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September, 2011 - Herbal and Health News

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Technology changes the once simple cookbook
usatoday.com - 9-30-11
With a box full of carrots and a hankering for something vaguely exotic, Mary-Claire van Leunen turned to her computer for a recipe.
"I looked for 'Turkish carrots' and I found it easily, in fact I found half a dozen," said the retired Seattle software researcher.
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Why laughter could be the best medicine for dementia patients
dailymail.co.uk - 9-30-11
Laughter may be good medicine for elderly dementia patients - and best of all, it doesn't have any unpleasant side effects.
Scientists found nursing home residents who received regular visits from a humour therapist saw a 20 per cent drop in agitation levels compared to those receiving standard care.
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3 jobs where workers are most likely to smoke
msnbc.msn.com - 9-30-11
Miners, construction workers and food service workers are more likely to smoke than workers in any other industry in the U.S., according to a report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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People Who Are Easily Embarassed Are More Trustworthy
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-30-11
If you are a person who is easily embarassed, you may find comfort in what researchers from the University of California, Berkeley report in a paper published online this month in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: they suggest moderate embarassment is a good thing, because it means you are also likely to be more trustworthy and generous.
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H1N1 hit racial, ethnic minorities hardest
upi.com - 9-30-11
The H1N1 pandemic affected racial and ethnic minorities to a greater degree than others in Utah, U.S. health officials said.
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Those on oral steroids may lack vitamin D
upi.com - 9-30-11
Adults and children taking oral steroids are twice as likely as the general population to have severe vitamin D deficiency, U.S. researchers say.
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Drug may aid social function in autistic
upi.com - 9-30-11
U.S. researchers say propranolol -- a drug used to treat high blood pressure, control heart rate and reduce test anxiety -- may help people with autism.
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No One Treatment for Acid Reflux Clearly Better Than Another: Study
healthday.com - 9-30-11
Medications are effective for most patients with acid reflux disease, but some surgical options may be just as effective, according to a review of studies on current treatments for this common condition.
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Does Your Picky Eater Have a 'Feeding Disorder'?
healthday.com - 9-30-11
Picky eating is normal in children, but a pediatric feeding disorder is a much more serious problem that can affect a child's physical and mental development, an expert says.
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Single Dose of 'Magic Mushrooms' Hallucinogen May Create Lasting Personality Change, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 9-30-11
A single high dose of the hallucinogen psilocybin, the active ingredient in so-called "magic mushrooms," was enough to bring about a measurable personality change lasting at least a year in nearly 60 percent of the 51 participants in a new study, according to the Johns Hopkins researchers who conducted it.
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Instead of Defibrillator's Painful Jolt, There May Be a Gentler Way to Prevent Sudden Death
sciencedaily.com - 9-30-11
Each year in the United States, more than 200,000 people have a cardiac defibrillator implanted in their chest to deliver a high-voltage shock to prevent sudden cardiac death from a life-threatening arrhythmia. While it's a necessary and effective preventive therapy, those who've experienced a defibrillator shock say it's painful, and some studies suggest that the shock can damage heart muscle.
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Roads Pave the Way for the Spread of Superbugs
sciencedaily.com - 9-30-11
Antibiotic resistant E. coli was much more prevalent in villages situated along roads than in rural villages located away from roads, which suggests that roads play a major role in the spread or containment of antibiotic resistant bacteria, commonly called superbugs, a new study finds.
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Potato cheapest source of potassium
upi.com - 9-29-11
White potatoes are the largest and most affordable source of potassium per serving of any vegetable or fruit, U.S. researchers said.
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Vaccine could reduce HIV to 'minor infection'
telegraph.co.uk - 9-29-11
Spanish researchers found that 22 of 24 healthy people (92 per cent) developed an immune response to HIV after being given their MVA-B vaccine.
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Governments try to calculate 'happiness'
upi.com - 9-29-11
Several governments say they are considering developing a way to calculate psychological well-being of citizens, a researcher in Britain says.
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Tens of thousands of surgical patients dying needlessly because of poor NHS care, says Royal College of Surgeons
dailymail.co.uk - 9-29-11
Tens of thousands of elderly patients are dying needlessly after routine operations because they are not being properly looked after in hospitals, leading surgeons warn.
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Two-thirds of women would want to avoid hospital
telegraph.co.uk - 9-29-11
Three-quarters of those questioned in a survey also said they or an elderly relative had been treated in an unsatisfactory way by the NHS.
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Soviet-era pill from Bulgaria helps smokers quit
msnbc.msn.com - 9-29-11
A pill developed in Bulgaria during the Soviet era shows promise for helping millions of smokers cheaply and safely kick the habit, the first big study of it shows.
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Popular Painkillers Linked To Increased Heart Attack Risk
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-29-11
A new international study finds that popular painkillers or anti-inflammatories knows as NSAIDs can increase the risk of heart attack or stroke by a third, with some having a much stronger effect than others, and size of dose also making a difference. However, experts urge patients worried about the findings not to give up on their NSAID medication and to speak to their doctor about their concerns.
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Colorado cantaloupes kill up to 16 in listeria outbreak
bbc.co.uk - 9-29-11
At least 13 deaths and 72 illnesses have been linked to a listeriosis outbreak from fruit in the US state of Colorado, health officials say.
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Downturn drives doctors to plastic surgery
upi.com - 9-29-11
The bad economy is driving more doctors into plastic surgery, leading to more botched procedures, the head of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons says.
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Study Suggests Link Between Sleep Deprivation, Alzheimer's Risk
healthday.com - 9-29-11
A new study shows that levels of amyloid beta, a byproduct of brain activity that is considered a marker for Alzheimer's disease, normally rise during the day and decrease at night.
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Cancer Patients Should Ask Doctors to Use Simple Terms
healthday.com - 9-29-11
Cancer patients are often faced with many difficult-to-understand treatment choices that can have serious side effects and even mean the difference between life and death.
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Number of U.S. Kids on ADHD Meds Keeps Rising
healthday.com - 9-29-11
The use of stimulant medications such as Ritalin or Adderall in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is continuing to climb, although at a slower pace than in decades past, a new study finds.
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Experts Point Out Signs of Dangerous Heart Rhythm
healthday.com - 9-29-11
People who experience what feels like drums pounding in their chest, shortness of breath, chest pain and dizziness may suffer from the common but potentially dangerous heart arrhythmia known as atrial fibrillation.
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Number of U.S. Kids on ADHD Meds Keeps Rising
healthday.com - 9-29-11
The use of stimulant medications such as Ritalin or Adderall in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is continuing to climb, although at a slower pace than in decades past, a new study finds.
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Tendons Absorb Shocks Muscles Won't Handle
sciencedaily.com - 9-29-11
Researchers at Brown University have learned how muscles and tendons in the legs deal with sudden impacts. Experiments showed that tendons absorb the initial burst of energy from impact before the leg muscles react. The tendons act as shock absorbers, protecting the leg muscle from damage at the moment of impact.
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Big Tobacco Knew Radioactive Particles in Cigarettes Posed Cancer Risk but Kept Quiet, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 9-29-11
Tobacco companies knew that cigarette smoke contained radioactive alpha particles for more than four decades and developed "deep and intimate" knowledge of these particles' cancer-causing potential, but they deliberately kept their findings from the public, according to a new study by UCLA researchers.
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Additives Meant to Protect Vitamin C Actually Cause More Harm, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 9-29-11
Anti-caking agents in powdered products may hasten degradation of vitamin C instead of doing what they are supposed to do: protect the nutrient from moisture.
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Children With Autism Benefit from Early, Intensive Therapy
sciencedaily.com - 9-29-11
A primary characteristic of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is impairments in social-communication skills. Children and adolescents with social-communication problems face difficulty understanding, interacting and relating with others. University of Missouri researchers found that children who receive more intensive therapy to combat these impairments, especially at early ages, achieve the best outcomes.
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Study: Public clueless on diet/cancer link
upi.com - 9-28-11
A British study of public perceptions about cancer reveals 50-year-old ideas still hold sway while current research is being ignored, researchers say.
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Hormone linked to severe asthma in women
upi.com - 9-28-11
Women taking postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy may have an increased risk of severe asthma attacks requiring hospitalization, Danish researchers say.
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Using Vinegar to Thwart Cervical Cancer in the Developing World
healthland.time.com - 9-28-11
Who knew that the key to preventing cervical cancer could be as simple as table vinegar?
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Listeria-cantaloupe-linked deaths rise to 16
cbsnews.com - 9-28-11
As many as 16 people have died from possible listeria illnesses traced to Colorado cantaloupes, health officials say — a death toll that would make the food outbreak the deadliest in more than a decade.
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2.3B to have urinary infection by 2018
upi.com - 9-28-11
Half the world's adults -- 2.3 billion people -- will have urinary tract symptoms by 2018, an increase of 18 percent in 10 years, a U.S. researchers says.
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Pools, play-in fountains spread diarrheal disease, CDC says
usatoday.com - 9-28-11
The ground-level fountains so popular with the grade-school set can also be founts of a rather nasty diarrheal disease caused by the microscopic parasite cryptosporidium.
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My pet spaniel saved my life by sniffing out my breast cancer
dailymail.co.uk - 9-28-11
A mother says her breast cancer was discovered... by her faithful pet spaniel.
Brenda Jones, 47, was feeling fit and well but said her loving dog called Mrs Murphy sensed something was wrong.
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Chemotherapy appears safe in pregnancy
msnbc.msn.com - 9-28-11
Treating pregnant cancer patients with powerful chemotherapy drugs appears not to harm their unborn children, but pre-term delivery to avoid subjecting them to chemotherapy does, according to a study by cancer experts on Tuesday.
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Saw palmetto no better than placebo for prostate problems
cnn.com - 9-28-11
The millions of middle-aged men who take saw-palmetto supplements to cope with the symptoms of an enlarged prostate might as well be popping sugar pills.
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Canadian life expectancy up to 80.9 years
upi.com - 9-28-11
The life expectancy for Canadians rose slightly to 80.9 years in 2008, Statistics Canada reported from Ottawa Tuesday.
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Marijuana extract helps prevent chemo pain
upi.com - 9-28-11
Cannabidiol, an extract from marijuana, may be a promising treatment to prevent pain in those getting the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel, U.S. researchers say.
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Fatalism Keeps Many From Colon Cancer Screening
healthday.com - 9-28-11
A fatalistic attitude contributes to low colorectal cancer screening rates among poorer people, even when the screening and cancer care are free, according to U.K. researchers.
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Super-Tight Blood Sugar Control May Not Ease Mental Decline in Diabetics
healthday.com - 9-28-11
For people with type 2 diabetes, intense treatment doesn't slow decline in thinking skills, a new study found. Super-strict blood sugar control actually appeared to increase study participants' risk of death, the researchers found.
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Women Have Stronger Immune Systems Than Men -- And It's All Down to X-Chromosome Related microRNA
sciencedaily.com - 9-28-11
As anyone familiar with the phrase 'man-flu' will know women consider themselves to be the more robust side of the species when it comes to health and illness. Now new research, published in BioEssays, seems to support the idea. The research focuses on the role of MicroRNAs encoded on the X chromosome to explain why women have stronger immune systems to men and are less likely to develop cancer.
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Organic Tomato Juice Contains More Beneficial Phenolic Components Than Juice from Conventionally Grown Crops
sciencedaily.com - 9-28-11
Organic tomato juice contains more phenolic components than juice from conventionally grown crops, according to a new study published in the journal Food Chemistry.
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Drug that 'shrinks children's brain tumours by 50%' is launched as once-a-day pill
dailymail.co.uk - 9-28-11
A drug that can shrink brain tumours by up to 50 per cent in children with a rare disease has been launched in the UK.
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How taking painkillers can destroy your stomach lining in days
dailymail.co.uk - 9-27-11
When Claire Calder was prescribed painkillers for a common foot condition, she didn’t think twice about taking them.
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Could your sweet tooth be a warning sign that you're ill?
dailymail.co.uk - 9-27-11
Despite the endless health campaigns to encourage us to cut back, sugar still makes up a third of our calorie intake.
This is deeply worrying, say experts, who are increasingly concerned that our bodies were not designed to take such a sugar overload, and fear it is contributing to many modern ills, including diabetes, heart disease and cancer.
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Infertile men have higher heart disease risk
telegraph.co.uk - 9-27-11
Researchers who tracked them for a decade found that those who remained childless throughout life were almost a fifth (17 per cent) more likely to die from cardiovascular disease.
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Dying cancer patients should not be given 'futile' drugs
telegraph.co.uk - 9-27-11
After a year-long investigation, a panel of leading academics said that the cost of treating cancer to western societies is spiralling out of control, as the ageing population means that increasing numbers of people are growing tumours.
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Maggots Heal Diabetic Wounds
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-27-11
Delegates at a conference in Chicago recently learned how maggots could one day heal stubborn wounds in diabetic patients who are otherwise facing lower limb amputation. In a small trial whose results have not yet been reported for peer review, 27 of the 37 patients who underwent the "biosurgery" given by Dr Lawrence Eron of the University of Hawaii in Honolulu using sterile larvae of the green blow-fly (Lucilia sericata), had successful outcomes.
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Different Fruits And Vegetables Affect Cancer Risk In Different Parts Of Bowel
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-27-11
Eating more apples is linked to lower risk of distal colon cancer, brassicas like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli and Brussels sprouts are linked to lower risk of cancer in both the proximal and the distal colon, while on the other hand, drinking more fruit juice appears to raise the risk of rectal cancer, according to new research from Australia published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.
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Vitamin B12 deficiency linked to memory problems
cnn.com/ - 9-27-11
There's been a lot of buzz about vitamin B12 in recent years, and here's another reason to pay attention to it:
A new study finds that a deficiency in vitamin B12 is associated with memory and thinking problems, as well as brain shrinkage. The research is published in the journal Neurology.
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Caregivers have negative health behaviors
upi.com - 9-27-11
The estimated 6 million informal caregivers in California show serious psychological distress and negative health behaviors such as smoking, researchers say.
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Childless Men May Face Higher Heart Disease Risk
sciencedaily.com - 9-27-11
Men who do not have children appear to face a higher risk of dying from heart disease than those who become fathers, a new study suggests.
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Lots of Coffee Might Lower Depression Risk: Study
sciencedaily.com - 9-27-11
Coffee lovers, take heart: Women who drink four or more cups of caffeinated coffee daily seem to have a lower risk of depression than those who don't drink java or stop at one cup a day, a new study suggests.
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Could Too Little Vitamin B-12 Shrink the Aging Brain?
sciencedaily.com - 9-27-11
Too little vitamin B-12 may be associated with smaller brain size and more problems with thinking skills as people age, new research suggests.
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More Frequent Doctor Visits May Benefit Diabetes Patients
sciencedaily.com - 9-27-11
Diabetes patients who visit a primary care doctor every few weeks achieve quicker control of their blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, researchers have found.
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Scientists Find H1N1 Flu Virus Prevalent in Animals in Africa
sciencedaily.com - 9-27-11
UCLA life scientists and their colleagues have discovered the first evidence of the H1N1 virus in animals in Africa. In one village in northern Cameroon, a staggering 89 percent of the pigs studied had been exposed to the H1N1 virus, commonly known as the swine flu.
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Diabetics' Coronary Calcium Levels Strongly Linked to Heart Attack Risk
sciencedaily.com - 9-27-11
Notable levels of calcium buildup in coronary arteries can be strong predictors of heart attacks and strokes in people with diabetes and metabolic syndrome, according to a study led by UC Irvine's Heart Disease Prevention Program.
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Looking for a fitness buddy? Get a dog
reuters.com - 9-27-11
When it comes to getting fit a person's best friend just might be a four-legged one.
Experts say studies show dog owners walk more, walk faster, and are more likely to enjoy an active lifestyle because of their companion animal.
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Americans get too much healthcare, their docs say
reuters.com - 9-27-11
Here is a diagnosis of what's wrong with health care in America, straight from the horse's mouth: There's too much.
In a new poll of primary care physicians, nearly half of them said their patients received too much medical care and more than a quarter said they were practicing more aggressively than they'd like to.
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Cyclists in big cities inhale more soot
upi.com - 9-26-11
People who cycle through big cities inhale more black carbon than pedestrians, which may cause lung damage or trigger heart attacks, British researchers say.
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Moderate alcohol may reduce asthma risk
upi.com - 9-26-11
Moderate amounts of alcohol may reduce the risk of asthma, researchers in Denmark suggest.
Sofie Lieberoth of the Bispebjerg Hospital in Amsterdam and colleagues found drinking one to six units of alcohol a week could reduce the risk of developing the asthma.
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Churches help cut hospital mortality rate
upi.com - 9-26-11
U.S. hospitals are getting together with faith-based groups in an effort to improve care and cut costs, a health official says.
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Helicopter fly-along provides bird's eye view of marijuana in county
theunion.com - 9-26-11
Most Nevada County residents know a lot of marijuana is being grown here — both legally with medical marijuana recommendations and illegally for sale.
But seeing it firsthand drives it home.
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New report casts doubt on virus' link to chronic fatigue syndrome
usatoday.com - 9-26-11
Researchers have shot another arrow through the credibility of claims that a virus likely causes chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).
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Use kitchen staples as green cleaners
usatoday.com - 9-26-11
Cleaning the bathroom can be daunting, even if you're armed with traditional cleaners laden with bleach and strong but perhaps environmentally unfriendly ingredients. But what if you want to go green and still get the toilet bowl, sink and tile to sparkle?
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Young people worldwide having more unsafe sex
msnbc.msn.com - 9-26-11
Young people across the globe are having more unprotected sex and know less about effective contraception options, a multinational survey revealed on Monday.
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Rectal Cancer Treatment Varies Greatly From Country To Country, Europe
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-26-11
Chemotherapy and radiotherapy usage for rectal cancer varies greatly from nation-to-nation within Europe, researchers from Leiden University Medical Centre, the Netherlands, reported at the European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress 2011, Stockholm, Sweden. The presenters said that clinical practice across Europe needs to become standardized.
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GERD Treatments, Benefits And Risks - New Report
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-26-11
New plain-language reports compare the risks and benefits of therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a digestive condition that affects millions of individuals in the U.S., and can be treated with medications or surgery. The reports are from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and are based on an updated evidence publication also released today.
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H1N1 flu virus prevalent in animals
upi.com - 9-26-11
Almost 90 percent of the pigs studied in a village in northern Cameroon were exposed to the H1N1 virus, or swine flu, U.S. researchers said.
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Poll: All want fast, portable, cheap lunch
upi.com - 9-26-11
During the week, all U.S. consumers say they want fast, portable and inexpensive lunch options, but baby boomers also want healthy food, a U.S. survey says.
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Dietary Supplements Could Make Athletes Unwitting Drugs Cheats
sciencedaily.com - 9-26-11
Minute levels of banned substances in some dietary supplements are leaving athletes susceptible to failed drugs tests according to Loughborough University Professor of Sport and Exercise Nutrition Ron Maughan.
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Some Brain Wiring Continues to Develop Well Into Our 20s
sciencedaily.com - 9-25-11
The human brain doesn't stop developing at adolescence, but continues well into our 20s, demonstrates recent research from the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Alberta.
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Americans Spending More of Their Lives Struggling With Diabetes
healthday.com - 9-25-11
Americans may be living longer than ever before, but they're not necessarily living better. And that's especially true for people who are obese, a new study finds.
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Good Moms Seem to Help Poor Kids Become Healthy Adults
healthday.com - 9-25-11
Poor children are more likely to become unhealthy adults -- vulnerable to infection and disease -- than kids from higher-income families, according to a new study.
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U.S. ranks last in preventable deaths
upi.com - 9-25-11
The United States' preventable mortality rate was almost twice that of France, which lowered its rate to 55 per 100,000 in 2007, a report found.
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Mental disability rose in last 10 years
upi.com - 9-25-11
In the last 10 years, the number of non-elderly U.S. adults who self-reported mental health disabilities rose, but researchers aren't sure why.
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Living in Damp River Valleys Leads to Lung Problems, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 9-25-11
A new study has shown that living in a river valley at low altitude can increase the risk of developing lung problems. In the first study of its kind, researchers from the UK aimed to assess the impact of weather, pollution and geography on the symptoms of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This is the first evidence to find a link between increased respiratory symptoms and lower altitude areas of river valleys.
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Obama Administration Set to Ban Asthma Inhalers Over Environmental Concerns
weeklystandard.com - 9-25-11
Remember how Obama recently waived new ozone regulations at the EPA because they were too costly? Well, it seems that the Obama administration would rather make people with Asthma cough up money than let them make a surely inconsequential contribution to depleting the ozone layer:
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The Day I Died [VIDEO]
personalgrowthcourses.net - 9-25-11
BBC Documentary on Near-Death Experiences
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Divorce, smoking may trigger hair loss in women
usatoday.com - 9-25-11
As if the heartache of divorce wasn't hardship enough, it appears that women enduring marital break-up may also have to deal with hair loss.
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Scientists Turn Brain Images Into YouTube Videos [VIDEO]
ibtimes.com - 9-25-11
Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, believe they are on their way to learning, and possibly seeing, what exactly is going on in the human mind through advancements in brain imaging.
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Marijuana DNA database can track pot's origins
msnbc.msn.com - 9-24-11
There is a new tool in the ongoing war on drugs and it comes from a forensic scientist at the University of New Haven.
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Death toll may be as high as 10 in listeria outbreak
usatoday.com - 9-24-11
The death toll in the 15-state listeria outbreak linked to cantaloupe from Colorado may now be as high as 10; at least 60 people have been reported ill.
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Study Shows More Mental Illness, but Decline in Getting Help
abcnews.go.com - 9-24-11
A few months ago, Dr. Ken Duckworth, a psychiatrist in Massachusetts, was swimming in his community's pool, chatting with other swimmers. When he mentioned his profession, one man wanted Duckworth's opinion on his struggles with depression; another asked for advice on a family member's schizophrenia.
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New report casts doubt on virus' link to chronic fatigue syndrome
usatoday.com - 9-24-11
Researchers have shot another arrow through the credibility of claims that a virus likely causes chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).
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Diabetic dog owner reveals how her untrained pooch has saved her life... twice
dailymail.co.uk - 9-24-11
A dog owner has another reason to love her loyal companion and friend - her pet has saved her life twice.
Tracey Poole is an insulin-dependent diabetic and can suffer from hypoglycemic attacks at night, when her blood sugar falls to dangerously low levels.
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Daily pill 'could stop or even REVERSE multiple sclerosis'
dailymail.co.uk - 9-24-11
Doctors have made an 'exciting' breakthrough that could lead to a new treatment to stop - or even reverse the symptoms - of multiple sclerosis.
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Women in charge 'have less sex'
telegraph.co.uk - 9-24-11
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health examined the relationships between married women’s autonomy and the regularity of their sexual relations.
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Popular weight-loss drug under review over liver failure fears
telegraph.co.uk - 9-24-11
The European Medicines Agency said there had been four suspected cases of “serious liver toxicity” linked to the medicine in recent years, one of which was fatal.
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Brains Of MS Patients Lack Neurosteroids, The Discovery May Open New Route To Treatment
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-24-11
New research finds that the brains of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) lack a group of chemicals called neurosteroids which help brain cells repair themselves and do other important things. The researchers, led by Dr Chris Power, a neurologist who works at the MS clinic in the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton in Canada, hope their discovery will open the door to new treatments for the disease.
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TEDMED: Fixing the brain with super glue
cnn.com - 9-24-11
Super glue: It's good for mending shoe insoles and drawer handles, but how about the human body? Don't try this at home, but doctors can actually use the medical-grade version of this material for fixing certain tiny malfunctions in the brain.
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Hospital privacy curtains harbor MRSA
upi.com - 9-24-11
Most hospital privacy curtains contain potentially harmful bacteria, including superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, U.S. researchers found.
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Poll: Married couples exercise less
upi.com - 9-24-11
Married people exercise less than single people, a British survey found, supporting research that couples are more likely to be obese than singles.
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Recession said to be a threat to elderly healthcare
upi.com - 9-24-11
The recession threatens to derail reforms in long-term care leaving the elderly facing mounting medical bills, an economic adviser to the U.K. government says.
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Severe asthma in kids linked to vitamin D
upi.com - 9-24-11
Children with severe therapy-resistant asthma may have worse symptoms due to lower levels of vitamin D in their blood, researchers in London say.
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111 ill from pesticides used on bed bugs
upi.com - 9-24-11
There were 111 cases of acute illness confirmed from the use of insecticides to control bed bugs in seven states from 2003 to 2010, U.S. officials say.
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Americans Spending More of Their Lives Struggling With Diabetes
healthday.com - 9-24-11
Americans may be living longer than ever before, but they're not necessarily living better. And that's especially true for people who are obese, a new study finds.
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Antioxidants Not Behind Red Wine's Healthy Effect on Heart: Study
healthday.com - 9-24-11
Many studies have shown that a glass or two of red wine a day is heart-healthy, and much of the benefit has been attributed to the anti-hypertensive effects of antioxidants found in red wine called polyphenols.
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ADHD Symptoms May Add to Burden of Autism
healthday.com - 9-24-11
Attention and hyperactivity problems worsen quality of life for many children with autism, a new study finds.
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Researchers Pinpoint the Cause of MRI Vertigo: Machine's Magnetic Field Pushes Fluid in the Inner Ear's Balance Organ
sciencedaily.com - 9-24-11
A team of researchers says it has discovered why so many people undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially in newer high-strength machines, get vertigo, or the dizzy sensation of free-falling, while inside or when coming out of the tunnel-like machine.
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Humor as Effective as Medication in Treating Agitation in Dementia
sciencedaily.com - 9-24-11
Humour therapy is as effective as widely used antipsychotic drugs in managing agitation in patients with dementia -- and avoids serious drug side effects, a new study shows.
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Mother’s Occupation While Pregnant Can Increase Risk of Asthma in Children
sciencedaily.com - 9-24-11
Mothers who are exposed to particular agents during pregnancy could give birth to children with a higher risk of asthma, according to new research.
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Singing After Stroke? Why Rhythm and Formulaic Phrases May Be More Important Than Melody
sciencedaily.com - 9-23-11
Patients with serious speech disorders are often able to sing complete texts. However, melody may not be the decisive factor.
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Men's top sex query is about erections
upi.com - 9-23-11
More than two-thirds of men who contacted a British non-profit group for sexual advice said they had erection problems, officials say.
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51% in California still oppose legalizing marijuana, poll finds
latimes.com - 9-23-11
Legalizing marijuana remains a tough sell in California, according to a new poll.
The Public Policy Institute of California, in a new statewide survey released Thursday, showed that 51% of voters oppose legalizing marijuana while 46% favor it.
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Best diet: One-third protein, carbs, fat
upi.com - 9-23-11
Meals made up of one-third protein, one-third fat and one-third carbohydrates allow the body to function best, researchers in Norway found.
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Family dinner = Fewer teens using drugs
upi.com - 9-23-11
U.S. teens who eat family dinner fewer than three times a week are more than two times likelier to use marijuana and twice as likely to drink, researchers say.
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You are held in a very stressful queue... how waiting on the phone for more than six minutes actually makes us ill
dailymail.co.uk - 9-23-11
Waiting in a call centre phone queue for more than five minutes and 58 seconds is bad for your health, new research shows.
Experts found callers' stress levels and blood pressure rise dangerously high as they become frustrated with the delay in getting through.
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Edinburgh and Cambridge scientists make virus discovery
bbc.co.uk - 9-23-11
Scientists have gained new knowledge into how viruses such as flu and HIV jump between species.
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Many U.S. black men short on vitamin D
upi.com - 9-23-11
Black men living in U.S. areas where there is low sunlight are more than three times more likely than white men to have vitamin D deficiency, researchers say.
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High pollution ups heart attack risk
upi.com - 9-23-11
People have an increased risk of heart attack for 6 hours after exposure to high levels of air pollution, researchers in Britain said.
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Bed Bug Insecticides Causing Sickness, Officials Warn
healthday.com - 9-23-11
Bed bug infestations are bad enough, but a new report finds that more than 100 Americans have become sickened from exposure to the insecticides used to eliminate the pests.
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Popular Diabetes Drugs May Raise Pancreatic Cancer Risk, Study Suggests
healthday.com - 9-23-11
People with type 2 diabetes taking the drugs Januvia or Byetta might have an increased risk of developing pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, a preliminary study suggests.
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In Older Men, Prostate Biopsies Can Raise Risk of Hospitalization
healthday.com - 9-23-11
Almost 7 percent of men 65 and older who have a prostate biopsy are hospitalized within 30 days of the procedure, a new study indicates.
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Genetic Links Seen Between Bipolar Illness and Schizophrenia
healthday.com - 9-23-11
There is a genetic link between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, two common and often disabling brain disorders, a new study indicates.
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Death Rate Higher in Minorities With Acute Leukemia
healthday.com - 9-23-11
A new study finds that blacks and Hispanics are less likely to develop acute leukemia than whites. But if they do become ill, they're much more likely to die.
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Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Airway Changes in Children With Severe Asthma
sciencedaily.com - 9-23-11
Children with severe therapy-resistant asthma (STRA) may have poorer lung function and worse symptoms compared to children with moderate asthma, due to lower levels of vitamin D in their blood, according to researchers in London. Lower levels of vitamin D may cause structural changes in the airway muscles of children with STRA, making breathing more difficult. The study provides important new evidence for possible treatments for the condition.
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Flesh Eating Disease In Cocaine Found In New York, Los Angeles – Cocaine Supply Of Entire Nation May Be Affected
alexanderhiggins.com - 9-23-11
Cocaine cut with the veterinary drug levamisole could be the culprit in a flurry of flesh-eating disease in New York and Los Angeles.
The drug, used to deworm cattle, pigs and sheep, can rot the skin off noses, ears and cheeks. And over 80 percent of the country’s coke supply contains it.
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Cannabis 'could ease pain of post-traumatic stress disorder'
dailymail.co.uk - 9-22-11
Cannabis could help ease the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, scientists say - as long as it was administered early enough.
Researchers from Haifa University, in Israel, found that cannabinoids - the active compound in cannabis - blocked feelings of anxiety in rats after they experienced a stressful episode.
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Blood test for inherited motor neurone disease 'in months'
telegraph.co.uk - 9-22-11
An NHS blood test for the most common form of inherited motor neurone disease is likely to be available within months, say British scientists who have discovered its genetic cause.
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Tainted cantaloupe toll rises to 55 illnesses, 8 deaths
msnbc.msn.com - 9-22-11
The toll of listeria food poisoning infections tied to contaminated cantaloupe rose sharply Wednesday, with federal health officials reporting 55 people sickened and eight dead in 14 states after eating tainted fruit.
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The Power Of "Push Polling", How Hypothetical Questions Influence Behavior
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-22-11
Being asked "what if" questions in a poll survey can affect our behavior if we are not aware of it, conclude US researchers in a paper published recently in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. The researchers describe such hypothetical questions as "wolves in sheep's clothing", and make reference to how "push polling" uses them as a tactical tool during election campaigning.
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Preschoolers on meds: Too much too soon?
cnn.com - 9-22-11
As the sun rises over Phoenix, 4-year-old Shelby wakes. She sleepily uses the potty, dutifully washes her hands, and then accepts a white capsule from her mother, Victoria*
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Polio strain spreads to China from Pakistan
bbc.co.uk - 9-22-11
Polio has been found in China for the first time since 1999 after spreading from Pakistan, the World Health Organization (WHO) has confirmed.
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Car fumes 'raise heart attack risk for six-hour window'
bbc.co.uk - 9-22-11
Breathing in heavy traffic fumes can trigger a heart attack, say UK experts.
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Older adults make better decisions
upi.com - 9-22-11
Some think getting older results poor decision-making but U.S. psychologists say older adults are adept at making good choices that lead to long-term gain.
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Chicago's mold count is dangerously high
upi.com - 9-22-11
After some warm, idyllic September days, Chicago's mold count is dangerously high and the city is officially on alert for poor air quality, an allergist says.
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Birth control beads 95 percent effective
upi.com - 9-22-11
A birth control method that shows the 12-day "fertile window" of a woman's period using beads is more effective than a condom, U.S. researchers say.
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Intuitive thinkers apt to believe in God
upi.com - 9-22-11
People with a more intuitive thinking style tend to have stronger beliefs in God than those with a more reflective style, U.S. researchers found.
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Two-Day Dialysis Interval Could Pose Danger: Study
healthday.com - 9-22-11
Waiting more than a day between dialysis treatments ups the risk of death and hospitalization in people with kidney disease, new research suggests.
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Movement Disorders on YouTube Not What They Seem, Experts Warn
healthday.com - 9-22-11
Most depictions of movement disorders on the popular video-sharing website YouTube are not what they claim to be, warn a group of neurologists who reviewed them.
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Drug Shows Promise Against Deadly Lung Disease
healthday.com - 9-22-11
An experimental drug may offer a thin ray of hope to people suffering from the rapidly fatal lung disease known as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
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Japan Reactor Fallout Reached San Francisco Bay Area: Study
healthday.com - 9-22-11
Traces of radioactive fallout from the Japanese nuclear reactor damaged in the March earthquake were detected around San Francisco Bay, scientists report, but at such low levels they posed no health risk to residents.
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Biologists Discover Genes That Repair Nerves After Injury
sciencedaily.com - 9-22-11
Biologists at the University of California, San Diego have identified more than 70 genes that play a role in regenerating nerves after injury, providing biomedical researchers with a valuable set of genetic leads for use in developing therapies to repair spinal cord injuries and other common kinds of nerve damage such as stroke.
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How Our Liver Kills 'Killer Cells'
sciencedaily.com - 9-22-11
Our livers can fight back against the immune system -- reducing organ rejection but also making us more susceptible to liver disease. Scientists at the Centenary Institute in Sydney have seen for the first time (in mice) how the liver goes independent, engulfing and destroying the body's defence troops -- T-cells.
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Overweight Older Women Have Less Leg Strength, Power
sciencedaily.com - 9-22-11
A new study from the University of New Hampshire finds that the leg strength and power of overweight older women is significantly less than that of normal-weight older women, increasing their risk for disability and loss of independence. With more Americans aging and becoming overweight or obese, the study, published recently in the Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, dispels the popular image of the bird-thin elder being at greatest risk of becoming disabled due to loss of muscle mass.
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Electrical Stimulation of Brain Boosts Birth of New Cells: Animal Study Suggests Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Memory
sciencedaily.com - 9-22-11
Stimulating a specific region of the brain leads to the production of new brain cells that enhance memory, according to an animal study in the September 21 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The findings show how deep brain stimulation (DBS) -- a clinical intervention that delivers electrical pulses to targeted areas of the brain -- may work to improve cognition.
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Mild Hearing Loss Linked to Brain Atrophy in Older Adults; Early Intervention Could Prevent Slide Toward Speech Comprehension Difficulties
sciencedaily.com - 9-21-11
A new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania shows that declines in hearing ability may accelerate gray mater atrophy in auditory areas of the brain and increase the listening effort necessary for older adults to successfully comprehend speech.
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Passages: Osteoporosis can be a 'silent killer'
usatoday.com - 9-21-11
My mother and my maternal grandmother were both crippled by osteoporosis. Nana was an Irish virago who even in her 60s was hauling rocks to build stone walls for her stepped gardens. Still, she developed a widow's hump. My mother swam every day, but like Nana she had no idea that a silent thief was turning her hip bones to powder. When it became too painful for her even to sit and enjoy reading a book, she put her head down and died.
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Average Briton spends FOUR years with a hangover
dailymail.co.uk - 9-21-11
The average adult spends FOUR years of their life with a hangover, a study has revealed.
Researchers found we struggle with a splitting headache and nausea for 24 days a year, which equates to 1,452 days during an average adult lifetime.
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Eat, drink and be sleepy with these surprising natural remedies
msnbc.msn.com - 9-21-11
Sleep restores us. And not getting enough of it can put us at greater risk of heart disease and cancer. Sleep even makes us smarter. Yet researchers are finding that more than 10 percent of the population is chronically sleep deprived.
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Stimulating brain with electricity aids learning speed
bbc.co.uk - 9-21-11
Electrically stimulating the brain can help to speed up the process of learning, scientists have shown.
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If a parent drinks a child will drink more
upi.com - 9-21-11
Children of a parent who abuses alcohol have an increased risk of consuming more alcohol after stressful situations, researchers in Sweden found.
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Japanese students seek more life purpose
upi.com - 9-21-11
Since the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident in Japan, Japan's youth are taking a more altruistic approach to work and community, a survey indicates.
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Americans eat out about 5 times a week
upi.com - 9-21-11
The recession has many Americans pinching pennies but the average U.S. adult eats 4.8 meals per week in restaurant, a survey indicates.
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New Test Predicts Risk for Impotence After Prostate Cancer Therapy
healthday.com - 9-21-11
Researchers say they've developed a method that reasonably predicts which men undergoing prostate cancer treatment will suffer from impotence as a result.
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Depression Tied to Higher Risk for Stroke
healthday.com - 9-21-11
People who are depressed are at greater risk for suffering a stroke, a new study indicates.
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Cash, Luxury Goods Really Do Get People Salivating: Study
healthday.com - 9-21-11
Move over, gourmet meal. Apparently cold hard cash and a shiny new sports car are drool-worthy, too.
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Why Many With Breast Implants Fail at Breast-Feeding
healthday.com - 9-21-11
Women with breast implants who think breast-feeding will change how their breasts look are less likely to nurse their babies successfully, according to a new study.
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Can Fatty Acids in Breast Milk or Formula Make Kids Smarter?
healthday.com - 9-21-11
Whether they're fed by bottle or breast, babies seem to turn out smarter when nourished with healthy fatty acids found in breast milk and some formulas, two new studies indicate.
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Certain Heavy Metals Boost Immunity, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 9-21-11
A new natural defense mechanism against infections has been evidenced by an international team led by researchers from CNRS, Inserm, the Institut Pasteur and the Université Paul Sabatier -- Toulouse III[1]. Zinc, a heavy metal that is toxic at high doses, is used by the cells of the immune system to destroy microbes such as the tuberculosis bacillus or E. coli.
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Stopping Smoking Boosts Everyday Memory, Research Finds
sciencedaily.com - 9-21-11
Giving up smoking isn't just good for your health, it's also good for your memory, according to research from Northumbria University. Research published in this month's online edition of Drug and Alcohol Dependence reveals that stopping smoking can restore everyday memory to virtually the same level as non-smokers.
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Autism, Intellectual Disabilities Related to Parental Age, Education and Ethnicity, Not Income, Utah Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 9-21-11
New research from the University of Utah in collaboration with the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) shows that the presence or absence of intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) varies with risk factors such as gender, parental age, maternal ethnicity, and maternal level of education. The study, published Sept. 15, 2011, in Autism Research, also shows that household income level has no association with either ID or ASD, in contrast to what other studies have suggested.
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Cutting sugary drinks may cut diabetes
upi.com - 9-20-11
Canadian and U.S. researchers say switching from sugar-sweetened beverages to water might reduce type 2 diabetes risk.
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Certain 'senior moments' may signal mental decline
usatoday.com - 9-20-11
Those "senior moments" that plague so many aging Baby Boomers may or may not be a sign of more serious problems down the line.
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No forgetting for those with rare 'higher' memory condition
usatoday.com - 9-20-11
Unless you were married that day, or had a baby or lost a loved one, Sept. 19 of those years probably has blended into all other days.
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Medicines, undiagnosed illnesses and even the wrong kind of workout: Why it might not be your fault you're FAT
dailymail.co.uk - 9-20-11
As obesity levels continue their inexorable rise, the Government’s official weight-loss message is still focused on four words: eat less, move more.
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The sweet science: Our uncontrollable cravings for treats are triggered by falls in blood sugar
dailymail.co.uk - 9-20-11
Scientists from Yale University have revealed that feeding the brain with sugar from healthy sources could help people resist the temptation of waist-expanding treats.
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Social butterflies (or social mice) may be skinnier
msnbc.msn.com - 9-20-11
All that yapping you do between sets at the gym may not be that counter-productive, after all. A new study conducted by the Ohio State University Medical Center suggests there may be a connection being social and losing love handles.
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Back Off, Mom. Parents Who Hover Impede Kids' Activity
time.com - 9-20-11
Parents, if you want your kids to get more exercise, you'd be wise to get out of their way.
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Schizophrenia and epilepsy have 'strong link'
bbc.co.uk - 9-20-11
People with schizophrenia are six times more likely to develop epilepsy, says a study which finds a strong relationship between the two diseases.
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Majority of people are 'cyberchondriacs'
upi.com - 9-20-11
Sixty percent of U.S. adults -- people the Harris Poll dubbed "cyberchondriacs" -- say they went online recently to check for information on health issues.
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More Evidence Links Diabetes, Dementia
healthday.com - 9-20-11
People with diabetes are at significantly higher risk of developing all types of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, finds a new study that bolsters previous research connecting the two illnesses.
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ADHD Drug Delays Puberty in Male Monkeys, Study Finds
healthday.com - 9-20-11
The widely used attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication methylphenidate -- best known as Ritalin -- appears to be tied to delayed puberty in male monkeys.
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For Kids With ADHD, Regular 'Green Time' Is Linked to Milder Symptoms
sciencedaily.com - 9-20-11
A study of more than 400 children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder has found a link between the children's routine play settings and the severity of their symptoms, researchers report. Those who regularly play in outdoor settings with lots of green (grass and trees, for example) have milder ADHD symptoms than those who play indoors or in built outdoor environments, the researchers found. The association holds even when the researchers controlled for income and other variables.
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Association Found Between Stress and Breast Cancer Aggressiveness
sciencedaily.com - 9-20-11
Psychosocial stress could play a role in the etiology of breast cancer aggressiveness, particularly among minority populations, according to study results presented at the Fourth AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities, held here from Sept. 18-21, 2011.
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Rise of Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Needs Urgent Action, Experts Urge
sciencedaily.com - 9-20-11
Gonorrhea is evolving into a scourge resistant to most antibiotics, and urgent action is needed to combat this public health threat, states an editorial in CMAJ.
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Soy Peptide Plus Chemo Drug Block Colon Cancer's Spread to Liver, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 9-20-11
A University of Illinois study reports a promising new weapon in treating metastatic colon cancer, particularly in patients who have developed resistance to chemotherapy.
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Brains of obese crave calories differently
cbc.ca - 9-20-11
The brains of people who are obese may be wired differently for impulse control, such as resisting a doughnut when their blood sugar levels drop, compared with people who are not obese, a new study suggests.
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ADHD doubles a child's risk of injury
usatoday.com - 9-19-11
Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are twice as likely to be injured badly enough to need medical attention as other children are, a new study finds.
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New drug could reduce blood clots in joint replacement patients
telegraph.co.uk - 9-19-11
The blood-thinning drug, called apixaban, has been found in clinical trials to prevent clotting that can lead to sudden death while not increasing the risk of bleeding.
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Five Non-communicable Diseases, $47 Trillion Global Burden Over Next Two Decades
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-19-11
According to a study released by the World Economic Forum, the global cost of five non-communicable diseases will reach over $47 trillion over the next twenty years - the diseases include CVD (cardiovascular disease), diabetes, mental illness, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer. The authors of the report wrote that 70% of lost output from non-communicable diseases are due to mental illness and cardiovascular diseases.
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New spaghetti a source of fiber
upi.com - 9-19-11
A new pasta made with barley may soon be labeled a "good source of dietary fiber" and "may reduce the heart disease risk," researchers in Italy and Spain say.
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Family of Four Has Its Genome Sequenced
healthday.com - 9-19-11
After John West, an executive in the genetics industry, suffered two pulmonary embolisms in 2003 because of a genetic mutation he carries, he decided to have his two children tested to see if they had inherited the same vulnerability for dangerous blood clots.
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New Light On Detection of Bacterial Infection: Polymers Fluoresce in the Presence of Bacteria
sciencedaily.com - 9-19-11
Researchers at the University of Sheffield have developed polymers that fluoresce in the presence of bacteria, paving the way for the rapid detection and assessment of wound infection using ultra-violet light.
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Voting triggers stress hormone
upi.com - 9-18-11
Researchers in Israel said they found scientifically that voting is a stressful event -- inducing measurable hormonal changes.
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Hysterectomies Not Well Understood by U.S. Women
healthday.com - 9-18-11
Although there are more hysterectomies in the United States than in any other industrialized nation in the world, many American women do not have a clear understanding of the procedure and how it will affect their bodies, according to a new study.
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Drug May Increase Cognition for People With Down Syndrome
sciencedaily.com - 9-18-11
A University of Colorado School of Medicine scientist is completing a major clinical trial on a drug that could boost cognitive function in those with Down syndrome, significantly improving their quality of life and representing a potential milestone in research on this genetic condition.
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MRI Research Demonstrates ALS Attacks Multiple Parts of the Brain
sciencedaily.com - 9-18-11
Recently published studies by a researcher in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry demonstrate that ALS -- known as Lou Gehrig's disease -- damages neurons in parts of the brain responsible for cognition and behaviour.
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Stopping Brain Cancer Cells Feeding On Cholesterol Could Be A New Treatment
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-18-11
Brain tumor cells feed on cholesterol, and blocking their access to it may offer a new way of treating glioblastoma, the most deadly form of brain cancer, and perhaps other cancers too, say US researchers in a new study published online this week in the journal Cancer Discovery. The researchers propose the potential treatment could be effective for tumors with an over-active PI3K signaling pathway, which includes nearly 9 in 10 glioblastomas.
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Apples And Pears Can Reduce Stroke Risk By 52%
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-18-11
Consuming fruit with white edible portions, such as pears and apples, can reduce the risk of stroke by 52%, researchers from Wageningen Uninversity in the Netherlands wrote in the journal Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. This is the first study to look at the link between fruit and vegetable color groups and stroke risk, the authors explained.
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Low-fat yoghurt 'child asthma risk' during pregnancy
bbc.co.uk - 9-18-11
Pregnant women who eat low-fat yoghurt can increase the risk of their child developing asthma and hay fever, a study says.
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Telaprevir cuts hepatitis C treatment
upi.com - 9-18-11
A newly approved drug may cut the treatment of hepatitis C by some six months in about two-thirds of patients, U.S. researchers say.
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TV hurts parent-child communication
upi.com - 9-18-11
Reading books increases maternal communication beyond a level required for reading, while watching TV decreases maternal communication, U.S. researchers found.
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Vaccine for methamphetamine promising
upi.com - 9-18-11
Three promising formulations could be used in a vaccine to treat methamphetamine addiction, U.S. researchers say.
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Emmanuel: Skipping health program will cost you
upi.com - 9-18-11
Chicago city employees and their spouses will be dinged an extra $50 a month if they don't take part in a new wellness program, Mayor Rahm Emanuel says.
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Scuba Diving May Help Paralyzed Vets
healthday.com - 9-18-11
Paralyzed veterans who learned to scuba dive experienced both physical and mental improvements, a new study suggests.
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White fruits and vegetables may lower stroke risk
usatoday.com - 9-17-11
Fruits and vegetables whose edible sections are white may lower your risk of stroke more than other fruits and vegetables, Dutch researchers report.
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Alcoholics struggle to keep their balance for years after giving up the bottle
dailymail.co.uk - 9-17-11
Stumbling home from the pub before toppling over the kerb, you can usually spot a drunk person a mile off.
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Alcohol DOES give you cancer, say scientists ... bit of a downer for Friday night down the pub
dailymail.co.uk - 9-17-11
Drinking alcohol can increase your risk of cancer because ethanol is itself a carcinogen on certain parts of the body, scientists have found.
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40% rise in NHS patients still waiting after a year
telegraph.co.uk - 9-17-11
Official figures show there were 19,939 people still on an NHS waiting list in July having been referred for treatment more than 52 weeks earlier.
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Bad hair day? Experts explain curse of the cowlick
msnbc.msn.com - 9-17-11
Alfalfa from the "Our Gang" TV serial had a famous one that stuck straight up. So did Dennis the Menace of comic strip fame. Supermodel Claudia Schiffer reportedly has two on her front hairline. "Twilight" star Kristen Stewart has one in front. And in a recent tweet, The Pioneer Woman, Ree Drumond, the blogger turned Food Network TV star wrote, "My cowlick is fired." Channeling her inner-Donald Trump, she perfectly captures how this wayward whorl of hair can drive people crazy.
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Fear Proves Prime Motivator for Vaccinations
healthday.com - 9-17-11
Sometimes a little fear might be a good thing.
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Dementia Patients Seem to Benefit From Small Group Homes
healthday.com - 9-17-11
People with dementia appear to be better off in small group homes rather than large nursing homes because they offer a domestic environment where patients can live as individuals, new research suggests.
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Resistance to Antibiotics Is Ancient
sciencedaily.com - 9-17-11
Scientists were surprised at how fast bacteria developed resistance to the miracle antibiotic drugs when they were developed less than a century ago. Now scientists at McMaster University have found that resistance has been around for at least 30,000 years.
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Yellow Patches Around Eyelids Predict Risk of Heart Problems, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 9-17-11
Raised yellow patches of skin (xanthelasmata) around the upper or lower eyelids are markers of an individual's increased risk of having a heart attack or suffering from heart disease, finds research published online in the British Medical Journal.
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Number of Children Poisoned by Medication Rising Dramatically, Study Says
sciencedaily.com - 9-17-11
The number of young children admitted to hospitals or seen in emergency departments because they unintentionally took a potentially toxic dose of medication has risen dramatically in recent years, according to a new Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center study.
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Prenatal Exposure to Stress Linked to Accelerated Cell Aging
sciencedaily.com - 9-17-11
Young adults whose mothers experienced psychological trauma during their pregnancies show signs of accelerated aging, a UC Irvine-led study found.
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New Approach to Tracking the Dangers of Designer Drug Meow Meow
sciencedaily.com - 9-17-11
Experts from Kingston University have devised a new questionnaire to detect behaviour such as mephedrone use. The aim is to pinpoint exactly how widespread the abuse of substances like mephedrone, commonly called meow meow, is by using a method of data collection that aims to filter out respondents who might not be telling the truth.
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When Ticks Transmit Dangerous Pathogens: Local Antibiotic Therapy Stops Lyme Disease
sciencedaily.com - 9-16-11
Blood-sucking ticks are not just a nuisance, they can also transmit dangerous diseases. One of them is Lyme disease, which is caused by bacteria of the genus Borrelia, and requires a course of treatment with antibiotics lasting several weeks. LMU researchers have come up with a quicker alternative.
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Mobile Phone Electromagnetic Field Affects Local Glucose Metabolism in the Human Brain, Finnish Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 9-16-11
Recent PET-measurements in Turku, Finland, show that the GSM mobile phone electromagnetic field suppresses glucose metabolism in temporoparietal and anterior temporal areas of the hemisphere next to the antenna.
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Video games may not boost cognition
upi.com - 9-16-11
U.S. researchers say several influential studies showing action gamers' skills are superior to those of non-gamers suffer from a host of methodological flaws.
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Arctic Ground Squirrels Muscle Up to Hunker Down
sciencedaily.com - 9-16-11
When Arctic ground squirrels are getting ready to hibernate they don't just get fat -- they pack on muscle at a rate that would make a bodybuilder jealous. And they do it without suffering the harmful effects that high levels of testosterone and other anabolic steroids usually cause. University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) researchers have started to untangle how the squirrels manage it, and their results could someday have implications for human health.
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Lighting up could be slowing men down in the bedroom
dailymail.co.uk - 9-16-11
Men trying to give up cigarettes now have a more immediate reason to quit - it can affect them in the bedroom.
Researchers found men who successfully stopped smoking saw greater improvements in sexual health compared to those who relapsed following a quit-smoking programme.
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Brain tumours feed off cholesterol
telegraph.co.uk - 9-16-11
Just as some types of tumour are driven by hormones - such as certain breast cancers and prostate cancer - so the most common type of brain tumour is dependent on low-density liposome (LDL) cholesterol to thrive.
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An Apple a Day Really May Keep the Doctor Away
healthday.com - 9-16-11
Fruits and vegetables whose edible sections are white may lower your risk of stroke more than other fruits and vegetables, Dutch researchers report.
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Lung Cancer Rates Begin to Decline for U.S. Women
healthday.com - 9-16-11
The rate of new lung cancer cases among American women is finally beginning to decline, much as it has for men in for years, a new U.S. government report shows.
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Problem Drinking Linked to Brain Damage
healthday.com - 9-16-11
Long-term alcohol abuse can result in significant damage to the brain, a new study shows.
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Adult vitamin D consumption declines
upi.com - 9-16-11
A University of Minnesota researcher says vitamin D in adult diets has been on the decline for the past 25 years.
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Marijuana nationwide: UA student maps prices
wildcat.arizona.edu - 9-16-11
Monica Stephens, a Ph.D. candidate in the UA School of Geography and Development, created a map showing the retail price of marijuana throughout the country.
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USDA warns about contaminated cantaloupes
upi.com - 9-16-11
Health officials are warning consumers not to eat Rocky Ford Cantaloupe shipped by Colorado-based Jensen Farms because of possible listeriosis contamination.
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Copper Reduces Infection Risk by More Than 40 Per Cent, Experts Say
sciencedaily.com - 9-16-11
Professor Bill Keevil, Head of the Microbiology Group and Director of the Environmental Healthcare Unit at the University of Southampton, has presented research into the mechanism by which copper exerts its antimicrobial effect on antibiotic-resistant organisms at the World Health Organization's first International Conference on Prevention and Infection Control (ICPIC).
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Why drunken people do embarrassing things
upi.com - 9-15-11
After people have been drinking, alcohol dulls the brain "signal" that warns them they are making a mistake, U.S. researchers say.
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Push underway to cut drugs for dementia patients
usatoday.com - 9-15-11
Nursing homes around the country are trying to reduce their use of powerful antipsychotic drugs and some say they're seeing remarkable effects.
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Children who get less than nine hours sleep a night 'suffer at school'
dailymail.co.uk - 9-15-11
Children who get less than nine hours sleep a night struggle at school, research has shown.
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Chocolate 'as good for you as exercise'
telegraph.co.uk - 9-15-11
Scientists found that small amounts of dark chocolate may improve health in a similar way to exercise.
The researchers focused on the mitochondria, the tiny powerhouses in cells that generate energy, and discovered that a plant compound found in chocolate, called epicatechin, appeared to stimulate the same muscle response as vigorous activity.
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Resistant TB Spreading In Europe At Alarming Rate, WHO
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-15-11
Forms of tuberculosis (TB) that resist drugs are spreading in Europe at alarming rates, says the World Health Organization (WHO). A new report from the organization says Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis is a disease that could cause a pandemic in Western Europe and kill thousands of people if health authorities fail to tackle it properly.
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New camera for burns victims 'shows blood flow' in skin
bbc.co.uk - 9-15-11
A Swiss company has developed a camera which shows how blood is circulating through the skin in real-time.
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College hookups: More talk than sex
upi.com - 9-15-11
When it comes to college hookups -- casual sex outside of dating or exclusive relationships -- there is more talk than sex, U.S. researchers determined.
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Clinic weaning patients off Xanax
upi.com - 9-15-11
A mental health clinic in Louisville, Ky., is trying to get all of its patients off the anti-anxiety drug Xanax by the end of the year, an official said.
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Laughter is the best medicine; it reduces pain
upi.com - 9-15-11
A good belly laugh with others helps people feel less pain, but a polite titter has no effect, researchers in Britain found.
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Maple syrup may increase liver function
upi.com - 9-15-11
Feeding laboratory rats a diet in which some carbohydrate was replaced with pure maple syrup from Canada improved liver function, Japanese researchers say.
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Breast Cancer Rates Jump Worldwide, Study Finds
healthday.com - 9-15-11
The number of new cases of breast cancer has jumped dramatically worldwide, from about 640,000 in 1980 to more than 1.6 million in 2010, University of Washington researchers report.
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Tailored Hepatitis C Therapy May Cut Treatment Time in Half
healthday.com - 9-15-11
Patients infected with hepatitis C virus who have an early favorable response to a new three-drug regimen can be cured of the disease in half the normal time, a new study says.
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Certain Risk Factors Could Spur Heart Failure in Normal-Weight People
healthday.com - 9-15-11
Normal-weight patients diagnosed with a cluster of factors known as the "metabolic syndrome" could face a higher risk for heart failure than even obese patients without such factors, new research suggests.
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Trouble With Math? Blame Your Lack of 'Numbers Sense'
healthday.com - 9-15-11
Some children are born with natural math ability, while others aren't, a new study contends.
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Older Musicians Experience Less Age-Related Decline in Hearing Abilities Than Non-Musicians
sciencedaily.com - 9-15-11
A study led by Canadian researchers has found the first evidence that lifelong musicians experience less age-related hearing problems than non-musicians.
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Does That Hurt? Objective Way to Measure Pain Being Developed
sciencedaily.com - 9-15-11
Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine have taken a first step toward developing a diagnostic tool that could eliminate a major hurdle in pain medicine -- the dependency on self-reporting to measure the presence or absence of pain. The new tool would use patterns of brain activity to give an objective physiologic assessment of whether someone is in pain.
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Impotence 'could be a harbinger of heart disease'
dailymail.co.uk - 9-14-11
Failing erections can be an early warning sign of heart disease in men, according to a review of a dozen studies.
Scientists have long suspected there was a link between impotence, or erectile dysfunction, and heart health.
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Is lactose intolerance in the mind? Poor diets may be to blame for 'allergy' boom
dailymail.co.uk - 9-14-11
The thought of a latte or milkshake brings many people out in a cold sweat because they are convinced they are allergic to dairy.
But researchers say most people who think they have such an allergy or are lactose intolerant are mistaken.
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Why a man with a deep voice makes a lasting impression with the ladies
dailymail.co.uk - 9-14-11
Men who sound like soul singer Barry White can get ahead in the mating game because women remember a deep male voice, scientists say.
Women are very sensitive to the pitch of a voice and will recall a deep voice above higher tones.
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Spicing up broccoli with wasabi or horseradish makes it an even better cancer-buster
dailymail.co.uk - 9-14-11
Spicing up broccoli with horseradish or wasabi can enhance the vegetable’s cancer-fighting properties, according to researchers.
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Winehouse's death points to dangers of detoxing alone
msnbc.msn.com - 9-14-11
Amy Winehouse’s father says the late singer was off drugs for three years, but she was in a continuous battle with alcohol — and believes that the way she was trying to detox may have killed her, according to an interview with Anderson Cooper that aired Monday.
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Dangerous bacteria spreading in warming oceans
msnbc.msn.com - 9-14-11
Warning: The warming of the world's oceans can cause serious illness and may cost millions of euros (dollars) in health care.
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Depressed people often hide symptoms from doctors
cnn.com - 9-14-11
Family doctors and other primary care physicians are often the first health professionals to learn that a patient is depressed, but that doesn't mean they identify all of the depression cases that walk through their offices.
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Insulin Via Nasal Spray May Slow Alzheimer's
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-14-11
Insulin inhaled via a nasal spray may slow decline in cognitive function in people with Alzheimer's disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment, a condition thought to precede Alzheimer's, according to the results of a pilot study published online first in the Archives of Neurology on Monday.
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UN says synthetic drug use overtakes cocaine and heroin
bbc.co.uk - 9-14-11
The United Nations says the use of synthetic illegal drugs such as ecstasy and methamphetamine has overtaken cocaine and heroin.
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High cholesterol linked to Alzheimer's
upi.com - 9-14-11
People with high cholesterol -- total cholesterol of about 224 milligrams per deciliter -- may have a higher risk of Alzheimer's, Japanese researchers say.
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1 in 20 worldwide have diabetes
upi.com - 9-14-11
Worldwide, the number of people with diabetes reached about 366 million this year, the International Diabetes Federation announced at a meeting in Lisbon.
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Japan to have over 47,000 centenarians
upi.com - 9-14-11
Japan will have 47,756 people age 100 or older this year, up 3,307 from last year, a health ministry survey said Tuesday.
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More Mammograms Equal More Mastectomies: Study
healthday.com - 9-13-11
One of the goals of mammograms is detecting breast cancer early enough to avoid needing a mastectomy. But a new Norwegian study suggests that mastectomy rates climb higher as more women undergo the screening test.
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Lifestyle Changes May Prevent Heart Failure
healthday.com - 9-13-11
A healthy lifestyle -- including not smoking, shedding excess pounds, exercising and eating lots of vegetables -- could ward off many cases of heart failure, a new study finds.
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Many Alzheimer's Cases Go Unrecognized: Report
healthday.com - 9-13-11
Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's disease early is essential if patients are to benefit from the medications currently used for this dementia, a new report stresses.
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More Evidence That Spicing Up Broccoli Boosts Its Cancer-Fighting Power
sciencedaily.com - 9-13-11
Teaming fresh broccoli with a spicy food that contains the enzyme myrosinase significantly enhances each food's individual cancer-fighting power and ensures that absorption takes place in the upper part of the digestive system where you'll get the maximum health benefit, suggests a new University of Illinois study.
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Plant Compound Reduces Breast Cancer Mortality, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 9-13-11
Phytoestrogens are plant compounds which, in the human body, can attach to the receptors for the female sexual hormone estrogen and which are taken in with our daily diet. A number of findings have attributed a cancer protective effect to these plant hormones. At DKFZ, a team headed by Prof. Dr. Jenny Chang-Claude summarized the results of several studies in a meta-analysis last year and showed that a diet rich in phytoestrogens lowers the risk of developing breast cancer after menopause. Now the Heidelberg researchers wanted to find out whether phytoestrogens also have an influence on the course of breast cancer. Prior investigations on this topic had provided contradictory results.
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Pressure for Positive Results Puts Science Under Threat, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 9-13-11
Scientific research may be in decline across the globe because of growing pressures to report only positive results, new analysis suggests. A study by the University of Edinburgh examined more than 4,600 scientific research papers published between 1990 and 2007 and found a steady decline in studies in which the findings contradicted scientific hypotheses.
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IUDs may prevent cervical cancer
usatoday.com - 9-12-11
Doctors have long promoted IUDs, or intrauterine devices, as an effective way to prevent pregnancy.
Now, in a finding that has surprised even the experts, research suggests that IUDs have an unexpected benefit: preventing cervical cancer.
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Why are more women depressed? Is this a real epidemic - or the result of cynical marketing by drug giants?
dailymail.co.uk - 9-12-11
More women than ever are reaching for the happy pills, it was revealed last week. New research suggests there has been a massive increase in the number of women with depression.
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USDA to ban six new E. coli strains from meat supply
msnbc.msn.com - 9-12-11
Federal agriculture officials are expanding long-delayed rules that will ban six new strains of potentially lethal E. coli bacteria from the nation’s meat supply, msnbc.com has learned.
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Bowel Cancer Death Rates Vary Widely Across UK
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-12-11
The rate of deaths due to bowel cancer varies by as much as three times between the lowest and the highest rate areas of the UK, a fact that must not be ignored says the cancer charity Beating Bowel Cancer, which also considers that even the lowest death rate is still too high and over 5,000 lives could be saved every year if more people were screened and diagnosed earlier.
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Fatherhood 'lowers testosterone to keep men loyal'
bbc.co.uk - 9-12-11
Men appear to be biologically wired to care for their babies, say researchers who have discovered levels of testosterone go down after fatherhood.
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Fish oils block chemotherapy drug
bbc.co.uk - 9-12-11
Fats found in fish oil supplements can stop chemotherapy drugs working, according to researchers.
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Parents clueless of children's drug use
upi.com - 9-12-11
American parents tend to think it is someone else's teenage children who are drinking alcohol and using marijuana, not their own, researchers say.
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Survey: One-third in U.S. can't cook
upi.com - 9-12-11
Nutritionists urge people to cook meals at home to control portion size, fat and salt, but a U.S. survey indicates nearly a third of U.S. adults don't cook.
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Tangible ways offered to prevent suicides
upi.com - 9-12-11
U.S. mental health experts say cultural elements can help prevent some of the estimated 1 million suicides that occur worldwide each year.
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Insulin Spray May Improve Alzheimer's Symptoms
healthday.com - 9-12-11
A nasal insulin spray may someday help people with mild memory problems or early Alzheimer's disease improve or preserve their mental functioning, a new small study suggests.
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High Cholesterol Might Be Linked to Alzheimer's Disease
healthday.com - 9-12-11
New research suggests that high cholesterol levels could boost the risk of Alzheimer's disease by creating more brain-clogging bits known as plaque.
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Virtual Colonoscopy Still Has Its Skeptics
healthday.com - 9-12-11
Whether the most technologically advanced way to check for colon cancer will become the standard screening method of the future does not appear to be a slam-dunk.
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Is 'SpongeBob' Too Much for Young Minds?
healthday.com - 9-12-11
Fast-paced TV shows like "SpongeBob SquarePants" seem to negatively affect children's concentration levels shortly after watching them, while slower-paced shows don't, a new study suggests.
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Tinnitus Discovery Could Lead to New Ways to Stop the Ringing: Retraining the Brain Could Reanimate Areas That Have Lost Input from the Ear
sciencedaily.com - 9-12-11
Neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley, are offering hope to the 10 percent of the population who suffer from tinnitus -- a constant, often high-pitched ringing or buzzing in the ears that can be annoying and even maddening, and has no cure.
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First Proof in Patients of an Improved 'Magic Bullet' for Cancer Detection and Radio-Therapy
sciencedaily.com - 9-12-11
Oncologists have long sought a powerful "magic bullet" that can find tumors wherever they hide in the body so that they can be imaged and then destroyed. Until recently scientists accepted the notion that such an agent, an agonist, needed to enter and accumulate in the cancerous cells to act. An international research team has now shown in cancer patients that an investigational agent that sticks onto the surface of tumor cells without triggering internalization, an antagonist, may be safer and even more effective than agonists.
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Quitting Smoking Enhances Personality Change
sciencedaily.com - 9-12-11
University of Missouri researchers have found evidence that shows those who quit smoking show improvements in their overall personality.
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Association Found Between Long-Term Use of Nonaspirin Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Renal Cell Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 9-12-11
Long-term use of nonaspirin anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with an increased risk of renal cell cancer (RCC), according to a report in the September issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
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Advertising is behind the high take-up of antidepressants
telegraph.co.uk - 9-12-11
The pressures on many mothers juggling the demands of work and family are no doubt stressful enough. Still, it is hard to credit the report last week from the authoritative-sounding European College of Neuropsychopharmacology that, as a result, they are twice as likely to suffer from depression than 40 years ago.
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What Is Cocaine? How Addictive Is Cocaine?
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-12-11
Cocaine is a bitter, addictive pain blocker that is extracted from the leaves of Erythroxylon coca, also known as the coca scrub, a plant that comes from the Andean highlands in South America. Cocaine is the most powerful stimulant of natural origin. The name of "cocaine" came from the plant "coca". When Coca-Cola first came out it contained nine milligrams of cocaine per glass - in 1903 it was removed, but the drink still has coca flavoring.
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Meteorites contain chemical essential for life
telegraph.co.uk - 9-12-11
Astrobiologist Dr Terry Kee, from the University of Leeds, has found meteorite fragments contain a precursor to a key chemical that allows biological cells to capture energy from their surroundings.
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Marijuana Use Grows, While Methamphetamine Falls In USA
medicalnewstoday.com - 9-12-11
The number of users of marijuana in America rose from 14.4 million in 2007 to 17.4 million in 2010, while the numbers of methamphetamine users aged 12+ years dropped from 731,000 in 2006 to 353,000 in 2010. Illicit drug usage overall rose between 2008 and 2010, according to a SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) national survey.
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Watercress: A garnishing green that provides bountiful health benefits
naturalnews.com - 9-12-11
If watercress is served as a garnishment In a restaurant, don't throw it out. Eat it with the food served. It will help you digest your meal and provide many more health benefits than most know about. As a matter of fact, you'd be wise to mix it in salads or juice it with other veggies often.
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Thousands of 9/11 responders are ill
usatoday.com - 9-12-11
Jeff Rosenzweig began coughing about six months after he began volunteering at ground zero on Sept. 12, 2001.
He tried throat lozenges, but the cough seemed to just get worse. For awhile, "I couldn't stop coughing," said Rosenzweig, a chiropractor, registered nurse and former emergency medical technician who is co-owner of Monmouth Total Health Care in Eatontown. "It was irritating."
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Crocus drug that can kill tumours in one treatment with minimal side effects
dailymail.co.uk - 9-12-11
A drug derived from plant extracts could wipe out tumours in a single treatment with minimal side effects, according to research.
Scientists have turned a chemical found in crocuses into a ‘smart bomb’ that targets cancerous tumours.
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High blood pressure genetic clues
bbc.co.uk - 9-12-11
More than 20 new sections of genetic code have been linked to blood pressure by an international team of scientists.
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Mother's diet may affect baby's allergies
upi.com - 9-12-11
People eating fewer omega-3 fatty acids -- found in salmon, tuna, walnuts and pumpkin seeds -- may explain food allergy increases, French researchers say.
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Larger women more apt to have sex on date
upi.com - 9-12-11
A survey of 10,000 members of a British Web site indicates larger women and tall (and skinny) women are more likely to have sex on the first date.
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Peer Pressure? It's Hardwired Into Our Brains, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 9-12-11
The rewards outweigh the risks -- when you're in a group, anyway. A new USC study explains why people take stupid chances when all of their friends are watching that they would never take by themselves. According to the study, the human brain places more value on winning in a social setting than it does on winning when you're alone.
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Researchers Team With Glowing Cats Against AIDS, Other Diseases; New Technique Gives Cats Protection Genes
sciencedaily.com - 9-12-11
Mayo Clinic researchers have developed a genome-based immunization strategy to fight feline AIDS and illuminate ways to combat human HIV/AIDS and other diseases. The goal is to create cats with intrinsic immunity to the feline AIDS virus. The findings -- called fascinating and landmark by one reviewer -- appear in the current online issue of Nature Methods.
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Chemotherapy Is as Effective Before Breast Cancer Surgery as After, Study Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 9-12-11
Whether chemotherapy is given before or after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) does not have an impact on long-term local-regional outcomes, suggesting treatment success is due more to biologic factors than chemotherapy timing, according to a study by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
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Liquor store density linked to homicides
upi.com - 9-11-11
U.S. researchers say violent crime would drop if local ordinances limited the number of neighborhood liquor stores and ban single-serve containers of alcohol.
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Marijuana Legalization Dead in Calif. (for Now)
nbcbayarea.com - 9-11-11
A prominent Bay Area marijuana activist is waving the white flag on the California marijuana legalization movement.
Richard Lee, the founder of Oaksterdam University and the chief sponsor of last year's Proposition 19, says that efforts to get a successor legalization measure in front of California voters have stalled out, according to SF Weekly.
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Men more likely to use firearms for suicide than women
usatoday.com - 9-11-11
Guns are the most common method of suicide in the United States, but men are more likely to shoot themselves in the face or head than women are, a new study finds.
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A new device that heats lungs like an 'egg whisk' gives hope to asthma sufferers
dailymail.co.uk - 9-11-11
A tiny ‘egg whisk’ inserted into the lungs is proving remarkably successful in treating severe asthma. The device, which is less than 3mm in diameter, emits radiowaves that heat the airways. This shrinks scarred, thickened lung tissue, aiding breathing.
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Ta-ta tattoos: They are a common sight but like actress Megan Fox many people are beginning to regret their inkings
dailymail.co.uk - 9-11-11
They were once a permanent statement of rebellion, but today, tattoos – or body art, as they are known – are a common sight.
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Storms, floods take toll on mental health
msnbc.msn.com - 9-11-11
Do what you can to combat climate change, and take simple steps to protect your mental health.
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Why your allergies are bugging you
cnn.com - 9-11-11
Every year, sneeze sufferers swear: "This is the worst allergy season ever." And they're right.
"Pollen levels are increasing, pollen seasons are getting longer, and more people are developing allergies," says Estelle Levetin, Ph.D., chairwoman of the aerobiology committee for the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.
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Safer birth control method being developed
upi.com - 9-11-11
The next generation of birth control for women will involve enzymes to interrupt ovulation, unlike "the pill," which uses hormones, U.S. researchers say.
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For Many Americans, 9/11 Worries Still Dominate
healthday.com - 9-11-11
Almost half of all the U.S. adults who experienced physical or psychological problems in the months following the 9/11 terrorist attacks still struggle with feelings of fear and anxiety 10 years later, a new Harris Interactive/HealthDay poll found.
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Is your high-maintenance hair making you pile on the pounds?
dailymail.co.uk - 9-10-11
It's easy to blame those ever-expanding thighs and tummies on age, a slow metabolism or even bad genes. But the real obstacle for dieters who can't quite shed those extra pounds could be something they have never considered before – hairstyle.
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Marijuana Slims? Why Pot Smokers Are Less Obese
time.com - 9-10-11
If cannabis causes the munchies, how is it possible that pot smokers are thinner than nonsmokers?
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Gene find could lead to drug for chronic back pain
bbc.co.uk - 9-10-11
A gene responsible for chronic pain has been identified, with scientists saying this could lead to drugs for treating long-lasting back pain.
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Forty percent of Canadians have insomnia
upi.com - 9-10-11
Forty percent of adult Canadians told researchers they experienced at least one symptom of insomnia at least three times a week in the preceding month.
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Half in U.S. drinks sugary drinks
upi.com - 9-10-11
Approximately one-half of the U.S. population age 2 and older consumes sugary drinks on any given day, a government report finds.
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A Little Dirt May Be a Good Thing
healthday.com - 9-10-11
Good hygiene has saved millions of lives, protecting people from countless bacterial and viral infections, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
But there is growing concern that strict adherence to good hygiene, though a valuable means of protecting health, has left humans open to other forms of illness.
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Children More Likely to Drink & Drive if Parents Drink: Study
healthday.com - 9-10-11
Parents who drink -- even moderately -- may increase the risk that their children will drive under the influence as adults, a new study has found.
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Birth Control Pills Affect Memory, Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 9-10-11
Women who use contraceptives like birth control pills experience memory changes, according to new UC Irvine research. Their ability to remember the gist of an emotional event improves, while women not using the contraceptives better retain details.
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Parents' Stress Leaves Lasting Marks On Children’s Genes, Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 9-10-11
Researchers at the University of British Columbia and the Child & Family Research Institute have shown that parental stress during their children's early years can leave an imprint on their sons' or daughters' genes -- an imprint that lasts into adolescence and may affect how these genes are expressed later in life.
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Mother's Diet Influences Baby's Allergies, Research Suggests
sciencedaily.com - 9-10-11
A possible link between what a mother eats during pregnancy and the risk of her child developing allergies has been identified in new research published in this month's The Journal of Physiology.
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Spring flings, teen pregnancy peaks linked
upi.com - 9-9-11
There is a peak of births of school-age teens in Canada nine months after Ontario's weeklong spring break, researchers say.
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Liquor Store Density Linked to Youth Homicides, U.S. Studies Find
sciencedaily.com - 9-9-11
Violent crime could be reduced significantly if policymakers at the local level limit the number of neighborhood liquor stores and ban the sale of single-serve containers of alcoholic beverages, according to separate studies led by University of California, Riverside researchers.
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Babies Feel Pain at 35 to 37 Weeks of Development, Experts Say
abcnews.go.com - 9-9-11
Preemies begin to feel pain around a woman's 35th week of pregnancy, about two to four weeks before delivery, according to a new study from University College London.
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Great Britain lifts ban on gay, bisexual men donating blood
usatoday.com - 9-9-11
England, Scotland and Wales have decided to lift a lifetime ban on gay and bisexual men donating blood, reversing a practice that's been in place about 30 years, the BBC is reporting. Any man who has not had sex with another man for 12 months prior may donate blood, according to the BBC.
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Black children twice as likely to have food allergies, especially peanuts
usatoday.com - 9-9-11
Black children and those of African ancestry are more prone to food sensitization to multiple food products, with children of African ancestry more likely to develop sensitization to peanuts, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.
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Brain stents designed to prevent strokes actually DOUBLE the risk
dailymail.co.uk - 9-9-11
Artery-opening brain stents that are designed to prevent repeat strokes in patients actually significantly increase them, scientists say.
A large clinical trial found in the first month after treatment, patients with the stents experienced more than twice the rate of strokes and deaths compared to patients without them.
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Take away online porn and what do you get?
cnn.com - 9-9-11
Over the past month, I’ve been conducting a “no-porn” experiment with a group of guys. Not that I’m anti-porn; I’d like to think that I take a nuanced perspective.
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Cancer drug resistance clue found
bbc.co.uk - 9-9-11
It may be possible to extend the usefulness of cancer drugs by preventing drug resistance in tumours, say researchers.
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Copy cat chemical suicides in U.S.
upi.com - 9-9-11
After a rash of chemical suicides in automobiles in Japan -- suicide in a confined space such as a car -- some occurred in the United States, officials say.
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Peer pressure is brain hardwired
upi.com - 9-9-11
A part of the brain associated with rewards showed higher activity when a person wins among peers, compared to winning alone, U.S. researchers say.
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For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
healthday.com - 9-9-11
Women who consume moderate amounts of alcohol in middle age are somewhat more likely than teetotalers to be in good physical and mental health in old age, new research finds.
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Losing Child in First Year Might Raise Early Death Risk for Parent
healthday.com - 9-9-11
Parents, particularly mothers, who experience a stillbirth or the death of a child in infancy have an increased risk of death for many years afterward, a new study suggests.
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More U.S. Adults Using Illegal Drugs: Report
healthday.com - 9-9-11
The number of Americans using illegal drugs has continued to rise, reaching 22.6 million, or 8.9 percent of the population, in 2010, a new government survey shows.
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New X-Rays Offer Clues on Evolution of the Human Brain
healthday.com - 9-9-11
New X-rays revealed the best and most accurate images of the brain shape of an early human ancestor, according to researchers.
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Healthy living can cut chance of developing diabetes
usatoday.com - 9-8-11
Living a healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of diabetes by as much as 80 percent, researchers from the U.S. National Institutes of Health report.
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Weight Watchers twice as effective as advice for obese
telegraph.co.uk - 9-8-11
Obese patients who enrol on commercial programmes such as Weight Watchers lose twice as much weight as those just given advice by doctors, research suggests.
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Move over dad: Mom's better at soothing baby's pain
msnbc.msn.com - 9-8-11
Preemies show less pain when mom holds them than when dad tries to comfort them, according to a new study of babies having blood drawn at the hospital.
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A drink a day 'is good for older women's health'
bbc.co.uk - 9-8-11
Women who enjoy an alcoholic drink in the evening tend to be healthier as they move into old age, research shows.
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Warning over global cancer levels
bbc.co.uk - 9-8-11
The number of new cancer cases has increased by 20% in under a decade and now stands at 12 million a year, according to the World Cancer Research Fund.
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One-third of Canadians always have cold
upi.com - 9-8-11
In any given month, one-third of Canadian adults have a sore throat, cold or flu, but one-fifth of those sick ignore symptoms altogether, researchers said.
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Heart disease leading cause of U.S. deaths
upi.com - 9-8-11
The leading causes of U.S. deaths in 2007 were heart disease, cancer, stroke, lower respiratory diseases, accidents, Alzheimer's, diabetes and influenza.
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TNF Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Boosts Skin Cancer Risk
healthday.com - 9-8-11
Treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors appears to increase their risk of developing skin cancer, a new review of prior research indicates.
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Extra Pounds a Deadly Risk Factor for Black Women: Study
healthday.com - 9-8-11
Carrying extra weight, especially around the middle, is a risk factor for death among black women, according to a new study.
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Potatoes Reduce Blood Pressure in People With Obesity and High Blood Pressure
sciencedaily.com - 9-8-11
The potato's stereotype as a fattening food for health-conscious folks to avoid is getting another revision as scientists report that just a couple servings of spuds a day reduces blood pressure almost as much as oatmeal without causing weight gain. Scientists reported on the research, done on a group of overweight people with high blood pressure, at the 242nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), being held in Denver the week of August 29.
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New Drugs Hope for Dangerous Yeast Infections
sciencedaily.com - 9-8-11
Researchers are a step closer towards creating a new class of medicines and vaccines to combat drug-resistant and deadly strains of fungal infections, following a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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'Dirty' Wild Mice May Be More Relevant Immunology Model
sciencedaily.com - 9-8-11
Like humans, mice that live in their natural habitat encounter bacteria and other pathogens that exercise their immune system, yet the lab mice typically used in immunology studies are raised in isolation from most diseases. A study on natural killer cells in wild mice published in Molecular Ecology examines the hypothesis that the unsterile living conditions faced by humans and wild mice may improve the readiness of the immune system to fight new infections.
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Aerobic Exercise May Reduce the Risk of Dementia, Researchers Say
sciencedaily.com - 9-8-11
Any exercise that gets the heart pumping may reduce the risk of dementia and slow the condition's progression once it starts, reported a Mayo Clinic study published this month in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers examined the role of aerobic exercise in preserving cognitive abilities and concluded that it should not be overlooked as an important therapy against dementia.
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Concerned With Safety, Hovering 'Helicopter Parents' Can Impede Child’s Ability to Play, Study Shows
sciencedaily.com - 9-8-11
Parental safety concerns may prevent children from getting good exercise, according to a new North Carolina State University study that examined how families use neighborhood parks.
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Major Advance in Sleeping Sickness Drug
sciencedaily.com - 9-7-11
A new study published in the open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases on September 6th presents a key advance in developing a safer cure for sleeping sickness. Led by Professor Peter Kennedy, researchers at the University of Glasgow's Institute for Infection, Immunology and Inflammation have created a version of the drug most commonly used to treat sleeping sickness which can be administered orally in pill form.
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Children Who Have Their Adenoids out Do Not Get Fewer Upper Respiratory Infections, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 9-7-11
Children who have their adenoids surgically removed do not get fewer upper respiratory tract infections such as sinusitis and colds, finds research published online in the British Medical Journal.
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Tick-borne parasite may be creeping into blood supply
usatoday.com - 9-7-11
A potentially life-threatening parasite in ticks capable of causing malaria-like illness is more prevalent than doctors realized and can be transmitted through blood transfusions.
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Raise a glass to healthy old age: Women in their 50s told two drinks a day can fight off illness
dailymail.co.uk - 9-7-11
A glass or two of alcohol a day in middle age could help women enjoy a happy and healthy retirement.
Those in their 50s who regularly have a little wine with their dinner are more likely to be free of the ills of old age, from cancer to heart disease, than those who are teetotal or drink to excess.
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Fungus 'developing resistance to drugs'
telegraph.co.uk - 9-7-11
The fungus, known as Candida albicans, is widespread among humans and is relatively harmless to healthy people but can be fatal to hospital patients with weakened immune systems.
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No more nit-picking? New FDA-approved treatment promises easier way to defeat lice
msnbc.msn.com - 9-7-11
When teachers open their classrooms to students this fall, they’re also inviting an unwanted guest: head lice. Any parent who’s gone several rounds with a nit comb and a squirming child knows how maddening it can be to fight the tiny, persistent parasites.
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Miscarriage risk doubles with use of anti-inflammatory drugs
msnbc.msn.com - 9-7-11
Common anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen and naproxen may increase the chance of miscarriage if they are taken early in pregnancy, a new study suggests.
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NDM-1 superbug enzyme's 'photofit' taken
upi.com - 9-7-11
The structure of the protein which stops some of medicine's most powerful antibiotics working has been determined by researchers.
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Source sought for novel swine flu cases
upi.com - 9-7-11
Several patients in Pennsylvania and Indiana are recovering from a unique type of swine flu, health officials say.
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Mild cognitive impairment hurts lifespan
upi.com - 9-7-11
Cognitive impairment, especially at moderate-to-severe stages, affects life expectancy "on the same order as other chronic diseases," U.S. researchers say.
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Bananas may help reduce child asthma risk
upi.com - 9-7-11
Parents set to make back-to-school breakfasts may consider serving bananas, apple juice or pineapple because they reduce asthma risk, British researchers say.
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For Young Breast Cancer Patients, Breast-Conserving Therapy Appears Effective
healthday.com - 9-7-11
Younger women with breast cancer who undergo a lumpectomy to remove their tumor survive just as long and aren't any more likely to have a recurrence than women who opt for the more radical and disfiguring mastectomy, or removal of the entire breast, two new studies report.
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Burnout, Dissatisfaction Seem Rampant Among Medical Residents
healthday.com - 9-7-11
The medical resident of today -- possibly your doctor in the future -- is exhausted, emotionally spent and likely stressed out about debt, a new study indicates.
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Working-age poor population highest since '60s
msnbc.msn.com - 9-7-11
Working-age America is the new face of poverty.
Counting adults 18-64 who were laid off in the recent recession as well as single twenty-somethings still looking for jobs, the new working-age poor represent nearly 3 out of 5 poor people — a switch from the early 1970s when children made up the main impoverished group.
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New green compliant 60-watt LED bulb to cost $15
naturalnews.com - 9-6-11
When the US federal government begins to unlawfully rip away Americans' freedom to purchase the light bulbs of their choice beginning on January 1, 2012, the only available choices will be poisonous compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs, which are loaded with toxic mercury, or expensive light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs, which a recent CNET article explains will cost roughly $15 a piece for the 60-watt variety -- and that is on the inexpensive end of the spectrum.
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How bad is the drought in Texas, really?
naturalnews.com - 9-6-11
As I've been living in Austin, Texas, for a while, I thought I would report on the Texas drought situation first hand. How bad is the drought situation here? It's critically bad, actually. Even the wildlife are facing starvation and dying of thirst. I saw some wild pigs the other night (they're quite common throughout Texas), and they looked like they were barely surviving in a state of near-starvation.
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A third of Europeans 'suffer from a mental disorder'
dailymail.co.uk - 9-6-11
More than a third of Europeans suffer from a mental disorder, with the most common being anxiety, insomnia and depression, according to new research.
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Strange symptoms: What your skin, eyes and hair may be telling you
msnbc.msn.com - 9-6-11
Today's warp-speed doctors' office visits rarely address all of your Q's, which is why it's more critical than ever to be in tune with your body—it can help yield some important insight. Here's what to look for:
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Undetectable blood vessel damage linked to signs of age
bbc.co.uk - 9-6-11
Tiny clots in the brain may be the cause of some signs of old age such as stooped posture and restricted movement, say US scientists.
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Meth use highest in western U.S.
upi.com - 9-6-11
Evidence of methamphetamine use in the general U.S. workforce dropped from 0.18 percent in 2006 to 0.11 percent in 2008, a diagnostic testing firm says.
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Paintball injuries hospitalized 20K in '08
upi.com - 9-6-11
More than 20,000 people injured by air and paintball guns were treated in U.S. hospital emergency rooms in 2008, federal health officials say.
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Healthy Living Can Cut Chances of Developing Diabetes
healthday.com - 9-6-11
Living a healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of diabetes by as much as 80 percent, researchers from the U.S. National Institutes of Health report.
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Tick-borne Illness May Lurk in Blood Supply
healthday.com - 9-6-11
An uncommon, but potentially fatal, tick-borne illness may be creeping into the U.S. blood supply and doctors need to develop a way to spot it, researchers report.
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Boorish Co-Workers Can Damage Your Home Life
healthday.com - 9-6-11
Rudeness among co-workers can have negative effects that extend well beyond the workplace, a new study shows.
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Couch Potatoes Explained? Missing Key Genes May Be Cause for Lack of Resolve to Exercise, Researchers Find
sciencedaily.com - 9-6-11
You may think your lack of resolve to get off the couch to exercise is because you're lazy, but McMaster University researchers have discovered it may be you are missing key genes.
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CDC: Strokes rising among younger ages
usatoday.com - 9-5-11
Strokes are on the rise among teens and young people, a new government report shows.
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Mid-life health crisis: Britain's middle-aged 'are unhealthiest in the world'
dailymail.co.uk - 9-5-11
They are meant to be in the prime of their lives. But middle-aged Britons have been found to be in the world’s worst shape. They are fatter, more depressed and much more likely to be puffing away on cigarettes than their peers around the globe.
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Tuberculosis relative could be new vaccine
bbc.co.uk - 9-5-11
Injecting modified bacteria related to those which cause tuberculosis could protect against the lung disease, US scientists say.
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Improving homework starts with parents
upi.com - 9-5-11
Parents who want their children to do a better job on their homework should start by improving their own attitude and behavior first, Israeli researchers say.
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Habit makes bad food easier to swallow
upi.com - 9-5-11
Once people form an eating habit, they no longer care whether the food tastes good, they'll eat the same amount -- fresh or stale, U.S. researchers say.
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Sexist Men, Women May Be a Good Fit: Study
healthday.com - 9-5-11
When it comes to aggressive courtship strategies, sexist men and women seem to be perfect for each other, new research suggests.
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Harmless Soil-Dwelling Bacteria Successfully Kill Cancer
sciencedaily.com - 9-5-11
A bacterial strain that specifically targets tumours could soon be used as a vehicle to deliver drugs in frontline cancer therapy. The strain is expected to be tested in cancer patients in 2013 says a scientist at the Society for General Microbiology's Autumn Conference at the University of York.
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New Model Shows How Badly US Hit By Fukushima Radiation
ex-skf.blogspot.com - 9-4-11
Using the supercomputer program called SPRINTARS, researchers at Kyushu University and Tokyo University created the simulation of how radioactive materials from Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant may have dispersed throughout the northern hemisphere. The researcher say their simulation fit the actual measurements.
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From Burns to Body Odor: Recipes For Relief
abcnews.go.com - 9-4-11
Most people turn to a drugstore when they're in need of teeth whiteners, stench-busters, and skin-care solutions. But what these same people often forget is that the solution to many minor health problems can be found in their pantry. Read on to see why you should never underestimate a well-stocked pantry.
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Self-medicating and sleep disorders
usatoday.com - 9-4-11
Every patient who sees me in my office at Winthrop Sleep Disorders Center is asked a specific question: Do you ever use alcohol to help you sleep? If I don't ask this, patients may not think about this alcohol intake – which they regard as truly medicinal – and forget about it as they tally up their weekly alcohol intake. Many patients simply do not recall or even realize that they use alcohol to promote sleep. Though not deliberately concealing this from their doctor, they will often forget to volunteer this history if they are not specifically asked about it.
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Yoga shows some benefit for diabetes
msnbc.msn.com - 9-4-11
(Reuters Health) - Gentle yoga classes may help people with type 2 diabetes take off a small amount of weight and steady their blood sugar control, a small study suggests.
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Fewer baby boys getting circumcised, CDC says
msnbc.msn.com - 9-4-11
The number of baby boys getting circumcised in hospitals has dropped slightly in the past decade, health experts said on Thursday.
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Some bread, as much salt as potato chips
upi.com - 9-4-11
A British group tested 294 fresh and packaged loaves of bread from supermarkets and bakeries and found 28 percent had as much salt as potato chips.
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Sex orientation has unconscious influence
upi.com - 9-4-11
People taking part in a Canadian study rated white straight men as more likable than white gay men, but found gay black men more likable than straight blacks.
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Why drunken people do embarrassing things
upi.com - 9-4-11
After people have been drinking, alcohol dulls the brain "signal" that warns them they are making a mistake, U.S. researchers say.
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Revolutionary Three-Dimensional Model Shows How Breast Tissue Grows
sciencedaily.com - 9-4-11
University of Virginia researchers have developed a revolutionary three-dimensional model that allows them to visualize how breast tissue grows in its earliest stages, giving them the closest look ever at the very beginnings of breast cancer.
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5 More Patients Blinded by Avastin
abcnews.go.com - 9-3-11
Five Los Angeles patients receiving Avastin to treat eye disease have been blinded, the New York Times reported.
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Bad BO May Be Genetic, Treatable
abcnews.go.com - 9-3-11
People with intense body odor may have a rare but treatable genetic condition, according to a new study.
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Mammograms are NOT cutting breast cancer death toll despite £100m a year bill
dailymail.co.uk - 9-3-11
The Breast Cancer Screening Programme does not save women’s lives, a controversial report warns.
Regular mammograms have had little impact in reducing the numbers of tumours diagnosed very late, which are often terminal.
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Two children infected with new swine flu strain
msnbc.msn.com - 9-3-11
Two cases of a new strain of swine-flu related infection have been reported in young children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Friday.
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Spotting autism's unique shape in the brain
cnn.com - 9-3-11
Diagnosing autism is not easy. Doctors currently diagnose autism in children by observing behavior. But researchers at Standford University believe they have developed a way to use brains scans that may help identify autism in children in the future.
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Top surgeon warns against hair transplants too young
bbc.co.uk - 9-3-11
Young men shouldn't have operations as soon as they start losing hair, according to one of the country's leading hair transplant surgeons.
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US stroke rates 'rising in young'
bbc.co.uk - 9-3-11
More children and young adults in the US are having strokes - with unhealthy lifestyles being a likely cause, scientists have said.
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Walnuts may help lower breast cancer risk
upi.com - 9-3-11
Mice that ate a modest amount of walnuts as part of their regular diet had a significant decline in breast cancer risk, U.S. researchers say.
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Unexplained encephalitis may be rabies
upi.com - 9-3-11
Rabies exposure can vary and physicians should consider a diagnosis of rabies for any patient with unexplained progressive encephalitis, U.S. officials say.
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Longer Allergy Season Means More Misery
healthday.com - 9-3-11
A trend toward a longer allergy season may mean more sneezing, sniffling and misery for allergy sufferers, experts say.
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New Treatments for Baldness? Scientists Find Stem Cells That Tell Hair It's Time to Grow
sciencedaily.com - 9-3-11
Yale researchers have discovered the source of signals that trigger hair growth, an insight that may lead to new treatments for baldness.
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Researchers Identify Gene That Leads to Myopia (Nearsightedness)
sciencedaily.com - 9-3-11
A Ben-Gurion University of the Negev research group led by Prof. Ohad Birk has identified a gene whose defect specifically causes myopia or nearsightedness.
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Why Sjogren's syndrome caused Williams to quit U.S. open
usatoday.com - 9-2-11
Venus Williams' surprising withdrawal from the U.S. Open on Wednesday has shifted the spotlight from the tennis star's daunting serve to her diagnosis with a little-known disease known as Sjogren's syndrome.
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Potatoes may help lower blood pressure. Purple ones, that is
msnbc.msn.com - 9-2-11
Pity the potato. It's widely blamed for the fattening of America . But a small new study found that daily consumption of a certain type of potato -- purple ones, that is --- can help lower blood pressure, without causing weight gain.
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Biological 'Computer' Destroys Cancer Cells: Diagnostic Network Incorporated Into Human Cells
sciencedaily.com - 9-2-11
Researchers led by ETH professor Yaakov Benenson and MIT professor Ron Weiss have successfully incorporated a diagnostic biological "computer" network in human cells. This network recognizes certain cancer cells using logic combinations of five cancer-specific molecular factors, triggering cancer cells destruction.
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Starving Inflammatory Immune Cells Slows Damage Caused by Multiple Sclerosis, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 9-2-11
In a paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, a pair of researchers at the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences report that inhibiting the ability of immune cells to use fatty acids as fuel measurably slows disease progression in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS).
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New Microscope Might See Beneath Skin in 4-D
sciencedaily.com - 9-2-11
A new type of laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) holds the promise of diagnosing skin cancer in a single snapshot.
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Alcohol Dulls Brain 'Alarm' That Monitors Mistakes, Study Finds
sciencedaily.com - 9-2-11
Most people have witnessed otherwise intelligent people doing embarrassing or stupid things when they are intoxicated, but what specifically happens in the brain to cause such drunken actions? A new study testing alcohol's effects on brain activity finds that alcohol dulls the brain "signal" that warns people when they are making a mistake, ultimately reducing self control.
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Doctors giving antibiotics inappropriately
upi.com - 9-2-11
Prescription of antibiotics for U.S. children age 14 and younger for respiratory infections not requiring antibiotics is down, but is still high, officials say.
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Engaged dads boost IQ, behavior in kids
upi.com - 9-2-11
Dads engaged in raising their children -- not necessarily living with them -- can help make offspring smarter and better behaved, Canadian researchers say.
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Exercise works as second depression drug
upi.com - 9-2-11
Exercise can be as effective as a second medication for depressed patients whose condition has not been cured by a single medication, U.S. researchers say.
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Half of Americans Will Suffer From Mental Health Woes, CDC Says
healthday.com - 9-2-11
About half of Americans will experience some form of mental health problem at some point in their life, a new government report warns, and more must be done to help them.
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Really Bad Body Odor? Undiagnosed TMAU May Explain Many Cases of Personal Malodor
sciencedaily.com - 9-2-11
Scientists from the Monell Center report that approximately one third of patients with unexplained body malodor production test positive for the metabolic disorder trimethylaminuria (TMAU). A definitive diagnosis offers relief to these individuals, as symptoms of TMAU can hinder social and workplace interactions and cause psychological distress. But once the disease is identified, these debilitating symptoms can be ameliorated using changes in diet and other approaches.
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Habit Makes Bad Food Too Easy to Swallow
sciencedaily.com - 9-2-11
Do you always get popcorn at the movies? Or snack while you're on the couch watching television? A new paper by USC researchers reveals why bad eating habits persist even when the food we're eating doesn't taste good. The study also reveals the surprisingly simple ways we can counter our habits to gain control over what we eat.
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Decrease in Smoking Reduces Death Rates Within Months
sciencedaily.com - 9-2-11
A study by the University of Liverpool has found that a decrease in smoking rapidly reduces mortality rates in individuals and entire populations within six months.
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New Culprit in Alzheimer’s Disease: Too Many Blood Vessels
sciencedaily.com - 9-2-11
University of British Columbia scientists may have uncovered a new explanation for how Alzheimer's disease destroys the brain -- a profusion of blood vessels.
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Marshmallow Test Points to Biological Basis for Delayed Gratification
sciencedaily.com - 9-2-11
A landmark study in the late 1960s and early 1970s used marshmallows and cookies to assess the ability of preschool children to delay gratification. If they held off on the temptation to eat a treat, they were rewarded with more treats later. Some of the children resisted, others didn't.
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'Plastic Bottle' Solution for Arsenic-Contaminated Water Threatening 100 Million People
sciencedaily.com - 9-2-11
With almost 100 million people in developing countries exposed to dangerously high levels of arsenic in their drinking water, and unable to afford complex purification technology, scientists have now described a simple, inexpensive method for removing arsenic based on chopped up pieces of ordinary plastic beverage bottles coated with a nutrient found in many foods and dietary supplements.
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Simulation Map of Cesium-137 Deposition Across the Pacific by CEREA Shows Cantamination in US Greater Than That of Weatern Japan
ex-skf.blogspot.com - 9-2-11
France's CEREA has the simulation map of ground deposition of cesium-137 from the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant accident on its "Fukushima" page. It not only shows Japan but also the entire northern Pacific Rim, from Russian Siberia to Alaska to the West Coast of the US to the entire US.
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Syphilis Experiments Shock, But So Do Third World Drug Trials
abcnews.go.com - 9-1-11
A commission set up last year by President Barack Obama has revealed that 83 Guatemalans died in U.S. government research that infected hundreds of prisoners, prostitutes and mental patients with the syphilis bacteria to study the drug penicillin -- a project that the group called "a shameful piece of medical history."
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Women married before age 18 at higher risk of mental woes
usatoday.com - 9-1-11
Nearly one in 10 women in the United States were married before the age of 18, a new study finds, and they could face a slightly higher risk of mental illness than other married women.
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'You don't have to go out and party to be happy', study reveals extroverted people are NOT happier than introverted peers
dailymail.co.uk - 9-1-11
Extroverted people who are always out drinking and partying are not happier than their less socially inclined peers, a new study has revealed.
The study compared techniques used by extroverted and introverted university students and found the less social ones relied more on family relationships and friendships or cognitive strategies like positive thinking.
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'Miracle' technique cures grandfather of cancer
telegraph.co.uk - 9-1-11
The therapy used on Brian Brooks, 72, involved directly delivering high doses of radiation to tumours deep in the body, via tiny radioactive glass beads injected into his bloodstream. The treatment itself lasted just two days.
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Hospital garb harbors nasty bacteria, new study says
msnbc.msn.com - 9-1-11
They might look quite clean, but the white coats, pastel uniforms and colorful surgical scrubs worn by doctors and nurses actually may harbor a host of nasty, potentially dangerous bacteria, a new study finds.
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Half of Americans guzzle sugary drinks daily
msnbc.msn.com - 9-1-11
About half of Americans drink a sugar-sweetened beverage on any given day, with teenagers and young men consuming way more than recommended limits for staying healthy.
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'Anti-cancer virus' shows promise
bbc.co.uk - 9-1-11
An engineered virus, injected into the blood, can selectively target cancer cells throughout the body in what researchers have labelled a medical first.
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Pro-vaccine agenda in shambles after pivotal Washington meeting
naturalnews.com - 9-1-11
Efforts to save the sinking pro-vaccination ship are failing, especially after a recent US State Department Listening Meeting during which various non-government organizations (NGOs) presented sound scientific evidence against the continued use of mercury in vaccines. According to a recent article by consumer advocate Tim Bolen in his Bolen Report, the vaccine promotion house of cards is quickly crumbling, and it is becoming increasingly more obvious that special interests, rather than valid science, are driving the pro-vaccine agenda.
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Health not age key to melanoma spread
upi.com - 9-1-11
Patients' underlying health -- good or bad -- is linked to the outcomes for melanoma, not age, U.S. researchers suggest.
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Irritable kids attached to their mom are more social
upi.com - 9-1-11
Irritable children with secure attachments to their mothers are more likely to get along well with others than those without, U.S. researchers say.
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Vitamin C may help children with asthma
upi.com - 9-1-11
Depending on a child's age, exposure to molds or dampness and asthma severity, vitamin C shows varying degrees benefits, researchers in Egypt say.
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Potatoes May Be Good for the Heart After All, Study Says
healthday.com - 9-1-11
French fries and potato chips may have given potatoes a bad rap, but new research finds the lowly tuber -- when cooked correctly -- may actually be good for the heart.
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Longer CPR Backfires for Certain Heart Patients: Study
healthday.com - 9-1-11
More is not necessarily better when paramedics give cardiac arrest patients CPR before administering shocks to the heart, a new study finds.
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Some Older Breast Cancer Patients Can Skip Hormone Therapy: Study
healthday.com - 9-1-11
Some breast cancer patients over the age of 60 who have small, early-stage tumors can skip hormone therapy without increasing their risk of death, a new study says.
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Americans Getting Too Many Calories From Sugary Drinks: CDC
healthday.com - 9-1-11
Almost half of Americans get a substantial amount of their calories from sweetened drinks, a new report indicates.
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Like Mama Bears, Nursing Mothers Defend Babies With a Vengeance
sciencedaily.com - 9-1-11
Women who breast-feed are far more likely to demonstrate a "mama bear" effect -- aggressively protecting their infants and themselves -- than women who bottle-feed their babies or non-mothers, according to a new study in the September issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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Tiny Oxygen Generators Boost Effectiveness of Anticancer Treatment
sciencedaily.com - 9-1-11
Researchers have created and tested miniature devices that are implanted in tumors to generate oxygen, boosting the killing power of radiation and chemotherapy.
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Flame Retardants Linked to Lower-Birth-Weight Babies
sciencedaily.com - 9-1-11
Exposure during pregnancy to flame retardant chemicals commonly found in the home is linked to lower birthweight babies, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley's School of Public Health.
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