both patients and doctors, that modern medical science often lacks understanding of or treatment for common, everyday ailments.
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Indoor mold poses key asthma risk for babies
cnn.com - 8-3-11
When infants are exposed to mold in the home, their risk for developing asthma more than doubles, according to a study published Tuesday in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. The study doesn't prove mold causes asthma, but it does suggest that exposure to mold during infancy is linked to the development of chronic inflammation of the lung airways, which causes wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing.
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Bear chemical brings heart hope
bbc.co.uk - 8-3-11
A synthesised compound also found in bear bile may help the recovery of some people who have had a heart attack.
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Scientists hyping 'universal' flu shot to perpetuate vaccine scam
naturalnews.com - 8-3-11
Influenza vaccination rates are on the decline as Americans increasingly learn not only that flu shots contain harmful additives like Thimerosal (mercury), but also that they do not even work as claimed (one of the "side effects" of getting a flu shot, after all, is the flu itself).
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New EPA-approved DuPont herbicide linked to widespread killing of trees, authorities unconcerned
naturalnews.com - 8-3-11
The DuPont chemical company recently received approval from the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) for its new herbicide Imprelis (aminocyclopyrachlor), which has been alleged as an "environmentally friendly" alternative to other herbicides.
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More cases of rickets turn up in UK, lack of sunshine exposure to blame
naturalnews.com - 8-3-11
Thought to have been eradicated at least 80 years ago, the bone disease rickets is once again making a big comeback, particularly in the UK where cases of it are popping up all over place. A recent report from BBC News explains that rickets is on the rise in Cardiff, Wales, the country's capital, and largest, city.
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Five lies self-made victims tell themselves
naturalnews.com - 8-3-11
It's a harsh title and at the risk of sounding harsher still, I should say that self-made victims go well beyond telling themselves the following lies. They tell themselves with the passion of a preacher. They feel them with such conviction that we may be more accurate by suggesting that these are lies that people live, not merely tell. And before I appear arrogant beyond belief, I confess that I have done my share of living these lies, as most people have. The challenge, as with most of the deeper issues, is to recognize them.
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Popular Antidepressants Not Always Best Choice for Seniors
healthday.com - 8-3-11
New research suggests that hugely popular antidepressants such as Prozac and Effexor might not always be the best choice for seniors, since they seem to have more side effects than older antidepressants do.
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Cancer Patients May Be at Greater Risk for Sun Damage
healthday.com - 8-3-11
During the summer, cancer patients are at greater risk for sun damage and need to be extra vigilant about sun safety, researchers say.
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Larger Dose of Zinc Lozenges May Shorten Colds
healthday.com - 8-3-11
There's still no cure for the common cold, but there may be a way to shorten its misery: A new study suggests that higher doses of zinc lozenges in certain formulations may cut the length of colds by more than 40 percent.
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Americans No Longer Outliving Europeans: Study
healthday.com - 8-3-11
Americans used to live a little longer than Europeans, but that's no longer the case, according to a new study that gives high-income nations in Europe an 18-month advantage in longevity.
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Monkey See, Monkey Do? The Role of Mirror Neurons in Human Behavior
sciencedaily.com - 8-3-11
We are all familiar with the phrase "monkey see, monkey do" -- but have we actually thought about what it means? Over the last two decades, neuroscience research has been investigating whether this popular saying has a real basis in human behavior.
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Brain Chemical May Explain Why Heavy Smokers Feel Sad After Quitting
sciencedaily.com - 8-3-11
Heavy smokers may experience sadness after quitting because early withdrawal leads to an increase in the mood-related brain protein monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A), a new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) has shown. This finding, which was published in the Archives of General Psychiatry, may also explain why heavy smokers are at high risk for clinical depression.
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New Study Identifies Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Strain of Salmonella
sciencedaily.com - 8-3-11
A new study has identified the recent emergence of a multidrug-resistant strain of Salmonella that has a high level resistance to ciprofloxacin, a common treatment for severe Salmonella infections. The study, led by François-Xavier Weill, MD, and Simon Le Hello, PharmD, at the Pasteur Institute in France, is published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases and is now available online.
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My lettuce addiction was a sign I had cancer... and, thanks heavens my scientist husband spotted it
dailymail.co.uk - 8-2-11
When Elsie Campbell began having cravings for lettuce, she thought it was a passing fancy.
Even when it became an obsession that saw her eating four whole lettuces a day, she still tried to shrug it off as harmless.
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Statins reduce risk of second stroke in younger adults
telegraph.co.uk - 8-2-11
A study of 215 people, who had their first stroke between the age of 15 and 49, found that those who took statins at some point afterwards were 77 less likely to suffer another, over a nine year period.
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Cow's milk 'too salty for babies'
telegraph.co.uk - 8-2-11
It is almost four times as salty as breast milk, say researchers who have found that those fed cow's milk before 12 months tended to have the highest salt diets.
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Most avoid discussing a 'good death'
upi.com - 8-2-11
There is an avoidance of death in U.S. society that often sidesteps important issues until it is too late for critically ill patients, a professor suggests.
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Sun, heat a risk for cancer patients
upi.com - 8-2-11
Because of their treatment, cancer patients are at higher risk from the sun so they should take precautions, U.S. physicians advise.
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Washington, D.C., tops for adult drinking
upi.com - 8-2-11
The District of Columbia tops the nation for alcohol dependence or abuse for adults age 26 and older at 8.1 percent, U.S. health officials say.
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Study: Crying Won't Make You Feel Better
healthland.time.com - 8-2-11
There's something cathartic about having a good cry and "letting it all out," even if you don't have anything in particular that's bringing you down.
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Alcohol and anxiety a risky mix for some
cnn.com - 8-2-11
Many people who experience chronic feelings of anxiety about social situations, work and relationships, or other aspects of everyday life often reach for a beer or a glass of wine to quell their unease.
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Fish oil during pregnancy may lessen infant colds
cnn.com - 8-2-11
Pregnant women who consume plenty of omega-3 fatty acids from supplements or natural sources such as salmon may be helping to fortify the immune system of their babies, a new study in the journal Pediatrics suggests.
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Monsanto-spawned superweeds growing three inches daily, destroying farm equipment
naturalnews.com - 8-2-11
The proliferation of superweeds -- weeds that have mutated to develop resistance to popular herbicides like Monsanto's Roundup formula -- continues to rise. But the individual plants' overall size and strength is also increasing. According to a series of new studies published in the journal Weed Science, farmers are having more trouble than ever dealing with out-of-control superweeds in their fields, some of which grow up to three inches a day in size, and are so strong and thick that they are destroying farm equipment.
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The cheapest, fastest, easiest way to detoxify the whole body, look younger and be healthier
naturalnews.com - 8-2-11
Some years back I heard Bernard Jensen, one of our country's great nutritionists and author of over 50 books, tell the story of Samson, "the Saxon Giant." Samson was a weight lifter and wrestler who was brought to the United States by Florenz Zeigfield in the 1920's as one of the featured acts in the Zeigfield Follies. Besides his strength, Samson was also known for his baby-soft skin, a feature that Samson attributed to his daily regimen of dry skin-brushing, and a fact that greatly intrigued Jensen.
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Legalizing marijuana would hinder the multi-billion dollar empire of Mexican drug cartels, say some
naturalnews.com - 8-2-11
The prohibition of marijuana in the US has led to an "underground" cannabis industry in Mexico run primarily by violent gangster cartels like the ones wreaking havoc at the southern borders of Texas, Arizona, and California.
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New Guidelines for Spotting, Treating COPD Released
healthday.com - 8-2-11
Four of the world's leading pulmonary associations have issued new guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, one of the world's leading killers.
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For Many, Risks of Lung Biopsy May Outweigh Benefits: Study
healthday.com - 8-2-11
For many patients, biopsies of lung nodules found during CT scans may be unnecessary and even dangerous, a new study finds.
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Fetal Exposure to Magnetic Fields From Appliances, Power Lines May Up Kids' Asthma Risk
healthday.com - 8-2-11
A new study suggests that the children of mothers exposed to high levels of magnetic fields during pregnancy are at increased risk of developing asthma, findings that are sure to reignite the controversy over the health dangers that might be posed by exposure to power lines and electronics.
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Smoking, Diabetes, Obesity May Shrink Your Brain
healthday.com - 8-2-11
As if there weren't already enough good reasons to avoid smoking and keep your weight, blood sugar levels and blood pressure all under control, a new study suggests these risk factors in middle age may cause your brain to shrink, leading to mental declines up to a decade later.
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Study Tracks Masturbation Trends Among U.S. Teens
healthday.com - 8-2-11
A new nationwide look at data on masturbation among U.S. adolescents finds that boys do it much more often than girls, and they also tend to start earlier.
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When Teens Abuse Prescriptions, Addiction Often Follows
healthday.com - 8-2-11
More than one in five teens who have been prescribed a controlled medication such as Oxycontin for pain or Ritalin to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are misusing the drugs, a new study has found.
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When Teens Abuse Prescriptions, Addiction Often Follows
healthday.com - 8-2-11
More than one in five teens who have been prescribed a controlled medication such as Oxycontin for pain or Ritalin to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are misusing the drugs, a new study has found.
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Some Exercise Is Better Than None: More Is Better to Reduce Heart Disease Risk
sciencedaily.com - 8-2-11
Even small amounts of physical activity will help reduce heart disease risk, and the benefit increases as the amount of activity increases, according to a quantitative review reported in Circulation, journal of the American Heart Association.
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Indoor Air Cleaners Ease Asthma Symptoms in Children Living With Smokers, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 8-2-11
A Johns Hopkins Children's Center study of Baltimore City children who have asthma and live with smokers shows that indoor air cleaners can greatly reduce household air pollution and lower the rates of daytime asthma symptoms to those achieved with certain anti-inflammatory asthma drugs. Although the air cleaners improved the overall air quality in homes, they did not reduce air nicotine levels and did not counter all ill effects of second-hand smoke, the researchers warn.
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Fatty 'comfort' foods may alter brain's response to sadness
usatoday.com - 8-1-11
New research suggests that fatty foods do more than satisfy our stomachs. They may also soothe our psyche, literally serving as comfort foods.
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Making music can help overcome depression
telegraph.co.uk - 8-1-11
It might not have worked for such legendarily gloomy composers as Beethoven, Schumann or Morrissey, but according to academics making music can help overcome depression.
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More U.S. kids on government healthcare
upi.com - 8-1-11
With unemployment staying high and parents losing health insurance, more U.S. children are being covered by public health insurance plans, researchers say.
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Tiny blood card offers easier tests for remote areas
bbc.co.uk - 8-1-11
A cheap and portable blood test could provide a breakthrough for diagnosing infections in remote areas of the world, a scientific study says.
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Recognizing voices difficult for dyslexics
www.upi.com - 8-1-11
People with dyslexia may not notice how people pronounce words differently, something that makes voice recognition possible, U.S. researchers say.
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Help for husbands whose wives have cancer
www.upi.com - 8-1-11
A men's support group at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas wrote a book, which shares stories of members whose wives had cancer.
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Study: Alzheimer's drugs appear to cause severe brain swelling
naturalnews.com - 8-1-11
A trial involving a new Alzheimer's drug currently being developed by pharmaceutical giant Bristol-Myers Squibb has revealed that the drug may be the cause of a severe form of brain swelling known as vasogenic edema.
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Gene Variant Associated With Asthma Risk in Blacks
healthday.com - 8-1-11
A gene variant associated with asthma in black Americans has been pinpointed by a team of researchers working together in a new national collaboration called the EVE Consortium.
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Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics: The More They Resist, the More They Divide
sciencedaily.com - 8-1-11
The number of multiresistant strains of bacteria in hospitals is increasing. Bacteria acquire resistance to antibiotics through mutations in their chromosomes and by incorporating new genes, either from the surrounding environment or from other bacteria. Now, a research team at the Portuguese CBA research (University of Lisbon) and the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência has shown that, surprisingly, when both mechanisms of resistance are playing out in the bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli), its ability to survive and reproduce is increased.
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Restoring Happiness in People With Depression
sciencedaily.com - 8-1-11
Practicing positive activities may serve as an effective, low-cost treatment for people suffering from depression, according to researchers at the University of California, Riverside and Duke University Medical Center.
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